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Mining Review Jan 20, 1900

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Array ���������Hv^'V-^'"'  'CxJr  ���������#���������=//���������  ^7.;  !���������:  ���������V  :!:.  VOL 3,-KO. 32,  SANDON,: B.C., SATURDAY,-JANUARY 20, 1900.  FIVE CENTS.  .#  the Honest Laborer i Denounces. Fire--  :. - Brands and Coercioiusts.  ?*v.J  j-.-l:-  -//  -ft  ... ;.7'   Gradually, enough  is conning to the  surface.to open The eyes of  the people  of British 'Columbia   in1 -7 this' -labor  . ���������  '.trouble, if; anything   will,   as to   Ed,  Boyce, president, of the .'Western Federation of'Minera-.;   Ho was, here a few  /months ago,.; and, if we' are not mis-  informed, it ���������'was'lie' who  was.: iiistru-  7 mental 'in'placing the Sanson Miners'  /. .Union in affiliation with,--the Western  ��������� Federation.ofMin'ers..   For some time  ...     or; . . .... ..���������.,  .   pasfit hasbeeh apparent to otlier labor  '.'..organizations of'the United States, tliat  .   'the: Western Federation of Miners was  ''/growing . too rank'and top despotic for'  7them under the"'fostering care" of this  Mr. Boyce.   This led to correspondence  between Mr. Gampers,'president of the  the  Western 'Federation/of Labor, and  Mr. Boyce, and in one.of his letters the  latter wrote saying, that,eastern orgnn-  izationsvv.f labor were too slow for,, him,  that there" is:now  but little sympathy  ���������-"; existing "between the laboring men 'of'  '    thei west and   their .eastern  brothers,  that llTe/labpringmeii of the west", will  . be further ground into"'. the dust unless  they have t,lio;innhnpod to.get out and  light ...with., the sword." 7 In, reply.' Mr.  Gampers says:   ���������"'������������������        .;������������������������������������;,/--/'���������/  "It' grieves 7me,   however,'"' to 'learn  that you; believe /there is an/'easier'  way..winning.the battles of, labor than  7 as you describe the.:i������,'si_ttitig dty\yn7in  ... idleness  uiitii^capitalists..atarve,us to  ;   death inidleness and hunger.'������������������' This is  " hofthelanguage of' a'-nian 'I imagined  as the hero of the Lead ville strike.  "As for your suggestion .that the re-  '  sort nutst.be the.sword,-1 prefer, nof to  discuss.   L only want to call your': attention to, the Tact, however, that,force  mav havp. changed i'm'msof government;  ,: but never "attained real'liberty."   j"  In.iurther reply Mr. J. L. Kennedy, a  member of the industrial commission  who visited thuf' Goeur d'Alene, says of  the.correspondence between Boyce mid  ; Gampers:  "Organized labor,is as near, and dear  to.my'heart as to any man in America.  I havcWheen si member; of .it for 27  years. I have labored for the cause  and been honored by my fellow-crafts  men. Organized labor has given me  better conditions and wages than T  could have enjoyed outside its ranks.  <:T could not. be a tuiitor to'that cause  and am hot. But I thank God that I  am an enemy of'dynam'iters, murderers  , anJ destroyers of property���������and that is  what Edward Boyce means,"  We repeat again,' is it not time for  the people,of British Columbia to open  their eyes  to the situation  when they  find the industrial affairs of their own  province   now   under   the -influence  and control,  through the affiliation of  their own local organizations,with thi  outside   corporation   controlled   by  a  man like Boyce ?   In the late negotiations between the local union' and the  mine ownjii's^ye are informed, every  offer backwards and forwards was s'ub-  , milted   to the W.'F. of M., and,  there-  lore, to Boyce, so the ultimatum of the  local union is  hiferentiailythe dictation ot Ed. Boyce.   Today hundreds.of  men  in this camp   who honestly'want  10 work arc  prevented   from  doing 50  by Boyce and his  emissaries���������are, in  inot, paid so much a day to prolong the  trouble and to prevent other men iroin  going to work, ami rapidly ruining tne  institutions 61 .the country.   Is it true,  wo ask again,  if ihe legislature of the  country  is going to stanu  idly by and  sec the interests of this province thus  ruthlessly walked on by an alien organization, to promote the wishes ana interests of a lew alien despots ''.    Is it a  fact that the legislature of the province  18 going  to,allow our mining districts  to Oecome the battle ground.of shysters  and dynamiters,   on   which 'they   will  introduce Boyoe's sword later on when  they leol themselves strong enougu to'  !   do it?. Their .'.president threatens tho  :���������'���������. sword   at home, and to have it, more  %. effectual he will later call on the allies  '7;'ho is now sustaining lor future uaful-  ���������^./bess. ��������� Miners' unio..a���������we mus.t'haye as  K%ell as unions 01 every other kind, but  ijin the name of all that is fair let ttieir  /"^control Delimited to British influences,  ,7and cut oif all.outside connection and  ,; .'dictation   that   can  only  end  in  the  ,::sequel to the   Opeur d'Aiene troubles  : ;that have brought such disgrace on the  ;7?Vifestern Federation of Miners.  ;7:7;jiln  the local field, local, unions have  "'many uselul lunotiuns to perlorin-they  should care lor their sick and disabled,  see that proper board and sleeping accommodation    were   secured    at   the  ���������: mines; see that in the workings proper  /precautions   were taken lor  tuo safety  file and limb, and that proper pay  was got for work performed;'.'but they  should under no'circiirhstances, for the  safety of the country, be allowed working connection with' an.organization'  that believes;, in dynamiting, destruo-'  tirn of property and the advancement  of.their alleged interests by the sword  Doubtless ad vising Mr.. G/ute and the  Federal 'government' .of ..these, ;revelations "would .be'.qf ���������some-service, if our,  provincial'government -is" too weak- to  move in. the interest of tlie country.  AVereitinot for thcafliliation of the'1,  local.unions ��������� with this Western Federation our;' Slocim trouble would never  have had an existence, for any length  at. least,"; /After tlionew law caine into  force, meetihgH. would have been held,  compromises.wOuId,have been effected  and. work wouldhave been- -resumed at  one'e. ���������.-'��������� ������������������������������������    :" ���������������������������������������������.������������������'.��������� 7:'7:'.7,' .������������������ 7- ���������'. .''/��������� ���������'.-���������  Labor Trouble Talk.  Labor Will: Attain; a "Status; Witliout  ���������' the:InterfeFerice/OfjYotG-Haut- /���������"  7    ing 'Politicians. -^;      r ������  Wages, Like', Comi-nijrcial Commodities,  .'���������- . Are Ruled' by 'v. the' .Great, -Law of"  .  ...'Supply and  Demand.    ...���������"..-;  J. M; Martin, father of the'eight-hour  law, presented a petitioii to parliament  signed by 23 mine owiiers in and  aroundEossland praying for the!,repeal  of the Act. John Houston, hangs all  oh "give it a trial." These hieii set  forth "that they havegivea. it a trial,  ���������and.if not repealed they, will have to  reduce wages with tlie almost, certain  consequences, "a strike:" It'cites that,  capital-was invested liere months ago  on a lQ.-hpur day .uhderstaiuling, and .  with time,and results ..correspondingly.,  reduced/the owners;lnive been discriminated against.' '"  It ;appenr3 ; to us' that .when the owners offered ; wges'������������������acceptable, to ���������the  miners, here,' tlie government 'Ought., to  step/inland end the trouble. .There"ia  no.reason.why agitators, at hbrne/ahd  abroad, who make good livings but' of  the hard-earneol money of the miners  and do nothing for it, .should bo per-  niitted to longer continue ; Ihe/agita-  tioh.' British Coluinbia /should not be  especially made the "happy hunting  ground" for idle adventurers across the  line.,.    ... ; ,-    .-,;-,.-..' . ���������-....  .    ���������.--..       ...  '..  ��������� A gentleman   in   .this  Pity,:  whose,  word-will, readily .b.e,takevi';   says he.  heard   two  members   of   the miners'  union say that in case the/owners had  accepted the late  offer Of the   union,  after   they got  properly   under   way,  thirty days' notice   would   have been'  given for higher wages.   In such a case  the owners "would  either have had to  pay  or do  worse���������close   down   again.  Everyone wili'see  the lack of candor  in. this. '.-''������������������  ,It appears, tons  that the mine owners,  the business.people and the aur  thorities' must take   the bull   by the  horns,if this trouble is to have an early-  termination.   As soon its miners come  ��������� here to go to work they  are met  by  union men and many of tli.em dissuaded  from going to work.   