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The Moyie Leader Aug 18, 1906

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Array ~~f %    li ���    if ���  J-  \  /  **  /  *-*i- t.f ;v.'v"w.-^v  '   > I  'OL. 9, N019.  MOYIE, B. a,  AUGUST 18. 1906.  ��2 A YEAR  mBB^mmmm^^  '���S^-S^SS?  Men's  If you need a  '   r c,,;       ;.'',,'','  suit, now is your  'v/;time'."'..;'''.: '.'  '     '     ' , , '  r  '     '' , " -   '  '   .   ., '     .        I .' . '< r-  We%carr;Si|it 'you.'  MILLMEN-GET  EIGHT HOURS  <,      .'  New System Now; In  uVogue." ��  LOCAL  NEWS.  IMS  Engineers, Ask. for Reduction  Also in Their .-Working -  ' ���'   , Hours- '  y FIRE- INSURANCE.' '-������: A-:-'  v    The hot summer, months,are near at,.,  hand. Ve Ask 'yourself whether  yoii^are  properly insured against, fire,, and wBiie,  ''���,       -., "���   >i        ih   ���>>  - -'      m  ',  --.���"      I   '   .  - ,      ��  ,   --V- ','    ''B        ���  Heart Office ",  QKANUKOOK  M0.YIE, R .fc  Now is^lifefeeserying/Season;  Forrea'c&^l^msfPrunesy.Pkrs^btcr^^  *  ; -  .'.'���t ,  w  A -  ,    ,".-..     .'V    A..    ��� .,  v *-  ���-;  ��� a.���;-,"��� Give me   yourf-order, a^a^va.*,,- .N.?  I.  '*-��� Crown'Brand'jars in pints; quavtst and'1-2:'gaK  Ion size,'and rubber'rings for same;'- ;, ',�� ",  " >,,'.,  -  ���AT-  FITCH'S  .An eight, hour day ia now m vogue  at- the St.-Eugene concentrator.' The  request of tho mill men was acceded  to yesterday and they w.ill be^paid 'at  the rate of. an eight hour" day since  the 10th of tlio month, ihe date ! of  their request. Therefore the men will  draw,"pay for a shifty and a half's   work  since the lOthand as long as they have  '-���v.        t '���. ... <.  to  work 12Phoui8. -But  three  eight-  '        i i o."        i * J  hour sliifts will be worked as soon as  possible, , In fact 6ome of tlie men. are  '    * ' f ,'a'  already working only eight hours'and  probably in  two .or 'three days they.  will all be on   the new   system.   The  ���Jbullcooks," or roustabouts will  work  ten- -hours.. .   _ "    '   '  ' '���< ,        ,   ,    '  ,T je engineers   at , the compressor  and mill asked tome time ago to,, have  their hours cut from   12,to   8. but it  is 'understool  they   did  so   verbally.  Anyhow ihey were overlooked   yester-  day, and it was only after considerable  purs'uasion    that _ they   consented1 to  *��� - .  work until Mr. Aldridge  would -arrive  ' iV ���- '    , 1   A 'I  today and discuss the .matter '.with  tVetfi.1,. As there are only- four'engi-  ueers involved in all pfofiiibilify   their  request will be granted and there   will  >    ' . .   - .*.   i      .  be no further trouble.   ,       ��� ,.  Read Wilson's ad-'   -  Wm. Lucas has his launch  running  again. ' , '  James    Graham, returned  Tuesday  from Ymir.  .   Jamps Kerrigan was up from   Cranbrook yesterday.       '  3).ncs tonight in'Eagle hall for the  hose team. ��.  t j  ,Miss Edjlh Il.iwke is in   Cianbrool"  visiting with the Cliiie girls. ,  ...  Mi", and   Mrs. T. P.'   Schmidt   are  visiting in Spokane."  The gang laying   the  new   steel' ia  only a short distance north of town.  John Boyd rt-turned Thursday fr m  his farm near Gateway, Mont.  A. L.'McDrfrmot was up from Cranbrook Wednesday. , ���     "    ' "���  .   Mr. and Mis. E.A.' 11 ill and  little  girl were visiting iu Cranbrook yesterday.  ' t      '"''-'     ^  ������   Miss Xeltie .King has~elurned to  Spokane. " i.  '   i. ���  C. A. Foole, the tailor, is in Pinches  Creek, visiting with his ^parents.       _���  -  II. J. Stewart  baa   been made  mill  foreman at the St. Eugene concentra-  tor.     .,.-,,..'.'..     y     -  -  i r A  .The Moyie club held another .enjoyable hop in' Eagle hall Wednesday  evening/   y -    .   -   ��� ���'  Rev. Mr. Sowerbntts, of the Method-,  ist church, speut most of the w;eck in  Fernie. '   ��� \.    ���  ONLY ONE  - JOHN DALY  Genial Irishman Gets  Fitting"'Sendoff,  m-mm^mm  AH You Want Under One Roo*  This  many  Smoker .'at ��� Hotel Kooteriav  One of  the Best Ever  ,  -   'Given  Here,    ������  ���~Ar-r-   _- _    A J , a����a~.  ilily Clothier was1, over from Rossland this'week aud attended the Daly  banquet.     - ^���^J���1. A ' ,  .rt'*_tfzjrfz-sS/ iCiJ^t-si'X-rfz. ^z-^rfz- f?z *���& '  i  L  ���r  Hotel Kootenay  The best of accommodations  for  the .Traveling  Public'. '-  Large and Commodious Sample^Rooms. Billiard Rooms.  ^ i -        * i i  McMAHON BROS, Proprietors.  ���ic   itf-tir*?^ <8f?E9ner��gs-^-/9rzan3r ^r^-^TTy: Tyry ^^ ^.-^r^-^.  "G. B. C,"   CORSETS  We havo secured these corsds for  Moyie, and would liko lo have the  ladi.s' opinion of them. Wc have  them in Btyles and sizes lo fit .all  figures at prices ranging from 75cts lo  $2.50.  Lot us show them to you. ,  A. HILL  THE    LEADING    LADIES' AND MEN'S   FURNISHER.  K-z_vfi. 7vr/vsrzvx_2vx" ,-V* *U- *V�� -v-  Imperial Bank of Canada.  SAVINGS DEPARTMENT.  ' Deposits of ?1.00 or upwards received. ^  '���-..,-������. There is no better investment than  a  savings  Bank deposit. ',. ;" . t  ... Once opened it grows whether.added to or    not.  | "���   Interest   allowed at   current   rates   and   com  pounded twice a year.  CRANBROOK BRANCH.  PINKHAM, Manager.  ; .SB  f J-FAM-  y ';:���'���$  <���  ���$���  Suinmers-Fo'ran Wedding-  '- .    > , '  A pretly wedding took pUce at the  Catholic church iu Aroyie List Mondiy  morning when Mr, Thoni.is Summers  and MissElizibeth Agnes Foran were  uuited iu marriage by Itev. Father  Choinel. W.J Williamson ofSoiited  as groomsman and Miss King as  'bridesmaid. TDe bride and - groom  had their wei'ding breakfast at the  home of Mr. and Mrs. P, Summers,  and left on the afternoon's train for  Craubrooli, whore they wero guests at  the Cosmopoliton hotel. They are  again in Moyie and are making their  home. iu the Farrell residjnee on  Moyie oveiue. Mr. and Mrs. Summers have a Host of( friends here who  wish them every success.  At tho wedding the bride was attired in a cream cashmere dress, trimmed with lillies of the valley, and wore  aveil and a wreatua of lillies.  Following is a list of thd presents  given: Mr. ami Mrs. P. Summers,  bed aprea-l'and lace curtains; Mr. and  Mrs. P. Higgius, salad bjwl; Tim  Farrell, cut glass cruet; .Mr. and Mrs.  Geo. Edwards, Japanese set; Miss  Cowell, glass pitcher; Mrs. Gorman,  chcncille tablecloth ; W. J. Williamson,  cut glass berry dish ; -Miss Kiug, cups  and saucers; Miss Lanquist, two  sal-ad bowls and imtstuulis cup: Mr.  and Mrs. J. L. Gibbons, Jap.uieao set;  Mr. and Mrs. Win- Bird. Jap-nose  set, Thos. B.irron, hand painted salad  bowl; M iclO icho.-n tt M icdo.i ild,  silver carving set. II. J. McDonald  Joe McClaren, James limine. Chas.  O.Brien, Chas. Stiue, James Noel,  Frank Guindo.i. James L ling, dinner  set, h ilf dozen silver knives and forks  and half do/.on lemonade glasses.  The following presents were sunt from  Rossland: Mr. and Mrs. T. R >berts,  table cloth and table napkins; Mr. anil  Mrs. M. Duinphy, applique pillow  shams; Mr, and Mrs. \V. Richards,,  table napkins; Mr and.' Mrs, P Duinphy, bedspread, pillow shams, bureau  covui and chamber. s>;t; Mr. and Mrs.  T.Fleiniuing, silver kuives and forks.  Mrs.'M. liugeut, two canary'birds and  cages. ..:' .   Gus Zing Mav "Lsave.f,..  . It is rumored that G. A. King intends leaving Moyie about tbe first of  September,aud will live for awhile in  Spokane, where he has  a comfortable  .jiscrf^sfc' ^s^ifl  homo oa 'Mansfield avenue.  W, II. Wilson,' the Cranbrook Jeweler, "was in .town. .Tuesday looking  after bubioeS3. '",'],  ���Mrs. Cowan is here from-Nakusp  visiting with her mother, Mrs.-Goupil!  and sister, Mrs. Genelle'". '       "' '  G. T. McGregor?,Monty Howe, and  Thos. Calon "* attended tho Masonic  lodge in Cranbrook Thursday night.  ,  i..-Andrew Stewart/eturned from near  Kaslo,'where he was doing assessment  work on hi3 claims.      ���'��� '���-   >  ���Mrs. .Whitehead,' "iwho-'runs the  bourding house at the St. 'Eua;ene,<wa3  in Cranbrook the first of the week.V .  ,'A special meeting'of the "industrial  Workers ol the World was hold Wednesday evening and several candidates  were initiated.     "        f        i '-  \ Mrs. P. T. Smyth and daughter left  Monday for JNIullen, Idaho. ��� P. .T.  Smyth has a good position in the  Morning mill near Mullen.  'Owing to- the counter .attractions  last week Miss Quenio McCoy and  Miss Uuderhill did not give , their entertainment Saturday'evening.  R. ,T. Howard left /Xuuraday for  Enderby whore he will take a two  weaks'vacation. At the eud of th it  .time he and his wife will return to  Moyie,      '  POSTIONS'WANTED���Two ladies  iu Moyie wish positions, one as waitress and the other as chimber maid.  AddressfLeader office, Moyie.  Krnest Marsdcn left jester lay for  Nelson to j lin.lhe cricket,team which  is going to the coast to play a series  of games with the boys over there.  Mr. Marsden is one of the strongest  players iu the  Kootenays. '  J. II, C-artwright, who has been  working in the St. Eugene concentrator for the past two years, left Well  nesday with his wife lor Spokiue.  They will probably leniiin in Spokane  for a lew wjeks and then go to the  Coeur d'Alones.  A. G. Blaine, who with Mr. Fred  Small is sonductinj; the Crow's Nest  Steam Laundry at Cranbrook, was in  town WednesJ.iy, Tli3 boys are attending btrictlv to business and are  getting plenty of work. Tliey do not  employ Chinese therefore thoy receive  a big bunch of work from M iyie each  week.  Lost or Es'ray���M/ gny mare  Maude, weight, abo'it l,fDJ puiU  and gray horse, Toney, weight about  1,200. Twenty-iivo dollars rew.ud will  bo paid for return of either or information leading to same.  II, CAMERON,  Uuuecosaary  J��xi>vii9��.  ���Acute attacks of co'ic and diarrhooa  come on without warning aud prompt  relief must be obtained,'; There is no  necessity'of incuring the expense of a  physician's service in such cases if  Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and  Diarrhoea Remedy is at hand. A dose  of this remedy will relieve the patient  before a doctor could a-rivo. it has  never been known to fail, even in the  most' Revere, and dangt-rous cases ami  no family should be . without it. For  sale by the Moyie Drug & Stationery I .  Op, .  , The popularity of John Daly Jw;>s  fully attested Thursday, evening at the  smoker, given in' his honor' at the  Hotel" lCootenny.' Any man might  wellf feel ilattereU by the words ,of  p'raise,-.ftnd tlie regrets of his dipar-  ture,,which he received. ' ' '  The smoker, was one of the most  pleasant features of its kind ever held  in 'Moyie! The-.best'of 'feeling prevailed, there" wis ample good things  for everyoue ��� to ct^ and drink,'the  'toasts were responded to with promptness' and they were without exception crisp, witty and to", the point.  Then Miner's orchestra, of five pieces  was'nght therewith all the late and  up to d&te music as well as, the national airs and other appropriate mus'c  for such an. occasion.  At 9:30 o'clock forty people were  seated around the tables and enjoying  the good thiugs aud listening to the  sweetstrains from the orchestra. After  the cigars were passsd D." J, Elmer,  the, cliairmau,trapped for' order aud  the evening's 'program" was starleil.'  Following is tlie toast,, lia't. and , thOaO  who responded:     -       ->���' * >e  1���ThepKing,  2���President of the Uuited States.  -  f 3���Our Domjnibn-A. P. Macdonald.  ~l 4i��� MiningTfndustry- Wf F. White; .  -   5���Our    American > Cousins-E.   O.  Kamm and D. A. Ayres, ,      '   ...  6���Our Sjuburb, Nelson-FI. Byers,  '7���Our Merchants-It Campb.-ll and  E. A. Ilill, " '   '  fS���The Press-F. J. Smyth,  9���The Proviace-J. P.   Farrell,  10���The Bachelors-Williamson and  Bonner,  '  11���Hose Team-E. O. Kim'm and  II. J. Stewart,.  12���Moyie and Its Future-J. P.  Farrell,  13���Mine IIost-The chair!  Iu the course of the evening several  telegrams w.-re received and read.  One from Theodore Roosevelt read:  "Sorry I cannot be with .you; beef  trust and coming election demand my  undivided attention, on this side.  Glad to learn that Daly is healed this  way.    Figuring on his votejn 1903."  T. G. Shaughuessy wired that he  cetild uot bo preseut, but he. would  place a car at his service: "Work  traiu leaves Movie every morning  earlv."  - c  Crrrie'Nation S2tit word to- John to  refrain f.-om partaking of any moro  Irish and said that her hatchet was as  sharp as ever.  MrTD-ily was pres 'ntetl with a hand  some cut   glass   decauter   ii.led   with  Irish whiskey,  C)  Mr. Daly wishes to convey to the  people of Moyio his kindest thanks for  I heir manifestations of good will towards him.  Mr. and Mrs. Daly and children are  Waving to-d.iy for Mullen, Idaho,  whero they will make their home.  Mr. Daly will take choree of a storo  for the Federal Mining company.      ;  OUR    OPTICAL  DEPARTMENT  is here   for your benefit.  You   are   at   liberty   to  make   use   of  il,   freely,  fully,   at   your conven- ,  ieneeJ   It's our business  to tell   you   of  eye   ail- ,  ments. and  to prescribe  the cure.     And  always-  'remember- tlie examination    costs   you. not   a  cent.  W.  H. WILSON!.  Jewyler. CRANBROOK, B. "C  Graduate Op'ical Institute o. yCan-  a. .     j  is ��� ono  of  the  advantages   in  dealing   with   us.    Almost    every thing   you  want   can   be   secured  'wjlhout.trouide or loss  of time.    Wo' carry a  ii~) large-and well assorted  slock of General  Merchandise.     Our .goods  ^^^ 'S*��*i��.����i��S5' .are of .excellent  quah  iiy: new and correct m every way. ''Wo  guarantee  everything we sell."   , J   A ���     ''        *      '  a Try our''Whale- Swan ('reamery, Butter. You  will'find it Of the choicest flavour even in the warm  ���weather. '   ' ' ,   , n ;  Wc are op3ning   \ip   a swell line  of Japanese  china, wliich we will,have on display next 'week, .  acEaehewi  '      ,--lNTD-' , >''' '      '       \ r  Macdonald.  I jeag^asftgsaiafiwassa^^ BEmwuoastm  Ttie Fire Brigaae,'  A    m^etin.^. of  the Dominion   Day  celebration committee was held in thc-  Laader oflioe Wednesd'ay evening:    A  motion    was, pissedcauthorii^u^   the  p ij ment of $20 3D to wip3 oui   an  in-,  debtedness'on soma fire hose purchased a year ago.   This  amount   will   be'  paid out of' the fund left over after Lhi  Dominion, D iy celebration,  e A public meiting will bVhcJJ   nex"t,  Monday at this offi .e whe-r the   qaes-  tion   of  imnroviiu   the-fire   fi'htius;  . ���- - .-  pquipmsnt will be discu-sed.     Au  ef-  fort will be  made to^reinnve   the  firt  hall to some   more   suitable'location,  and to overhaul the hose reel, hose and  other apparatus.    If suriijient. money  can be raised .a   room   with a two  beds  will-ba fixed fn"the tire 'hall' and 'two  men will be given f.ee   room, rent  for  looking after the  place.    Movie   nejds  bet-.er fire proteotiou an 1   nowl'is   the  time for'ths business men and property  holders'to get together and'd) sj'iii-  thing for'the beneiit of iho town..  METAL' MARKET.  N.-*.v  York-Bit   silver,   G5 cents,  L?ad, $3.15. ' \'  Lo.n-don���Load, ��LG 1(5,-'. 3 1.  GDJE3AL   NE/Vi  NOTES.  ' TI13 steel gang o-i the Spokane  Iu- ,  teru.uioml have reachel S indpiint, ' ���  ' -Ar. ,air comprassir an 1 mic^iini  drills will sion hi iu use at the MjUy  Gibson.mine.  It is sail that Frank It is=>, CI. P. It.  agent at Oregon, his'resigned aril  vill go farming near tint town'.   u      \  la Hands of Sheriff.  Sheriff Tuck of JSTelson''h is seized  Slocan City with execution papers  which put the entire municipality into his hands. When the sheriff took  poesession of the placo the m lyor and  aldermen sent in their resignations.  C. E. Smitheringale of Vancouver is  .the creditor who is closing up the  town. Recently he endeavored to  girinshee the licenses pn.l by hotels  aud.soloons. but _the miyor was-too  quick and pii.l out the .mosey as sal  ary for eivio ofH.oia.ls. The cJher.ff will  levy a special tax ou all property in  the ci'y to piy the j i lgunint. If not  piid, the sheriiF will.give notice that  in eighteen months-all the real estate  iu the city will be sold at public auction.  '  An Agreeable Surprise,  D. J. Elmer was probably the misl  smprisjd mm in town yesterday  m >ruing when he awoke and found a  big wiuksrch lir in his ho.ise with a  tag attacked up >n w!i��c'i wis written  the words: "D. J. E!ni3r, Ch iirm in  Daly B inqnet. Co npliments of John  Daly." It is needless to sty tint Mr.  Kluier thoioughly appreciates tin-  gift.  .   Oomiae   Events,  Labor   ])ny,    Craubrotk,   Monday, I  September 3rd.  Neleun Fair, September 19.   '20, and .  21, j  Spokane Interstate Fair  September j  21 to October 6'  . Iiirca&e .of an election it is'"said that  J. H, lliWtbornthwAzie/Sdb.Klist, will  be^a ca.idida.te iu tha ^Vancouver  rid-  iu=-    '.p' _^ r-%'c"  ' '   >  ��; The lumber an I considerable tlmbor  at King's mill, sevj'n miles, so-itli .of  .Moyie,,were'de-stroyei by "lire last, Sat-'  urday afternoon.'  More "than 10,030 . membors' of the  Fiatern.il Order of E i���'les were in  sessiou in Milwaukee this week attending the iiiiiiii il couve ntion. '   ''  , Ainsworth, the oldest miu>ng camp  in ihe Kootenays, ds taking oa new  life. Some very rich discoveries lhave  been made there receutly.  i Fred Irviu, the painter, ^ well  known along the Crow, is in the  Macieod j ul awaiting trial for'an alleged assultou a 113 year old girl employed at the Bjllevue   hotel.  Tha Black-Maokav Oa.  Chas. A. Mackay, mauajer of the  Black-Mackay-' Minlhg Co., owning  the sub marine miuinij proposition ou  .Moyie lake, is again iu town aud i*  busily engaged doing , assessment  work. Another test will bo m ide to  ascertain the depth.of bedrock on thu  Si. Eugene side of the lake. Whero  the sun 1 pipe wis driven last spring it  .showed an alluvial depusit of SO feet.  1 h'.s was near the edge of tho shore.  The new test will be mado some dU-  taaco out ia the lake. Tlio company,  receutly purchased two 1 its from J. U.  Drewry upon which will be built u,  vuirehousc, ofiice uuil lings, etc.  We h..ve just received a choice assortment of  New    Weitmins'.er  ���2nd to 0th,  Fair,    October  Novelties  '.'"Mulce'Hny While tlm Sun shi"9��-'  There is a lesson in the work of  thrifty farmer. Ho knows that  b'rigut s'un.��hiue 'may  last, but  a  tbej  the  lav  and he prepares for the showers which  lire''so liable to follow. So it should  be Willi every household. Dysentery,  diarrhoea und cholera inoibus niav  attack some mtntbt-r of the home  without waniing. \ Chamherlain's  .Colic, Cliolera and Diarrhoea Uemedv,  which is the best known medicine fo.  thyse diseases, should be keot ��t ban-.',  as immediate treatment, is no cessary  aud delay 'tu-iy prove fatal. For t-ale  by the Moyio Drug aud Stationery Co.  mauy .,  .   ..Mr.  ugeut.  u?eful    and   all   orn-.ime.nUl.  Come and see   them. y  E. A. Hill'"' ol   Moyie  is  our  W. F. TATE & SON"  Jewelers and   Graduate Opticians. ���  CRANBROOK, BO.  OUiciul.Watch Iiifpcctor for C.  P. ���&'���  Crow's Nmt 1'ass Divisiou.  ,>  . y  ,      .. *" '���..  - -i'   ��� ' -, V2&I  h li-  ���*    K  '   t.'  "   "      "-   i"     U  -  >'P<  i-'jrS THE LEADER, 3H0YIE, BRITISH COLUMBIA'.
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f Linked by Fate I
BY CHARLES GARVICE J
£    Author of *' The Verdict of the Heart," " A Heritage    t
,of Hate/' "Nell of Shorne Mills," "Paid,    ,   -t.
For/' "A Modern Juliet/' Etc. f
+'♦ -IT-ff* ♦ + + M ♦♦ fHMH ff-f-H-H-f-^-f f ft ♦ ♦ ♦;♦ ♦■»-» *
(Continued.)
THE  HOLIDAYS.
sliowii'-yotir ghost—'
-th." whole hug of
gin-n   myself     away?
"Aifd ,'I   have
you,    117    . fuc-i-
t ricks.   I   havo
Yes.'"
Vane's Mem </-y<-s niT-wercd  him.
"Well'*   What   uie you  jjfomt;  to  do'*
1 Iu  had    the   best   of   ii,   as    Vane
.fell. / ,      ,
>     "1  ought   to sti angle you,  kill you
hy an.\   means,  you—you  traitor!"
',      .Julian   smiled     "My  dear   Vane,     X
wish  I  could  set' your mind  at     rest
o'n   t'ftat  point,   but I  can't.    I don't
• say   that     .Tmiitli   was aware,     fully'
aware,   of   Ihe   modus   operandi,   thnt
-.she  knew   exactly  how   I -Was    going
to—remove you;   hut  I'll   swear  that
she   knew  you  were  to  he   lemoved!
If  you   have   listeiie'd  attentively '  to
my confession you must have gathered  that  fart."
"l.iar!  .Murderer!" .said  Vane
,       "Murderer—well, yes,  1  admit;  but
a   liur—I   ntrM-r   lied  jet,,    Lying-,.is
yultri'r—and   useless.      But     Judith.
'Oh,  yen, -'when  vou   are master," etc.
Oh. .she knew!  1  .saw,it  by    her face
thai   night.   heard   it   in   her   shriek.
,   And.  uumi   \ ou,, .ludith  must     abide
by   the"CTnii.m<t,      .ludith    is     mine!
Mine,   by   the  right   of"Hhe     price    I
have paid  tor  her1   Not    yours!"  II.
advanced  threateningly,  his hand upraised;   his  linger.';  clutching     at   the
'   empty air.   "Vo't ^vonis1   Vou    would
'not   have sinned  as  T have    done for
her.   Vou—" '.n
His  voice  sank,   and he laughed.
."Pardon!   V"ovu   will admit m.v'claim
; t'O   ht-r.. I   a'm .going.   You   will   'riot
see' me again.  When   a man   loses,  ns
(T have lost, after Mich a struggle, effort,   he sliould efTacefybimself   , .   ad-
■  mit   tlmt    T "urn   going,   and you  will
' not ,sre, me   or   be   troubled  b.v     me
,»again "ti
He walked,' quite steadily now, toward  the  table'.
"Will  you   allow, rrie to use  a telegraph iorm° Thanks.", ' ' '
"' In   horrified  silence  Vane drew back
and   watched  him.   lie  took '-a.    form
.from 'tlie   stationery   stand,   and.   after   n5 moment's   thought.     wrote   ,<ti
message,   wry  plainly and. distinctly.
When he had  finished he rose, looked   at   Vane, with   a "calm,' cool,   .indeed  critical  gaze,   then,with  a smile
said:                <
"Thanks i   Cloqd-bve!" _       ,''
Vahc watched-him as lie 'went Jout
of th6'i otS'in, 'then sank into a chair
—not the chair in which Julian had
sat—ond buried'his face in his hands.