If there was  an organization  of men  favorable t&  mine opening torneet   and look  after  these people, it would|do much to meet  the end  that all so much .desire.   The  other day  two men got. off the  train  here.and they were at once c.ollared by  union men, when one of the new coders said, "I came her<=> to go to work,  and I am going todo it."   No man can  now be called a ''scab" by any one for  going to work at the schedule advertised, as the union; accepted   it,  and  only'differed with the owneru on technicalities.   Many of the resident nien  also, we know/would like to go to woric  if they could free themselves from the  entanglements.      Let.there  bo a systematic effort,  to secure irecdom'and  liberty for .nil, and   the spell  can soon  be broken.    \V'o do not   advocate? low  .wages, and cannot be accused of doing  so, when wo simply favor the resumption 'of work on the scale accepted by  the union,  less the nnworkable conditions.  ':'' It is''but; too"often- -the mistaken, impression' of, parliiitntrntary/repn'sentn-  tives,  representatives; of7uni������i,ls   "f-'l  politicians, who are hunting for votes,  'that 'they(,cau;������bv legislative acts of a  protective cliaracter7 greatly improve,  the condition of;,labor,1'roiu. the. earning point of view/;./but it  cannot, be  done.   Labor in  every form,, whether  by tlie hand,. the hPad,. the pon  or the  tongue,   is a ,marketable  coromodity,  the same as butter and cheese, /and its  value, the'same'-."as that of^other corn-  mod'ties; 'must be 'determindd/.by .the  great, law,..of:-supply   and  .demand.-  Laws, enactments find regulations'i-ii'ay.  be adopted ; that  for;a time serve the  object in view, but it can/only be temporarily, as thereffects of : the great law  eventually,'/overcome   all; superficial  barriers  and equalise  things as   they  were before   the 'tehiporary   benefits  .were adopted.1' .      i7"      ������������������"'������������������'���������'.���������''���������. 7  'The    situation     in   this    province,  viewed considerately,  is a strong case  in.point..  On  account of the  general  buoyancy   of: .Jinaueial" anattera ; the  world .over,. at Mie present time,   th.ere  is':ri."great demand for labor oh   public  works and -pu blip' u nd erta kings.   Th is,  ���������))yc>re'/or'.ls*s...7d.^v'.:'*^'ii>,iil.-brai'icho3 of  industry, and 'makes a scarcity.    As in  other departments, there is_ji scarcity  of miners  lor the  properties'in hand.  Tehiporary  advaiitage can,  no doubt,  be taken of the situation to force  by  enactments and 'combines' wages to the  highest point ��������� the value of production  will  warrant.     Industrial  enterprises  may be ��������� on  the increase,   but Labor is  capital. Get in the latter and public  uiidertakinKs are commenced, the demand for labor is increased; and instead  of 'men' competing: witli one another to  get .a few jobs, the jobs' will' be.compet-'  ing with one another to.get the men,  lihu'.the highest ���������waives, the value of  their products/will allow; will be paid  them. Others may : have' their views  ontheso matters,' but in the.light of  the revelations'of history,- this, is the.  only sensible view'of the situation best  calculated to advance the interests of  all, that  presents 'itself, to lair pbsery-  atiohi/'' /;/ 7; ;': .'. .7  -"���������������������������    Mi.v hd 1 ��������� 1   ; ���������'.  .    . -The Only Aiternative.   '7  Guests at the Reco.  . X. W. Parkinson, Nelson.  W. G. Scott and wife, Nelson.  G. 11. Green, Viutoria.  Geo. ,VV. Lawso'n, Toronto.  ��������� A. MieCorquodale, Spokane.  "Vy. H. Smith, Chieag:').       .  "A. Bossmby, JSTew llamburg.  A. It. .Brown, AVhitewater.  A. F. McOlaine, 'I'acoma.  ���������f. A. Tepootea, Vancouver.  L. B. Ivoyser,' Vancouver.  vV. T. Duhamel, Spokane.  Dan G. MoLachlan, Whitewater.  A. IT. Thomas, Spokane.  .11, W. D. Copeland, Victoria.  M.G-intzburgor, Vancouver.  Barclav Bonthrone, Vancouver.  ,W. II. Will, Now Denver.  A. It. Fingland, New Denver.  .'���������       ������g������- ~r~  AN EXrU. S. CON6U1.  well up in the race with it. Accordingly then, to use a vulgarism, as times  go up or [labor is in high or low demand, and. wages-���������barometer liko^-go  with'it, being of course ,at all times  more or less affected-by the prices of  the necessaries of iifo, unturu of work,  etc., etc. .As we said before, in any  country then, by artilieial mean? the  wages may be'temporarily influenced ;  but it can-Only be temporarily as the  great, wave' of supply and demind  comes into play, as the status of public  undertakings is iniiuenceu by the good  or bad times.  " ��������� _ '  In good times then, like the present,  by combines, enactments or other sup-  erlicial devices, adopted for the defeat  of the great law of nature, wages may  be temporarily'advanced, but certainly  not permanently.; The moment there  is a great drop in any section of industrial operations, all others are affected  by it. Stop railway building and the  labor in it.wends its way ..into ail other  branches of labor, increases the supply,  and, therefore, diminishes the demand  and wages with if. This is tho-case iv.  all line's' of labor, and it is equally  true in mining. For some .reasons,  there is a'failure of the cotton crop,  and up go tho prices of cotton goods.  There- comes an enormous yield of  wheat, and down gojtlie prices_of brea,-!  stuffs. As we said above, legislatures  and combines by laws.and nrliliccs  may adopt measures that have for a  time modifying or checking influences;  but their effects, being opposed to universal laws, can be but temporary.  Tho man in British Columbia, who  is too small in his make-up for any one  but a "Whang the Miller," says put a  Ohineso wall around the province.  Keep out labor and the properties that  are in it, as Ihey naturally increase,  will have to advance ' wages.' These  people ivevcr want to see the province  any better than it is, but to remain as  it'was in the days of tne Indians, "a  happy hunting ground" for,tho laborers  in' it, its resources to remain, for  ever hidden and undeveloped. The injunction to men to improve the talents  ���������,; A'special K. & S..'train brought in 28  miners for the.Pay he!'about 1 o'clock  Monday morning, and  at once  there  was a chase -by the  miners'.union machine 'to  prevent, as.ithey ./put' it,  by  moral suasiob,these men from going to  work. 'There is'one- thing   the  local  unions and their, guardian angel; the  -Western  Federation of- Miners,   may  take notice, Of and it is this :7 These  Sandon mines'   are going either to be  not worked at all,, in which, case .the  entire community may as well pull up  stakes.and leave, or t'ne'y will, be operated outside the dictation'of the. ma-  cliine.:;./:,. ;���������-..,.���������      ...     '���������..'.':..  ���������''  ;   Until the   owners'made   their  late  liberal  offer sympathy -was to a large  extent with the" men ;vbut:'since the  machine refuses to allow gthe-men to  work under that offer���������approved of .by  the men in a vote.of 171 to-17���������public  sympathy has.drifted, and properly so,,  bodily the other way.   The, entire community  sympathise with   the men in  one respect; and would much prefer to  see, the   old timers, to' new orifis' employed here ; but they confess that the  owners are fully justilicd in refusing to  yield their manhood  to suit  the dictates of the Western Federation.  It is not the interests of the men  here that'the W. F.of M. is!anxious to,  promote. If. it was they would advise  the accptance of the late '.offer of the  owners, but.strength.for themselves to  light dynamite and.,slm.ilatvhaU-les at  home. 7We ask, in all seriousness, if  the government of British Goitim.biit  are not going to adopt some, measures;, to prevent our' business men  from being, financially ruined, /oar  local miners from being necessarily  displaced by outsiders, and tlie inter-,  ests and prospects'of our province  being blighted to serve the interests of  the W. i<\ ofM. at hoine. The only  objecls o'f-'.The.Ileview are td'soe' the  local men fairly treated, as they would  be under the late o'er, and the future  of the province protected from blight  to gratify'the greed of a few ambitious,  cut throats and shysters' across the  line.' It appears to us that the busi-,  ness men and others of the country  would not be going one step too far in  urging the local.miners to.,accept the  offer, and failing in.that assisting the  owners in getting the mines started by  respectable miuers from outside.  P$USQ$&V   MENTION.  '/Mr.TF. A1./Wood returned   Tuesday  from, a'visit spilth.'-.    /   '/        '    _,  .Mr...Tho?. McG.uigan,:h"as" returned  from a:visit south.,/ -'7 ; >;'  Mr. Hand returned last week from  his. leng trip south and .west.  7" Mr. Evnns, of the Kaslo Kootenaian,  spent Saturday/here on a' biisiness trip  SOUth.'. ./.;-' '���������/���������-'..  W.JT. Smith, representing a Chicago  drugiirni, spent Saturday in the city  on business.    ,'7;,7/  .-.. Wm.liamngton.late of the Bartlett  house, is in from Duncan City, where  lie bpent,the suihrner'. ,' ';  Mr. Bossenbery, / of New Hamburg,  Ont.,^cousin of John Gable, spent the  past week in the city. ;  ��������� Mrs. Pitts and children/,, of Donald,  returned home,''on. Thursday after a  ���������short'visit in the,,'cily with  Mayor and  Mrs. Pitts.// /;���������'���������  "  "'.Mrs. Wm. Wilson, returned home on  Monday from hervisit at her old home  in'Edmonton, N.W.T.: She was accompanied by her sister, Miss.'Henderson,.  and her sis'terrih-law, 7 Miss Wilson.  Thelatter willhi'dke her home here..  Higgins in tlie House.  Ex-Speaker Higgins,in defending his  non-allegiance to the Government, said  that he did so largely because, without"  consulting .their supporters, certain of  the  Ministers had sought a  coalition  with their opponents even at a sacrifice  ot party principles; and because, again,  without 7consulting  their supporters,  the Government had offered a million  dollars toward. the Pacific.cable construction,   the   only return   being   iu  bver-cootly advertising,   this  odor not  being   subject   to i'atilicati'on   by the  Legislature'.and, therefore, a violation  of .the.constitution, ��������� He .censored tho  Government 'for   not   endeavoring  to  -terminate the deadlock between miners and mine owners in the Slocan over  tlie eight-hour la\v,!ind announced that  he would move for aBoyai commission ���������  of inquiryinto the working of that act,  with a view to finding a solution of the  ���������existing.''difficulties', that are   greatly  prejudicial  to tlie  mutual interests of  labor and capital. .''���������.-���������  Not Successful.  ���������c^yi���������  A Nut for the Unions to Crack,  The machine of the unionscnt out a  posse of men to the Payne, on Thursday, to dislodge the'newly arrived enemy with battering rams of some description, but to their surprise found  on arrival that'-Judge Lilly had all the  men around- the,premises sworn in as  special constables. Seeing his predicament, General Machine, like the duke  of old,, marched his men up the hill  and marched them down again, sadder  if not wiser for the exoerienoe.  Here is 'somethinjr for the miners'  unions to ��������� take notice of. 'Edward  Winch, was a printer in the News office  at'Buffalo, N. Y.,' and ; he persistently  refusei! to join tho prinle.rs'*u:uon. At  length .1. Snankland, the president of  the union, urged, the News to dismiss  Winch, and the firm did it to prc-ven't a  strike. Alter being out of his job 25  weeks, Winch sued Shnnkland, the  president of tiro union, for ���������;02o���������the  amount of ��������� his wages���������and Justice  Chiids of the -Supreme Court awarded  him the lull amount of hii claim.  On tho same ground, if the' mine  owners hero had accepted one proposition of the union embodying aclauso  to dismiss aii non-union'men after ,"0  days, all non-union men so dismissed  could have sued the union and recovered the amount of w-iges thereby lost.  Unions may adopt wrinkles like these,  but tlie laws of civilization discourage  their enfor jement. If any non-union  man in the Kootenay loses ��������� his job at  the instance of the unions, because of  his non-connection, the courts open a  way for him to get satisfaction. . .  ETCH BLOOD.  If the stomach and bowels perform  their duty, the blood is rich in all ihe  elements needed to assure perfect  health. Karl's Clover Roof Tea r-akou  as directed,-guarantees ihe por.eol action of stomach ''ind bo'wvls. PriO'- -���������'S  cts. and 50 ets. .Money refunded .if you  arc not s-itlstied. Sold by. McQueen.-  the Druggist.'  It's ah 111 Wind   That Blows   Nc.idy  .  Good.  It mav turn out   after all that   Joe  '.oi?  Hon. Edward Young.formerly United  States Consul at Windsor, N. S��������� says  that he always keeps Dr. Eowler's Extract of Wild Strawberry in the house  to use when he has eaten anythiug  that disagrees with him.  they have, is of no service to men  of J Martin's treachery may be. the means  that make up. The few who arc iu the  country at present may make a little  money; but it is a forlorn hope for  posterity.  j' As we said at the outset, good times  invariably giye advanced wages to  labor through incteased demand. Then  why not open the way for as permanently   as possible extending "the good  of keeping tne Semlin party in power  McPherson, Martin's collcige in Vancouver, promised to vote with Joseph  "agin" the government; but now it  transpires that Joseph is conniving  with Mr. Dun8muir, the very thing  that Vancouver does not want done,  and,McPherson will go back on, his  promise to support Joseph. If Prentice  supports 'Semlin, as he is likely i to do,  times to this province?   Out off all re-      __ . ,   .  striding   and embarrassing laws  and   the government may pull along tor a  regulations in the way of the inii.ix of] time with one of a majority.  DISTUKBEUS ATTISXTION. .  We have before iioa-,called the attention of miners 'in tlie Slocan,  who are  disposed   to   be troublesome,   though  nn any  of fhoni-have ,the good sense to  be.gentlemanly, that  tlie laws of this,  country are  very rigid.   We have now  full-knowledge that in  the future it is',  the intention of the owners to prosecute all disturbers to the utmost limit  of tho law.   The owners  want   to get  the  mines started quietly  and poice-.  ably under law-observing and iaw-abid-  ing workmen,   and   any and   all who  visit the properties  for the purpose.of  influencing Vyorkmen,   or in  any way  intert'erfering with men employed will  be treated to the severest penalties of  the law, which  may'be imprisonment  for several years.   This   should  be a  sufficient caution, and we hope it will.  be.  B.B.B. CUBES ABSCESSES.  "I had large abscesses under my arm.  as well as sOres in various parts of my  body. Being advised to use Burdock  Blood Bitters, I did so with the result  that the abscesses and sores all went  away and have never bothered me  since. Mrs. Philip Kice, Villa-Nova,  Ont.  '6  8*  r-.  AS. ������ ���������  r^T-p-  ���������������f^"  iSl-^V  ,!i,!'4;Spfc:,S**(w5 . The Reverend Michael Itu.'.den, cur-  He of Rodesley, was sketching uuslly.  After working hard for'over an hour,  (To looked at the result of his labour  pith the feeling of a man who has done  his duty to h.a country and tho world  U largo.  " Ah," he said, " I think I havo nt  last attained tho true artist's dream  md   ambition���������colour I"  There could be no doubt as to his  having done so, inasmiui'h as the trees  he was depicting had their natural autumnal tints portrayed lu vivid crimson, tho fields wore brilliant gruen,  whilo tho soa in tho distance was wash-  sd in with a dazzling blue. Furthermore, a solitary figure in the foreground was arrayed in goidon brown,  forming, ho said, a quiet resting-place  for the oyo,  made an impression, continued his' remarks, and in to coarse a strain that  at last human nature broko through  professional etiquette, and tho curate struoK the minor a ringing blow  on the face. Thi blow was returned  with interest, and a hand-to-hand  fight ensued in tho pathway outside  tho vestry doer.  A passing boy quickly spread tho  news of the thrilling event, and a  crowd of men assembled, all thoroughly enjoying the startling spectacle.  Hackers for both parson and minor  ware found nt once, but tbo betting  from tho first was in favour of tho  puisoa, who displayed an amount of  science which every second raised him  in tho estimation of the beholders.  Bith were i.iii strong men, but tho  brute  stre igth  of  (ho  miner  was  no  The  ltevorend  Michael Rusden  was   match for the .skill of tho curate, who  no fool. lie was a good scholar, a fair  preacher, an excellent musician, and  k. first-rate athlete. And yet on nom-  of theso points was ho .proud. The one  thing he could not do was tho only  thing about whioh ho was feverishly  aager, and oven self-conscious. Hi  would listen to praises of his really  fine tenor voice w.th unaffected indifference; but, when asked to produce his portfolio of sketches, ho would  blush like a giil, and talk about them  by   the  hour  to'gether.  After  admiring   Ins  work for  some  minutes,  he  put  up  his  painting-ma-  torials   with   a pleasant  feeling   of in-   crime.    At the first glimpse of Mr. a.  tense satisfaction. ''Beckett,  the full  horror of  the situa-  I dare say the Vicar will bo in the  ��������� church about  these repairs,"  ho  said,  ,    " I  will  go and show hiin my sketch.  I think ho will like it."  