How long lie sat^he know not then
or over; but, '.suddenly remembering
the unhappy,,wretcti, he> sprang Mo
his .feet   and  huiried   into'the hall.
He  almost   ran   into  tlie    arms    of
I?ranife,M'who uttered   a yell of   amaze-
'"nient  and   feai,  culling  on' his. name:
"Loid Ceshoioiigli'"
. '''"Mr. Julian1", cried Vane
. "Mr. 'Julian' ' lJbrd Lesborough!
iris lordship "-went out a quarter of
an" hour ago1 ', Hut—but—oh, lord,
who are you, sir? Oh,, my, lord,, is it
you,  i>; it >ou'?",
The whole household was - in contusion. The clamor'of tongues, tho
<nos and screams and tears of relief and thanksgiving so confused
Vane that he was thwarted in his
intention of following the unhappy
man. Jlut.at last he got a cai riage
and drove, to the station, to find
that Julian! had dep.u ted by .the
train which h.ul lull a few minutes
belore   Vane  .uined >
grew dieainy ana ioiiu •
' "JJe "s tall and very straight, with
broad shoulders; yant'l he is Veiy
strong and good-lboking; quite
bronzed and tanned, with eyes that
—" She broke oil with a ,laugh- at
herself. "Oh, he is a son' of tho
gods—not our gdHer;- gods, Polly,
but the Olympian ones; "a model of
grace, and full of vittue,' but 'his chief
one it, that1 he condescends to IbxJ
poqrji'-tle mo!"
Polly looked 'up at the rrtf'liant
face, the graceful' figure, and, laughing,  tossed ,her head  st-ornfuWy.
"As if he could help it' I'd''like'to
RP£._iOy_. ?nan _who_.could! Alarri_;dP.'
sThen she sighed "You'll write ho
more plays. Iiecinm, that's sure nnd
certain! It's- a pity, for ' 'Twist
Love and Love' is doing so, "very
•well!"
"It's not at 'all sure nnd certain."
;md Mnn. "Why .shouldn't P No
jne will know that 'Herbert Wood'
is Lady Lesborough, ami if they did!
But Xf>\i must talk it, ov/L-r with iny
husband when you meet him to-
night. - ,i
"Tonight!" r t
"Yes," said Nina, Iriughing.'at her
tone of awe' "Here i4, a note from
Lady Yivi^mii. '.She wants 'us all to
go to the Al minis 'to-night, and come
bar k to su|ipm* with them., 1 am
looking  forward  to. it   so  much!'''
'J'he play went splendidly that evening, and Nina, filling well behind
(he curtain of-the box. was all
aglow with pleasure niul honest prido,
in her- work.. It was sweet to see
Vape 'applauding und^looking round
the delighted audience with glowing
eyes. v as if he were saying: "Clap
away; shout, yunr hardest, ..oo'd folk;
my  wife  wrot,e this piny,"      .
They went home to - Evprsleigh
fourt.' where the Sut combes had
provided a suppei, which/if it had
not Keen so substantial, would have
been suspiciously 'like a wedding
breakfast: ayd at Vane's warm
greeting, and the friendly look nt his
frank e\ es- all Polly's awe and nerv-
ous-.i.l-ss   fled.      ' \ ,
"t litllo though). JI'ss Bainfonl."
when' ['was walfhmg you act, writh
the -j-i'ciitest ininiii-nt'Cin, that.V'was
looking at my wile's clearest and
best friend," he _sa1d, as lie held her
hand in his warm t-r,\sp "I ' can't
tell you how oit'ei1.' she and I have
spoken of, yOii. o>( how much I hitve
wanted t,p see you tin I—thank you!
L hope you will sh.uv \oiu- fi'iendshtp
for. her vtith  in'e    Will you?"
ft was &* \ ery haj>p\ ' little party,
(hough ever.\" now and then .a, "shadow stole o\er' \'ane*s face Ife could
not altogether get rid of the memory of Julian—of tin- while,' livid
face., with< its black eyes., gleaming:
,1'iom  their dark hollows.    c ,(,
"What do you think will become of
him?" he had'asked ,L'etehford, and
Sutcombe  earlier an  the evening.   ».
I know a. boat, and 1 know a pool—
*tVare the  boat and pool.
'Tis holidays, there is nj school—
"Ware the boat and pool!
You'd  feax a tiger strong- and  great,
The  crocodile that  lies  in  wait,
But still you'll go  with  steps elata
Towards  the boat aud pool.
'Tis only a little pool and boat—
Ware the boat and pool!
The boat hath teeth, the pool a throat-
Beware the boat and pool!
Unless I'm with you do not go;
They coax, they beckon—yes, I know, '
But you misrht fill .ny world with woe—
Beware the boat and pool!
Hand In hand they go together,   ,, '
The leaky boat, the pool.
All in this lovely summer weather,
' ' The leaky boat,.the pool.'
I think I see you on the bank,
Your lips are white, your hair is dank, I
And wo carry you  home on a ,slab or
plank—
Beware or the boat and pool!
A rattlesnake you .dread;   you  do  not
fear _, ' .
The, leaky boat, the pool.
What is the score most every year '.
Of the leaky boat, the pool?
Beautiful little girls'-and  boys,"    '   '
Death took them away for pretty toys,
And quenched forever how; many Joys?
"Ware  the 'boat, and pool?
f        —The Khan, in Toronto Star. '
'  COL. MAITLAND'S QP.AVBJ
COURAGE IN DIFFICULTIES,
Stories    Showing    How    Two    Persons
Faced  Great Peril—How a Women
,,        Saved   the   Situation. .
u>odging a Landlord.
An amusiiij.  account  was   .riven   in
tho   Shoredttch   County  Court  of  how
! a man had for sit months past ole-ver-
) ly evaded his landlord, until, as counsel
, put  it,  the  landlord had  become  posi-
Women display courage in their own ' tively distracted.
CHAPTKI^XXVri/
"De~iina'"   screamed   Polly,     wTieii,
ivitli   the mei est   apologv for a knock,
Nina   entered   ihe   tamiliar   looms   in
Pony   Street. ,,lhe   loom     in      winch
she  had   found   loving  shelter   in   her
tune   of need,   the  room  in  which  she
had   11 mimed   hal1-  and  bonnets,    and
afteiwaids—oh,   gieat   achievement' —
written   pla\ s   for   the   members     of
Mr.     Haicourt's    company!       "Deei-
ina1"   and  Poll-,,   wiLh  the     tears    in
her eyes, liuuged her dear friend, never   dealer   than' m    this   moment     of
her  ict tun    "How   well  you  are looking,   and   how—how—   Unci ma,   something   bus   happened   tcjojou"     Something   that's   altered   you   m   a     way
that    I   can't   describe        You     never
,    looked   so   happy,   and   with     such    a
light   in'your  e.ies,   not   even   on   tho
fust   night  ut   ihe  play!      Sit   down'
Take  youi    things- off'   Ix't   me     give
you   another    kiss,   you   dear,     sweet
thing'   And  mu\   tell  me all about it!
The     voyage1       The     advent ores   you
hinted   at'    Hid   vou   find   thai      mys-
U'l ions   island—why   didn't  you     toll
me   more   about   if'   Did   you   find    it,
and  is  that   what  makes \-o-i  look  so
heavenly radiant   and   i mining     over
wall   joy''"
"Ves. I found it, Polly," replied
Nmii, "bui it was .something else I
found that makes me so happy,
"i mi I! never f-ues-.1 Conn, i-losei and
1 11—I  !l   wlnsp.i '"
Polly l»i,ell l,."-ide her, end Nina,
blushing like a si boolgu 1, wlnspcied
one  mini,   at   whu.i   Polly  slu icked
"What1 A husband' Deiinin' W ho
—who i>- he' Tell me quirk, quirk'"
And w In n Nina bad told her that,
and a gi.vit deal moie—m fact, the
hisloiv oi tin- wieck and hei strange
m.ii i i.i". — Polly all .i-heap on the
'floor, could oi'ily' stare at. bur open-
mouthed with' w-onder, delight and
awe.'   :.."-'■''■■. ■'...■"■'-.'.
a ''Married,    married    all   the     time!
And     to  an   earl!       And  you   are    a
Countess!     Lady .   Lesborough!    .,  Oh,
poor Lord .Sin.co.mbo!" Nino   laid' her
hand'on   Polly's  lips,   ..  "A  countess!,
and  been  one  all-the  time!   And  here
was I  trenting you   as  if ,^-ou  were a
mere  nobody,   just  like  myself!.'    And
yet,  somehow,   I  always  suspected—"
"That     I  was  a  princess-  in     disguise!    'Changed   at 'my   birth      with
the  rightful      owner,'   as  the     Irishman   said.   You   dear,  .foolish    Polly!
As if  it  made.' any difference who and
.what   1   nni! ', And—nnd   1   think     you
'will   like my 'husband.. dear."
,   Polly emitted a*'"Oli!  Like him. I
—-Khali   be   afraid.   An   earl,     a     real
Knglish  earl.   Jle—I   mean,  Lady Les-
liorou'gh!".
"Vou dare! Tiecinia,' if you please.
Oh, no, you won't be afraid of him.
What nonsense!. You are not ufruid'
of  Lord   Sutcoiiibo!"
"Oh.   but  he's   only   a   viscount,   or
whatever  il;  is,   and yours   is  a
belted   earl1!"   explained. PolK-p
delicious   naivete.   "What   is   he
Deciina?"
Nina. Juuidied. softly,   aijd  her
[to bc continued.]   l
BLEAK SHETLAND.
Its STrarmn of Sen Gull* nnd Iti Lone
,     I "     Tree. '
Up ta little lane off Lerwick's one
street there is a garden. At least, it is
un inclosed .space. In the^mlddle of
this space there is a tree. It is not a
very tall tree; you could, in fact, toss
a biscuit over its branches,'but still it
is a' tree—the <?nly tree in Shetland.
And Shetland is proud of 'it. Children
who are brought for the first time to
see the wonders of one slreeted Lerwick are shown this (roe. This is not
fiction. It is the only tree in Shetland.
As there' are no trees in Shetland,
there are no birds, except, of course,
the sea gulls, which you can number
by the thousand. The sea gulls are the
sparrows of Lerwick, and, as such,
they have a greater share in the town's
life than have the sparrows of Loudon.
In the morning time you will note that
a sea gull sits on every chimney pot.
Sea gulls swoop and hover over every
roof in the town.
The air is full of their strange, high,
plaintive, haunting cries. Their sad,
shrill, long drawn cries are to Lerwick
as the chattering of sparrows or the
cawing of rooks are to us Iu England.
Every house has its own familiar sea
gulls and evry-y street its own band of
soa gulls. OTiey never mix. The children in each bOuse have a pet uame for
their own particular sea gulls, and,
having called them to them by those
names, they feed them every day. And
each sea gull knows what is meant for
him. No sea gull attached to one house
ever seeks to eat tho food scattered
from the house next door. lie docs not
dare; the other gulls would kill him.
So all day long tho sea gulls hover and'
call over the roofs of Lerwick. The
people of the town, if they come across
a little pile or rice laid upon the road--
way, step over it with cure. They
know that it is placed there for some
sea gull. And at night the sea gullx
leave thoir own appointed chinmej'
pots and fly gracefully away to thelj
resting places on the rocks, of-tlie Islt,
of Noss.—London Express.
Gallant   Soldier's   Last ' Resting   Place
Found, at London, Ont. -.'    r \
A discovbry has' been-'made of considerable interestto'ihe Maitland family, the head of whom is Lord Lauderdale, whose eldest son, Lord Jliiltland,
is.assistant-dlreotor for the Yeomanry
at the War Office.  ''This is-the flridlng
at London,   Ont.,, of   the grave of Col.
John Maitland, C.'b., son of,the eighth
Earl o£ Lauderdale, and brother, of the
ninth' and tenth earls.      Col. Maitland
was an  officer of  the  32nd  Regiment,
and took an active part in the defence
of the western frontier of Ontario, then
Upper Canada, during and subsequent
to the rebellion of 1S37.  He died on Jan.
IX, .1839, and a stone was put over his
gravely the officers of the 32nd Regiment,  which  he'oomman'ded  for   >up-
wards-'of twenty years,  as  a mark "of
their esteemfand.regard.",
This gallant soldier's, last .resting-
place was,foundffby'Dr. H. J. Morgan,'
of Ottawa, author of Celebrated Canadians, who came across''it in an out-
of-tha-way corner of, the English cemetery at- London, and had it not been
discovered "when It "was. all trace of the
grave niust inevitably have been . lost
.in a few months'xtime. Col. John Maitland had a distinguished career, and
was a prominent figure in the early history of Canada, yet Burke simply gives
the dates 'of his birth and death, and
states he 'was a colonel in the army.
Though, however the people of the
Dominion'neglected his grave, they, are
not altogether fprgetful of thoso,. who
served Canada in the past.pfor/lt ia
proposed, with the permission' of the
officers qf Col. Maltland's old regiment,
to remove 'his remains to the new
cemetery, at London, and have tho,tablet over h^s grave placed'in the'English '.-athedral in that city. Besides.,his
'brilliant services in Canada, Col. Maitland served with the expedltionUo Copenhagen under Lord Cathcart, In Spain,
and Portugal under Sir John Moore,"in
the Peninsular as aide-de-camp to Six
William' Houston, and-", fon returning
home as aide-de-camp '"to his uncle,
Gen. Bir .Thomas < Maitland.—Court
Journal.      ' . >    «■      \ ■     , -
incomparable fashion. Typical of wo
man's method ot encountering danger
is the story of the woman who observed as she was concluding her toilet for
the night the presence of a burglar under her bed. "Without letting the man
know that she had perctlved him. thi.=
woman quietly put on' ht-r dressing
gown and knelt down at the bedside
to say her prayers. She prayed ajoud.
She made her own-.peisonal mteicessions to heaven and then prayed for
all poor sinners living in the darkness
of estrangement from God, "particularly this unhilppy man lying under my
bed, meditating the wickedness of
stealing and peiliapsvof muider." This
woman  saved, the  situation.
I cannot imagine a worse situation i
than that of a certain steeplejack !
wlip found himself ono day at the top
of a church steeple with a madman
grinning Into his eyes. Th^ madman
was his mate., Both men had be-en nt
w6rk on this steeple ior many days
and had talked together while . they
hung,In the saddles with the utmost accord, but on ..this particular day one
of the men looked up to .see madness
In the eyes of his companion. In that
moment he was alone with danger! No
shout could avajl. From the, street
below^lie looked like a spider snoozing
in its'web. The roofs and chimneys of
the houses seemed to be level with the
ground. , High up1 In the'loneliness of
the empty air he was alone with a madman. ' ' i   . '» i-
■The, man 'kept his  wits  alxsut  him,
and addressed some    .cheerful    remark
to  his  mate.    The ma'dman  only  grinned.    The .man   bade   him   look  alive,
that  they might  the  sooner' get  below
and  enjoy  themselves.      The madman
chuckled,    and   announced    that    they
would gal belgw in 'double quick jtime,
for   that- he  was, going to  Jump' from
the steep)agn>ith his friend in nls arms.
The' 'othe? laughed   as  if  at a, good
jest,  and  turned  to   his  work.    ''Then
he began pushing with his feet'against
the  steeple   to   get  a swing, into   his
saddle;' he meant,; to- grab   the   inad-
man  and' hold   him   till     help     came.
But  the, madman  was also >■ swinging
his   saddle,   and   before   the   sane   man
realized    his    danger y.  the •,  madman's
fingers were   closing round' his   throat.
,   There   they swung   in "the ,dizzy  a'r,
high J over   the   unconscious 'city.1      By
something "of a miracle the, man found
his   hand   clutching   at4t h'ls   I'toob" box
as'he swung  back.''  His  hands  closed
'on a wrench. "He grabbed it,  made an
upward'-   thrust    with     his     strangled
body,    and    caught , -the    madman • a
jangling   blow   across^the. side   of .his
ihead. , Then  he  clutched   the' fellow's
body  to   save  it from   falling and,   after    a , moment's    breathing,,   quietly
lowered   hlms&f-.and ' his   unconscious
mate „,to    the , ground   below*.—Strand
Magazine.r      '
Counsel (to the landlord)—How did
he keep out of the way The Landlord
—Used to come to the front wind-.ws,
blow me a kiss-, and walk out at the
back. (Laughter.) '
And did.be leinaln a prisoner in his
house during that time? Not a bit of
it; he had gone to Kdiiisgnte for a holiday,  I heard. (Loud laughter.)        ,
Then I believe you tried the ruso of
a registered letter to get at him?
Yes, but he's up to overyt trick. We
Intended to get in when he opened the
doqr. but he would not do It, as he
signed 'the receipt after it had been
handed through the letter box (Laughter.)
His Honor—I make an order for possession in two'' weeks.
CEYLON GREEN TEA
Is preferred by former Japan Tea drinke
because of Its greater purity.,
Lead    Packets    Only,    40c/   50c,    and    60o    per    lb.      At
' Highest Award   8t   Louis 1904.
all
Srocen
A Chesterfield Retort.
When Lord Chesterfield was in his
last illness and his death was only -a
matter oi a few \ye,elis,' his physician
advised him to go for an easy drive in
his carriage, and he wftnt out- As the
equipage was proceeding slowly along,
lt was met by a lady, who remarked
pleasantly to the great invalid, MAh
my lord, I am glad to see you able to
drive out!"' ' "I am not dilvlng out,
madam," . answered Chesterfield. - "J
am simply rehearsing my funeral."
Delicate
Child
The children cannotpossiblyhavT^dT
unless the bowels .re in proper condign,
sluggish liver gives a coated tongue; bad h»*
constipated bowels. Correct all these bv ., i '
!™'.!Ld®!!"'^y*r,*i""*.-   Genuine liver 2
T6TI «K£'!E£& ti! SE^' su'"-;*d.m
the t»m«l«» «< «ll ter itdldtc fy0- *I»?e»,
TYPHOID FEVER.
Benefit of Clover On the Land.
' The chief y-iluu, of plowing under, n
crop of clov&r lies, then, in the a-dril-
*-*on of humus and its associated mineral plant food and in the addition of
-aitrogen.iBy the subsequent <Jecay In
the.soil of the turned'under'clover these
constituents are converted .into available rood for futuro-usje for farm crops
and fruits. While the, growth nnd harvesting of other crops leave, the spil
poorer in nitrogen, the growth of clover, even wjien the crop' has been harvested and the root3 onlylqft, leaves
the soil invariably richer in this constituent.-    "   , > '
EXIT   PLUG   HATS.
.' •' Never1. Lost,a Day's'Work.
„ "Will*lamf,Pierce, who ,lives 'Jn .Iliglv
Wycombe, was liorn ,on Jan."29, 1823.
He- Is ,n<nv a pensioner, and, throughout his life he never ldst^a day's work.
He was In one s.-rvice "for seventeen
years', and'du, another 'for 'fifty-One
years, lie had four brothers, and four
sisters. Two nt 'his brothers were christened "Joseph and the otli€jr two Edmund,-, and two of his.sisters had the
na-me'-of Ann. - A sister, a, brother, a
brothtSr-in-law, a,niece, and a nephew
worn  inn fried rthrep Itirnes.y    _     ',    -'   •
Sonrcem ot Thla Duneeroni and Pro-
'' trucled  DI«ett>e.
Although   there-.la  always  more or
less typhoid fever in most" of the larger ,
.cities of Uits country,' the late summer',
and autumn are'the seasons when it is
most to he feared.     ,   - '„       -
The disease'is not so'formidable, ,ns ,
regards'the mortality,^ asl some others,'
,but its great length hnd the evil consequences which .sometimes follow .it In
tlio form of weak heart, Svcak splne4or.
nervous disorders,muke It quite as se-V
rlous ns some which lire more fatal, but,
far less protracted*-,- -    • -' I       •>    , ," '
Unless'one knows how the,disease is
usually , spread   one   cannot "hope   to-
avoid it,'and sVit may be useful to'
consider in what ways-thef gerjms 'of
the malady find their way into the sys-.
tern, r      ''."-; ''..''_"'•>
„ -Water Is  the usual'vehlclcVfor ty-
phoid  germs, as is well   knownr-ond*"3
ov
England's Social World Appears to  Be
o    .    Tired of'Theml, <.
AN   INDIAN'S   PRIVILEGE.
Tagish Charley Gets Drunk Evtry.Day
- ' —Has Special Permit.
Probably unique ,in the British Empire "is the case of Tag-ish Charley, the
Indian who first found gold on the
Klondike, creeks and reported his reco-v -
ery toiwhite men. Charley Is a wealthy
man. and is permitted to enjoy his affluence in a manner forbidden in Canada to all others of his race. In .consideration of the valuable .services, he
rendered the country in discovering
gold, and also In consideration of five
thousand dollars In cash, the Dominion
government granted htm the privilege
of drinking intoxicants, so that he is
exempt from the law prohtbi. ng In-
.dians taking whisky. This privilege Is
resulting in the, Canadian treasury obtaining a geod deal more than the $3,-.
000 originally paid. Charley gets drunk
nearly every day now, according-' to
men just down from White Horse, Yukon Territory, and he is regularly arrested and as regularly released 'an
paying a fine of $25. At this rate his
fortune, estimated at $100,000, 'will last
him about seven years. He has no
extravagant tastes outside his fondness for the cup that inebriates.
Shookum Jim, his friend and former
partner .In Klondike' sought a ' Ilka
drinking privilege 3nd offered the Government $10,000. He was rfefused, a fact
which benefits Tagish Charley, for
Shookum Jim looks after his fellow Indian, while the latter "fills up" and un-
tW he is ripe for police interference.
Tvnen that occurs Jim leaves Charley
to tho tender mercies of the Royal
Northwest Mounted Policf, knowing full
well that he will have his companion
to look after again in a few- hours, minus $25.
'At every race meeting, morning or
afternoon, ceremony, or '."funcWon lot
business or pleasure this year the
doom of the frock coat and top-hat
,has been more'and more emphatically
denounced. The social world is tired ot
them..   -     -       ,i     ,i ' ,    ;    '.''',' ,'_
At Epsom during race week,0 even,
the presence of the,>King did not pre'-'
vent a third of the.'visitors pin 'the
boxes, stalls, and club stands from ap-,
pearing in comfortable gre>; suits and
''bowlers" oh '"Thursday and Friday.
At Eton."4th of June celebration, nearly
Half the male-visitors had discarded
'black clothes and top-hats, and appeared in grey or, blue summer country
cloths which iive years ago would havo
caused a boy to '^c'ut" his "father or'his
best friend, i To-day, every man Is
nervously asking his friend what will
happen at'Ascot. ' "Will, lawless, licentious freedom' invade this innermost
adytum, this sanctum sanctorum, 'of
fashion? ' l
"The question could not exist," said
an arbiter of male costumes, "in an
ordinary year; but this year unconventional visitors will take courage from
the absence of the state procession,
and will dare anything, i I prophecy
lhat on-Tuesday and Thursday top-hats
will be in a bare .majority, and on Wednesday and' Friday in a considerable
minority."
Top-hats, as every visitor will remember, were not universal at the
Windsor Castle garden party last year;
they have been In a hopeless minority
on the club lawns of Kempton and
Sandown this year, and it seems to be
a veiy open question whether In the
future they will often be seen outside
Uic streoi-s and Darks of London.
^ AFTER JEN YEARS"f"   ,        '.
air/'G:  L. Stephenson, of Peterijor.
*gh says: Wor over' ten years 1 "suf-
jered constantly with 'Piles, first Itching,  thqn  Bleeding; ' pain"' almost   unbearable; life a,burden.   Tried ever*
thing in vain  till I   used   Dr.    Leon-
hard fs   Heiii-Roid.     ■   '
* |'I had taken but a few, doses'when
,£; began  to.notice, .an    improvement.
.JNow(l   am completely cured."
A $1,000 guarantee,, with' every'ho\
of Ilem-RoW. .-?i.   ai, deaSers, or the
-Sns.e coi' Limued': *«rr,
 J , ' -     i
•'.'!>■_ '   -s - ,''.,,
,p\    ,,    ,     Ko Faith In Illm.   "    .,  f/
"Guess^that "freckled' daughter''"of.
Thompson's must have a steady-iaoung"
man.",' .'. ' ,_,"',-. , ' '«""' ' '- -
." "What'makes,you' think, so?',''''""' ' ''
t "The old man was In-here yesterday
to buy one'df these newfangled contrivances that'-make a'big 'saviag In
tbe gal, you"burn."   '     ■"* ,..   ,*,_
"I don't believe the young man's a
steady. If lie-was they'd "save all, the
eas."'       ■> "
(<i —_—_____  Q
The Stadium.
The stadium used' by both Greeks
and-Romans" was 400 cubits or 243
rards l foot nnd 9 inches. v     u
real,
with
like,
eyes
Pa««Imr of tho Period.
"What baa happened to our old
friend the period V" remarked a man
who observes little things nnd has'a
habit of reading advertisements. "It
, seems to have dropped out of use almost completely in the setting up of
advertisements1 lately. And to nny one
who pays attention to punctuation the
absence of the fuli stop puzzles him a
good deal.
"Here's n book ad., for Instance.
Reading lt as it is punctuated, it gives
you reason to believe that in addition
to the author saying several complimentary things about his own story he
asks you if you've read it, advises you
to and tells you what its price is. Of
course I know they Want you to buy
their books, but I never saw one doing
this in an advertisement before,
"Printers tsll me it's the latest style
In composition to omit the period. If it
is It's the silliest fashion I've observed
in a long while, and I'll bet that when
that particular author sees that nd
he'll think so too."—IS'ew York Press
, Hudson's Bay Is Ours.
During the discussion on tho bill to
amend th* Fisheries Act, „whlch was
given Its third reading in the House of
Commons the other day, Hon. Mr. Bro-
deur announced that the Government
intended to proclaim that Hudson's Bay
Is part of the fJomlnlm of Canada.