The Reverend Rupert a Beckett was  tho Vicar of Rodealey, a fine, genial,  highly-cultivated man, and a really  talented artist, although, from lack of  time, he had for soma years past ab-  juied painting. Tho Vicar and his curate wore both about thirty-four years  of ago; and they worked together on  the' best of terms. Nevertheless at  . ��������� times the curate's sketches were a  ������������������''.���������-. Bore trial toMr. a Beckett, whoso honesty and kindness of hoaort ware always doing battle over . them. He  longed to say, "My dear Ru3don, you  don't, understand tho first -principles  of, art;" but, finding that even .the  gentlest criticism hurt the curate's  feelings, he held his tongue whenever  practicable, generally contenting him-  _self with saying that the subject of  ~~Tthe sketch was a very fine one.  Kodesley was a mining locality, the  population a rough, one ; and, although  the Vicar was always'doing all in his  7 power to influence the men, scarcely any. visible Improvement rewarded his efforts. They liked him personally, but laughed at his suggestions,  jind ridiculed the idea .of going to  ehurch. -.'...  Half-way. on tho Toad'to tho church  the Vicar and curate met faoe to face.  " I expected to find you in the vestry,"    said   Mr.    Rusden.   "I   havo  a  ���������ketch to show you."  "I shall/be there soon," said Mr. a  Beckett. " You go on, and I will quickly  join  you."  "I'm afraid I can't get it out in the  street, or I would show it to you now,"  Eaid the curate proudly. " I- think you  will admire' the young lady. ,in the  foreground."  " Not  a portrait,  I hope l'\, returned  the   Vicar,   laughing.  " Oh,  dear,  no I"  The subject of young ladies was a  standing joke with, both clergymen,  neither of whom had, until a very recent date, evinced.any signs of matrimonial intentions. It was thought  however of late that the Vicar was  beginning to look with kindly eyes  upon a certain pretty young lady; but  the curate stood firm. He was, in fact,  k. widower, and by no means disposed  to marry again. He had dearly loved  his wife, to whom he was wedded when  only two-^iud-twenty ; and it was not  until her death, some five years before,  that he had aoy idea of taking Holy  Orders. Previously to that ho had lived "as an'independent country gentleman, and was renowned for his  strength and activity. Hte was a genuinely good man ; but, having been ordained only two years;, he sometimes  entirely forgot that he was a parson;  and, though up lo the present time  he had done nothing unbecoming to  his cloth, he had by no means settled down into a strictly clerical  groove.  He puts his portfolio down upon the  vestry table, and took out his last  sketch, placing it in the best light  In order that the Vicar might see it to  the greatest advantage. The day was  very warm, and Mr. Rusden opened  the vestry door wide, so that he could  see the peaceful graveyard full of old  trees  and   ancient   monuments.  Presently he turned his l*ock to tho  door in order to look once more at his  sketch, when suddenly he heard,a loud  guffaw, and, looking round, he saw a  man standing in the doorway, one of  , the roughest of the miners, whoso  name was Gibson, a man detested even  by his fellow-workmen���������a big bully  . with low tastes, although ha h?d re-  seived a belter education than most of  his  fellows.  " He,   ha,    ha !"   he    roared     again.  " "Well,  if  ever  I see  such  a daub  as  .    that there I"  The curate's face flushed crimson,  and he laughed uneasily.  "So you don't care about it?" he  said,   trying  to appear unconcerned.  " Care about it I" repeated the man,  derisively. " Why, I ain't quite a fool,  and I have seen thsrn, pictures at  South Kensington ; but all the gals  and young fellers a-workin' there never turned out such abad 'un as that I"   pointing    contemptuously     with  his  thumb.  If his preaching had beea railed at,  'his manner of life assailed,  his other  'talents  impugned,  Mr. Rusden  would  still   have   kept   his   temper;   but  his  had been a famous boxer, and after a  somewhat lenglhy combat was victorious, his supporters giving vent to  their  feelings  in a round  of  cheers.  As tho hut cheer died away, Mr. a  Beckett apps'irH on the scene. Gofd  heavens. c.m;d that bruised, disorderly-  looking man bo D:s curate���������h's good,  ge'ntlemanly curate who hid ever  preached lorbear.iace and kindness?  Alas 1 it  was. pve.n sol  Mr. Husdnu's temper had been so  thoroughly aroused that it was not  until the Vicar appeared that he even  faintly  realised   tho enormity of    his  added to   which, I have Mr.  Rusden's  work to do as well as my own."  " Oh," returned the' girl, with a  smile, " don't take It to heart, Mr.  a Beckett 1 I am very certain that no  one will think any tho worse of Mr.  Rusden; and I am so disappointed  about tho riiver."  The Vicar said "Good-bye" and  walked with a preoccupied air past  the poultry and fish stalls. Ho could  not put faith in Miss Johnston's pro-  diction. No; ho feared both his own  influence and Mr. Rusden's were gono  for ever. Of what avail was it to  preach and not practiso f  To Be1 Continued.  tion dawned upon him. As ho wiped ids  blood-stained face, he heard the Vicar  saying, " Go aw ly, my men 1 *���������and (he  crowd at once dispersed. Then Mr. Rusden found himself sitting down in ihe  vestry in tho presence of h;s friend.  Tho-curate loaned his head upnn his  hands and said noth ng, for there was  nothing to say. Whit possible excuse  could ho offer for his' unseemly, his  disgraceful CLnducf at the very church  doors? He was not afraid of his Vicar,  but he was bitterly ashamed of himself���������so ashamed that for: some five  minutes be did not remove h.s hands  from his face.        .  ��������� '  There was complete silence for Mr.  a Beckett was,, loo deeply moved to  speak., Looking at the- matter from  a priestly point of view, it seemed to  him that the honour of the Cli'ureh had  been, dragged in the dust. He said  nothing, because he feared his words  0\c������ademnation would be too strong.  When Mr. Kusdon at last found voice  he was so penitent, his humiliation  was sp complete, that,, instead of censuring him, the Vicar placed his hand  upon, his shoulder and spoke a few  words of kindness, which proved a  greater punishment to tho curate than  any rebuke   could have been.  Then Mr. a Beckett opened the door  of the vestry, and saw that the churchyard  was  empty. ,  " You must go home, now, Rusden,"  he said, "and attend, to yourself.-Or  will you go to the. Vicarage ? I think  that would be best."'  Tlle curate however refused to go to  the Vicarage���������he would have been  ashamed to dine with hi3 Vicar just,  then, even if his countenance had not  been disfigured. Ho presented a sorry  spectacle and he knew it; and his one  ardent desire was to get home to his  lodgings out of,sight of every one.  Unfortunately ho would have to walk  through Rodesley to reach his destination.  ^"1 will   go with   you,"   said Mr.   a  Beckett.  Although the churchyard was empty, the streets were not���������indeed they  were usually full of people. Groups  were talking together at every corner  and the Vicar and the curate both  knew what they were all,talking about.  Mr. a Beckett put his arm within that  of his, curate, and walked on. with his  face set firm, lips tightly compressed,  head thrown slightly back. As to Mr.  Rusden, his face was incapable of  expression just then, his eyes being,  as many of tho miners declared, "nearly,  bunged  up."  They had almost reached the lodgings, when, as ilMuck would havo it,  to, complete the Vicar's humiliation,  a dignitary of the Church well Known  to hi.m came riding by ; but, although  he .was arm-in-arin with a man who  looked like a battered prize-fighter,  Mr. a Beckett only held his head a  little higher and acknowledged his  friend's -salute with unusual dignity.  On reaching his lodgings tho curate  rejected all further offers of service,  and   the  Vicar departed.  The disgrace seemed to fall upon  both clergymen equally; but, while  the Vicar was bemoaning the terrible  scandal, and (ho consequent loss of  influence he would suffer after all his  hard work and earnest endeavour, (he  curate was feeling keenly that, he must  leave the neighbourhood ; and to part  from Mr. a Becke.lt would be a great  trial. Besides, when his reason for  leaving was known,���������and ho wns determined not to withhold the truth-  no one   would  triko. hhn   as curate.  The day following the encounter  was market-day, and Rodesley was  crowded with count ry-folk. The"Vkiar  had occasion to pass -through, the market-place, on his way to visit a sick  Trtirishioner, and at one of the flower'  and fruit stall's he mot the young lady  who, rumour, declared, had made so  deep an impression on  him.  " Huw do you do, Mr. a Beckett ?"  she exclaimed, well pleased. " What is  this I hear about a fight,bet'.ween Mr.  B-usden and  a miner?"  "Have you heard of it?" asked the  vicar,   in  dismay.  "Oh, yes���������every one in the market  is talking about it I How plu<:ky of  him to fight that big man 1"  Mr. a. Beckett felt that this view,  though comforting, was not the right  way  of looking at the  matter.  " I was going to ask you to go out  boating on  tho rivdr this afternoon,  LORD CUES HAM.  Thr Von  Vllin Him I'.irrnllnl 8000 Konlis  Kliler* In Urcit Itrlmlii.  Lord Chcsham, who has managed to  raise with a few weeks' time a forco  ot some 8U0D voluinteor cavalry, composed ot men who Jiave alt received  some cavalry training is one of the  mojt popular of sporting peers in the  United Kingdom, and belongs to that  historic house of Cavendish, of whi.h  the Duke of Devonshire is the head.  He is still on ths right side of 50, and  was at one and tad same time tho  brother-in-la.w and the son-in-law of  the Dulw of Westminster, who has Ju.it  died. i'\>r, whereas Lady Cheaham is  a daughter of the late Duke, Lord  Cheshajn himself is a brother of the  widowed Duchess. Lord Chesham  served for u time iu tho lCLh Lancers. -But it is wich tho 10th 'Hussars  that is to say, the Prince oU Wales'  rcgimiut, that his name is most closely associated. Since retiring from  active stirvico iu the army ho has been  Cooinel of tii-o Royal Bucks Hussars,  o,io of uu orajk regiments of yeomanry oavarly In the United Kingu^m. I  Both Lora and Lady Chesham ur-o  Just as the lightbuoy is a signal  of danger to sailors, and the red iight  to railway men,so lias nature equipped individuals with danger signals  of one kind or another when their  physical condition is not quite right.  It may simply be a tired feeling, a  slight cold, weakness of the muscles,  fickle appetite or some other sign���������  slight at first���������which indicates that your condition is not &  healthy one. If the danger signal is not heeded, serious results will follow and a complete collapse may occur. In nine  cases out of ten the direct cause of the trouble is impoverished  blood, or weak nerves. You.need something to brace you up  ���������to make your blood rich and your nerves strong. Dr. Williams' Pink Pills is the only medicine that can do this promptly  and effectively.'   They strengthen from first dose to last  ��������� Mr. John Siddons, London, Ont., says :���������" I can speak most favorably of  the virtue of Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. They prove invaluable in strengthen-  ing-and loning up the system when debilitated. Having used them for some  time past I can speak most favorably of" their beneficial results. As an invig-  orator of the constitution they are all that they claim to be."  .Sold  by  all  dealers  or post paid at 50 cents a box or six boxes for  $2.50, by addressing the Dr. Williams Medicine Co., Brockville.  THIRTY  YEARS  WITH  CANNIBAL?.  Tli������ Experience of ihe Her.   Or.  John ���������������  Vt 111 In ilie Nov Hebrides f������liiii<l������.  The career of the Rev. Dr. John G.  Paton, a returned missionary from the  Now Hebrides, from tho time that   he  did our first; work, every widow was  strangled to death the moment hor  husband died. Child murder was  common, and children destroyed their  parents when long siclr or aged.  Neighboring iribes were o.ten at war  with each oihor, and all they killed  were feasted on by tho comruerors,  which was also tho fatd of  ill    shiTV*   _^ ���������^ far ile������t So������aanJ' thirty-ono years ago, to j wrecked siiitors and strangers who foil  too devoted   to huatmg~and*To"other i^'s return to. America is a serial story ' into th?.ir hands, while crimes' of   the  forms of sport to spead much of their   of adventures and hardships, of escape   most revolting character were delightt  ^ci,t'^?a^n-'&ar'i they ...make, their'from death/almost incredible/And it   ed m- ' '  piincipai homo at Latimar   w)w������r<. th. ' .-������������������'���������-.  Cav^is^s.^ave   been Jettlod    ever   Waa flot in th*">ath    of v conquest, or  leading the serried   ranks    of    battle  that Dr. Paton   met   and   surmounted -side and died in consequence    of    an  dangers  and difficulties and  brought (attack upon our livo3 at Tanna..Mem-  Par.iifment, and   many thousands   of ignorant   savages j ^s of tho mission families'and'many  accordeiug  to  contpmnnnr.'���������'ii-,���������,���������,.,, '���������(.������������������' j      ,.     j- -      * i,.  ���������   ���������    l.        ������   native  teachers with their wives and  was foadgof^k^|"at oi7the ^ace-        --  ���������d���������rs.ta,ndinS ������f tho    art*: ot\ children either died or 'werejmurdor-  fuLvlew. ������rom Lh,a *i'������nt of the hou^e  since  the reign of liueen Klizabeth.  -,"7���������...        >'lW(i CHAi.ii.J5S I.    "7     7  spent  a considerable'  time at Latimer  while a priioaer of*  .;,.'';���������. FIVE MISSION ABIES  were murdered and two of them eaten  on Errumanga.     A sixth' fell by my  across the Kiv^r Chess to the woods  o������ Chemes. ; The grand old hllizabeth-  an mansion has bjdn modernized,  though with taste anil discrimina  civilization; but it was in preaching ; ed and eaton by tho heathen. Three aa-  the Gospel that Dr. Patoiz and his as- j sociatcd with mo either died or were  sociates wrought their work. kil!^, lan.vi.ig me the only^misdonaiy  north of Aneaty.um hying;.to tell    the  Educated in    the   parish'    school, in   story  While stately, it is essenu'alfy^ham^ Dumfrie3- in southern Scotland, and',] -��������� "It was thirty-six ;y������ara ago that  ly, cozy-locking houoe ihe front i finishing a course of study in the barely escaping, with my life I found  charming.y cknhed with 'creepers. It 'classical and medical departments of".' %&??* to Auattnalia and by a con-,  is full ol family oortriirs ���������f lr-������+ n, u "*. ���������- - -T ��������� , "��������� siderable effort secured- our firstf mis-  value, an.d of old masters air Jolntl C������    g& at. GIasgow' Dr- Paton im-. sioQ  -.schooner, , the   Dayspring;    and  Keyuoids, Titian Murillo' etc bein n^diately began -work as a city miss- since then the work has steadily pro-  'reppcseutea on the wails^        '' g   lonary'in Glasgow;    His si>ecial field   greased-,  and   Christian influence has  had nuo^^ ^baJftfis^bTv ������*t P^latlve were the Policemen of his , now read in twenty-two diifcront./lan-  iadt year, winm he was cerriblv' hurt ele^eQ y63���������' Iabor amocugi them that guages and, about eighteen thousand  by barbed wire, that buco-ar of uli ' aP������a hia departure they gave him;a'; natives have been redeemed from! sav-  hunting men: H-a lo.t his eldest ! handsome gold watch, which hH now ^^ w?ut of tho savage cannibals,  daughter two wir^ ���������r���������������������,���������i     ��������� 1        . ^e    ��������� '   "*"v" ���������u������  ""   among whom we were first placed, w������  prtt^^k^^rilA������Z^l lCarriea- Dr" PatCm had established : b-ive educated over three hundred na.  field, th-a poor child being thrown frrrn cluDS and reading circles among the tive teachers. The high chief of one  her pony and dragged alomr  hor foor   P<>lico, and it is remarked   that   both H^laod cheerfully gave up eleven wives  Ses tit*8m acrlsTrouad'LTti' |f������ntributo;1 to ^e gift,   ,   The- watch \ Ms and now has two sons engaged" in    -u^u-   ijearg   the   inscription:    "Presented to   missionary work in tho islands. Erom  Dr. John G. Paton, city' missionary, by . ons.ha. reouivocl a.letter contai-.ing   a  i.i������n   ,'v���������| :   ������������������ ���������, j.     ���������, ',.       wonderful atory, illustrating , tho de-  tboC Division of the Glasgow Police votion of (the converted natives, ft  as a token of his appreciation of his appears that the chief of an.inland  zeal in the promotion of their fempor- town on one of tha islands inviteft Dr.  al and eternal wcifaro, March, 1S57 " . baton's son, a-tew weeks ago, to vhit  t���������  ������Mr���������   ui^l ���������   i  u    |him at his home.   ., The young minis-  In 1858 Dr. Paton.    accompanied by i ter, accompanied by one of the native  weak point bad been roughly touched, he said gravely, but this unfortun-  axtd ho' felt his indignation burning! nte affair has so dtsturbeA me that  wlthiu bim.    Tho man, seeing he  hud   I   fool   amto disinclined  fo/  pleasure;  mer, owns a quantity of reai estate iii  tho most higli-priced residential districts  of .Loridflin.     '  One of his bsst paying pieces of property in the metropoas is that Burlington Arcade, wnieh is familiar to every  foreigner who vsats London. H13 connection with t.h-3 Burdngion Arcade  was b.ought to light a thort lime ago  by his efforts to puri.y tue atmosphere  of the place toward nightfall. For,  whereas it is a popular thoroughfare  and much frequented during the morning and. early-part of tho afternoon,  no respectable woman dared to show  her nos* in the place after'4 o'clock;  The shopkeepers ..complained bitterly,  and Lord Chesham, realizing the mistake, both economises well as moral,  that h������ wan making m permitting his  property to'baoome known as a resort  of this kind,  ��������� GAVE  STRICT   ORDERS    ' ,. .        ...  I intrepid missionaries wore. unmolest-  to drive away bolh men and .women ;ed, but a white trader visiting tho  who visited the Jiuxlington Arcade : islands made au unwarranted person-  merely lor the purpose, of meeting one ' -     ���������  another. In confluence of these orders a Mr. G-aorge Barant, a lawyer,  ot good famiiy, wan expelled from the  his bride:of a year, left for the missionary field in. the New, Hebrides.   ; ���������  7.        THE NEW HEBRIDES  are a group of   islands in    the   South  sea,   an  archipalago of    Polynesia,   a  chain extenoiiig from latitude 13 deg.,  south, longitude 166 deg., east, (o latitude .20 deg. south, longitude 170 deg.  east, about five   hundred miles   long,  and adjacent to the island of Borneo:   .  Weeks   later Dr. Paton  arrived    at  the island of Tanna, ono of the' north-  jern islands of the group, and landing  I began, his -labors.     For a'    timo    the  teachers, started with the chief. They  had not proceeded far when the chief,  suddenly turning, levelled his rifle at  the intrepii young mis-ionary. Divining tha chief's murderou.V intent tha  converted native threw himself between tho missionary and the rifle,  receiving tho bullet through h's. heart.  .BLOODY BRITISH BATTLES.  Arcade on th-e ground that he had addressed insulting remarks to a lady  with whom he waa not iic^uanit.Ml,  arul wii-mrn. ho mistook for a p'romin-i'iif  demimoiidaine.   Jnst'eud'ot quietly :.u'c-  native chief in  tho party I  a fine harbor, capable of accommodai-  initnug to this putiishmunt, Mr. Uai- j iug a large number of vessels, but an  rant was foolish enough to bring .su-.t j upheaval of tha earth completely des-  against Lord Chesham for damages | troyed it. After the 'escape- of the  for his forciblis- fjuc.tion. On learn- jparty from Tanna they were . given  ing through .cross-examination tho,shelter for a time with a friendly  obj'.'ct for which th;; plaintiff hrtd visit- | chief, but the natives were hostile and  ������<l. the place, the .') udge manifested-tho ! n.n atrempt was made 10 i-ncapo from  utmost indignation .ilu'.i. he- should: tho island in an open boat, but a  have had thi- audacity to go to law over j rough sea compelled the pallnnt work-  tbe matter, and, acting under insiruc- ers to land again. On. the following  lions from itlic bp.nch, the jury im-(night the uiisuonnrk's were assailed  mediately'and without leaving the box, ; and tho house in which they were  returned a verdict in favor of Lonl !stopping burned and tho lifo of Dr.  Cbesdam, at the same time commend- ;Paton was attempted. Dr. Paton, in  ing his endeavors to purify this onco ispoaking of the attack said  Action   of Mnildrr Itivrr .<:ompnrcii Wltb  ��������� Souk* 4>ili<*r I'uKa^oii&riilK.  Lord  Methuen's  telegram aftor  the  fight at Modder River told us it was  ,ono of the hardest and most trying in  al attack oti Dr. Paton, and following i ^e annals of tho British army. To the  this tho savage natives plundered  1 he j ordinary mind a battle   is   hard   and  house.-and-.hardly a day  passed  w.iih-���������; t rving iu proportion to the danger tho  out some attempt upon the,, lives of tho ladder encounters and overcomes, and  :  missionaries, compc ling them ! o leave i-lhu oa!v possibie gaug0 by- which ihat  the islands and -soak a refuge  wit 1 a | danger can be measured is the toss in-  f in aiioliei' island.    When jCUrred> in overcoming it. It may. be in-  andad at ianr.a  (here was ii.eresl.ing to comparo    tho    ac ion    of  notorious   thoroughfare.  II was in the Burlington Arcade that  Lord Eustpn, tho eldest son and. heir  of the. Duko of Grafton, made 'the. acquaintance, of tho notorious Kate Cook, |  who, despite all his    efforts to get: rid  't defied the natives, and apxiaront- 1    1849.  ly in answer to my prayer, a    tornado ; Albue.ra,  1811  came with incredible swiftness and so  alarmed  the    natives that    they    ran  away  arid molested, us no more."  The ne.\t day the party escaped  by  Modder lliver with some other buttles  iu. which the British army has been  .engaged   in   the present  century.  Lord Methui'ti's force was about 6,-  500 strong. His losses killed and  wounded, were a7.5, or .71-i per cent.  The other figures given below are  taken - from ''a table published! by  Colonel Henderson. Professor bf Military Art and History at the Staff College, in his "Lif���������- of Stonewall Jack-  son."-  Talavera, 1809.  j Chiliianwnllah,  of her, remains his wife, and as such 'vessel to Aneityum, an adjo.iiing- is-  ivill bccom������ ere. long the Duchess of .-'bind, one of tho missioaaries and his  Grafton, while many olhor iciiyis of ; wife dying on board, before the port  the British ���������aristocracy who have been j was reached from the hardships aud  guilty of mesalliances such as that of I dangers through which they: had  Lord   Euston   first    met  their    wives'.'passed.  promenading   in   the    Burlington  Ar- j    "The mission passed  through  cado. ' j tism of blood in beginning'th  Lord Chejsham's eldest son, a young j South Sea Islands," said   Dr  fellow of about 23 y-oars of age, is al- !"Tho population of tho group was then  ready in South Atnc.a, bsing an officer 'estimated)  at    150,000,    all    cannibals,  of  the  crack-rogiment of   17th    Lan- ; without,clothing, and with no written  cers. language.   . On Aneityum,   where    we  i-Baroosa, 1811.  I Salamanca. 1812. .  iQualro Bras, 1S15  ! Waterloo    1815.      .  Firozshah.  , ISla. ���������'.  Sobraon,   IS-ili.  Alma,      1854...  Ihkerman,        1854.  Modder River,  18ii9..        .      .    .  Killed l.ml  I'er-  BtJCMlKl.il  \\ llllliilf',:  centa.a  ������0,500  ti,250  30  15,000  2,388  15  , -8,a,o  a.too  48  4,-������:o  1,210  27  i0;- 01)  3,3t6  13  ���������li'/.0i)'  2,i:01  20  "3 Sl'l  ���������o,-::n  iW  ��������� .I6,:.0t!  ���������.! iC  J!)  -.l;>,aC<)  -,!!(>;  Vd  21,SCO  2,i'0.1  'J   ,  7,4(34  2.367  31  6,500      475     7,1-4  gh a hap-    '��������� Lord Methuen's loss in officers was I  o work in j Killed, 4; wounded, 19;    total, 28.  One  r.    Paton. ' battalion   of British  infantry  onterod  j tho action at Salamanca witH 27 officers  and 420 rank  and file;  it  had 24  officers  and 312 rank ��������� and  file  killed  and wounded.  I, ^ . ��������� ' i ''���������'���������''      ':''������������������'''���������' ���������' . '" "      '' ���������   ' i  -     -   .f- tin   1  .      ��������� 1.        ' ���������*'  - >i ���������>   tJ-    Ji f- 1  .    ���������"    ���������������������������-.������       1---       t '*        *. 1-,   11    ,    -'ii       .      ������      1.1 . -        -���������   '  ���������      J . I. V .    .'    "-'J       .'   ���������  4 -   1.    -1    ������    ��������������� ( -t.1    vi     -������\il|        t������������   ���������       \   .���������������  I   - >   1     -  &t������������*U i4  [ *'; ' 1  Ll���������f f    J. d>  .���������V _  V. 1.  .tl  mm v.  t, u  V    !  H  -��������� ^  THEY Limn 6000 B, 0.  FACTS FROM VERY ANCIENT TOMBS  OPENED IN EGYPT.  Fur������tiis ISnlllrs flfro Ifaril Tlirn ��������� The  IlaiillH of-llie 1'foiile Were Very ������'l -  firi-iit Irom 11 hat They Arc Sow���������  Vunlly Mil-. Fell.  How long has man been on tarlh?  Tho answer to this question is being  modified by every turn of the explorer's spado.' The expedition sent out  by the University of Pennsylvania,  which has been at work at Nuffer, has,  thiough  Prof. Hilprecht,  its  Assyrio-  etc. Of coarse, there was no thought  then of omba m ng, and it was entirely  due to tho dryness of. the soil ihat the  body had been preserved al-,all. In tho  tomb of the Pharoah whose name was  in lie ted by a eeip.nf. it was foynd  that thire was anumbjr of ad jo ning  chambers, probably intended for the  bodies of his wives or of his prominent court officials. The tomb of ono  of these, by name Nebnofer, "good  master," a royal scribe, was among  those found. .The floor of this timb  was made of heavy' sycamore planks,  which may well stand as.' tho oldest  pninks in iho world, being some 8,(,00  and odd years old, as well as can bo  estimated. Instead of having1 been  nailed down to cross pieces, (hey wero  |simply tied together by bands of  briis.s, which were si ill found in place,  logist,    set   the    date of G.tOO or 7,0tO , The mortar, too, was    found    to havo  been mixed with fibres of palm loaves,  much as hair is now used to mix, with  plaster, proving that this secret was  known a ������i������w thousand years ago. ,  CIVILISATION TRACED.  