Thero are three ports on the bay, and
the Arctic and a new steamer will patrol between them and keep order. A
fee of $50 will be charged for the privilege of ;whale fishing in Hudson's Bay
waters.'
Spencer and Color*. •
Herbert Spencer's notions of art were
very crude. His favorite color was
what be called "impure purple." • He
wore "impure purple" gloves and, flud-
ing tliat tho furniture was a little somber, had a binding of "impure purple"
pasted round it by ii seamstress. lie
cut tlie first strip himself and showed
her how to stick it on with paste. He
had his vases filled with artificial flowers, lie wished to have everything
bright about him and consequently en-
Joyed color. When it was suggested he
could get that In real flowers he replied: "liooh! They would want constant replenishing!" He wanted to
kuow why tlie people should object to
artificial flowers in n room any more
than to an artificial landscape.—"Home
Life With Herbert Speueer."
J bought a horse with a supposedly
incurable ringbone, for $;J0. Cured
lnmv with ,$1.00 worth of MTNARD'S
LINIMENT and sold him for ?S5.00.
Profit on liniment, ?54.00.
MOISK DI3ROSCE.'
Hotel  Kqeper,  Sl.  Phillippe,  Que.
probably air^cat outbreaks of the dis-,
ease in ''cities are'due to an.lnfected
water supply. This has, been .'strikingly
shown - In   Philadelphia,.'-where, some,
parts of the,city are,supplied with filtered water and others wlth'unfiltered '
"or-uilxed water.1'Comparing, two parts-
of the city" In which the conditions, "except as to water supplj;, are almost the "
same, It was fouud.that In'tbe one sup-
plledwith filtered water, the Occurrence
rate of,.typhoid fever jvas one-incifiv*
thousanit^'hile in tho others, in which
the unflltfred filter .was drunk,,it was
one iu sixteen hundred. ' »,     _  '-'■ '■*,•''„.,
.  But a city w;lth'an ideal-water sup-"''
ply, may   be' scourged   -with "typhoid -
fever, although less severely,* through
the medium of impure ice,* and it Is. almost, as Important to know; where'the
Ice,Is  cut. or .with  what;water it is
made,'if artificial,, as,'where the city
water comes\ from. o-Not' long since,,a-
number^of officer? on one of the .United
States   ."ship's   in ' the   Mediterranean
squadron  were1 taken,"down with "typhoid' fever: /When*the source o.f'the
infection was traced 'it-was found, to be
'some ice •loujjtht at Athens', the leg .machine    on    shipboard   having^ broken
down.- ,:'i r   -v  , p,''  i^ii'- 4.-   <■   ■'-.'/*,.
,' Anothc^'source of.infection Is found;
'in oysters that have, been "fattened fn
"streams^contuminated;, >viih   sewage.
Not only has typhoidffo'ljowed'the eating offthese' Ssh,'|jut,tbc typhoid bacilli."
have been found In the stomachs of ^ the
oysters".' f ,.   -       '        -'  " i, "
Raw vegetables used for salads,may
hare been grown In soil'contaminated
'with slops used""as -fertilizers or, may
have been washed in Infected .water.
Unless a water supply Is above sus-.
piclon all that used for drinking,'tooth1
cleaning and in'the kitchen sliould'be
boiled and the drinking water cooled
, by putting vessels containing It on tho
ice, not by putting Ice In the water itself. ,     ,
Finally,,great care should be taken
to screen all food from flics, for if
there Is a case of typhoid fever in1 the
neighborhood (flies may become most
active distributers of the polsru.—
Youth's ..Companion!
Cracker
Charm
There is
all the iff.
erencc in
the   world
between
eating < bo-
cuits (and
biscuit eat
<, •-        ' ■_     - ing.' Ont
may cat- a' biscuit and not tag.
it.- but' when  you  think of bis-
• ?' -"    '-. »>
cuit.eating 'you "think instantly of
, Mobney's Perfection
"'.-',* * Cream Sodas   \
' *''.,'/.' '■'   ',"'"'• \
' Crisp," delicious and tasty.  .
'Absolutely' and   distindly
1 c>
'superior, to" any other make.
' \Say "Mooney's'f to your grocer.
Wilson's
"fly.:;
PADS
ONE I'AOKETJUS^
:ACTU A I. f/lfKlLlED.
A. BUSH Ell OF FLIES-
Sold by all Druggists »nd General Stow • |
''.   ' '* i . ''!  " and 'by mail.
-   ' TEN CENTS PER PACKET FI&.M.
/, ARCH DALE AVI L50N,'
' - -"' " '. HAJWli/TON. OXT.
„; .'   A   Itnllivn>""HuU.
•' Tne recent intimation of nu Irish railway that therd would be "no lift train
to Cork"' has apparently Induced to
Great Eastern'Railwaj- company tn
Issue a placard stating that trains ti
Walthamstow will • run "nil tliroupn
tho night'on week' days."-St, James"
Gazette.
GOOD  FEED STUFF.
Silent Love.
They sat beneath the sHent moon.
This seaside makl and summer"riliap-
l>y.
No   word or whisper broke the oharm,
They- were nnspeakalbly happy.
Only/, Nine, and" a Genius. '..
Swindon has a musical prodigy. A
lad named Davies, nine years of age,
although having had only six months'
tuition of the piano, has already a r--
portory of. over twenty classical pieces
which he can play from memory. , ,vi
a recent concert he gave''remaik-'lf'.f
Interpretations of Greig'a "Albumblaff'
and Gad-e's  "Ringeltanz."
! Unfeeling.
i Mother (angrily)—The brute! TTe has
dared, to scold you? Newly Married
Daughter (sobbing)—Not so bad as all
that, mamma. I scolded him from the
house five minutes ago, and the unfeel-
laar brute hasn't come back yet!
lCon«ro  Panlullmeut.
A missionary recently returned from
tho rtglon of .upper .Kongo, iu Africa,
says that he saw there a curious platform thirty feet high erected in front
of. the head sentry's house. The latter
informed the missionary that it was a
large stage from which to shoot leopards,, but natives told him that it was
a torture platform. Unfortunates who
did not bring'in sufficient quantities of
rubber were first beaten,'sometimes almost to death, and then taken to the
top.of the structure and compelled to
gaze at the suu until relatives brought
the necessary'amount of rubber as redemption. A .;'.•'  '
A Restaurant Acquaintance.
"When you go lo New Zealand, I wish
you would enquire after my great-
grsuul-fathor, .Teiemlah Thompson."
"Certainly," said the .traveler, and
wherever he went Im asked for news
of the ancestor, but without avti.II, according to The DuiKife Advertiser. One
clay he w.-is Introduced to a line old
M.uor.1 of advanced age. "Did you eyer
meet with an KnglLshman named Jere-
m'ah Thumps >n V" he asked. A smile
paused ovei the Maori's f.ice. "Meet
him?" he repeated, ' Whv. I atq him!"
A Of/od Medicine requires Utile advertising. Dr. Thomas,' I2c|(>cti-ic Oil
gamed thf good name il now enjoys,
not through elaborate, advei lising, but
on -its groat merlls as a remedy for
bodily pains and ailments of the respiratory organs. Ii has can led its
fame whorovor it.has gone, a,nd it is
prized'at' the ..antipodes as well as at
homo."Dose .small, effect sure.   ,
.. Scotch I.HTT.
By the, law of Scotland the bushes
or shrubs planted in the garden belong
to the landlord, and the tenant cannot
remove them at the end of his tenancy
Tho English law .is till' same ou thiis
noint.
'lliose Pool  Qne'iit'onii.
"Hello," says, the man, seeing his
friend sallying, forth with pole and.net
and bait basket.   "Going fishing?"
"No," replies the friend, turning.od
him solemnly., "No; I'm going to stand
on my head and keep my, hair from
falling out. What madia you think I
was going fishing?"
Lady   (in    dry   goods   f;lore)
is  this color also genuine?
Salesman—As genii-hie as tho
on your cheeks, miss.       -       j.
Lady—ll'in—show  me another one
—Kieines WHt/.blatt.
And
roses
.,V *"a*e Use of Lime.
Dr. Hopkins tells the farmers of his
state  (Illinois)  that lie never will real
ommend  the  use  of:any  material  of/
land  that would  injure  it'in the long
run.   He'suggests   only   natural     materials.  The source, of  the lime  now
in the soil is limestone. The tendency
of burnt lime—-caustic lime—is to burn
the soil. Ground limestone will correct
acidity just as   efreetive.lv' as   caustic
lime  if used in Sufficient" quantity/'.It
is  the cheapest form of lime for this
purpose.     It is   absolutely    harmless
and   it-'.'does.'the   work   of "destroying
acidity.  : ■       ;..'■■'■- .
The ground limestone cannot stimulate nor do any injury. On poor land
it would not secure as much clover unaided as does .-caustic lime, but it would
do all that may be required of it safely
—it corrects the acidity and It feeds
the clover directly . when lhat is required. A ton of ground.'jjmostone is
,the;equivalcnt of more than half a ton
of caustic lime—"ground lime"—in
neutralizing free acids in the soil The
price is low, usually $l ,-_ ton at the
works.—Alva Agee in National Stock-
Wheat Bran  By the  New  Milling Process—Rich "In  Protein.
Letters rcceivedat the Michigan experiment station indicate that in somo
parts of Michigan-a prejudice    exists
against 'roller   process    wheat    bran.
Some  farmers   prefer    finely    ground
bran, others are prejudiced in favor ot
coarser samples. The product of roller
mills is  not uniform in this    respect,
fn some samples the germ  is ground
with the 'binn-'in other mills the germ
is found  either in the flour or as    a
separate byproduct. To get some light
on the relation of the composition of
bran to Its physical appearance   fourteen samples were analyzed, some of
them from roller mills, some from bur
stone mills, some from mills of largo
capacity   and  others  from  smaller establishments. The per cent, of prote.n
varied from 3-i.3S-per cout. In the bran
of a roller, process mill  with an    annual output of 1,200 tons to 19 per cent,
in   a  Hist grade  roller process    bran
from ono of the Immense mills in Minneapolis.    Little variation was   found
In tho composition of extremely coarso
bran and  the flnor articles.
Roller  Process; Product Approved.
The chemist of the station savs on
this topic: The two extremes, tho" very
coarse and the very fine, ari? of much
the same composition,   while   neither
shows the host sample so far'as feeding   properties   'are,  concerned.   The
medium grfidos generailv shOwa bet-1
ter  analysis  than either of.    the    e*
tremes. Theoretically the    bran    pro-'
ducedrby the. roller process should  he
more valuable than that produced by
bur stones, as in one,the germ,.which
is rich In  fat,  is separated   out .with
the   flour and   in  the  other  this 'part
goes into th«i bran; The roller process
.brans are all perceptibly higher in pro^
,tein  than  are those of the bur stone'
process. It Is not so much the amount
of starch  present in the bran as' the
amount of protein and  fat that is of
consideration to  the "feeder.  The end
for  which, the  nil Hers   are constantly
working  in   the  'milling  process    tho
most complete separation of the starch
possible  and  the needs  of    tho    consumer of bran, a .food  rich in  protein
and fat, are identical. The new milling
process instead .of supplying the fecd-
e.r Ji,h, an  '"ferlor'.grade of    feeding
stuffs   furnishes   him   with  ono  much
superior  to. that  supplied  by  the  old
prociiss.
."      Where  _lne  nub Coinon.
"Well,'.' said the good uatiireil boarder,, "lucre's one thing about out boarding house—you "cau cat all you lit'
there."
"Of course; same as ours," replied
the grouchy one. "You can eat nil y«
like, but there's never anythlns J«
could    possibly    like." Il
Depend* on tlie Man.
"What good is, experience?" walW
the man who ,was looking for a job.
"You cau't cash It."
"Some people cau,"' said his friend.
"I bought some experience once Oil
cost me $3,000."- -     ,
DEAFNESS CANNOT BE CURED,
by local applications, oa thev cannot
reach the diseased poitlon ol the <*'■
anoro Is only one way to cure deafmi*
and that Is by constitutional irnuilM-
Deafness Is cau.icd by un InllaniiJ condition of tho mucous llnliiff of tl'e Eustachian Tube. When this tube Is IniUmM
Inflammation can bo takfn out and th1'
hoarlnsr, and when It Is entirely rliwi
Deafness Is tho result, and hiiI^m tl"
Inflammation can be taken out nnd th"
tube restored to Its normal condition.
hearing will bo destroyed fori-, .'i. nlna
cases out of ten are caused by Pntar'h.
which is nothing but nn Inflamed «n-
dltion of the mucous surfneen
Wo will  (five  Ono   Hundred  D0II1" '"*
any cose of Deafnesstcatised by i'iii»rn»
that  cannot  bo  cured   by ."fill"* f'nlnrTi
Cure    Send  for   circular's 'free. -
•F. J. CHENEY   &  CO..  Trie*). U
Sold   by   Dru.wrlsts.   "Be. , .
Take Hall's Family rills for consl'P<U|on
-Snrmnte,  WI10 Nevtr Pr/irlle'"'
Siirasnte, the great violinist. I" I" on'
respect   very • fortunate  anion),' niusl-,
dans.  He knows nothing'whatever of.-
the drudgery a nd 'weariness of practicing.  'Most, weli known singers and
great,'executants .go'on practiclnff with
mors' cr less regularity all their., lire*
Not so Pablo Sarasafe.   Ho lakes, up '
his violin for his.own amusement, b"'
■ills, fluency .and  facility are s..t.:t .■"'»• ■
lie can dispense with the Irksi'ine d.al.l/.
task of playing to.keeo his hand i' •
Minard's   Liniment   Cures   Distemper-
MjMiy   UT   rile   rnt**x. ,
Tlie  lily  of- the  valley >. fn"n°"
lore, emblematic of happiness. In '«
tugai this flower Is symbolic of '"
estyp its   lowly   growth   ami   ri> ' ' *
hablta  giving  it a..symbolism cii»
okln to that of the violet.
"jriss May,"
"would you—er
kiss you?''
began   Mr, nonrale.r.
-lie ni.nl If .1 vc"
to
brlfth-
A t-nenner Filled,        '>'
Gerald-I Iiave a cold In my head
Gcraldine-Well, I suppose that Is bet
ter than.nothing.—Now York Treso.
"Not necessary," »ej',le'1.:'!,,cnlil(i i»
girl, "but I 'would '^rtalnly bo mafl
lot. mil "-— Rnlfl'vinw  >*"«■"
W     N
U    No.    597
u,M**«iVr?»iH»,-•- THE LEADER, MOYTE. BttlTISH COLUMBIA".  s^  55  HoTr tie Corr Cnme Hon..  ..iror the information of those who  . ��� ,n the habit of sending a dog for  I ?, Mr cows I wish to report a litt.e ��-  ' -edJce which I have had along this  if ��� I tested the iniik from a cow  ! iner she was brought to tbe stable by  ���    /nYtbe dog In turn being in charge  llX*   and   quite  warm.     Her   milk  f2,t^d 2 3. The next morning it was  I    !   and a week later, when��� she was  brought Jn by a man and perfectly  - 3 her milk tested 0.2. Now., you  ' -l,i n-ure out whether or not. It pays  1 0 use a dog around a dairy herd I  ] iould state that the pasture and feed  :��.I0  exactly   the   same   in   each   In-  stance," says an Iowa man.,  He,. Time to Muke Clieene. ,  ,   rn^ i,P,t time to make dairy cheese  ' ,s immediately after milking, says Pro-  I - 8s0r   A.   I..   Hnecker. , The   various  m,u."os that take place in milk'nearly  *���' develop In the fnilk drawn  In the  ..'enlng' iu.il  kept'over  until  the fol-  : Towing nioiulng.   So if milk, is  made'  nn)  "heese -immediately 'after ' it ��� la  Sr'awn   no  difficulty   will f be   experl-  auced.      rj_  ' , - .  Separator   For   Small   TJnlry.  If you have-as many as five cows.lt  fill pay you to own a separator. If  roil expect at any,' timo to milk as  dj.uiy as ten caws you ought to buy  ibiiu't u No. 2, which will cost $123,  sat if you do not expect (o keep more  jinn live cows a smallerpsize will an-  ,,���',... which will range' in cost from  IMto $75.���Southern Cultivator.  THICK, SWOLLEN GLANDS  that mate a home Wbeore,  have Ttilelc Wind, or CI��,ko-  do��a,cui bo removed wllh ,  SHATTERED   NERVES.'  Made'Strong and steady by Dr. Williams' Pink Pills^ "i, v  1 Whon ydur nerves'are out Qf.order  your w bole health Is' on the .verge of  a bieal-down. ,'Sudden sounds startle  'jou, -your muscles twitch- and -your  hamlh" tremble;' youro seilf-contrqi is  'hiiatiercil; your will-power -gone.  'Your head'aches;'your f^efare ''often  cold and/ your face . flushed., Xol,r  Heart jumps and'thumps, at tho Jeast  exeiiement;,*"you'are restless ,at"nlght  and tired when" you wake. '.Jourt  temper is ���irritable1 anil'you feel utter,;  ii uuwu-hearted/,'And. ' thfe whale  trouble is becausoiyour "blobd" is- too  tlnii and,watery,.to   keep^the,nerves  'strong. ''"There is onlyfune'way to  l(,ivc strong, healthy nerve's���feed  them with the rich red', blood-that  only Dr. Williams'; Pink Pills {Can  make���and da make. Mr. Fred Forth',  IT 'Sullivan-street, ''Toronto, 'Hays:���  "1 was a complete1' wreck with "nervous prostration','' but T>r. Williams'  Pink'"Hill's have made a new. man''of  me. 1 had been' nervous',for years;  tlie least n'olse would startle me, and  the least exertion would leave me'ut-  le-iiy.prostrated. I lost,,in weight,  am!.physically I was almost, a-wreck.  '1 had not taken the'pills long/when I  found they were helping me:" mj;.'appetite improved, my nerves began to  glow steady, and day by day I^gained  until I was again a,-, well,man. /My  weiglit increased,- twenty-five'"- pounds  while ,I was using .the-pills. '.To any  wild suffer as I did,.1,'can. say'.that .if  Ur. .Williams' .Pink;'Pills '..-are .given a  lair'trial/a cure will be-sure to follow  " ' /    *"    "        ���*> >   ���    -A A   ^ .   .'  Dr. .Williams'- Pinlc "-Pills ��� restored  Mr. Forth"? sirnply.,b'ecause theyf.made  .the'rich, pure1,blood which\properly  nourishes the nervfes and keeps ,;them  strong. .They <wiir "cure all*" the'dis-  ea'ses, due to bad blood and "shattered  nerves, such as_ anaemia; indigestion;  headaches'   and \.b'adka"chesr,   'rheuma-  'iism, lumbago, SL- Vitusndance, paralysis, general weakness "and the secret ailments'of 'growing ,girls and  women.- But ybu must always-insist  .dn getting the genuine pills with the  full name *Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for  Hale People an the    wrapper   around  .e.i.'i box:. Sold by "medic.r,e-dealei>>  or sent direct by mail at 50 cents ���t.  box or throe boxes for ��2 50 by writing  the 'Dr.   Williams'   Medicine   Co.,  . Brockvillef Ontario.  Am  RBINE  or any Bnnch or Swelling  caused hy mi-aln -or Dillam-  mutlon. No Winter, no  hulr (rime, nnrl horse kept  at work, ft OV per bottle, delivered.   Jlnok J-O free. ��� ._  ABRPRBI.NE, Jit., ror mankind, m.W. u���-  llvomd.' Cure. Uoltro, Tumnra, Varicose Yflru  Hydrocele, Varicocele.   Ilookfrc-e.   JMddeonly by '  W.F.Young, P.D.F.,  137  Monmouth St.  Springfield, Mass.  Can. Ag'ts: Lyma:i Sons & Co.. Montreal  BUTTER TO SELL;  THE ART OF ACTING.  The "Word "CannfIialT��in." *"  , The word "cannibalism" is really-the  name of a people. It is identical with  Carib, many of the Caribs, who formerly flourished in the .West Indies,  having been consumers of human flesh.  The letters "1," "u" and "r" are interchangeable Iii certain aboriginal American languages,'so that Columbus found  one jWest Indian,island saying "Can!-  ba" where another said "Carib," while  Shakespeare's Caliban is another va-  ' rlety of the same. Columbus' own con-  T-jecture was'that the name was connected' with the great khan, and later  philologists of tlie'old slapdash ���type as '  sociated with "canis,"- a dog. ' Apparently, however, the meaning of  "carib" was brave and^aring.' ���  Cool.  "Mary," Mrs. Housekeep called.from'  the foot ot the stairs, "how about  breakfast?"   '  "Oh," replied tho.new servant, wbo  had overslept herself, "yo naden't trouble to bring me anny. I ain't very hun-  Kry this mornin'."���rh'iladsJphla Press.  Nearly all Infants are more or -less  subject to diarrhoea and Such cam-  plaints while teething and' as this  period of their lives Is the most critical, mothers'should not be without  a bottle of Dr. .T.D.Kellogg's Dysentery  Cordial. This medicine, is a specific  for such' complaints arid is highly  spnken of by those > who' have, used'it.  The proprietors claim , it will euro  any case of cholera or summer com  plaint.  Known to Thousands.���ParineleQ's  .Vegetable Pills regulate the. action ol  the secretions,'purify ttio blood and  keep .the btomach and bowels fiec  from deleterious matter. Takk'ii ac  cording to1 direction I'hcy will over  came -'dyspepsia, eradicate biliousness  and leave the' digestive organs healthy  and'strong'to perform their fuwiiorih  Tnoir merits are well known to thous  ands r, who - know by experience hov.  'beneficial, they are In giving tone' to  the'system.. , s - ��� ,  -.'        y-r-yrr-, ���  ,. L i nc uuai r-urpose -t/Ow. . ���,  ' The' dual .purppfce cow Is , rapidly  drifting to the shamble..s, tbe natural  place fpr her, at this stage of the proceedings, says. ri;W. IJglity in Nation-  arStockmap. The'horseman, the sheepman-and "the hpnman,may'*be ablo"'to  use the dual pur'ppse.'I cannot speak  for them,'but I have! had so much'experience and have been so entirely dependent on the cowtto(pay my debts  that I'do'speal* with earnestness'and  positlveness. when we come -' to, that  branch of animal'1 husbandry.,The man.  who to-day .hires' help, at market prices  and depends for his income on the dairy - products1- uses dairy cows or ��� goes  under.      1     ,      ,'  .  , ' ' '  -        A ~- "     r  Sunlight Soap 'is .better than other  soaps, but- is  best when  used in tin  Sunlight way.'        Buy  Sunlignt Soaj  and follow directions. ,        ,       0  . ,., i. j s 1  ' .... . r_ i        '  , 'y ' ^Almond' MIIlc.       . .       ,   , ,  . Almond milk Is made .by blanching,  thirty good sized "Ionian almonds aud  'bruising them to'a. powder in half'a^  pint - of a distilled 'water.. A  lump  of"  sugar must be worked in at the same  time to 'prevent Uie oil from separating.-  The-process   takes   some' .lime "and-  should frbe.'done,iu  a mortar. , Strain  through cheesecloth. To make,the milk  richer  increase 'the^number 4of   nuU"  used. , The preparation is' one of, the  .most'sooiliiug and bleaching.     "'   "  M'inard's . Liniment y.QuVes :.Diphtheria.  > >'f      > -������;���:���!7���r~   , '  '"���, ' >' i '.AlflCIttcn nnd a Jfeedle.1   ,,  'A short time, ago a woman living In  England was petting her.kitten;' when  she suddenly felt- something scratch  her band.'. On examining tho spot  whence the scratch proceeded, she felt  tlie point of a needle sticking out of  poor pussy's neck fur. Tho needle was  pulled out by her husband,' and another surprise was experienced when it  was found that.a length of thread was  attached to, the needle, both having  passed down tho kitten's throat and  out again from-'the fur.  Mirvard's'.Liniment   Cures    Garget    in  Cows.  The Dcit of tlie Toem.  "I .don't see anything In that poet's  new poem."      ' >  "Of course you don't,"'ropjled tho  ��Hlor In chief, "because I opened it  fust and took" a five dollar bill out of  It. Give It a good place���top column,  ue\t   reading   matter!"  '   Tlie'Hc-nIUiI<".t  Trade.  It Is stated that the healthiest trade  -i Ihe world is that of d.-cmaking from  coal   tar.    The  average  life of a  tar  worker is eightv-six vcn'-s.  Do not delay in getting 'relief for  the .ittle tolks. Mother Craves' Worm  Kxterminator is' a pleasant and sure  cure. If you love your child why do  you leu it'suffer when a remedy is so  near at hand?  *tIlccoiiffli   tit  Dinner.  Many persons are debarred from din-  lug out owiHg fo their liability to contract hiccough during a meal. As a  rule'when caused by-food it comes ou  at once, and equally ns a rule the food  causing It is hot. Soups arc more likely to provoke hiccough than solids are.  It-is a good plan to forego soup, which  can be done without causing remark,  says Home Notes. Or one may eat. a  little bread before taking it. A third  plan is to drink a little cold water aud  to take the soup in very small sip.s.  Active Liver,  Good Digestion  And There  is no More Prompt  and Certain  Means of Keeping the Liver Right Than  DR. CHASE'S KIDNEY-UVER PILLS.  In calling your attention to 'Dr.  .phase's-. Kidnev-Liver Pills it' is only.  necessary to point to their success  ���u-the past, tor they are known, in  "early, every honic. .  ��� H'y means of their,direct and.specific  action-oil the liver���causing a healthful Mow.of bile���they regulate and enliven Hie action of the bowels ami on-,  sure' good digestion in the intestines.  '*-*��� the same time, thoy stimulate the  kidneys' in their work - of filtering  Poisons rrom tlfc blood.  'This cleansing process sot in ac-  ���������"��' by Dr. Chase's Kidney-biver  Hills means'a thorough cure tor bil-  Hoiisness, intestinal indigestion,"tor-  l'lil liver, kidney derangements and  constipation.      .  H means, a'restoration., of heal lb,  strength and comfort, where there has  been pain, weakness and suffering.  It means a removal of the .conditions  which lead to backache, rheumatism,  lumbago, Brlght's Disease, appendicitis and diabetes.  When   Summer .Miirlcetn   Are Floode*  "K'ith tbs Farm Product.  Usually farm bu'ttermakers can se-  cuie a pr?3��ium above the average  inaiket price by selling tbe butter to  private customers who have regard for  quality in products of this nature.-  '     "  If the maker is compelled to take  his butter to stores he usually has to  take the average price given for butter regardless of quality. A few storekeepers will recognize certain lines of  butter as being superior to others and  will pay more for them, -but usually  not as much as can be obtained by  private marketing. In most localities,  particularly during , the "> summer  months, the markets are flooded with  farm butter, and tlie prices are 'very  unsatisfactory. The maker who Is depending on-the stores for tlio sale of  his. butter usually has jto accept tho  current pricev while if he has worked  up a private trade'the chances are that  he has a market that w'ill give a uni-,  form price throughout the' year.���Edwin Ef. Webster. '        .  Pleased anil Paying: Bayer*.  One thing should always be borne In  mlid by the person who is making butter to sell. The butter Is for somebody  else to.eat, and It is for your Interest  to make lt to suit them, whether it Just  suits,your taste or not Habit has, a  great deal to do with our likes and dislikes. You may have been accustomed  to sweet cream butter, If so you probably liko that best. Or you may.have  got used to eating butter made from  very ripe cream and the butter not  Washed to erpel the buttermilk, causing It to havo a> very decided flavor and  taste, and so-you look upon'fine, dell-,  cata flavored butter as Insipid: Or you  may'Ulte little or. no jsaltlng' or high'  salting,' light color dr high color. But  all this In of no consequence.- It Is no'  matter what you like. You want to  make It to suit your customer, and you  want your customers to be' those who  are ablo and willing to pay a 'good  price for what suits them. ���If-the.customer wants sweet, cream butter,"make'  it; If unsnltcd, make it so; if ho desires  It high salted, salt It high, and so on.,  Always make it tho same for the same  customers. They are gettlngy tastes  formed which you, can make it profitable to gratify. If cue Is making'butter  to put on tlie general market he'wants  to make what that market demands  and will pay the best price for.���C. P.  Goodrich.', p ��� ,   ,  *  Adopt m. Line  atd  ICeep Tt. ,  Breed from tho best stock or the best  your'means will furnish and keep atrlt.  nave a purpoao.', Breed to a * line.  Breed'typo., Keep'at the bead,of your  herd a 'malo that you' can .point to  with prldcas your chief sire. Raise  him if you can.... Buy him if you must,  "introduce new, blood by���tbe purchase  of females. Develop, your young stock  by .generous 'feeding, > kind' treatment  and careful attention.- Grow them so  w;ell that they, will be, objects of attraction and iadmli-atlon. ��� Ilolsteln-  Frleslan Iteglstei*.  Dairy Tallk  of  Today  "What, Amntewm Wli�� Would Become  , Star* Muttt ti-arn.  It is surprising to discover how very  differently people who have played  pans all'tlieir lives deport themselves  before the footlights. I was acquainted with a lady in London wbo had  been the wife of a peer of tho realm,  who had been ambassadress at foreign  courts, who at the time had been a  reigning beauty and who camo to me  longing for a new experience and Imploring me to give her an opportunity  to appea'r upou the stage.  In a weak moment I consented, and,  as I was producing a play, 1 cast her  for a part which I thought fche would  admirably suit���that of a society woman. What that woman did and didn't  do on the stage passes all belief. She  became entangled in 'her train, she  could neither sit down nor stand up,  the shouted, she could not be persuaded to remain at a, respectful distance.  Init insisted upon, shrieking into the  actor's ears,"and she committed all the  gaucheries ryou would expect from an  untrained'country  weneb.  But because c^erybody is acting in  private -life' every one thinks be can  act upon the stage, and there is no profession that has so many critics. Every  Individual in the audience, is a critic  and knows all about the art���of acting.  But acting is ..a'gift. It cannot be  taught. ' '    ,  ���>You can teach people bow lo net acting, but you cannot teach them to act.  Acting is as much,ah inspiration ns the  making of, great poetry'and great plc-  turesl What is commonly called acting  Is noting acting.���Wduard M'ausfield in  Atlantic.   -'    ' ,   >-"      ,OLD .ROMXN'BATHS.     ,   '  Sunlight Soap is better than other soaps,  but is best when used in the Sunlight way.  To appreciate the simplicity and ease of  washing with Sunlight Scap in the Sunlight  way you should follow directions.  ' After rubbing on the soap, roll up each  piece, immerse in the water, and go away.  Sunlight  will do its work in thirty to sixty minutes.  Your clothes will be cleaner and whiter than if /.washed  in the old-fashioned way with boiler and hard rubbing. .  Equally good with hard or soft water. ,  Lever   Brothers  Limlrcd,   Toronto .53  FISHING  FOR  BIRDS.  They Held Thentpm, Temples, Fennt-  iiiK Hull* nnd Libraries..  ���The ancient Romans -were estrnvo-  gantly"fond of bathing. They got their,  notions about ttie/ bath as',a "luxury  from'tho Greeks unO nt one time there  were nearly 000 public bathing establishments in Rome, some, of which were  the most beautiful and elaborate structures In tbe' world."  " ���>  -The baths of tbe Emperor Diocletian  covered more than half a square mile  'and contained, besides immense basins  and thousands of marble,recesses, the-'  aters,,temples, halls for feasting,'prom-'  enades planted -with trees,, libraries,  schools' for*youth and academies, for  ,the discussions of tlie learned. The  bathers sat on marble ^benches below  the "surface-of'tlie wqter, around the  edge' of the basins, scraping themselves w.itli, dull,knh-es of metal and  Ivory and taking .occasional plunges "Into the water. . . ��  ���,  DissipateS Romans " would spend  whole days. In the bath,1 seeking, relief  from roverindulgencef in eating' and,  ,'drinking tbe night before.' Everybody,  even the emperor,' used' these baths,  which wore open* to .every," pne, who-  chose to pay the price-of admission;'  'It was not usual for'the old Romans  ���to have baths" ini-their houses, though  'at a date, 1,500 years before that, or  3,500 years ago, the noblemen of an-  ,cient Greece^ had their dwellings supplied witfi baths of'terra cotta."  Miss Juno -l.-niElo'.s- Manor, Siib.lv..  wnK.si-J'Kor a long time 1 suflced  from' liver complaint' and biliousness,  and coiiltl'iUic��,iiothlns. to '.lieU. mo.uii-  UI I used Di*. : Chase's .Kuiney-LIyei  Pills" 1 have recommended these puis  to many of my friends; and they jiave  nil been satisfied iwilh. the results.  You can use this loiter Tor .the beno-  (it of  women-who  arc sutl.enng as i  11 Mr. Wm.' Cook, Moosomnn. Sa'sk.,.  writes:-"! .'Havo been taking Dr.  Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills .;��>���''must  sav I hov have .lone me a lot of good.  I  have  been  a    ijrenl   -sufferer-   Irom  afflicted with I lus disease bat 11  Chase's ICi.liioy-l.ivo.' l'.ll-s will do  them good. I cannot say that I am  imUrelv cured but I. have been greatly  benefited  by   this  medicine. _  U...  ('liase's  Kidney-Liver  I lib. o. ne  pill a^H^25c.!iitsahox.aiallde.U-|  ers, oi-ICdinanso.il,  Bates te  Co..   loi-j  onto.  \  Are you feoding a1 cheese cow trying  lo 'get' butter? Use .your - scales, and  Babcock test aud find out for sure.1  The Better Dairy FiarmlnsT. ">  It is kiiown of all men that'it Is far  cheaper and more economical and hotter dairy farming to grow your protein  on tlie farm .than to buy it at the store,  even though the'purchased ground feed  Is bringing a'fertilizer on to the farm  to'counteract the depleting effect of  selling milk off the farm. Especially,  according to Home and -Farm, does  this stand true for thoso dairymen who  live below tho Ohio river and In tha  extreme south, where tbe lugumes  grow so freely and can often be followed by or follow another crop on tho  same land.    ,    ,.,  ' The Xervons Coir. '  A cow will nearly always give mora  milk when she is milked by a person  who has been accustomed to milk "her  than she will when a stranger takes  her in hand. Some cows are more  nervous or sensitive about being handled by strangers than others, but  those nervous cows are usually the  best milk producers. Frequent changei  of milkmen are not^dosirable.  Ilenl Dalrr Sin-res.  The day Is most surely .coming  when wo will nee that It is real economy to cut down the number of our  herds and get better stock. Then we  will get out of the bondage we are  now In. Tho real dairy slaves are tho  ones that are keeping so many cows  that do not begin to pay for their keeping. At least -that is the opinion of  Squire Little.  A Lnrire Boilr ot Ijrnoranc*.  There Is a large body of dairy ignorance in the world. It seems to be  moving a littlo, so let us bo patient  one with another. You know how large  bodies move.  Demonstration.  . One man kept a record of his cows  a year. One cow yielded a profit of  $3.00; another, $51.40.  In. Drlcf.  Cream Is cash.  Keep the calves growing.  Don't mix warm and cold milk.  Dairy farming Is cash farming.  A good cow Is a sure money maker.  Tho calf Is the beginning of tbe cow.  Tost the cows. Do It now. Don't  wait.  One tost won't tell the whole story  cither.  ���',' A good motto for dairymen::Get results.   ,,  Any cows In your herd testing 7 per  cent? ..-���''  Are your cows grafters? Test them  and see.    '  Grade cows are often all right. Grade  bulls never.���Kimball's Dairy Farmer.  4    BIooil,l*f,om a Stone.-    '  , . Tbe open terrace'in front of-the De-  wari-i-Khas" consists ' of two ..thrones,'  tlio black one'of which, 'facing .the river,'was cut out of, a> single slabrof  stone inJG03. This black throne, which'  is about'eleven feet long, aud support-^  ed by octagonal pedestals, was built'  by Akbar iu recognition , of his son's  title to the empire. Here Jchangir  used to sit occasionally and see tbe  fight of wild animals arranged for his  amusement. The crack on the throne  is believed to have been caused by  Lord Lake's bullet falling upon- it during the attack of 1S03. According to  tradition, however, it cracked when  the Jat king of Bharatpur sat on tbe  throne, for it was meant to be used by  -none but the real descendants of the  great "mogul. Then, again, when Lord  Ellenborough sat on it during ihe Kabul war In 1S42 blood is supposed to  have   come   out  of   it  CatcliIiiHT^O'lillK   niul   AllnttroMS   Willi  ' Hod   mill   I.lite.  t .  1 Curious though it may seem, it is a  fact that b'irds are caught with rod and  line in many parts of the world.1' The  pastime is declared to be almost as fascinating as fishing. Gulls in Newfoundland 4re caught in this way iu iaige'  quantities. In New Hi-gland fishing for  gulls aud petrels is au important in-  dustry.,  The method-of bird fHilng Is practically the' same as that of ordinary  fishing. Two men go out iu a^dory'aiid  throw pieces of cod liver on the \yater.  When large (piantities of birds'have  been attracted , to the ,spot more "'cod  liver Is thrown out on'a hook. This the.  birds greedily swallow aud thus fall  ,,eas'y victims. , .  , Albatross'are fished for in the same  way off"the Cape of Good Hope. A-  plece of pork Is attached to a long line,  and thrown overboard. The bird will  'eye it for a long1time|t gradually and  cautiously, making toward it,, Suddenly  he ;will'qfuj>tf it and hold it in his beak.  When he discovers that he is caught he  will sit",on the water and vigorously  !flap "his wings:t However, he will be  drawn into Hie boat' and made ,a cap-  live. ��� ' -'  " Albatross 'fishing is good sport, since  ,the bird requires careful handling. So  long sw he, pulls against the line it -is  easy enough. .The moment, however,;  he,swims forward tlie hook will drop  from his beak unless it is skillfully manipulated, and the bird will.fiud himself free. ' A  "'V CURIOSITY  INBOOKS.   '  The  of  ,for  Famous     Chained     Library  ',. WJmljoarne, Ireland.  'Wiinbourne,* Ireland,' is noted  many things, but its famous chained  library Is perhaps the inost'notable of  its curiosities'1 'The library-possesses  .unique ' interest' as . being one ,of the  earliest attempts to disseminate knowlr  edge among 'tlie people. >The collection  was made 'accessible' to the people in  "10SG and numbers some 200 volumes,  A SANITARY TROUGH.  A  Helpfnl   Appliance WJtlcH  Can   Be  '      Made by Almost Anybody.       ,  It will soon be warm enough to cause  fermentation of food left in troughs  where tlie sun beats upon them. Oziaa  Friendly suggests trying his plan:  Take a ten inch plank of any length  you prefer. Stand it on edge and tack  to it, keeping in tlie .middle always, a  piece of zinc sixteen Inches wide and  of the same length as Uie boards, less  one inch. This extra luch Is "to be di-  jvided between the; two' euds, so that  the zinc will miss reaching each end  of the board by one half Inch.' Now  turn the zinc on each side of the board  up at an angle of .-about forty-five degrees, tack'on a strip of wood a couple  of inches wide at right angles to each  end. of the board to keep the affair  from tipping over, and you will hare  the, nicest trough you' ever fed from,  and it won't cost a fortune either. Of.  course tin will do, or even sheet Iron  or galvanized iron, though zinc Is the.  .easiest of<tlie,cheap metals.to keep  clean. 3?he Idea Is to leave tlie troughs  outdoors, and when it rains instead of  making the food sour ,it will,,wash out  at ihe'ends whatever small quantities  of. mash are left in, it, and there'll be  no sour crop chickens in your 'flock.  -'    Bronchitis   In, Fowls.  Bronchitis is inflammation of ��� the  mucous membraneof the'trachea and  bronchial tubes. The most frequent  cause of'this 'disease Is exposure, to'  dampness, to cold, to drafts of cold air  and to sudden and extreme changes of  temperature. It'may also result from  the inhalation of irritating vapors, dust  and other foreign substances. Tbe first  -tiling to do is to remove the causef  -Begin treatment by placing the affected birds in a comfortable, dry and reasonably warm ,place "where they will  not be subjected to drafts��of air,'but  ��� where the -ventilation is good. Give  soft and cooling food, such as stile  bread or "a, mixture of bran and middlings moistened with milk. " Inhalation of steam or vapor from boiling  water ,in wliich hops or a small quantity of carbolic acid has been placed is  J      ' Give   with"1 the. food   two  grains, of black antimony twice a day  Pisli For the Brain.  Replying to a "Young Author," Mark  Twaiu wrote: "Yes, Agassiz does recommend authors to eat fish, because  the phosphorus in it, makes brains. So  far you are correct Biit I cannot help  you to a decision about the amount you  ueed to eat���at least uot with certainty. If the specimen composition you  sent is about your fair usual average,  I should judge that a couple of whales  would be all you would want for tbe  present���not the largest klud, but simply good, middle sized whales."  The  Kltclion   Autocrat.  "Yes, ma'am, an' now that I'm goin'  to tako hold here I'll settle th' permit  business first of all. You sec, I carry  me own fountain pen. There, take that  au* don't lose it."  "What Is this?"  "That's a permit, ma'am, for you to  visit th' kitchen. It entitles you to one  visit a week. If you come oftener th'  permit will be taken up, an' don't you  forget it."  The scarcity of books and thetvalue of  the collection.are both indicated in theAbeneficial  care taken for their'preservation, and ��� grains,of  especially against loss of such treas- j��A small, quantity of flaxseed steeped  urcs ,by theft. By means o'f chains iu hot .water makes a demulcent drint  aud rods the books were securely fas- ' that often gives great relief, and, in-  "tened to" .the shelves, antl these chains, the absence of tbis.-houoy or gum ara-  it is rather surpris'fng ,to learn, wero bic may be .added, to the drinking wa-  not removed until 1S5T, when the li-   ter with advantage,  In the early stages  Tha   Walking   Parson.  Tha Rev. A. X.'Cooper, M. A., ylcar  of Filey, tho fashionable Yorkshire  seaside resort, by his long walks In  the past 20 years has earned tine title  qi "The Walking Parson" 'At present  the reverend gentleman is engaged on  a COO miles walk In Sweden. The.-ia  long tra.rnps are -Mr. Cooper's Ideal'way  of spending a holiday, and the seeing ot  oth.-r countries. Jle Cummenci'd hi 1:S8S,  when he walked from Filey to London,  but, that Walk fanes'into liisl^iiiriearics  when cumparc-d wIUi subbeuuerit effurLs.  In 1SS9 he had Mi first foreign tour,  when he walked fruin Ilum'tair*. ��� to  Paris. In 1890 'he 'walked from, Filey  glum, and two yeaig later warned round  Holland. In 1900 he'walkf-d from Filey  to Venice: In 1003 to Monte Carlo; and  in .1901 ha footed It over the Pyrenees  Into Spain. He walks on an average,  27-miles a day. He la a tall, well,-built '  specimen of muscular Christianity, and.  in addition to being an able--writer, li  also an  interesting lecturer.  ,    - $2,000 For a Stamp.  Of all .Australian stamps the rarest  Is the 4d.'blue ot the first Issue with  tho swan inverted.,, Its rarity la, so  great that only, nine specimens are  known, one of - which realized ��400  some' time a'go. The other day another  copy came to the hammer at a saSa  held by 'Messrs. Vent'jin, .Bull & ^Coop-  er, when the bidding, which commenced at ��100.' ceased at  ��400.  - ,y  ���i'.VI  Love when true, faithful and well  fixed Is eminently the sanctifying element of human life. Without it the  soul cannot reach its fullest height or  .VinllnaKQ���RubI.-Ih    . , j  i   <���       . I  Tliere  avo a" number ot'vanetities  druggist and got a bottle at once.,'  The  Robin.     ' '  There is a well attested instance in  iSuglaud in'which u-u-obln formed,such  nn attachment for two ladies that ho  was iu' th'e "habit of accompanying,'  them In their country walks.'1 When  they went to reside iu'another district  be took bis .departure with them, Hying  along by the side of the carriage.  -      <���    ,    . "~ ;      .      A  r   ,. , Mohammed.  Mohaninjed-swasjibstemious. A handful of dates and.a mouthful of water ,  was all the food be required for a,day -���  of hara 'riding.  i-. .-. >'.  copy  Walter Raleigh's "History of tho  World," 1014. lt has suffered from fire,  and tradition says that Matthew Trior  was responsible for its condition, tho  story,'being that ho fell asleep when  reading it onco upon a time, and the  pages were burned by his candle. " It  has been neatly repaired, and Its mishap now adds^to Its interest The oldest volume iu'the library is a fine old  copy in vellum of "Rcginum. Aniuua-  rum." It is iu manuscript and bears  the date 1343.  ������a  Vindictive.  Naggus���What are you going to do  With tluvhe.ro and heroine of that magazine story you're running now? Marry  them? Bonis���Certainly. They will be  married in tlie Inst chapter. Naggus���  I'm glad of it. Itjlwlll serve them  right.  A  Hard   Case.  "You say you had to give the patient  chloroform twice?" '  "Yes," replied the dentist. "I had to  give it to him the second time to extract tha moiwi." -��� "', ���   '  Is It Your  Own Hair?  �� Do you pin your hat to your  own hair? Gan't do it?  Haven't enough h'aiijj? It must  be you do not .'-.know Ayer's  Hair Vigor I- Here's an introduction ! May the acquaintance result in a heavy growth  ofrich.thtck.glossyhair! And  we know you'll never, be gray.  "I think th��t Ayer'n Hair VlRor l'�� the most,  woiidorMl halrf-rower that.-was ever-made. I  have used It ror ��ome time and 1 car. truthfully i*v that I am Breatljr pleased with it.. I  eheerfullT recommend It as a splendid prepa-  ��3Sn."-rMiss V. Brock, Waylaud, Mich.  Hade by J. O. Ayer Co., lowed. Mm.  Also,manufacturers of '  SARSAPARILLA.  PILLS.  CHEERY PECTORAL, j  uers  Flrvt Glimmer of a Star.  A little girl, the French critic Sarcey  related, once presented herself at tho  Paris' Conservatoire  in order  to "pass  the   examination , for  admission.     All,  she knew was tbe fable of "The Two \  Pigeons," but she had.uo sooner recited .  the opening lines when Aubcr stopped  her, with a gesture.  "Enough," he said.   "Come here, my ,  child." .      ���  '  The little girl, who was pale and thin,  but whose eyes-gleamed with intelligence, approached him with an, air of  assurance.  "Your name Is Sarah?" he said.  "Yes, sir," was the reply.  "You are a Jewess?"  "Yes, sir, by birth, but I havo been  baptized."    '  "She has been baptized," said Aubcr,  turning to his colleagues.' "She has  said ber fable of 'The Two Pigeons'  very well.    She must be admitted."  Thus Sarah Bernhardt, for lt was  she, entered the Conservatoire.  Tender   Fowl*.  If the sk!u of fowls peel easily It is  a'sign of youth. If the spurs of chickens are over a Quarter ot an inch long  it Indicates old age.  mako   draughts    upon    their    vitality  highly detrimenral to their health.    It  Proper Mntinsr*. .        1S 0U|y oy t]lc most col-efu] treatment  The selection and mating of poultry ( that they are able, to keep themselves  for any purpose whatever is the funda- alert and active in their various call-  mental principle of success, according ings, many of them know the value  to the Feather. . No one can hope to ' of Parmelee's Vegetable Pills in reg-  succeed in producing better laying hens ulating the stomach and consequently  if be does not mate good layers for pro- j keeping the head clear'.'  ducers.   One cannot hope to rear exhi- '  . _ i~-'  bition fowls of  quality  unless he has Death~ of a" Balaclava Captain,  the best to breed from. Tbe high prices        B,r   iW11Uain    Gordon,    Baronet,    of  paid for tbe best is only a sample'les-    Ea.riston, Kircudbright, died a few days  ago. He led 'the left squadron of the  17th Lancers in the charge of the Light  Brigade at Balaclava. He received four  sabre trour.ds, and was dismounted. Ho  succeeded, however, in reaching tha  British lines, and was promoted, captain next day. He also served with tha  17th Lancers in the Indian Mutiny,  when Field-Marshal Sir, Evelyn Wood  was one of hla subalterns. Sir William Gordon retired from the army in  1S64, being then in command of hla ^  regiment. He had tho British, French,  and Turkish decorations for the Crimea and the Indian Mutiny medal. S'r  William was 76 years of age at the  time of his death.  bi'l  son ot quality. Select.tbe best keep  the best care for them properly, rear  the youug chicks to the best advantage  and you will succeed from tbe carefully  ! selected mating. No matter how good  your breeding stock may be, if they  are not properly cared for and the  chicks hatched from them are not properly reared to maturity the results will  not be successful. Tho fundamental  principles of success aro good breeding  stock properly cared for and the product from tlicm well hatched and grown  to a healthful, vigorous maturity.  There Is no use to hope to succeed with  slipshod methods.  The   KyelnillN.  To preserve the round shape of tho  eyeballs occasionally rub them gently  and always towanl the nose. As cue  grows older the eyeballs have a tendency to become flat Gentle rubbing  or massago helps to preserve their  shape.   Spnnlah   ntiqnelte. J  Ladies seldom rise in Spain to receive a male visitor, and they rarely  accompany ,him,: to the door. For a  Spaniard to give a, lady, even his wife.  his arm when out walking is looked  upon as a decided violation of propriety,    y    ,  . ��� , ' ���      ������   Ilonie  Boats   In   China.  Travel in the interior of China by  means! of house boats costs about $5 a  day. It is popular with European  tourists. '.  Elephant  Nurses.  Elephants often take the place of  nurses In Asia. Tbe children are lifted on the elephant's back with his  trunk; he then goes a Short distance  from the village, places them on tho  ground and cuards them-  The secret of all true greatness  Ii  glmpllcity.���Jordan.    ���>  SurnnmcM.  Nearly all surnames originally were  descriptive of their owners. Tbe Parkers wore keepers of noblemen's parks,  the Warners were warreners, or rabbit tenders; the Barkers prepared bark  for tanning, Forstcr meant a forester,  Webster a weaver, Wright a carpenter,  mil so on. ^  Easy.  "Did you sell horses to those two  customers yesterday?" wo asked of our  friend the horse dealor.  "Yes."  "Make anything?"  "Off of Jones���yes."  "Jones? Why, Jones was tho on��  that said be knew all about horses."  "I know. lie was easy. The other  fellow didn't know a thing about them  and brought around throe or four experts before ho would buy."���New York  Life. ��� ���'...'  An  Ej-e Opener.  "How does your father seem to regard my comiiig'here?" anxiously asked.. Adolphus of little Bobby, while  Miss,Maud was upstairs getting.ready  to������ present herself-  "Ho don't care uqthin' about it," replied Bobby carelessly. '  "So he has'no objections, eh? But  what did lie say, my littlo man?"  "He said if 'Maud.'had a. mind to  make a fool of herself, why let her."  Tliere Are So Certain Ones.  "The only objection I have to this  story," said the cynical bachelor, "is  the frequent use of tbe phrase''a-certain girl.' The phrase is grossly Inaccurate, as everybody well knows that  all girls are exceedingly uncertain."  An.Old Chartist's DetAh.  Mr. W. E. Adams, late editor of Chi '  Newcastle Weekly Chronicle, died at  Madeira recently from asthma. Born  at Cheltenham In 1S32,, he became an  ardent Charllst, with Intimate association with Charles Bradlaugh, George  Jacob IToIyoake, Julius Harney, Joseph  Cowen and others. His 'Caractacus"  letter in Bradlangh'a paper, Tho National Reformer, attracted Mr. Cowen's  attention, and he was given an appointment on tho Newcastle Chronicle. For  years he was the editor of The Newcastle Weekly Chronicle, and waa the author of several publications.  .t ��� .  They'll N'ever Make Up.  "A bride and groom in France are  planning to take a honeymoon trip in  an airship."  "I hope they haven't quarrelsome dispositions."  "Why?"  "Because I'd hate to hear of their  falling out"���Cleveland  Plain  Deal.-r.  WPifiillf  W.N    U    No.    597 JMrt'P''  'A',       'a      <  THE LEADER, MOYIE, BRITISH COLUMBIA".  ���.��    fcs  5fJ��- ,i  ;sifj.  -.$  %&.  m  "���*��!  ����5H  MS  r'1��  ;ft  *1  Mm.  ,JA,��B  i^l  &S  U-vj  :mm  ,*��� .re*  ,7"W.!U  fit  m.  hi  r?riL  Hi  ���Oi*  ��-f -M-+++-, +++++++++4 ++++++ +-M-f-M~f -t-*4=* -��� f++*+-M--f  | Linked by Fate I  '    BY CHARLES GARVICE ��  $    Author of " The Verdict of the Heart/' " A Heritage   j  of Hate/' "Nell of Shornc Mills/' "Paid |  For/' "A Modern Juliet/' Etc.- |  feymrf m *���������������������������� ������h-m mi *f+*mmmix  THE   HOLIDAYS.  (Continued.)  "Aifd J   iiovp sh6wn"yoilr    ghost ���  yon,     in     fact���the    whole     bag     of  ,    tucks.   I   have  given   myself     awav?  Yes?"  Vane's stern eyes answered  him  "Well''  What   me you  going  to  do"?  He   had     the   best   of   it,   as     Vnne  felt. i  "f  ought   to strangle you,  kill you  by any  luenns,  you���you  traitor!"  Julian   smiled    "My  dear  Vone,    I  wish   I   could   set your mind  at     rest  ou that point;  but 1 can't.    I   don't  suv  that     .Tnditli   was  aware,     fully  aware,   of  the  modu,s'operandi,   that  she  Knew .exactly   how  1   Was    going  to���remove  you;   but   I'll   swear  that  sdie   know you   were  to  be   leniQvedh  If you. have   listened  attentively    to  my confession you' must have gathered that  fact '" ,  "1-inr'  Murderer! "sard .Vnne:  "Murderer���well,   yes,  1  admit;  but  a'liar���I never  lied  yet.      Lying    is  vulgar���and   useless.      But     .ludith.  Oh,'yes,   'when  you  are, master,'etc.  Oli,  she knew'   I .saw it   by    her face  that , night,    he.i>-cl   it    in   her   shriek,  And.   mind  you,  Judith   must    {ibide  by  ihe xoinpaet     ,  .ludith    is    mine*  Mine,   by   the   i it-lit.   ol"  the    price    I  have  paid   foiphci'   Xot    youis'"  He  1 advanced thri-ali-ningly, his hand upraised,   his   fuigeis   clutching    nt   the  empty  air    "Vot youis1   You    would  not, Iiuve sinned  as'I have'   dqne for  her,' You���"           t '.,  llii  voice  sunk,  and he  laughed.  "Pardon!   Vou  will admit mv claim  to   her.   1   am. going.   You,will   'not  see me  again,   When  a man  loses,  as  ,r base lost, after such a struggle, effort,   he  should, efface himself.    I  admit thai.  1' am  going,   and you   will  not   see   me   or   be   troubled by     me  again."            '  lie walked,' quite steadily now,  to-  wnid  the, table.  "Will   vou   allow mr; to  use a  tele-1  grjiph' form'', Thanks "  In  horrified  silence, Vane drew back  anil   watched   him.   He   took -a    form  from   the  stationery" stand,   and,   after  a   moment's  thought,     wrote     n.'  message,  wry  plainly and  distinctly.  *i\heii  he had  finished he rose,=flook-  "ed   nt   Vnne   with  a   calm,   cool, '   indeed  critical  grr/e,   th^n  with  a smile  said'  "Thanks'   Good-bye'" ��i  Vane watched hun as he went out  of "the .room, then sank' into a chair  ���not the chair in which ,.Julian had  sal���anil bin led his fate in his hands.  How'long he sat he knew not then  or ever, but, s'uddenlv ryiiH'iiil.ering  the unhappy wieteh, he sprung to  his feet and hurrfed into tlie hall.  i- lie almost ran into the arms 'of  Prance, who uttered a yell of amazement  and  feai .  tailing on  his name:  "Lord Lesborough'"' '  , "Mr ^.Julian!" cried Vane , < '  "Mr MTnlian' Lbrd llcsboiongh!  His loidslup wont out a quarter of  an hour .ilio! Bui���but���oh, lord,  ,who are you, sir? Oh, my lord, is it  you, .s it miii''"   - . ,  The whole household was in confusion The clamor of tongues, the  cues and scieaiusa and tears of relief and thanUsgiMiig so confused  Vnne that he was thwarted in his  intention ol following the unhappy  man. But at last he got a cai riago  and dio\e to the station, to find  lhat .Julian had departed by the  ti am whu h had Melt a lew minutes  beloie   \ alio  arrived  grew Uroainy ann iouu<  "He is tall and very straight, with  broad shoulders; and lie is Very  strong and good-looking: quite  bron/cd and tanned, with eyes that  ���" She broke oil with a laugh at  herself. "Oh, he is a son ol (he  gods���not oni mallei';, gods, Polly,  but the Olympian ones, 'a model of  grace, and fi.ll of Virtue,' but 'his chief  one is that he condescends to love  poOrJittle mo'"    u       ���       '    '     ,  Polly looked up at the radiant  face, the graceful figure, and, laughing,   tossed  her Ivud  scornfully.  "As if he could help it! I'd "like to  gee_any..man_who could! Married 1"  Then she sighed. "You'll write no  more plays. IVc'imh; that's sure and  certain! It's a pity, for ' 'Twist  Love and Love' is doing", so verv  well!"  "JtVnot at all sure nnd certain,"  said Nina. "Why shouldn't P No  one will know 0t hat 'Herbert Wood'  is, Lady ]>esl>ornugh_ and if they did!  But you must talk it over wiih'uiy  husband when you anoet him tonight.",  "To-night '"  "Yes," said Kino', laughing at her  tone of awe. "Ilore is a note . from  Lady Vivienne She wants us all " to  go to the Mc.uus to-night, and come  bark to .supper with them. , 1 .a'm,  looking forward to it, sYi much1" '  The plnv went splendidly that evening,, and, Nina, sitting well "behind  the     curtain   of   the   box,     was     nil  I know a. boat, and I know a pool-  Ware the  boat and  pool.  'TIs holidays, there is n > school���  "Ware the boat and pool!  You'd fear a  tiger strong and  great.  The  crocodile  lhat  lies  in  wait.  But still you'll go  with  steps  elate  Towards the boat  and pool. ,  'TIs only a little pool and boat���  Ware the boat and pool!  The boat hath teeth, the pool a throat-  Beware the boat and pool!  Unless I'm with you do  not go;  They ooax, they beckon���yes, I know.  But you might fill .ay world writh woe���  Beware the boat and pool!'  Hand In hand they go together,   ���  The leaky boat,  the pool,  All In this lovely summer weather,  The leaky boat,  the pool.  I think I see'you on the bank.  Your lips are white, yonr hair is dank,  And we carry you  home on a slab or  plank���  Beware of the boat and pool!  A rattlesnake you dread;   you  do  not  fear      /- r  > The leaky boat,'the pool. A  What, ia the score most every, year  Of the leaky boat, the pool?  Beautiful little girls and boys,  Death took them away for pretty toys,  'And quenched forever how many Joys?  Ware  the  boat and pool?     '    ���  ���The Khan, in,Toronto'Star.  COURAGE  IN DIFFICULTIES.  Stories    Showing    How    Two    Persons  Faced  Great Peril���How a Women v  <,        Saved   the   Situation.  Women display courage in their i>wn  incomparable fashion. Typical ol woman's method of encountering danger  is the stoiy of the woman who observed as she was concluding her toilet for  the night the presence of a burglar under her bed. Without leltiin? tho man  know that she had perctived him, tins  woman quietly put on her dressing  gown and knelt down at the bed-ule  to say her piayers., She prayed a^oud.  She made her,own pei.sonal inteicessions to heaven and then prayed,for  all poor sinners Jiilng In the darkness  of estrangement fiom God, "particularly this unhappy man lying under my  bed, meditating the wickedness of  stealing and perhaps of murder." This  woman  saved   the  situation.  I-cannot imagine a woise, situation  than that of a certain steeplejack  who, found himself one day at the top  of  a. church   steeple   with   a   madman  ubdging a Landlord.  An amuslnu account was 'given In  the Shortdiitli eounty Court of how  a man had for six months past cleverly evaded his landlord, until, as counsel  put it, the landlord had become positively distracted.  Counsel (to the landlord)���How- did  ha keep out of the way Tho Landlord  ���Used to come to the front windows,  blow me a Id1**. dJ1(1 walk out at the  back. (Laughter.)  And did he remain a prisoner In his  house during lhat time? Not a bit of  it; he had gone to Kamsgate t<?r a holiday, I heard. (Loud laughter.)  Then I believeiyou tried the ruse of"  a registered letter to get at hlrn?  Yos, but he's up to every trick. We  Intended to get in when he opened the  door, but ho would not do It, as he  signed the receipt after it had been  handed through the letter box (Laughter.)  His Honor���f make an order for pos  session in two weeks. _,  COL. MAITLAND'S Q.1AVE.  CUAPTKU   XXVII.  "IVcinia"    sci earned   Follv,    when,  irith  the  iiieiest   npologi   loi a knock,  Nina   untemd   the   lamilmr   rooms   in  Percy   .street.,the   room'    in     winch  she  had   found   loving   shelter   m   her  time  of need    tbe  room  in   which  she  hini  tirmmed   hats and  bonnets,    and  " uft oi w aids���oh,   gloat   achievement' ���  wiitlen    pl.i.vs    foi    the   members      of  Mr.     Il.il tout t '*���     company'       "Deci-  ni.t'"  and  Polh,  with  the     tears    in  hti-'e\e.s.  hugged hoi   dear- fi lend, never   dealer   than   in   this   moment      of  her  letuin    "Mow   well  you  aie looking,   and   how���how���   Dec una,   something   has   happened   to   .\ou'    Something   that's   altoied   you   in   a    Wuy  that   1    can't   il.-uilie        You     never  looked   so   happj .   and   with     such    a  light   in   \iuii-   e\es,   not  even  on   tho  fust  night ol   ihe  pla.v !     'Sit   down'  Take  \ urn-  things-off!   ].ot   me     give  you   anolhei     kiss,   \ ou   dear,     sweet  tiling'   And now   toll  mo all about it'  The    vov.ige'       Tbe    advent in os  you  hinted   .it'    Did   \ oil   find   that      mysterious   island���wnv   'didn't   \ on <" toll  me   more  about   il>   Did  vou   find    it,  and   is  lh.it  what   m.-ikes \ou  look  sb  ho.ni'iih    radiant   and   i mining     over  with   io\-' '  "Ves I found it, Poilv," replied  Nina, "but it was something else 1  found lhat makes me so bappy.  *i on II nevoi guess1 Conic clos, i and  J 11���1 11   wlusp( r ���  Polh kin-It l��."-|do ber, efid Nina,  blushing like a siluKilgril, whisper ud  ono wind,  at wbub   Polly shrieked  "What1 A husband' Dec una' y.MO  ���who is lie' Ti II me (puck, quirk'"  And -\ li. -n Nina had told hit that,  and a irio.it d.-a! unite���in imi the  hisloi. oi _lie u i ock and hoi stiango  ni.ii i uigo���I'ullv all ii-hfiip on the  fiom (i.uld onl\ stale ul hoi open-  mouthed with wondei, delight und  awe  ' Maiiiffi, miii i ted nil the time1  And to an earl1 And you are u  countess' i ,|i|y l.esl.oi nugh' Oh,  /lour J oi d Sut i oinbe1 ' \inu Jind her  band on 1'olK s lips "A countess!  arid In . n one all the time' And hole  was I tiealirig you as il ion weie a  mole nobod, just like linsolf' And  ,\ 11, somehow I nlwa.s suspected���"  ' lhat I was a piiiiiess in disguise' ''lumped at m\ birth with  the iighliul owner,' as the liish-  liian said You dear loolish Pollv'  As if il made u.n. dilfiienie who and  wb.it I ii iu ��� \nd��� and I think you  will   like  m\   husband,   deal  "  Polh emit tod u'. ' Oh' Jake him. I  ���shall be aliaid An e.u 1, a leal  Knglish eail De���I mean, Lady Lesborough ! "  "You dare! 'Deeiin.i, ��� if you'please.  Oh, no, you Won't be afraid of hini.  .What iionsen.se! You are nut afruid*  of   Lord  SutcomlKi!"  "Oh, but. he's only a viscount, or  ���whatever it is, and yours i.s'a real  bolted curl!" explained Polly, with  delicious   naivete.   "What   is   h,.    like  aglow with pleasure nnd honest pr ide  in her work? Tt was sweet, to see  Vane applauding and looking round  the delighted audience with glowing  eyes, ns.'if he were, saying: ''Clap  away;'shout your hardest, good folk,  im   wifu  wcote this  pla1, ."  They went home to Evorsloigh  Couit, where Ihe Sut combos bad  proMdod a supper,(, which, it, it had  nol boon --o .substantial, would have  'boon suspiciously like a wedding  breakfast: nvl i at ��� Vmio's warm  greeting and the irrondK look in his  frank eves all Polly's awe and'nervousness fled ', ,  ' *T htllo i bought, M*ss .Bninford,  when f was watching jou act, with  the ji en test admii at ion, that 1 was  looking at my wife's dearest and  .best jrlend," be said, as he Held hoi  hand in bis waim e,i asp "I can I  toll vou how oIt,on she and I haw  spoken of you, oi how much T have  wanted to see you aril���thank you'  I hope you will share \ our fneiulshtp  for- hor with me Will you->"  , It was a very liapp\ little l party,  though every now and then a shadow stole ,o\or Vonc's lace, lie could  not altogether g"t rid of the memory ot .Julian���of the white, 'c livid  face, with its'black eyes gleaming  fi o'm their dark  hollows.  "What  do yiiu think will  become, ol  him'"   he  had   askctl   Letchford" , ahd"  Sutcombe earlier   in   the, evening.     ,  [to be coxrrxuKD.]  BLEAK SHETLAND.  Ita Swarmn of Sen Gulls nnd Its Lone  Tree.  Up a ^little lane off Lerwick's one  street.there is a garden. At least, it is  an inclosed space. In the middle of  this space there is a tree. It is not a  very tall tree; you could, in fact, toss  a biscuit oyer its brandies, but still it  is a tree���the ernly tree in Shetland.  And Shetland is proud of it. Children  who are brought for the first time to  sec the wonders of one streoted Lerwick are shown this tree. This is uot  Action. It is the only tree in Shetland.  As there are no trees in Shetland,  tliere aro no birds, except, of course,  the sea gulls, which you can number  by the thousand. The sea gulls are the  sparrows of Lerwick, and, as such,-  they have a greater share in the town's  life than have the sparrows of London.  In the morning time you will note that  a sea gull sits on every chimney pot.  Sea gulls swoop and hover over every  roof in the town.  The air is full of their strange, high,  plaintive,   haunting   cries." Their  sad,  shrill, long drawn cries*are to Lerwick  as the chattering of sparrows or the  cawing of rooks are to us in England.  Every house has its own familiar sea  gulls and every street its own band of  saa gulls.   ITiey never miv.   Tbe children in each bouse have a pet name' for  thoir  own   particular  sea   gulls,   and,  having called  them  to them by those  names, they feed them every day.  And  each sea gull knows what is meant for  him.  No sea gull attached to one house  over seeks to eat the  food scattered  from the bouse next door. He does not  dare; the other gulls would kill  him.  So all day long the sea gulls hover and'  call  over  the  roofs of  Lerwick.   The  people of the town, if they come across  a little pile of rice laid upon the roadway,   step   over   It   with   care.    They  know that it is placed theiu for some  sea gull.   And at night the sea gulls  leave   their   own   appointed   chimney  pots and  fly gracefully away to theb  resting places on tlio rocks of the Ig't  of Noss.���Loudon Express.  Gallant   Soldier's   Last    Resting   Place  Found at London, Ont. ,  A discovery has been made of con-  slderable01nterest to the Maitland family, the head of whom is Lord Lauderdale,  whoso eldest son, Lord Maitland,  is assistant-director Jfor the Yeomanry  at the War Office. ' This is the finding  at London,  Ont., of  the 'grave  of 'Col.  John Maitland, C. B.,' son of. the eighth  'Earl oi Lauderdale, and brother of the  ninth  andi tenth earls.      Col. Maitland  was Lan  officer of the  32nd  Regiment,  and took an active part in<-the defence  of .the western frontier of Ontario, then  (Upper Canada, during and subsequent  to the���rebolllon of 1837. He died on Jan.  li, 1839, and a stone was put over hi?  grave '<by the officers of the 32nd Regiment,   which  he-oommanded  for' upwards  of'twenty years,  as  a mark.of  their esteem and regard." r  i This   gallant   soldier's   last   resting-  place was found by Dr. H. J. Morgan,  of Ottawa, author of Celebrated Canadians,, who   came^across it in an out-  of-the-way corner of the English ceme-  'tery at London,  and  had  it not'   been  discovered when it was, all trace of tho  .-grave must'inevitably have been    lost  in a few months'-time.  Col. John Maitland  had  a- distinguished   career v and  'was a prominent figure in the early history of Canada, yet Burke simply gives  the dates  of his birth  and death, and  states   he  was a  colonel  In   the army.  Though,   however "the   people'  of    the  Dominion neglected his grave, they are  not  altogether  forgetful ,of .those  who  i served   Canada   in. the  past,   for   tt  ia  proposed,   with   the. permission   of   the  officers of Col.'AralHand's old.regiment,  to   remove   his--remains   to" the    new  cemetery at London, and have the tablet over his grave placed in the ISng-  'llsh cathedral in that city.' Besides' his  brilliant services in Canada, Col. Maitland seryed with the .expedition to Copenhagen under Lord Cathcart, in Spain,  'and Portugal-under SirJohn Mooie, in  the Peninsular as'aide-de-camp to Sir  William   Houston, ' and    on  , returning  home  as   aide-de-camp" to   his   uncle,  Gen.    'Sir    Thomas     Maitland.���Court  Journal. r '  grinning into' hi.s eves. The madman  was hie mate Both,men had. been at  wprk on this steeuJe for many dayt  and had talked together while they  hung In the saddles with the utmost accord, but on this particular *lay one  of the men lopked up to see madness  in the eyes of his companion. In that  moment he was alone with danger. No  shout could avail. KVom the street  below he looked like a splde'r snoozing  in its web. The roofs and chimneys of  tho houses seemed to be level Wdth the  ground. High up, Im the loneliness of  the empty air he was alone with a madr  man. , <���  The   man   kept   his   wits  ab<5ut   him,  and  addressed some   'cheerful., remark  to his  mate. /The  madman only  grinned, .j Tho   man   bade   bim 'Moult  alive,'  that   they  might  the sooner get  below  and   enjoy  themselves.      The   madman  chuckled,    and    announced    that    they  would get below In double quicklime,  for   that   he  was  going   to jump  from  the steeplagjvith his friend In his arms:  The  othFr, laughed  as   if, at, a good  Jest,   and   t,u>ned   to'his   work/     Then  he began pushing with his feet,against  the   steeple-'io   get   a  ��iwing' Into   his  -saddle;   he  meant   to   grab   the   madman   and   hold   him!  till     help  "- came..  "But   the. madman   was  also    swinging  his   saddle,   and '"before   the. sane   man  realized    his , danger'   the     mhdman's  fingers were   closing round ,'hls. throat.  There  they  s>wung/in   the  dizzy  air,  hfgh   over   the, unconscious'city.      By  something of.a miracle the man,found  his   hand   clutching  at    his   tool    box  as  he  swung back!  , His  hands  closed  on a wrench.   He .grabbed it, made, an  upward     thrust '  with  ' his    strangled  body,    and    caught    the ; madman'   a  jangling  blow   across  the   side   of 'his  head.     Then   he   clutched   the  fellow's  body   to  save 'it from  falling and,  after    a     moment's    breathing,    qufelly  lowered   himself   and   hls.-imconseiom.  mate rto    the    ground 1 below.���Strand  Magazine.      '       , ���-  f    ��� ������   >'  A Chesterfield Retort.  When Lord Chesterfield was in his  last Illness and.Jiis death was only a  matter of a few weeks, his physician  advised him to go for an easy driv(e,in  his carriage, and he went out. As the  equipage was proceeding slowly alonfr  it was met by, a lady, who remarked  pleasantly to Uie great invalid, ''All  my lord, I am filad to see you able to  drive out!" "I, am not driving out,  madam," answered, Chester Held, "1  un simply rehearsing my funeral."  CEYLON GREEN TEA  Is preferred by former Japan Tea drinke  because of its greater purity.      ^  Lead  4 Packets   , Only,    40o,    50c,     a nd    60o    per , lb.     At   all '  Highest Award   8t   Louis  1904. Sroc"*  Delicate  Child  The children cannot possibly have  unless the bowels ,rein proper condi"*.".*"!  sluggish liver gives a coated tongue bad A" ���A  constipated bowels. Correct til these h.**"  small doses of Ayer's Pills.   Genuine iS,^?-  tfat Imt��I���� el ��ll OCT MtAdOCt.  TYPHOID, FEVER.  Benefit of Clover On the Land.  The' chi^f vjIho of plowing under a  crop of clover lies,' then, In the addt-  *.Iou of humus and its associated mineral plant fooil nnd in,the addition' of  ���litrogi-n. By tlie subsequent decay In  the soil of the tinuo'd under clover those  constituents aie converted into available food fdr fn| tire-use for farm crops  ami fruits. While the growth anil harvesting of. other crops leave the soil  poorer in iiitro'ireu.'the growth of clover, even" when the crop has been harvested and the toots only left? leaves  the soil invariably richer In this constituent, i  ,r> .Never Lost a Day's'Work.  William Pieice,' whe lives ,ln High  Wycombe, was born on Jan. 29 1823.  He is' now a pensioner, and throughout ,111s. life 'he never lost1 a day's work.  He .'w as'in one service for seventeen  years und- In nnolher for ��� fifty-one  years. He had four brothers and'four  sisters. Two,of lil.s brothers were christened Joseph and ^Jfe other two Edmund, and'two of his .sisters had the  name.of Ann. a' slater, a brother, a  brother-in-law,'a niece,'arid a nepliow  w��   married   tl>re����,.limes."     .       r '  EXIT,PLUG  HATS.  England's Social'World Appears to  Be  ,    -���* o  - "Tired of Them.' '  AN   INDIAN'S   PRIVILEGE.  Tagiih Charley Gets  Drunk Eviry Day  ���Has Special Permit.  Probably unique  in  the British Empire is the cas<_ of Tagish Charley, tha  Indian   who   first  found   gold' on     tho  Klondike creeks and reported his reco> -  ery to white men.   Charley is a wealthy  man. and la permitted to enjoy his'affluence In a manner forbidden in Canada to all others of his race.-   In consideration  of  the  valuable  sendees   he  rendered ,the  country    in    discovering  gold,  and also In oonsideratlon of flva  thousand dollars la cash, the Dominion  Government granted  him  the privilege  of  drinking  intoxicants,  so   that  he  ia  exempt   from   the  law   prohlbi   ng  Indians taking whisky.    This privilege II  resulting in the Canadian treasury obtaining a eood deal more than the $5,-  000 originally paid.   Charley gets drunk  nearly   every   day   now,   according     to  men just down from White Horse, Yukon Territory, and ho  Is regularly arrested  and  as  regularly    released    an  paying a fine of $25.    At this rate hh  fortune,  estimated at $100,000, will last  him   about   seven   years.     He   has   no  extravagant   tastes   outside   his    fondness for the cup that inebriates.  Shookum Jim, his friend and'former  partner .in Klondike, sought a like  drinking privilege *nd offered the Government $10,000. He was refused, a fact  which benefits Tagish Charley, for  Shookum Jim looks after his fellow Indian, while the latter "fills up" and un-  tll_ he is ripe, for pollco Interference.  Tynen that occurs Jim leaves Charley  to the tender mercies of th�� Royal  Northwest Mounted Police, knowing full  well that he will have his companion  to look after again In a few hours, minus $25.  Di-i-iiiiuV"  Nina. Jautrhed. softly,   arid  In.  er   eyes  Pa��*!n__-  ot the   Period.  "What has happened to our old  friend the period?" remarked a man  who observes little things nnd lin-i a  habit of reading advertisements. "It  seems to have dropped out of use almost completely in the setting up of  advertisements lately. And to any one  who pays attention to punctuation tho  absence of the full stop puzzles him a  good deal.  "Here's a book ad., for Instance.  Reading lt as It is punctuated, it gives  you reason to beliete that in addition  to tlie author saying several complimentary things about his own story he  asks you if you've read it, advises you  to and tells you what its price Is. Of  course I know thoy want you to buy  their hooks, but I never saw one doing  this in an advertisement before.  "Printers tell me it's tbe latest style  In composition to omit the period. If it  Is It's the silliest fashion I've observed  in a long while, and I'll bet that when  that particular author sees that ad.  he'll think so too."���New York Press.  Hudson's Bay Is Oura.  During tho discussion on tho bill to  amend th�� Klshfiles Act, which wiu  given its third reading In the House of  Commons the other day, Hon. Mr. Bro-  deur announced that the Government  intended to proclaim that Hudson's Bay  Is part of the Domlnhm of Canada.  Thero are three ports osi the bay, and  th�� Arctic and a new steamer will patrol between them and keep order. A  fee of $50 will be chirged for the privilege of whale fishing In Hudson's Bay  waters.  y , 1 ir  ��� i('':i  Only Nino, and a Genius.  Swindon has a musical prodigy. A  lad named Davles, nine years of ape.  although having had only sl^ months'  tuition of the piano, has alrevidy a repertory of over twenty classical picr"��-  which he can play from mcmoiv \i  a recent concert he gave rern.uk 1 <<  iaterpretatlons of On-lir s "Albumblart"  and Gade's  "Rlngoltanz."  Unfeeling--.  Mother (angrily)���The brute! TTo has  .dared to scold you? iN'ov, ly Married  Daughter (sobbing)���Not so bad ns all  that, mamma. I scolded him from the  ; house five minutes ago, and thennfeel-  lax brute hasn't come back yet'  Seoieli  I.mv.  By the law of Scotland the bushes  or shrubs planted in the garden'belong  to the landlord, and the tenant cannot  remove them at the end of his tenancy  Tho Eugllsh law Is the same on this  noint  0 At   every   rq'ce   meeting,   morning  or  afternoon   ceremoii3',   or    function ' lof  business    or    pleasure   this;."year--, the'  doom   of   the , frock   coat,.' and   top-hat  has been more, and  more'emphatically  denounced. ' The social world is tired of  them. '        '!___     >      '.i--!---'-   5  y   At   ;Epsom'"during   race "week,   even  rthe presence of the King did not pre-���  vent  a   third .of  the visitors    in     the"  boxes, stalls, and club .stands .from'appearing  in  comfortable .grey suits and  "bowle,rs" i on    Thursday   and*" Friday.  At Eton 4th of June celebration, nea'rjy  half  the   male" visitors  had    discarded  black clothes andftop-hats, and appeared  in  grey or blue    summer    country  cloths which five years ago would havo  caused a boy to "cut" his father or his  best   friend.      To-day   every   man    is  nervously, asking his friend  what  will  happen at Ascot.    Will  law-less,   licentious   freedom   invade   this    Innermost  adytum,    this   sanctum   sanctorum,   of  fashion'.'  "The question" could not exist," sal.!1  a.n arbiter of male costumes, "In an  ordinaly year; but this year unconventional visitors will take courage from  the absence of the ,state procession,  and will dare anything. I prophecy  that 6n Tuesday and Thursday top-hats  will be in a bare majoilty, and on Wednesday and Friday in a considerable  minority." '     ��� i  Top-hats, as every visitor will re*-  member, were not universal at the-  Windsor Castle garden party last year;  they have been In a hopeless minority  on the club lawns of Kempton and  Sandown this year, and it seems to be  a veiy open question whether in the  future they will often be-seen outside  Uiu streets Jtyl Darks of London.  Spencer nntl  Color*.  Herbert Spencer's notions of art were  very crude. , His favorite color was  what he called "impure purple." He  wore "impure purple" gloves and, find-  fug that the furniture was a littlo somber, had a binding of "impure purple"'  pasted round it by a seamstress. He  cut the first strip himself and showed  her how to stick it on with "paste. He  h.ul his vases filled with artificial flowers, lie wished to have everything  bright about him and consequently enjoyed color. When it was suggested he  could get that In real flowers he replied: "Booh! They would want constant replenishing!" He wanted to  know why the people should object to  artificial flowers in a room any moro  than to nn artificial landscape.���"Home  Life With Herbert Spencer."  AFTER TEN YEARS.  Mr. G. L. Stephenson, ot Peteruor  ough srlys: "for over ten 'vears I sintered constantly with Piles", first Itching, .then Bleeding; pain' almost un-'  bearable; life a burden. Tried ever*  thing in ,vain till I used Dr. Leon-  hardt's jHem-Koid. ���   *  "[ had taken but a few doses when  I hegan  tp notice    an   -improvement  rvow-,1  am completely -curett"  ( A $1,000 guarantee with every bo*'  ot Hem-Roid.   J|.   All dealers, or "the  iV.iS-��nny.Ie    ����"    Li���ite".    A-lagurn  rails, -Out. i iv 'is  Source*  ot Tlila Dun Keren* and Fro-1  4 tructt'tl   DlNenae.  '  Although  tliere   is  always, more or  less tjplwld fever In most of tlie larger  cities of this country, the late summer'  and autumn are the seasons when lt is -  most to be fenre,d. .  The disease is uot so formidable, as  regards the mortality, as some others,  but its groat length and tlie evil conse-'>  (pjences wlilcl_ s,omet!iues follow it Jn  the form of weak heart, weak spine or','  nervous disorders make it quite us ue-<  riduR*as some which are more fatal, but  far less protracted,    ' * -      't  Unless one knows how the disease Is  usually   spread   oue   cannot  hope 'to  avoid it, and so it may he useful<ito"  consider in .what, ways the germs of.  the riialftdy Dud their way into Uip, sys-^  tcm. ;  ,    ���   i '       ' "'       ,\  Water l3tbe 'usual;vehicle tSfor^ty-",  ,phoid germs, as  is well  known, a'ud\  probably all great outbreaks'of the dis-.  easev. in cities are due" to an, infected ���  water supply,  This"has been strikingly *  shown,?In '^Philadelphia, -where' some  parts,of the city are supplied, with.fi 1- 1  tcred water,aud others with unflltered  or mixed water.   Comparing twqfparts'  of the city "in which the conditions, ex-,.-.  ccpt ^s to water-supply,,' are almost the  same, it was found that Ju the one sup-  , plied with filtered water tlie occurrence'  rat;c of typhoid "fever" was one in* five  thousands while In the'others, in which"  the unfijHrfcd water was drunk, lt was  '  one.in sixtpeu hundred.'       ,       ���   * - ' ,  Cracker  Charm  There ij  all the difference ? h  the world  between  earing' bb,  cuits and  biscuit eai-  ���-.-'���      , 'ng-   Ont  may -eat  a  biscuit 'and not taste  if, i i  It.   but' .vyhen'Jyou think of bis-  '- -"' ��� -'        ��',.,'    '   ���    ,'  cuit> eating you think instantly of  "    -   T     n, rL  j     - r- r   '  i Moloney's Perfection  '   . '"     '    J       'A      " (  --��\_'  ,'��- t':Cream Sodas'  ���   -y \ _'   , *        "  ?. Crisp,. delicious and tasty.  > Absolutely j a n d'��� d i s t i n dly  ' ��� '"    ��� '*        i, '  superior, to,any other make.  , Say' "Mooney' s" to your groat.  'But a city with an ideal water sup-  . .So Faith In  ntm..       '   s   ,   ,'  -','Guess that freckled daughter- of  Thompson's must have a steady'^pung  -man.". ,0     '       ';",''    -1  '  "What makes you think so?",  ���  "The old man vvas;'in here yesterday  to buy onon of Uicse neVfangled .contrivances ,that make a' big"��saving. In  vhe gas you^ burn,"   " ' ,���"   ,    f  "I'don't believe the young man's a  steady. If he wus they'd save all the  nus."      '      '  \ The Stadlnni.  Tlie stadium, used by both Greeks  and .Romans .was -100 cubits or 243  yards 1 foot' nnd 0 inches.  I bought a horse with a supposedly  incurable ringbone for $30.' Cured  him with ?1.00 worth1 or MINARD'S  UNIMRNT an 1 sold him for $S5.00  fro(if  on linimenl, ?54.00.  .  '    JIUISR D10ROSCR  Hotel  Keeper,  St. Hnllippe, Que.  ply may be scourged* with typhoid^J  fever, 'although less .severely,, through  the medium'of, impure Ice, and It is almost as Important to" know where the  ice Is cut, or with what water It is  made, If, artificial, as where- ��he city  water comes from. Not long'^lnce a  number of officers on one of tho,United  States ships- In' Aie .^Mediterranean  squadron were takcu' down with typhoid fever. When "Uie source of'tlie  Infection'was traced,lt was found to be  some ice ���rougbt.at Athens, the Ice machine on shipboard" having ' broken  down. . '"i ��� - . ,.' * ��� .- ' 'J - V  Another source of. Infection Is found  In1 oysters that have been fattened dn  -.streams ' contaminated wiUi sewage.'  Not only "has typhoid followed tho eating of Uiese fish, but tlie typhoid bacilli  , have been found in tlie stomachs of the  , oysters.  Raw, vegetables used for salads may  have been grown' in soil contaminated  with slops usedAas fertilisers or may  have been washed in infected water.  Unless a water supply is above sus-1  picion all tbat used for drinking, tooth-  cleaning and In the kitchen should be  boiled and the drinking water,,cooled  , by putting vessels containing It on tho  Ice,- not by putting ice In the water Itself.  ��� Finally, great care should be taken  fo  screen  all food'from   flies,   for If  there is 'a case of typhoid fever In the  neighborhood files  may  become  most  active   distributers   of   the ' polsrn.���  Youth's Companion.  Wilson's  fly  PADS  ONE I'ACKET EiS-  ACTCJ'.I.'.Y KILLED  ui  ,' A 'BUSHEL OF FLIES J  Sold by all DruRglsUiind General Stora p  .,      '-'".-    and by mail.  TEN.CENTS'PER PACKET FROM ��� ^i  If ARCH DALE WILSON,,.  *' ."     ITAMTLTON, OVT.  A  nnllivny  Hull.  ' Tne recent Intimation of an Irish rail-.  way that Uiere would he "no last train  to Cork" has ^apparently Induced the'  Great Eastern Railway company to  Issue a placard stiilim,-' Unit trains t��  Waltlianlstow will run "all tbroogi  the night.on' week days."-St. James1  Gazette.  GOOD FEED STUFF.  Silent Love.        .       ".  Thoy sat beneath Ihe silent moon,  This, seaside maid nnd .summer chappy.  No  wind or whis-ier broke  the charm,  They were unsptakalbly happy.  Knnvo Panlnlimci.t.  A missionary recently returned from  tho region of upper Konfjo, in Africa,  says that ho saw there a curious platform thirty feet high erocted in front  of the head sentry's house. The latter  informed the missionary that It was a  large stage from which to shoot leopards, but natives told him that lt was  a torture platform. Unfortunates who  did not bring: in sufficient quantities of  rubber were first beaten, sometimes almost to death, and then taken to the  top of the structure and compelled to  gaze at the sun until relatives brought  the necessary amount of rubber as redemption.  -l'nose  Fool  QneMlonx.  "Hello," says tho man, seeing his  friend sallying forth with pole and net  and bait basket.    "Going fishing?"  "No." replies,the friend, turning on  him solemnly. "No; I'm going to stand  on my;head and keep my bair from  falling out. What made you think I  was going flshingJ"  A Restaurant Acquaintance.  "When you go to New Zealand, I wish  you would eii<iuir_> artcr my great-  grand-father, Jouunlah Thompson."  "Certainly," said the traveler, and  whoever he wunt he nsked for news  of the anct-dor, hut without avail, ac-  r-oniiiiK to Tho Dundi-e Advt-rtisf r.' Ono  day he waa iniioiluced to a fine old  Maori of advanced sige. "Did you ever  mr-ft with an KnglJshman named .Tere-  m'.ih Thomii^.tiV hi- asked. A smile  pass,,I over 111,. M,in,-|-S f,u.0. *'.\reet  himV" he ivi eated, ' Whv. I ate him!"  A Good .Medicine lorpiiics 111 lie ad-  voi Using. Dr. 'I nomas' ISclecn-l.. oil  gained the gornl niiiue it now enjoys,  not thiou.;h elahoi.itt. advertising, but  on lis groat ini-illu ns a lomcilv for  bodily puins und iiIIiikmHs o| (be i es-  piralorv oig.ins. It has can led jis  fame wheievor it lias gone, and il is  prl/ed at I be initipodos as well as al  lumie.   Dose  small, elt'ect sine.  Lady (in dry goods store)���And  is  this color also genuine?  Knlcsmnn���As genuine as the roses  on  your cheeks;- miss.  Lady���l-i'ni���show me another one.  ���Kiellies VVHtzblatt.   ���   . '   ,  Sate Use of Lime.  Dr. Hopkins tells the farmers of his  state (Illinois) tbat lie never will icc-  ommerid the use of any material on  land thai would injure it In the long  run. He suggests only natuial materials. The souicc of tbe l.mo now  in the soil is lirnt'stone. The tendency  of burnt lime���caustic lime���is lo bjrn  the .soil. Ground limestone will coirect  acidity just as effectively as caustic  hmo if used in suilloient quantity It  is the cheapest foi in of lime for this  purpose. It Is absolutely harmless  and it does tho vvoik of dostiovlnj,'  acidity.  Tho ground Iimcslone cannot stimulate nor do any injury. On poor land  it would not secure us much clover unaided as does caustic lime, but it would  do all that may he required of it safely  ���it corrects the acidity and it feed's  the clover directly when that''''is required. A ton of ground liinoslone is  ,t,he equivalent of more than half a tori  of caustic lime���"ground lime"--in  neutralizing free acids in the,soil The  price is. low, usually $i a'ton at the  works.���Alva Ageoia National Stock-  Wheat Bran  By the New  Milling- Process���Rich  In Protein.  Letters received at the Michigan experiment station Indicate that In Somo  parts of Michigan a prejudice    exists  against  roller  process.,   wheat    bran  Some  farmers  prefer    finely    ground  bran, others aie prejudiced In favor of  coaiser samples. The product of roller  mills is not uniform In this    respect.  In some samples the germ  Is ground  wrth the -bran; in other mills the germ  Is found  cither in   the flour or as ' a  separate byproduct. To get some light  oa the relation of the composition" of  bran to its physical appearanco   fourteen samples were analyzed, some of  them from roller mills, some from bur  stone mills, some from mills of large  capacity  and others from  smaller establishments. The per cent, of prote.n  varied from 14.'J2 per cent. In the bran  of a roller process  mill  with an    annual output of 1,200 tons to 19 per cent.  In  a flrsL grade  roller process    bran  from one of tho. Immense mills in Minneapolis.    Little variation was   found  n the composition of extremclv coarse  bran and the liner articles.  Roller  Process Product  Approved.  Hie chemist of the station says on  this topic: The two extremes, the verv  r-oarse and the very fine, are of much  the same composition,   while   neither  shows the best .sample so far as feeding   properties   are    concerned     Tbe  medium  grades geneially show a bet-  lor analysis   than  either of    the    extremes   Thoorc't'rally  (he    hi an    produced by the roller process should   be  more valuable (ban   that produced by  bur -stones, ns In one the gen,,, which  s  rich  In  fa*, |3  scpaialcd   out wllh  the  four and  in   t^ie  other  this  part  goes into lh�� I),an. The loller process  .brans are all peiccpfIhly higher in protein  than  aro  those  of the bur stone  Process   It Is not so much the amount  of starch   prose,,!   in  the  bran  j, s lh��  amount   of jirotoln  and f.il   that ,s of  consideration   to  the  feeder.  Tlie  end  for  which   the  millers  aif cnnst-intlv  working   in   the   milling  ptocoss    the  most complete separation of the starch  possible and  the needs of    the    con-  nnrt��rnf0f bn.'?' a.f00">icl> hi-protein  and fat, are.identical. The new niilllnr-  process instead nf supplying' the feed-  T���rTi r {lV, rol'lor ��n"Ic of feeding  Sh f,"'(nls\e's '"' with one much  P    ces Ut s^11"0'1   b>'  the  old  Whore <hc  Hub Ciim<"��.  "Well," said the good na(tired boa*  'er,/'there's one thing about our boarding house���you cau cat all yon lit"  Uiere."    ,  "Of course; same as1 ouis," rcplW  the grouchy one. "You can eat all yM  .like, but there's never anything '��'  could   possibly   like."  ,   - Depen.I��� ,��>"  Hie Mini.  "What good is experience?" vralW  the man who was looking for a job.  "Vou can't cash It."  "Some people can," said hi? friend.  "I bought some experience onoe oncost me $3,000." .    _.  DEAFNESS CANNOT BE CURED,  by local applications, ns' they cannot  reach the discoied poitlon ul U"? "**���  Thoro Is only ono wny lo cum deiifnt*".  and that la by conatltmlomil ii-mid"*  Denfneaa Is cuuaed by tin Inllnmed curj"  dltion of tho mucous llnlru. of the Eustachian Tube. When tlila tube Is In1'-"1?'',.  Inflammation can bo taken out "n "-'  hearlnsr. and when It Is entirely clnwil  Deafness Is tho remilt. nnd tmleni ins  Inflammation can bo taken not anil J*1'  tube reatored to ' Ita normal eondltim.  hearing will bo destroyed forever, n ne  cohph out of ton aro caixed t'v - 'jt,in"'  which Is nothing but an Intlnnicil condition of the mucous sirrfne<"i ��� ...  Wc will irlve One Hundred Pellnrs '��[  ony ca��o of Deafness.raiiHtd In i'''1*'"1.  that cannot bo cured hv Hill n Curir���  Cure.    Send   for  circulnrn free     , ,    a  ���f. j. crrENrcv & co   W'��  Sold   by   Drutrrdstn,   T.Te. ,,���.iinn  Tako Hall's Family Pills for ronitlpi"����  -Snranntte,   "Who   Nevor r>rnelle��t,  Sanisnte, the great vlulliiM. I"'" on*  respect very fortunate .'iinotii,' in"sl'  elans. Tie knows nothing w h.iti'vcr of  the drudgery and weai-lue-s of I>ri-^  tlclng. Mo��l well known singers mw  great executants go on pnu <���' ���'"���' fl  mors cr less regularity all th',|r "rrt  Not so Pablo Sarasate. lie 1-il-os nP  his violin for his own auuiseinent, ����  bis fluency and facility ai- '���-<!' ���"  he can dispense with the b k-u,ne da-'  task of plnylm.' lo.keeu bis b.ntd '" ���  Minard's   Liniment   Cures   Distemper-  The  lily  of   the   va'lej   i". '" " \,  .re, emblematic of happlm"". '"     ,.  rgal this flower Is symbolic ot    , , ,  sty.   Its   lowly   growth   ni"1   rfl"'  rbits  giving  it a  symbolism, <-'��  i) it' ,,..  i..  w- nonn) t  A Vaenncr I'llltil,  Gera d-I have a cold l��� r.iy head  Genildlne-Well, r 8Uppoa6 thaf ls S  ter than nothlng.-Now York p^  '   "Miss   May,"   began   .....   "-,���.��  "would  you���or���he med u '  \f  kiss yon?" n     '    .    fJlc bright  "Not necessary," m-Hci   ne  girl, "but I woufil rortnlnly be m��<.  Int-' won "��� nnUI"i��r��  V��.w  W    N     U    No.  597  ^-.tf:^t--,-ii^=K-=?^;  ^.-^^.^M^y^ci^^Trf.'..*,!^*;:^*,^!,*^*^**,^ THE LEADER, MOYIE, BRITISH COLUMBIA.  How tlie Cow Came n��m��.  trorthe information of those who  in the habit of sending a dog for  ���r0 in tne n fl        e cJ__  frrlLCc��e -hich I ba��ve bad along this  K'.erB I Mated the milk from a cow  .fc she was brought to the stable by  la do* the dog in turn being in charge  La small boy. She, was considerate y  Sl.*_ed and quite warm. Her milk  % Jr\ '-3 The next morning it, was  liT and' a week later, when she was  1,,/niabt to by a man and perfectly  il'     her milk tested 0.2.    Now,  you  cool,  can figure  out whether or not It pays  to use a dog around a dairy herd I  hhould state that the pasture and feed  Kert exactly the same In each In-  Island," wys an Iovya man.,  Ileal Time to'Mnke  CIiee��e  r.ll develop in the milk drawn In the,  I'rc-iiluE and  kept  over 'until  the fol-  ||'o,vli.g nioiulng.   So if ruilk Is  made  foi to  cheese   Immediately   after   it   Ih  Jjrawu   n6 'difficulty   will   be   experl-  j suced.       ^ '^_ ,  S.pn^H<op  For   Small  Tlnlry.   ,  If you have as many as five cpws.it  in ill pay l"ou t0 own a separator. If  'rou o\pwt at any. time to f milk as  ���many as ten cows you ought to buy  i.lwo'r a'No. 2, which will ,cost $123,.  'tad if 3'0U ��,O',,0t- evpect to keep more.  !ji.u. five cows a smaller size will an-  i ,wr, which, will, range In cost from  llW to {.75.���Southern Cultivator."-  THICK, SWOILEN GLANDS  that make a liorne Wheeze,  havo Tlilck Wind, or rt.okn-  do<vu.csu. fxireiuovftd nlia  ^BSDRBINE  or anv Bunch or Swelling?  caused by Hindu, or luiraiu-  m&tlon, Ko blister, no  hair Cnne, mill homo kept  at work. Si 00 per liottlu, delivered,   linolt 3-0 free.  ABSOIUIISB. JR., for mankind, ���..���., ���D.  Itverod. Cures tloltro, Timori, Varicose Vtlnii  Hydrocele, Varicocele.   Book Irco.   M<uIoonly by  W.F.Young, P.D.F.,  137  Monmouth St.  Springfield,'Mass.  Can. Ag'ta: Lyman Bona & Co., Montreal  BUTTER TO SELL;  SHATTERED   NERVES.  Made Strong and'bteady byfDr..Williams' l?ink' Pills.   ���  ' _     ,       �����       >     j> ,  r Wlien your nerves are out of order  jo>ir wholediealth is on^the verge of  a 'umakdown. Sudden sounds startle  you, your muscles twitch'and your,  lnuds tremble;, your .self-control Is  siliatwred; 'j'our , will-power. gone.  'Your bead aches; your feet are often,  cold and your' face, Hushed.- Your  lieail jumps and thumps at the least  e.xclU'ioent; .yon are restless; at night  and- tlHid when, you wake. '-' Yourt  temper Is irritable and you. feel-utter-  Je -p.uwn'-hearted.,' And��� -the _ whole  trouble IS becauso your blood is too  tliiu and watery.to keep tho .nerves  strong. There is* only" one way-to  have strong,'' healthy nervos^feed  llH'in with the rich-"red", blood that  only Ur. Williams''! Pink Pills can  make���and do'make. Mr'.'Fred Forth,  IT Sullivan street, Toronto," says:,--  ���I wai.a complete wreck with-nervous prostration,-' but Dr.., Williams'  Pink fills have'made a-new man, of  mi. 1 had, been nervous for-yearn;1  thejeast, noise would startle mfi,"and  the least exertloA would leave me- ut-  tt-rlv prostrated. \\> lost lu-weight,  and* physically I was'almost a wreck.  ,1 hail note taken the pills long when I  found they wepe-helping me; .my'ap-.  fictile improved, my nerves 'began to  grow steady,* and day by day I gained  until i was again a-,well man.; 'My  weight increased ..tw.enty-flve,' pounds  , while r was using.-the pills, .*To 'any  who suffer as I did, ,1 can ,say tljat if  l)r: Williams'  Pink^Pills  are given a  ��� lair'trial, a.ctire will- be sure, to follow."        '        _ ,   y ���   i -* _  Ur. Willlanls'.Pink ,Pills, restored  Islr. Forth, simply because th"eyamade  tlie,'rich,' pure blood which, properly  .nourishes the' nerves" and keeps them  strong: ' They-will cure-all the'Jdis-  casos due to.had blood and shattered  nerves, such as ana'emia. indigestion,'  headaches and -.backaches', rheumatism^ lumbago, St. Vitus dance,, paralysis, general weakness and the, sec  ret ailments'* of growing girls , and  women. But you must always insist  oa getting the genuine pIUS with the  full name "Dr. Williams'.Pink Pills for  . rale People on the wrapper around  e.i.'i bo.\. v Sold by medic'.r.e-de.ileis  oi sent' direct by mail at 50 cents .1  box or throe boxes for ill 50" by ,writ-  , ing the Ur. Williams* '.Medicine. Co.,-  Uiockvllle*. Ontario.",-'. '  '  The Word "CnnnfliAllilm." "  . The word "cannibalism" is really the  name of a people. It Is Identical with  Carib. many of the Caribs, who formerly flourished iu the West Indies,  having been consumers of human'flesh.  The letters' "1," "n" and "r" are Interchangeable In cerlainiaboriginnl American languages, so that Columbus found  one West Indian island saying "Cani-  ,ba" where another said' "Carib," while  Shakespeare's Caliban is another variety of tbe same., Columbus' own conjecture was that the name was connected with the "great-khan, and later  philologists of the old slapdash type as  -socinted .with "cam's," a dog. Apparently, however, tbe 'meaning of  "carib" was brave and daring,���  Known to Thousands.���Parmelee's  Vegetable Pills regulate,the action ol  the secretions, purify the blood 'aful  keep the .stomach ' 'and bowels iree  from deleterious matter. Taken ^'ic,  cording to direction ihey will over  come dyspepsia, eradicate billoiisiiesh  and leave the digestive organs healthj  anil strong to perform their functions  Tne/r merits,are Well known to thouK>  andt> who know by 6\perience how  beneficial they are in giving tone to  the system. -    . , '     ,-,  ipic  uuai   r-urpose wow. ,   ,  ���i The dual, purpose cow" is rapidly  drifting to' the shambles, the natural  ���place for her at this stage of thepro-  ceedlngs.'gays I... W, Ughty in National Stockman.'The horseman, the sheepman and ,the henman maybe able.to  ,use the dual purpose. I cannot speak  for them, but I have had so much ex-  'pefience and have bepn so entirely-de:'  pendent on the cow to' 'pay' my .debts,  that I do speak With earnestness and  positjveness wh'en 'we'come to thai  branch of animal husbandry. The' man  who to-dayJilros help at market'prices  and depends for'his'income'on the dairy, products uses,'dairy cows or goes  under.    ' ' ;, ���     .  ., Sunlight. Soap is 'better than other  soaps, but is liest^whon  used in tin.  Sunlight way.        Buy"'Sunlight Soa]  'and follow' directions.-- . ,   ,  ,     -   <>'"    '��� '~   <>        ,       " -Almond  MIIlc.  Almond milk is n'lade by blanching  thirty good sized .Ionian'almonds and  brujslng them lo a' powder> In half a  ' pint of distilled water,. A lump" of  sugar must be worked in at the same  time to prevent the oil from separating.-  Thc* process- takes some time and-  shouldnbe "done in-a mortar. .*"Strain  through,cheesecloth. To make tkef_milk  richer increase-",the,, number of nub-  used. The preparation, Is oue of tlie,  most soothing nnd bleaching,  When   Summer Market* Are  Floode*  With lbs Farm  I'rodoct.  i Usually fara bu'ttermakers can secure   a   premium   above   the   average  { market price by selling tlio butter to  pr.-vate customers who have regard for  quality In products of this nature.  If the maker' is compelled to taka  his butter to stores he usually has to  take the average price given for butter regardless of Quality.   A few store-  'keepers will recognize certain lines of  butter as being superior to others and  will pay more for them, but usually  not as much as can he obtained by  private marketing. In most_lp��ahti?s,_  particularly during the ���" summer'  months, the .markets are flooded with  farm butter, and the prices are very  unsatisfactory. The maker who Is de-  pendlug on the stores,for the sale of  bis butter usually has to accept, the  current price, while If be has worked'  up a private trade tlie chances are that  he has a market' that will give a uniform price throughout the year.���Edwin H. Webster.  i < ,  rieaied and Paring- Bayer*.  One thing should always be borne In.  mind by the person who is making butter to sell. Tho butter Is for somebody  else to eat, and It is,for your Interest  to make it to suit them, whether lt Just  suits your 'taste or uot Habit has a  great deal to do with our likes and dislikes. You may have been accustomed  to sweet cream'butter.' If so you'probably liko that best.   Or you may have  , got used to eating butter made from  very ripe cream and the butter not  washed to expel the buttermilk, causing it to have a,very decided flavor and  taste, and so you look ufton fine, delicate flavored butter, as Insipid.  Or you  'may like Ujttlo'or no salting'or .high'  salting, light color or high ".color. But  all this Is of no, consequence. It Is po  matter what you like. .You want to  make It to suit your, customer, and you  wflnt your customers to be,thoso, who  are able''and ^willing to pay'a-good  price for'what suits .them. If the customer .wants sweetcream butter, make  lt; If unsalted, make it so; if he desires  It high salted, salt'it high, and so on.  Always make'It the same for'the'same  customers. ^Tbey , are. getting, tastes  formed which ypu can make It profitable to gratify'., If one Is makluglbutter  to put,pn the general market he wants  to make .what that market demands  and will pay tho best'price for.���C. P.  Goodrich.       ������ " ' '���     *        .       <"' -  Minard's   Liniment' Cures   Diphtheria.  U ICltten nnd a Jfeedle.-  ���A" short'.time, ago a- woman living In  England was petting her kitten, when  "shep suddenly felt something scratch  her" band." * On examining tho spot  whence the scratch proceeded, she felt  tlie point of a needle sticking out of  poor pussy's neck ftrr. Tho^needle was  pulled out by her husband, and another surpr!s,o.was experienced when it  was-found that.a length of thread was  attached to the needle, both having  passed down tho kitten's throat and  out again from the fur.-. t  v'i        ,    Cool. ,  "Mary," Mrs. Hoiisekeep called from  tho foot of the' stairs, "how about  breakfast?"  '  "Oh," replied the.new servant, wbo  had overslept herself, "yo naden't trou-  ble to bring me anny. I ain't very bun-  try this mornln'."���Phllad��]phla Press.  Nearly all infants are more or less  subject to diarrhoea and 'such complaints while teething and . as fids  period of their lives is the most critical, mothers should not be without  a bottle of Dr. .T.D.Kcllogg's Dysentery  Cordial. This medicine is a specific  lnr such complaints and is . highly  spoken of by those who have used it-  The proprietors claim , it will euro  any case of cholera or summer complaint.  The Bout ol the roem.  "I don't see anything in that poet's  new poem."    '  "Of course you don't.!' replied the  editor In chief, "because I opened It  fust and took a five dollar bill out of  It. Give It a good place���top column,  next   readlns   matter!"  Mirrard's   Liniment   Cures  Cows.  Gargftt    in  '   The   Ilcninilext   Trndr.  ,.It Is stated that the healthiest trade  j.i the world is that of d.-emakiug from  coal tar. The average life of a tar  -worker is elchtv-slx von'-s.  * Do not delay in getting rolier for  the .ittle lollcs. Mother Graves' Worm  Exterminator is a pleasant, and '.sure  cure. If you love your child why do'  you let it*suffer when a remedy is so  near at hand?  ��� Adopt  a I.tne at.d , Keep It.    ...  Breed from tha best stock'or tho best  your means will 'furnish and keep at It.  Ilave'" a purpose, 'Breed to a lino.  Breed type. Keep at the head of your  herd a male that you can; point to  with prUle as 'your chief sire. Raise  him If'you can. Buy him if you must.  Introduce new "blood ,by the purchase  of females. ��� Develop your.young stock  by generous feeding, kind /treatment  and careful attention.' Grow them so  well that they? will be 'objects of 'attraction and . admiration.��� Holsteln-  Frieslan,Register.    ,     , f   *     '   ' '  ,     THE ART OF ACTING.  ��������������� ,.  Wli>t Amateur* VVlo Would Become  Stars -Hunt 1-eorn.  It is surprising to discover how very  differently people who have played  parts all their lives deport themselves  before the footlights. I was acquainted with a lady in London who had  been the wife of a peer of the realm,  who had been ambassadress at foreign  courts, who at the time had been a  reigning beauty and wbo came to me  longing for a new experience and Imploring me-to give her an opportunity  to appear upon the stage.  'In a weak moment I consented, and,  as I was producing a play, I cast her  -for-a-nart-which I thought she would  admirably "suit���that of a spc-icty wo- '  mau, What that woman did and didn't  do on the stage passe? all belief. Sho  became entangled in her train, she  could neither sit down, nor stand up.  fche shouted; she could not be persuaded to remain at a respectful distance,  but Insisted upon shrieking into' the  uctor's ears,,and bhe committed all tho  gauchcries you would expect from an  untrained country   wench. "    ,,  , But because everybody is acting in  private life every one thinks he can  act upon the stage, aiid there is'no profession that"has so many critics. 'Every  individual In the audience is a critic  and knows oil about the art of acting".  But acting is' a gift. It cannot' be  taught.  1 You can teach people how to act acting, but you cannot leach them to act. -  Aeiinjfjls as" much an inspiration as tho  making of great <noetry and great picv,.  tures.  What is commonly railed acting'  Is acting acting.- Wchard "Mansfield in  Atlantic. ___/  OLD  ROMAN  BATHS.  Sunlight Soap is better than other soaps,  but is best when used in the Sunlight way.  To appreciate the simplicity and earc of  washing wiih Sunlight Soap in the Sunlight  way you should follow directions.  After rubbing on the soap, roll up each  piece, immerse in the water, and go away.  Sunlight  will do its work in thirty to sixty minutes.  Your clothes will be cleaner and whiter than if washed  in the old'fashioned way with boiler and hard rubbing.  Equally good with hard or soft water.  Lever   Brothers  Li ml red,   Toronto  FISHING  FOR  BIRDS.  Dairy  Ta^Ik, of  Today,  tllccciufch   lit   Dinner.  .Many persons are debarred from dining out owing to their liability to contract hiccough during a meal. As a  rule when caused by food it conies ou  at once, and equally as a rule the food  causing lt is hot. 'Soups aro more likely to provoke hiccough than so.lids are.  It is a good plan to forego soup, which  "can be done without causing remark,  says Home Notes. Or one may eat a  little bread before taking it. A third  plan is to drink a, little cold water and  to take (be soup in very small sips.  Active Liver  Good Dig  9  ori  And There is no More Prompt  and Certain  Means of Keeping the Liver Right Than  DR. GHASE'S KIDNEY-  la  ('lias  Calling your . attention to Dr..  s Kidney-Li ver Pills it is only  necessary to point to their success  i'i the past,,'for, they arc known in  nearly every hohio.   j '-      .'-,".    ������'���'������  lly means* of their direct and -.specific  ���.'Ction.on the liver���causing a .health-  ful'fiow of bile���they regulate and..eii-  bven the action of the bowels and eii-  ^"���c good ciigestion in the intestines,  "i- the same time they stimulate the  kidneys hi their .,work of 'filtering  lioisons from I h'd blood.  'I'bls cleansing process, .set in action hy Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver  I'ills'means a thorough cure lor bil-  liousiiess; intestinal indigestion, lor-  bbl liver, kidney''derangements and  constipation.  It means a restoration..,;of health,  ��ti-ongt.li and comfort where there has  been pain, weakness and suffering.  It means a removal of the conditions  which lead to backache, rheumatism,  lumbago, Bright's Disease, appendicitis and diabetes.  Sask.  Miss  liiITe   liaiigio!'*.   Manor  wS:-"F��)r.'a-loriK-'iIi��e.-!';��'^ere41  li-oni   liver   complaint And   biliousness,  nnd could find nothing to help nie un-,  UP 1. used   DA Chase's  Ividiu^pUyei  Pills.,   I Havo' reconiUU'.idei   these ���pills  to many of my friends, and tli^''���  nil  been   satisfied with    the    results.  You can use this loiter for the benefit: of  women   who  are suffering as .1  1   Mr ' Wm.   Oobk,   Moosomfn.   Sask.,  have ���.birch.' taking    I?r..  Liver  I'ills  and   must  nit! a  lot of good,  ill.   .sufferer    front  mil  I can say to all who arc  wii.li    Ibis  disease  that Dr..  * '^���~ : ��� ���  Are you feeding a cheese cow trying  lo'-'g.et butter? Use -your scales and  Babcockjt'est and find out for sure..  .     ,   ' The Hotter Dairy  Fnrnitnc.   "   \  "It Is known of all men'that lt is far  cheaper and more economical and'better dairy farming: to grow your protein  on tlie farm than to buy lt at the store,  even though the purchased ground feed  , Is bringing a fertilizer on to the farm  to counteract the depleting effect of  selling milk off the farm. Especially,  according to Home and Farm, does  this stand truo for thoso dairymen who'  live below'the Ohio'river and in the  extreme south, where the lugumes  grow so freely and can often be followed by or follow another crop on the  same land.        f ���  The Xervoii* Cow.  "A cow will nearly always give more  milk when she Is milked by a person  who has been accustomed to milk her  than she will when a stranger takes  her In hand. Some cows are more  nervous or sensitive about being handled by strangers, than others, but  those nervous cow-s are usually the  best milk producers. Frequent changes  of milkmen are not desirable.  Rcnl Dalrr Sla-reii.  Tho> day is most surely coming  when wo will see that It Is real economy to cut down the number of our  herds and get better stock. Then wo  will got out of the bondage wo are  now In. Tho foal dairy slaves are th��  ones that are keeping so many' cows  that do not begin to pay for their keep-.  Ing. At least that Is the opinion of  Sciuiro Little.  A ilnrite Ho.ly ot Isrnoranoe.  There Is 'a large body of dairy lg-  noranco In the world. It seems to be  moving a littlo, so let us be patient  one with another. You know how large  bodies move.  Demonfttrntlon.  One man kept a record of his cows  a year. Oue cow yielded,* profit of  $3.00; another, $51.-10.  In   brief.  Cream Is cash.  Keep the calves growing.  Don't mix warm and cold milk.  Dairy farming is cash farming.  A good cow Is a sure money maker.  Tho calf is the beginning of tho cow.  Test the cows. Do It now. Don'*  wait.  One test won't tell the whole story  either.  A good motto for dairymen: Get re-  'SUltS.   : a-' '.  Any cows In your herd testing 7 per  cent?        '.���������'  Are your cows grafters?   Test'them  und see.  Grade cows are often all right. Grade  bulls never.���Kimball's Dairy Farmer.  They H��-ld Tlii'ii(or��>'''re">Pl��'ji,,Pen��t-  iiiK Hull* nnd Llbi-urle"*1'  ' The "ancient IJomans were extravagantly fond of bathing. They got their  notions abdut Uie bath as" a luxury  from'tho Greeks nut? at one'time there-  were nearly 000 public balhlng���establishments in Borne, some of,,which were  the most beautlful'-and elaborate structures In the world.  '' The baths of the Emperor' Diocletian  covered more than, ,half a square mile  and contained, besides immense basins  and thousands of marble recesses, tbe-'  aters, temples, halls for feasting, promenades planted-'with' trees, libraries,  schools" for youth and academies . for  the discussions of the learned. The  bathers sat on ma'rble/.bendhes, below  'the surface of the water, around,the  edge of the basins, scraping themselves with dull knives^of metal and  Ivory and taking occasional plunges into the" water.  , , ��� <  Dissipated* Romans would spend  whole days In,the bath," seeking relief  from overindulgence in eating and  drinking the night before. Everybody,  even the emperor, used, these .baths,  which'were open to , every one ,who  chose to pay ,the price of admission.  It'was not usual for "the old Romans  to have baths in their liouses, though  at' a date 1,500 years before that, or  3,500 'years ago,- tlie noblemen of ancient Greece had their dwellings< supplied with batWof terra cotta.  ,, , ' Blood From n Stone.  ,'The,open terrace-in;,front of theJDe-  wan-i-Khas - consists fof two thrones,  'the black-one of which," facing the riv-  cer, .was-cut-out of a'siiigle. slab of,  stone In iG03. This black throne, which  is about eleven feet long, and supported by .octagonal pedestals, ,rwas built  l by" Akbar iu recognition of his son's  title to tho -empire. Here Jch'angir  used to sit occasionally and see tbe  fight'of wild animals arranged for his  amusement. The crack ou the throne'  is believed to havo been caused by  Lord Lake's bullet falling upon it during 'the attack of 1S03. According to  tradition, however, it,cracked'when  the Jafc klug of Bharatpur sat on the  throne, for it was meant to be used by  none but the real descendants of the  great mogul. Then, again, when Lord  Ellcnboroughsat o'n itrdurlng the Kabul war, in 1S12 blood is supposed to  have   come   out   of  it.  Catclilngr   GiiIIh   and   Alhiitroxx   IV'Itli  Hud   and  Line.  Curious though it mayfseem, it is a  fact that birds are caught with rod and  Mucin many parts of the world. Tlie  pastime is declared to be almost as fascinating as fisbuig> Gulls'in Newfoundland are caught iu this way iu large  quantities., Iu New England lislilng for  gulls and'petrels fs au important industry. ' '       . . ' ,   A  The method of bird fishing Is practically then same 'as that of ordinary  flshiug. Two men go out In a dory and  throw pieces of cod liver on the wuu��r.>  When large r-uuutitles of birds .have  been, attracted to "the spot more cod  liver,Is,thrown out on a hook. This the  birds greedily swallow -and thus fall  easy victims. ' , i ,<  ' Albatross "are 'fished for in the same  way off tlie Cape of Good Hope. A  piece of pork is attached'to,a long line  and thrown overboard. .The bird will  eye it for- a long time, gradually and  cautiously^ faking,toward it. Suddenly  he will seii.l& Jt and hold it in his beak.  When he' discovers that he is caught he  will sit on the water, and vigorously  flap his wings.' However, lib will, be'  drawn,into the boat and made a captive. ' '"       -   ' ' ���  Albatross fishing pis good-sport^-since  the bird requires careful handling. So  long m ,he pulls against the line it is  easy 'enough. The,, moment, however,  he swims forward the hook will drop  from his beak unless It is skillfully manipulated, and the bird -will Cud himself free.    - > ��� - '  A CURIOSITY  IN  BOOKS.  The  ot  for  A'SANITARY TROUGH.  A  Helpful   Appliance  -Which   Can  Be  Made by Almoht Anybody.  It will soon be warm enough to cause  rormentation of food left in troughs  Where the sun beats upon them. - Ozias  friendly suggests trying bis plan:'  Take a teu iuch plank of any length  you prefer. Stand it on edge and tack  to it, keeping iu tlie middle always, a  liicce of zinc sixteen Inches wide and  of the same length as tlie boards, less  one inch. This extra iuch is to be divided , between tbe two eiius, so that  the siiuc will miss reaching each end  of the board by one-half ��� inch. Now  turn the zinc on each side of the board  up at au angle of about forty-tlve degrees, tack ou a strlp'of wood a couple  of Inches wide'at-right angles to each  , The  Walking   Pareon.  The Rev. A. N". Cooper, M. A.,' vicar  of Filey, tho fashionable Yorkshire  f.easide resort, by his long walks In  the past 20 years has earned the title  of "The Walking Parson." At present  ,the reverend gentleman is engaged on  a 600 miles walk in Sweden. ,The.ja  long tramps are Mr. Cohpur's Meal way  of spending a holiday, and'the .seeing ot  othi-r countries. He (V>imn.-nO(>d in 1SS6,  when he walked frvm Filey to London,  but that walk fadt'sointo insigniflcanci  when compari-d vviiih subsequt-nt erfurts.  In 1SS9 he had his first foreign t>jur,  when he walked from llamtwurg ta  Paris. In 1S90 he walked from Filey'  giuin, and two years,]ati-r walked round  llolland. In 1900 he walked friim Filey  'to Venice;  In 1903 to Mor.tp Carlo;'and  _ .    ��� in  1901 he footed It over the Pyrenees  end of the board  to  keep  the affair i lnt0 Spaln;   He waIks on, an averaffe  from tipping over, and you will have  the nicest trough you, ever fed from,  mid it won't cost a fortune either. Of  course tin will do, or even sheet iron  or galvanized iron, though zinc Is the  easiest of the cheap, metals to keep  clean. Tbe idea is to leave tlie troughs  outdoors, and when it rains instead of.  making the food spur it will wash out  at the ends whatefver small quantities  of. mash are left in It, and there'll ba  no sour crop'chickens in your flock.  27 miles a day. He ia a tall, well.-buflt  specimen of muscular Chn.stlanlry, and,  in aJdltlbn to being an abl'e writer, 1j  also  an   intcrestingolecturer.  Bronchitis'In  FottIb.  y Bronchitis is inflammation' of "the  mucous membrane oi tbe trachea and  bronchial tubes. The most "frequent  cause of this disease is exposure to  dampness, to cold, to drafts of cold air  and to sudden and extreme changes of  temperaiture. 'It may also result .from  tlie inhalation of Irritating vapors, dust  and other foreign substances. The first  thing to do Is to remove, tlie cause.  Begin treatment by placing the affect-  ad birds in a comfortable, dry and rea-  'spnably warm place where they will  not be 'subjected to drafts of air, but  Give  Famous     Chained     Library  " -VVimlioarne, Ireland.  "Wimbourue,. Ireland,   is , noted  many things,  but its- famous chained  library Is perhaps.the most notable of  its curiosities., The library possesses ! where the ventilation is-good.  unique interest" as being one of thei"soft and cooling ,food, such'as stale  earliest attempts to'disseminate kuowl-j bread or a mixture of bran and mid-,  , edge among" the people. The collection! dlings moistened ,with milk. - Inhala-  avas made accessible'to the people in { lion of steam or vapor from boiling  1GSG and numbers some'200 volumes, .water in which' hops or a small quan-  The scarcity of books and the value of, tity of carbolic acid has been placedjs  the collection are "both indicated in the* beneficial.,' 'Give with\the food two  care taken for their preservation/and grains of.black antimony twice a day,  .especially  against loss 'of such treas- I A small' quantity of flaxseed steeped  ���*��� H "-, . , If   , ��_   .   i '__. s  _ 1_ ��� ���    a      /I nm flirti"lT"��T     /iTMTllr  'ures  by; thef"t.    By means of chains _  and rods the books were securely fas- J  teued- to tbe shelves, and these chains.-  . it Is rather surprising to learn,, wero  not" removed until iSoT, wlien the  library fittings  were repaired.   Among  the interesting works of the collection  Is  a copy  of the  first edition  of Sir  Walter  -Raleigh's    "History    of    tho".  World," 1G14. It has suffered from fire,  and tradition says that Matthew Trior  was responsible for its condition, tho  story heiug that he  fell asleep  when  reading -it once upou a time, and tho  pages were burned by his candle.    It  has beeu neatly repaired, and its mis- (  hap now adds to "its interest.   The oldest volume in tbe library is a flue old  copy in vellum of "Reglnum Aniuna- '  rum."' tt is in manuscript and bears  the date 1343. ,  in hot water makes a demulcent drink  that often gives great relief, and, in  the"absence "of this, honey or gum arable may be added to the drinking water with advan-toge/ In the early stages  it may sometimes l?o checked by giving  ten drops of spirit of turpentine in a  teaspoonfu! of castor oil and repeating  this dose after five or sis hours.  '  -    $2,000 For a Stamp.   '  Of all   Australian  stamp?  the'raresl  Is  the  4d. blue of  the first issue with  the   swan   Inverted. -  Its   rarity   Is   so  great   that   only   nine - specimens     axe  known,     one ,of   which   realized    ��400'i  some time afro.   The other dav another  copy,.came  to( the  hammer at   a' sale  held.by Messrs1. Ventoni. Bull & Coop-,  er, when  the. bidding, which commenced'at ��100. ceased at ��400. - , -  'Love when true, faithful and well  fixed Is eminently the sanctifying element'of human life. Without it the  soul cannot reach, Its fullest height 'or  hnliiioss! ���.rtiinU-in  Xoltnmmed.  Mohammed was abstemious. A hand-  ful-of dates and a mouthful of water  , was all tlie food he required for a day.  of hard ridiug. '  Fish For the 'Brain.  Replying to a "Young Author," Mark  Twain wrote: "Yes, Agassiz does recommend authors to eat fish,' because  the phosphorus in it .makes brains. So  far you are correct. But I cauuot help  you to a decision about tlie amount you  need to eat���at least not with certainty. If-the specimen composition you  sent is about your fair usual average,  1 should judge that a couple of whales  would be all yoti would want for the  present-not the largest kind, but simply good, middle sized whales."  The Kitchen   Aufocraf. ,  "Yes, ma'am, an' now that I'm goln'  to takb hold here I'll settle th* pentiit  business first of all. You see, I.carry  mo own fountain peu. There, take that  an' don't lose it."  "What Is this?"  "That's a permit, ma'am, for you to  visit th' kitchen. It entitles you to ono  visit a week. If you come oftencr th'  permit will be taken up, an' dou't you  forget it."  writes:���"I  Chase's  kidney  any they have doi'i  I ..have, been a'  diabetes  a'fllicteil  l-L'l  Pill:  will  that  I:  do  am  Chase's- KidneV-l/iver  (hem 'good.'  It cannot  say  o���u"���lv cured'1.111 I have been greatly  bonomnd   hy'fbis  rneiliciru'.  Or 'Chase's  Kidney-Liver  I'll s. one.  nil' -j dose  25 cents a box. at all deal-  ers, or Bdiuanson, Bates fc  Co..   I oi  onto. ; '  ..-.   'Vindictive.  ( Naggus���What are you going to do  'Wltii the hero and heroine of that magazine story you're runninguow? Marry  them?, Bonis���Certainly. They will be  married in the last chapter. Naggus���  I'm glad of it. It will, serve them  right,     nf .',.���.:������'���'  A Hard   Come.  . "You say you had to give the patient  chloroform twice?"  "Yes," replied the dentist. "I had to  give it to him the second time to extra ct tha manavj' "    '      "  Is It You A  Own Hair?  A Sound Stomach Means a Cleat-  Head.���The high pressure of a nerv-  ��� ous lite which,, business men of the  j present day -are constrained to live  I make draughts upon their vitality  I highly detrimental to their health. It  ! is oniy'by the most careful treaiment,  thatithey are able to keep themselves  FIriit Glimmer of a Star.  A little, girl, the French .critic Sarcey  related, once presented herself at the  Paris Conservatoire in order to pass  the examination for admission. All  she knew was the fable of "The Two ,  Pigeous," but she had no sooner recited I  tlie opening lines when Anber stopped  her, with a gesture.  "Enough," he.said.   "Come here, my .  child." . \.        '  The little girl, who was pale and thin,  but whose eyes gleamed with intelligence, approached him with au air of  assurance.  "Your name Is Sarah?" he said.  "Yes, sir," was ^he reply. t  "You are a Jewess?"  "Yes,-sir, by, birth, but r have been  baptized."  "She has been baptized," said Auber,  turning to his colleagues. "She has  said her fable of 'The Two Pigeons'  very well.   She must be admitted."  Thus Sarah Bernhardt, for it was  she, entered tho Conservatoire.  Tender   Fonl��.  If the skiu of fowl1? peel easily it is  a sign of youth. If the spurs of chickens are over a Quarter of an Inch Ions  It indicates old age.  son of quality. Select the best, keep  the best, care for them properly, rear  the youug chicks to the best advantage  and you will succeed from the carefully  selected mating. -No matter how good  your breeding stock may be, if they  are not properly cared for and the  chicks hatched from them are not properly reared to maturity the results will  not be successful. ' Tho fundamental  principles of success are good breeding  -.' ,i I  ', -'.' ,'r,."  1    iter I  '   ' - -" JJ> I  ,   There   are xi number ol  varietities  druggist and get"a bottle at once.  * -      <   The  Rol.l.i. , '  There^is a well attested instance in  England in which a robin formed suchs  an attachment for two ladies'that ho  was in the habit of accompanying  them' In, their country walks. When  Ihey wont to "reside iu another district  he took bis'departure with them, flying '"  along by the side of tho carriage.  ��� i> *j  ','  i  '*r',  ���> Proper  Mntinffi.  The selection and mating of poultry    ,���.���..     ~  ��� ,    for any purpose whatever is the funda- j alert aud active in their various call-  mental principle of success, according   ings,  many  of them know  the  value '  to the Feather.    No one can hope to ' of  Pai melee's   Vegetable Pills in reg-  succeed In producing better laying hens   ulating the stomach and consequently  if he does not mate good layers for pro-   keeping the head clear,  ducers.   One cannot hope to rear exhi- ' --*"*  bition fowls of  quality unless he has    ,'     Death1" of a'Balaclava Captain,  the best to breed from.  The high prices        gIr    -^_]nam    Gordon,    Baronet,    of  paid for the best is only a sample les-    Ear_ston, Kircudbright, died a few. days  ts~\  ���&1  ago. He led the left squadron of the  17t'h Lancers In the charge of the Light  Brigade at Balaclava. He received four ,  sabre wounds, and was dismounted. He  succeeded, however, in reaching -the  British lines, and was promoted captain next clay. He also served with tha  17th Lancers In the Indian Idutlny, ,  when Field-Marshal Sir Evelyn Wood  was one of his subalterns. Sir William Gordon retired from the army In  1864,  being  then   In  command  of    his  stock properly cared-for and the prod- ; regiment   He had the British, French,  .     .. .. "? .,   ��._. \.a.1    ..��,!    .vvn-nrr. ����^       TS.^b-leV,       ^ APrtM 11 rtTl O      fn r      f h A     (~!rl-  Do ydti pin your hat to your  own hair? Can't do it?  Haven't enough hair? It must  be you do not know Ayer's  Hair Vigor! Here's an introduction ! May the acquaintance result in a heavy growth  Ofrich,thicfc,glossyhair! And  we know you'll never be gray, |  "I think that Aycr'n Ualr VlRor In tho mo��t  wonderful halrf-rowf.r that vra�� wrer mado. I  hav* n.e.d It for noma time and 1 can truthfully iay that I am BrMtly ptea��*d with it. I  cheerfully recommend It a�� a uplendtd nropa-  Su5n."-Mi8S V. BROCK, Wayland. Mich.  Mado by J. O. Ayor Oo., X.owell,'Maaa.  Xiao manutfcoturera of  SARSAPARILLA.  PILLS.  CHERRY PECTORAL.  vers  The   Kj-eliiill"*.  To preserve the round shape of tho  eyeballs occasionally rub them gently  anil always toward the nose. As ono  grows older the eyeballs have a tendency to become flat. Gentle rubbing  or massago helps to preserve their  shape. ,    Spiinlah   Etianetle.  Xadios seldom, rise in Spain to receive a male visitor, and thoy rarely  accompany, him to the door. For a  Spaniard to give a lady, even his wife,  his arm when out walking is looked  upon as a decided violation of propriety. .     ,  , lionae   Bontii   In   Chlnn.  Travel in the interior of China, by  means of house boats costs about $5 a  day. It' is popular with Europoau  tourists. ���        |    ' '    Elephant   Nnraea.  Elephants often take the place of  nurses In Asia. The children are lifted on the elephant's back with his  trunk; he theu goes a short distance  from the village, places them on th��  ground and guards them-.  uct from thern well hatched and grown  to a healthful, vigorous maturity.;  There is no use to hope to succeed with '  slipshod methods.   .        The secret of all truo greatness Ii  simplicity.���Jordan.  SiirniimcH.  Nearly all surnames originally were  descriptive of their owners. The Parkers were keepers of noblemen's parks,  the Warners were' waneners. or rabbit tenders; the Barkers prepared bark  for tanning, I-'orstcr meant a forester,  Webster a weaver, Wright a carpenter,  mil so on.  ^.  IZany.  "Did you sell horses to thoso tw��  customers yesterday?" wo asked of our  friend the horse dealer.  "Yes."  "Make anything?"  "Off of Jones���yes."  "Jones? Why, Jones was the on��  tliat said he knew ail about homes."  "1 know. He was easy. The other  fellow didn't know a thing about them  and brought around three or four ��x-  perts before ho would buy."���New York  Life. ��� .���,���������-..'������....  and Turkish decorations for the Crimea and the Indian Mutiny medal. S'r  William was 76 years of age at 'tha  time of his death.  An Eye .Opener. ,,  "How does your, father seem to regard my corning here?" anxiously asked Adolphus of little Bobby, while  Miss Maud .was upstairs gettiug ready  to present herself.  "Ho don't care uothin' about It," replied Bobby carelessly.'  "So he has no objections, eh? But  what did lie'say. my little map?"  "He said if Maud had a mind to  make a fool of herself, why let her."  ��� Tliere Are Xo Certain Onea.  "The only objection I have to this  story," said the cynical bachelor, "is  the frequent use of the phrase 'a certain girl.* The phrase Is grossljj Inaccurate, as everybody well knows that  all girls are exceedingly uncertain."  An Old Chartist's Detith.  Mr. "W. E. Adams, ^ate editor of tha  Newcastle Weekly Chronicle, died-at  Madeira recently from asthma. Born  at Cheltenham In 1S32, he became an  ardent phartist, with intimate association with Charles Bradlaugh, George  Jacob Holyoako, Julius Harney, Joseph  Covven and others. His 'tTaractacus"  letter in Bradlaugh's paper. The National Reformer, attracted Mr. Cowen's  attention, and ho was given an appointment on tho Newcastle Chronicle. For  years ho was the editor of The Newcastle Weekly Chronicle, and was the author of  several publication!).  They'd Never Make  Vv.  "A bride and groom in France are  planning to take a honeymoon trip in  an airship."  "I hope they haven't quarrelsome dispositions."  "Why?"  "Because I'd hate to hear of their  falling  out"���Cleveland  Plain Dealer-  ...aiiilii?  W     N     U     No.    597 l��j#jyr  ���'A '1,  ' "  i   ' y  **  THE LEADED..^fOYIR-BRITTSPT COLUMBTA.  ��4f$|  ',  'I'1"  i f.r  5%'5  F. J. SMYTH,  Publisher.  -.- i iif. .���  J   *'Hl'Wb*  t-i;/'   '��?!&?' 'v  .ate h4v.  ''k'   ,.'.''<&'' ft    ,  Summer DiarrliofcH In Children. [  During the hot weather of theaum-  ~ " --*-"~ i���-~���r-rr-r-��� - - - I mer months the first unnatural loose-  -Piblished iu the mtereet of the people i ne6sofn  cllild'd  bowels  s-houlJ   have  >   " of Moyie and Ei��t Kootenay j "'* n5fdi;Ue a"��tion,  so as   to check    j the disease before it  becomes serious.  ��� All that is necessary ia a few  doses  of  Chamberlain'*    Colic,    Cholera    and  Diarrhoea Remedy followed by a  dose  of  castor  oil   to cleanse t he system.  li.'V. M. O.  Stocklund,  P.istor  cf   tbe  trrst M. E. Church, Li'tle Fall,   Minn.,  wiites,; "We have u^ed  Chamberlain's  Colic,    Cholera    and    Diarrhoea '  loi  several years and find it a  very   valuable    remedy   et-pecially   for summei  .li.-orders in  C'jildren."   Sold   by   tin  Moyie Di ug .fc Stationery Co ,  L 0. O. F.  CTHdey Lodge Xo. 4*.  Meets Tuesday evenings in McGregor  hall on Victoria street. Sojourning  Odd Fellows cordially invited.  R. T. Howard,  Noble Grand.  I'M ON  i. viiEr.  HATBt OFSPbSCIIlrTIOK.  Oje Year..  ..?2.00  SATURDAY, AUGUST IS, 190C.  >WRS��&  I  ���(tit <jd  -."fi^i 1  ly  T:wfS��?SI  -���* -���<;,#- .t*  ���sVAI'^Si "<'  'K-T.prf?.-.���'  i'K,'.i.\hu .-  > ���> t .. , r., * I u  *\ �� ?.>��i>-> i\  . i /'y i$'i\$,  j> ''. ".'  1     A I .  ���s.-i ^ 'V  - ' V -v J ?V >   !���'  '"-.j-IV'M-j"  >w v t^li: i.-j-s  ,, -'a,  j.. t- ���, ���"  .^j'.-rje-!, .-,  s'^fe] -S'  ..;-.Jr-'<-y4i, -i.i  -,',-  4^J1'��^  ^ - ;*  1  '        l       7     I  <'  '  .       I/  >    >>  "fi   ��<  i^:>'r  :>il|6l  ��� THE EIGHT HOUR DAY.  The mill men are   io   He   congratti-  3<��t��-(l on their victory  in  seeming   an  "' eight liour day.  , Ami the   bpst   of al,  ��� they 'won-by , peaceful ar.d biuinest-  ' likertiethods. 'And yet tliey only gor  ' what wus coming to Hum.    The eight  * hour -day ��� has   become   a   permanent  'fixture���it is here to  s,Uy.    In   miiieu  andlruill.s  wlur't    work  is  carried   on  21 hours out of the  21   the custom   is  ,- beconiing-permanently fixed to diyide  ���.the working time' into  three' shifts of  " c:ght hours eac]i.    This "gives  a man  ' fight houre-for work,   eight   hours   for  ��� *liop  and   eight   horns   for    pc  ,  improvement.  >       ,   ,        ���  ,    As a gentle  reminder: 'Keep 'your  ���    optics on -Moyic.    ' ,   "i  The Ran FrunciscQ JCx-unincr  refer?  ... V ,  y to the  den-th ,of_ Russell 'Sago  as  "A,  ' Cash Register Out of Commission,",/  East ' Kbotenay's    Big-  Holiday  F. J. Smyth,  Secr'y.  HATTAK  St. Eugr^ne r.o.lgo N*n. 37.  K. of P.  Meets every Thursday  'veiling    in    McGregor  hall at -8  o'clock.   Visiting brothers invited.'  G. H. .biMDr.Ay,       G, W. Ohchard,  Cliancellor Com. ' IC. 11, and S.  Comfortable  Rooms and  Best of  Table Board.  J. A.  GOUPILL, Propr.  Moyie   Miners'   Union  ,    No. 71   W. F. of M.  Meets iii McGregor hall every  Satur- I  day  evening.      Sojourning   member  are cordially invited to attend.  W.M. J. Feltham,  President.  Thos. E. Kelly,  Secretary  MOYIE AEEiTE NO. 855  i  v r  ""'Monday, Sept. 3.  MAKKKT8  In   all   the   Principal  Cities and   Towns   in  British Columbia.  MOYIE, B. C.  P. BURNS & CO  WHOLESALE AKW    RETAIL  MEAT     MERCHANTS  '    Fresh  and Cured Meats, Fresh  c  ��- ,  Pish, Game aii.i Toultrj:.   We  * r  supply only  tho  best.     Your  '   trade solicited. -  STOP AT THE  COSMOPOLITAN  THE CANADIAN BANK  OF COMMERCE  Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000.    Reserve Fund, $4,500000  HEAD  OFFICE,   TORONTO  B. E. WALKER, General Manager        , AL***X. LAIRD, Asst C   ���. !   ���        , ' lJCn 1 Manage  BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA  ANn tv  THE UNITED STATES AND ENGLAND  BANKING   BY   MAIL  Business may be transacted by mail with any b  of the Bank.    Accounts may be  opened, and den^  made or, withdrawn by mail.   Every attention ia     ���  to out-of-town accounts. *    ^^  CRANBROOK BRANCH.   - ' .  F. C. MALPAS,  taBtfjtJ-fjAAJi'iJiiHiwi1 iW'ftfKftafetmwe  FURNITURE!  F9.  Meetejjfiral WeJiiesiluy of each month.  DR.^ IIAE\'IE, , J. II HiVWKE,'  Worthy Pies'.        r    Worthy Secr'y.  The, .typhoid .r-jjiik-mic at MiJ-  Tvay, i: is eauJ; is  due   to   carelessness  -' ori the,part of the 'aulliontieS iii not  compelling som'e of the hotels to kKep  ' their premises' in a sanitary condilion.  k.  Five'persons were  drowned   in   the  Ppokin'ii' river  ritfnr    D.iVcnport   thi.*  ��� week;   Fotir were drowned atteinpling  to rescue   the   lifth, a   l.uly  who, was,  \ '       .    ' ' ��� <-  ,<Irnwii into  an eddy.    Mo-ia.,   biithcr.s  ��� Bliouldaake warning from (his lesson,  , ' -       ���>.������_.._������  After all tho price"of labor ,1a regulated by tlnrlavvof supply and demand,  ^jii-sli the 'same as thepiices of beif,  . 'potatoes dr., balled liny. When men  .,-ire scarse-jjood wages,are paid and tin  ^houivsare shortened! *bnt when men  faic plcntifnrhovv quickly''the, aiiua-  : tion in  reversed. -   - _. '   ���  Harvey   &    McCarter,  i v  Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, ;Etc.  Cranbrook,   -,-   B.C.  W. F. GURD,   itf. ��, _.  i 1IAKKISTKK, SOLICITOR, "ETC.'  CR.VNBROOk.        ,'    -;y    .      B. C  WIT AT TIIE 130CTOR ORDERS  is exactly what you" get  when  we  fill  the   preemption.    The   medicine  will  be composed of,none but the  PUREST DR.UGS. , , ' -  It, will not contain anything but'  what,is,ordered. We never substitute  some other.ingredient either for convenience or' proper. Neither' do wo  charge you a high price for our" faithfulness. Think of these illiings vvlien  you have a prescription to fill.' ',  -i  The Moyie Drag  and Stationery Co.  ���WHEN IN  ,,       . CEANBKOOK  K. IT. SMAI.T...Maunijer.     ,  -1   , ' '   ,  Good rooms, good tables and bar  , and   first claes sample rooiis.  Special -Trains  From",' Every  Point hi The  District.  C. H. DUNBAR  ,    ��  Burrister, Solicitor, Notary Public, Etc  Cranbrook, B. C.  DR. F. B. MILES,  iJEKTTIST.   -  Cranbrook,, B, C.  f  rVerybody.  ' i^fitepTge E.- Thompson, ���  Barristkr, SOLrCITOR,  No-  , ' ' '   o ��� t\  tary Public, &c.        '  <,,'-'  CKANBROOK:.* , -British Columbia'.  '' '   Ih case you v/islr to drop   a  line   to  "' Canada's goyWrior-^general, here is the  , *orthodo\~w;,iy to open fire.*  -'   ," To his Excellency the Right   Id'on-  orable Sir Albert Keury   George,  Earl  Crey, Viscount  Ilowick,   Baron   Gicy  'of iljwick,-iu the county    of   North-  -umbe'rlund, in the Peerage of-the-Uni-  'ted Kmsidoni and a B.iron6l:-Knight  'GrandvCross of tire Most Distinguisiud  ���"Ordcr.bf  S.rint��� Michael'   and    Saint  ���.Cleoige, etc , etc., Governor General cf  ' Canada. ���' - '���,'    ���  W. R.' BEATTY^' ' ., ' :  ���Embrtlm'er and Undertaker,      '  Phone S9.    ���      " \   CRANBROOK.  FOSSOM  ", .-.  ��'?���������'  BREAD,-\ *  cake,;  PASTRY,     ,  ^ICECREAM,  r ���      '   ALWAYS ON HAND. ' ���  'Meals at all1 Hours." .'  International  Hotel.  fi. R..STRANGE, .  Contractorand Builder  '���'PLANS AND ESTI-     '     ' <���  , ,      t      MATES FREE.  Apply   af    y      :.  '    '  i , ii  Mrs.' Gorman's - Bpard-  (.    ing-'House...  '��� ���    -    ",-,'���  ',   E.G..' GWYNNE. f  Cigar.*,-    .Tobacco,  . ���    Confctionery  '<    y    { i    Fruits, E'c      A     ' "  - ' ',   -     ' '; i. '  FARRELL BLOCK,        '  CANADA A ft!  -SSte  . ' .RAILWAY  ."WINNIPEG'    '  EXHIBITION  ' ' ,    .,/:,'     . '���   ,'  FROM CRANBROOK. %'  Cfdribr dqk Go-Operative Stores  ',."/,   <    :,.    ; LIMITED;-"-" '���' . "i   -' \ -  a   -Fiiberal Directorsiand-*  ;   ,     .     Embalmers;-      '  _ .., ><y, . -���> " '     . ..  A. [; JcMLOP  WfUvSM.MJ,, President  S'.J. MIg'hTON,1sL Vice-  Pro.-?.'    "'  H. WHITE, Soc-Troas.    -  Win. Jewell  The'Leading lighters,'  --������"��� , �� ^  What they   were   before  they  blos-  somed.out as figh'ers  and  vvh.it' they  fare nurr", is Ui'j subject, of  thq  follow-  . i��g; -   - ���., , ,  ,-   John L. Suilivan was a Bosl'on   cabman.   Jle.is lecturing cn_>temperanee.  V    Jim JifTiies ��vs a..boi'emiul:er. Now  lie ia a farmer.    . - -      ,      ,  I    Jim Corbctt wus u bank  clerk,    Ue  isian actor,at present.    .  j    Bob Eil/'immons was a blacksmith.  -Hij    Ist.   running   a, farm, now, doing  pnouolooguo   turns, and   fighting   be-1  (tweer, times.   ,    , I  ( ��� Tom, Shf.ri:ey was a sailor.    JIc   Iihf j  a saloon. ,   , I  St.   Joseph's   Convent.  "  "NELSON, B. C.        " fp  hoarding and D.iy School  conducted by tlie Sisters of St. Joseph, Nelson  B.��� C.,.    Commercial'   and    business  courses a  (.pocinlty.    Excellence   and  swift  progress   chanictei.ize   each   de  partment.    Pa-ents  should   write   for  p-irticrilars.   .One. month   assures   the  public  of   the   thoroughness   of   the  Sisters' methods   of teaching.   Terms !  corn induce January,  April   and   Sept  Pupils are admitttd during term.  Express and General   Delivery   Business.'   ' Livery; and,  Feed Stable.,  ASSA'YJBlf,  MOYIE  Leave Orders at  Gwynne'a Store.  Binish  Colum'iia.  NELSON,  B. C  BREST PHOTO CO.  Ckaxbrook and Movie.  "7  BUY'VOU II  Kid ArcCoy   was   a   clerk   in   a   dr\ \ '  '  C^ods ��tQ,-e,    At present  Jie Is a en pi- \ ���^3_gzFe��%J'2?&g  was  a printer  and an I "GPC^ID^OOC^S-  ironworker.   .Cupnuli-t, to-i. ^^^^v-"0.  Calist.  I   ,Gus. Rulili  BOJJSB CRANING!  Then you'll want some papering  and painting done to freshen up a  bit. Let me give' you an eeli-  ".viijte  , R.   WORMINGTON,  PAINTER.      .      �� '  ROUND; TRIP  "On Sale'July'.20,"-27  Good to .return, till Aug; 2  '   NEXT SELLING   DATES    ,  - * EASTB&H BIGURSIONS  Aug. 7, 8, 9; Sept. 8.10  St. PauJ., -Chicago, On.  tario, Quebec, Maritime Provinces  1 Full particulars from  ^V^-e^'^^#^^^^^-^^*^*^-<--i��*<"^->-'*3'>^^)  rl  fl\ ,  1 ',,,''''' 4      1 ��� , &  its;    ���"- ���>' ������.'��� Thirteenth���Anwxs.Vi'"''      '   |*  I Spb.Kanfe: '���.', I:ritecsMe%. , Kairl,  m -(    ;', _ >' i *; y* . ;J'. '\\ ,. ���. .  ,''Afcv. ,'"       '    '..    w"'i"  /Is  >$35,000:iri''Pri2es and-'Furses.  - . 1. ����� >   *., j .. < ,    - -,,��- > > -,, - ���*��� j��-   , j  /      K0O0  ror*Couulry ��mi District Krult Eihlblls.- Homolniiustry E   position  occupylrrsuott-.W.'WIbiill.Ilnif.CIK.d with work-lug ojchiblts.   Larger  oxhiblulu   every  ilL-imrt.mcut.     Jllg   I'oultry .Show, ��� \ W  i      > / ','c Two ifceks Fair aud   Knees.    ' H)  S.epi 24th to Oct. 6th,'06 f  Open Day And'Night ��� |  Sensational frco nct^ every nfrernoori.   Frco Vaude-. Uie nn<I Baud Couccrt every' /|V  . -      aa,   night.   Admission alter 6 p. in., only 10c. '.}}  For Program, i'die Listsnud other   Iiii/ormallorr,   J-Idress' ' (f|\  ���    ROBERT H..C0SGR0VE  , " !  31ti FIt��t Avenue,' Spokane, Waali. ,      secretary and Uiuifler T  ��� **k->��.��� >fc-^F^"^"^?^ ^'  J. Attwood, Agent, Muyie.  J. 8 CARTL'R,      '  - Dist, Pass,. Agf.  Nelion, Vancouver.  E. J. jCOYLE,  Ass't  Jake Kilrain is a bouncer at Mock  salojn on -J2ud st.ett, New York.  MINERAL   ACT.  ti-onM i.)  UEimrfCAii: or iMi'isoviiMrxis.  notici:.  _ Airrorii,    Iforlcsho",   Drniii^o,   Ktnn,     i ml  I'orllaud Ml.ierul  Clniin��,  ^ii.iiite  in  iliu  fun  rtteL-le M)ii.il(. Oi\l>.toii  i.f Ln-t   Kooluinik   Ins.  filler.  Where located  -On iri'l ��.i.j of lower  M.,u.  Lake.  lAKK.NpTICE .hut I,   riic�� T.  MuVitlU   F  ^r. <'. No  B 10(11, cic-jrir for O. J, JnlniMiri .-    \|  ('. .Vo. B ��H, Thn\  JiadtT   I".   11,  C.   No    B  4'q  I. B   riHiilj'irn F, M   C. .No   JS "Ox,,   I., K  ^HrHmrn  F. M. C. No. li'JU7, iuivii'l*>Un un\s   fuim   (irti0  lu-ri'iif, lo opi.lv to the  -Miniiiif  Kero-.ler  fur h  "ertllii aleci' Improvement", for the jn.rpo-eof  obtulnlri!.' a C'ro-,n: C.-ri-.ntof tbe nt.o\e eliiims    )  ,    And fnrllier  inke   rjotlec  Hint   ueiiun,   unil-r  , "'c'.iun iT.nmsi liu cotaine'ifcd  h.-f.nt!  ili���   "s  m.kiicu of .iiif.li Certir.cute of liiiDroi'i-rrien-.s  LiatL-d this, C.th day of July, IS06.  .-,- ���      ;:v-j;oTipE. -..-..a.........  Notice in here'hy Kiven  that al the expiration  '   of uOdays.l nauntl'to apply to Uie .Moyie  Waic.-  Co... Lt., for cadephcate cerll-f.cKte cf No. K  for  ���iii'J sbHrea 'of tl'M-k.   The origrrii.l" tfirt'ilicaie is  lost- .���.-'���    ,'    . ' '    -'   ���' ���..-.'.  ,'���   '.   "    '���"'  " " '   JOHANNA NFJ>;o.V,  ������   Administratrix of the csiuie ���I  Juoob  Nulson  Kim 1    . '     .'���'.���.:������;  niiil,   .���5i\-a7i;a'.3,    (JaSiforaij,     ,Tjly    j|;h  Oo,zic3Lv"  FROM  A. B. Stewart & Co.  Agent   fnr   Crows'   Nejt  Steam Liuhkhv.  - ->-   ���<. - > ' '   -       A ..  pEgAOI.NrER. KUOS,    i-rop,.  Lar^e sample-��� room in connection  with house for cororncrpiid.'mon.. Best  of sneomrnodations.. .-, -,.  '       Ileiidqunrters   for   Com-,  rnercial and JMimnzMen.  YOUR FAULT IF YOU FORdET"  that hclid.lys nrs past and itVour annual "come clown in price" gale on  everything in our fhr.jis. Some of (he  finest suitings-and overcoatings 'we  showed are htill to be h��d. They have  to go tluough and its "up to you" to  c.ct  SUITS AND OVKRCOVTS   AT  BIG  . > REDUCTIONS:     .      ��� ,  J Live them made now. They'll keep  tillaye.il to coir, o and \\q press arid  keep your olher ' cfothes iu "ship  dhirpu" during the interval.   ���  C. A. FOOT!  MOYIE,  DESAULNIER, .  '������nsiiait in  Fire   XaXTcSXJS^^.KrOES  Oolleptions.  ,     ' ,      ,    AGENTS  ���'Canadian Fire Insurance Co.," and "Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society.  Farrell & Smyth, Moyie.  MOYIE    HOTEL. I  '   ,    P. F. J0HMS10M ' ~~^ |  % hlmH^tel is ]SFew and ^ell Furnished   The  $ Tables are Supplied with the,Best the  $ JJarKet affords. The Bar is Filled with  %, the Best Brands of Liquors and Cigars.  Or  JIOTIE  HEADQUARTERS   FOR COMMERCIAL  AND, MINING MEK S  l  HKITISir.COI.U.UBIA    g  f  Q.UKENS   AVBSCE.  MOVIE,   11. c.  PROMPT   DELIVERY.  'duee'n's*.A"7e.   v MOYTE  i <i  d ii  f'  Klh^^SKt���^���^,  ;*Wft4^)tii&'??^??^^*rtr.-r��^v*i'a  v 3?XTH*��mi tn.  A^Sk

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