It is almost possible to trace tho development of civilization step by step  through those remains, for hero are  earthen plates so rudely shaped as to  prove that the potter's wheel, one of  the first inventions of primitive man  tho world over, was not yet known.  Then come other plates and pots and  jugs just as surely turned on that very  usjiui machine, showing iha next step  upward. The fo,lowing evolution of  inventive genius shows itself in the  more elaborate pottery, and the use of  metals for making rude tools. Hard  stone was now cut and shaped, diorite,  onyx and rock crystal jara and vases  wcro made with so much art. that their  highly polisha.l surfaces astonish the  modern discoverer. It seems as if tho  use of tho diamond or some ,other  hard substance must have been known  by the people who hollowed out some  of these vases, on tho inside of which  are still to be seen the marks of the  B.C., on some of tho monuments discovered. Now comes M. E. Amelincau  to re-enforce these dates by discoveries in prehistoric Egypt. The full report of the discoveries has not yet been  published, but this investigator has  prepared, the way to if' by issuing tho  first volume of his account' of tho ex-  cavationse at Abydoa, the sacred residence of Osiris. Here he has fo^nd  pre-historic tombs, some 1D01 in number, the contents of which go back at  least 8,000 years. Fortunately for us,  who fool curiosity as to' the doings of  those distant ages and the men who  lived then, the Egyptians had the  notion th.it death was but the bridgo  from this life to the next, which would  rescimblo this one so closely that tha  very food and furniture used hero  .would be useful thero. On this account, they furnished tho tombs as  they would furnish homes. Therefore  in them have been found the very food  and tho utensils which the* men and  .women of that timu used while alive.  It is to this fortunate accident that  is due tho exactness with which a  nineteenth century excavator can say  precisely how those who died ti.COO  years B. C, lived, what' they ate, how  they' dressed and what waa the range  of mind and civilization in that an-i  cicnl time.  .  ��������� OLD CEREALS.  ! Jin the jars and1, vases of these old  tombs Amelineau has found various  cereals, liko wheat and rye, proving  the agricultural tastes of those pcoplo.  Date stones are excellent evidence that the dato palm was even  then appreciated for its food, products.  Nor wero these pre-historic pcoplo  vegetarians, for if they wero why  should I here be tho bones of oxen and  tho horns of tho gazelle in their tombs?  fIE NOW LESS HORRIBLE  EFFECT OF IMPROVED MACHINERY  AND MODERN SURGERY.  Long: ItaiiKC ICiilicis 3Ioro Humane Ulan  Tiioio or o;<l-������;iii(i-lo-n.mil Conlik'li  Kcli'KnlciI  li>  l.ni-b.ii-laii-, ol" (lit:  S'asl ���������  Itllt'l'r������llll������ Subject   l>N('l|..q('cl.  Powder has spoken. It rests with  that great agent now to put an end  to the Anglo-Boer conflict. A signature of blood will alone settle tho  proposed   suggestion   to intervene.  One' can only deplore this struggle,  which brings into play so many human vices and destroys so many lives.  If it causes joy to tho monstrous but  happily scarce apologists of war, under the fallacious pretext that wars  are regeneratory, it plunges into consternation and too often into mourning those who do not think'men wero  created to detest and destroy one another.  Each people seeks to do better than  its   neighbor.   It  is   a constant   tend-  lies in the fact that the wounded not  only receive loss serious wounds, but  are surrounded with such immediate  care that they more frequently recover their health. As a last analysis  the wounded, though they are more  numerous,   show  a lower mortality.  With the ballistic power of modern  wenipoiiH mcu are hit at great distances. Under theso conditions the  bullel only passes through the tissues  without turning them, or perforates  tho bones without producing real sequestrum. And tho dressing to be  done is much more simple, ft is sufficient to place nt tho orifices caused  by the ingress and ogress of the bullet  pads of aseptic or antiseptic gau/o  k"Pt in place by a bandage to seo the  wound become cicatrized. If (ho  wounded man shows a little fever on  the evening of Irn wound tho dressing  is tnki'ii off unj the passage made by  the bullet syringed with antiseptics to  drive out the foreign bodies which  cause  tho fever.  What happened of old ? Many soldiers succumbed to slight wounds,  carried f-off by complications which it  was not known how to foresee or pro-  vent. It is a very little thing not to  touch (ho wound, but simply cover it  u'ilii stuff from which all the germs  havo been removed. And if the  wound is infected either by earth or  THE AIMIITION TRAIN,  MORE BRAVEdY NEEDED THAH IN  ��������� ANY OTHER SERVICE,  . j, --..������.    in    'inc^i,gu    uituci      uy     i:iu i  ency, a regular game with a record to j by fragments of clothes, .or from  beat. In 18a6 the Germans held tho  record with the noodle gun, but this  record has often been beaten since. In  1870 they held tho record for superiority in numbers, thanks to which  France was suddenly invaded.   ���������  In the days of Napoleon victory was  largely a matter of speed. So it may  be said that' tho great Captain won  his battles with his soldiers' Jags. Today, when railways have made the concentration of troops rapid and easy,  the god of battle does not favor as  cutting    implements,    ft    was    found   much as at the beginning of tho cen  that some of tho tombs wero paved  with n kind of rose-colored marble,  not native to Egypt, and therefore this  in whicn tho shauing of Ihe plumage is  must have been imported from .some  distant country, showing that the  men of that time travelled and, believed in imported goods much as we do.  PERFECT WOBKMANSHIP.  iFrom stago to stage tho perfection  of (he woikmanship and the. caro displayed in ornamentation increase constantly." The primitive geometrical  designs on i he earliest pottery give  way to drawings from life, and there  are representations of ostriches so  lifelike as to be easily recognized; a  carving of a duck's head in hard schist  broughl out, and a carving of a human hand in the same, hard' material,  where tho lines of the. finger nails aro  well defi'uod. As to wood ' carving  t'h-ise old artists were experts. They  took the ebony which they had to import and carved perfect statuettes of  lions, or of Nubian women/ which, can  be identified as such by the low forehead, angular   face, small   eyes,  pro-  Amelineau has actually taken us back :minent cheekbones, large mouth, thick  to the stone ago and' tho beginning-of ! li-ps, and hair parted into) a number of  the use of metals in, Egypt, for he,has "  found  innumerable arrow heads, cun  ningly chippid out of flint, and knives,  .scrapers and saws made of the same  hard material. The decorativo7iastinct  1 was already aliveT'or why should theso  old workmen have spent days ou polishing and chipping stouo bracelets?  :       "      INLAID WOOD.   ","  Besides the common pots for kitchen  uao,'and the fine vases tor the parlor,  .there  were discovered pieces of wood  .wonderfully inlaid with pieces of colored glass,  showing  that  the  secret  of  manufacturing glass was known even  .. then.  .This seems to indicate'a long  period of preparation or development,  ,   for men did not invent glass when they  .were crudo   and   uncivilized. Ini   fact,  the discoveries at Abydosi open so Wide  a vista  of   possibilities that    we    are  ecarcely surprised  to hear' that ���������  the  tombs of the gods of Egypt have been  actually     found.       But    before    this  ���������startling-discovery was made. M. Ame-  lineaa stirred up tho world's Egyptologists  by the announcement that  he  had found the namos; of 10 royal personages    hitherto unknown. He knew  that- they wero royal, for their names  were written iu u public dovice, and it  was just as if the sculptor had"engraved King So and So.   it is from those  designs that tho word Pharoah is derived, or rather   tho   deviso    signifies  Pharoah,  from    tho Egyptian Pcr-aa.  "Great House," that    is,    the place of  the court.  .When M. Amelineau opened some of  these graves be found them to  be tho  tombs of these great unknown  kings,  already acknowledged as kings of Upper and Lower Egypt,    but    not    yet  known,  as Sons of  the  Sun,   the titio  of the late Egyptian monarchs. Among  these  was one whose name  he   reaus  Don, and another Qa, and 14  bosidos,  some  of whose    titles    could  not    bo  read, as they were entirely  new. For  instance,  ono    was indicated    by    the  sculpture   of a sorpent,   but   how  this  is to bo pronounced or what, it means  no Egyptologist has yet found out. On,  comparing tho names just found with'  nil the long list of Egyptian Pharo"ahs,  not one like aiiy-   of    them    could  be  found, and it  was very logically concluded    that    these    autedato    Menos,  and that only now are    we    reaching  tho earliest history of Egypt.   ,  PRIMITIVE TOMBS;,  The,tombs are primitively constructed, some of the walls being so irregular  that,it is to be  doubted  whether the  plumb  line was    then    known.     But,  nevertheless        the interiors       of  the tombs wore most interesting. Some  of them were so short that: it watt evident that no human body could have  been laid hero at full length, and the  explanation was forthcoming that at  last in a tomb which no vandal Arab  had reached, a body was found all curled up a.nd surrounded with oarfhen-  war������ ports containing food, oinhiion s,  tresses. Here is a frog carved out of  diorite, as unmistakable as if it had  beeu done by a modern artist,   i  The mbn and women were alike fond  of personal adornmont, for beads, of  clay covered with "blue enamel, of  cornelian,' amethyst, emerald and rock  crystal, all pierced for stringing, the  strings having long since rotted away,  were found in large numbers. Here,  too, were ivory and wooden instruments -'with which the, eyelids : and  brows, were colored red on, black to  make the eyes appear larger. Vanity  is then at least 8,000' years old. ;  ','���������'.-' ROTTEN WOODWORK.  The furniture was only found in bits,  for the woodwork had generally rotted  away, an'1 all I hat remained ws the  ivory legs of sofas���������tho most remarkable finds made. These were so large  that it is certain I hey, must have been  made of tho tiisksiof the hippopota-t  mua. That this animal was! hunte'dl by  the early Egyptians is well.established  by wall paintings, but the. proof furnished by the finding of these tusks is  far more conclusive, carryings the( custom back several centuries. The manner in which theso lega are carved to  represent the legs of oxen is one of  the,marvels of all who havo had tho  good fortune to see them.  The work of the jewelers of this early ago is by no means primitive, for  thero are bronze, bracelets, cunningly  turned, into serpents, alloys of silver]  and gold, copper and brass, and other  tury those who arrive first on the field  of action. And tnis because a new  factor has made its appearance ���������tho  rapidity, precision and efficaciousness  of fire.  HOW VICTORIES WERE WON.  The victors of Ausferlifz, Jena and  Wagram were only armed.with rudimentary flint guns, the. smooth bores  of which took only a round leaden bullet, carrying from GO fo SO motors.  And, even fheu, rain had only to fall  during tho battle to silence their  weapons, since, if the powder in the  pans was wet it would not light by  the spark from the flint. As for tho  cannon, they discharged solid shot and  bombs, but not to any great" distance.  After 100 years nearly all the conditions which govern the art of war  aro changed. nand-fo-hand fighting  is a mere accident; engagements begin at a distance of several kilometers,  and with weapons so perfect that the  two sides hit without seeing each other, and generally produce wounds sufficient to stop a man's advance and  put him hors de combat wdthout seriously  endangering  his life.  For the last i!0 years ballistics have  progressed     continuously,    and  firearms  have  undergone,    and  are continually    undergoing,  fresh  improvements.     The modern weapon, at once'  more complicated in its structure and  more simple in its use, has tho enormous    advantage    over  the  old  of  a  more  powerful   fire  and   perforation,  more simple, more sure aud mire rapid, which requires of the snooters a  minithum of7 instruction and effort.  ���������  Projectiles  havo been fitted  with a  metal   casing  which  enables  them  to  be made longer.     The use of smokeless powders of great explosive power  has    extended.      Lastly,    as  a consequence    of recent    researches,  it  has  been possible to reduce tho caliber of  weapons, thus reducing the weight of  the rifle and projectiles to a minimum,  and      consequently      enabling    each  marksman  to  carry a larger  number  of cartridges.  GOOD LONG RANGE WORK.  It is sufficient now to shoot in front  of   one    to    be    a practically    useful  marksman.   As far back as at Saint       f  tools of the earlier stage  when  pure I Prival  iu 1S70 men were shot at 1,030 \ supervened,  copper was used.      To illustrate how ' ' - -   ���������������  near akin mankind has been through  these myraids of years it is only neces-  oiher cause, the use of sterilized  probes to sound the flesh, or asceptic  bistouries to" open it if necessary, and  of antiseptic liquids suffices to put  matters right and (o keep the wounded man from the danger of putrid infection, which used to make so many  victims.  OPERATIONS LESS PAINFUL.  Supposing that it is a question of the  shattering of the kneo by the bursting of a shell, or tho comminufivo  fracture of a thigh, tho present progress of surgery gives the patient  more chances of recovery than of  death. Formerly the limb was sacrificed, and tho operation was accompanied by the most horrible sufferings. At the present time, the use of  ether or chloroform renders the operation as easy for the operator as it  is painless for tho patient.  The average traumatism necessitated a great use of tho kndfo. For an  open fracture of the tibia recourse  was at once had to amputation of the  Jog. Injury to tho bon?.s of the foot  led to similar consequences. Now,  neither the knife nor tho saw comes  into use, except in very raro cases. It  is asex4.ics and antiseptics which allow  of seriously wounded soldiers being  preserved from complications. Tho  preservation of limbs is tho general  rule, and it is only when everything  else lailB, when everything is shattered or torn off, that the surgeon decider  to amputate.  A surgeon had to possess an unusual  degree of nerve to preserve the necessary calmness during an amputation made without anaesthetics. As  a consequence the principal idea was  speed i.n the carrying out of operations, with, as a result, an unfavorable influence on their success. Tho  skill of this or that' surgeon was legendary ; to-day this equality is relegated to the second or third i>lace.  There is no nscessity to hurry ; chloroform allows the operator to proceed  quietly, surely and efficaciously. The  surgeon has all the time he needs, but  his work must be irreproachable.  Accordingly, recoveries , aro very  rapid"; generally there is no suppuration, whatever, may have been the  condition of the limb, while formerly  they were very slow/even if death'did  not follow.  . ADVANCED SURGERY HELPS.  Tho  performance  of an  amputation  resembles but little    that  of former  times, though tho cutting of the flesh  and bone is necessarily the same. But  what was not done formerly was the  forcing back of tho blood toward the  base of the member by means of an  elastic- band, thus preventing the flow  of   the  vital  fluid,   and  allowing   the  surgeon    to    operate    "a seo."     Then  there is tho cleaning with soap^ alcohol and ether of the parts to be operated - upon,    the-   heating  of    130  degrees of 140 degrees centigrade, of the'  instruments    and   the bandages,    the  sterilization    of    the    hands    of   the  operator with soap and prolonged immersions in    antisespitc liquids,    the  employment   of   ,absorbent  ligatures,  the minute coaptation on  the wound  and the exact suture of its edges. The  consequence is a rapid local recovery,  so much so that in, .12 or 15 lays tlie,  wound of an amputated thigh is healed,   which formerly  was  a matter  of j  months,  if indeed,  no    fatal    results  Alwajn in (lac Tiifcct or llir lixht, !tm  Art- Ork-ilM'lch*. Iholr I.uslnrvs (o Mi; J  ply Mini ::inl f-lie 11 )��������� Mtv I'li-lup LI lit:  Etonnr*S!c-,\ of ( oiiM'qiiriicf-.  It has been announced in the newspapers of late that among the troopa  leaving for South Africa.have bc������nso  many men of tho "ammunition column." This tells nothing to the average reader, however. He has hoartf  of the Lancers and of tho Dublin Fusi-  liurs, but the "ammunition column"  is a body of whose existence he has  previously been ignorant, and at  whose work ho can only guess.   ,  ���������  Briefly,  this  ammunition column is  a  branch of the" AFrny Service Corps,  a  body   which acts as a sort of "Universal Provider" for the British army  im the time of wax, and ita duties are  to keep well  up with  tho firing liue  during an engagement and see    that  any   it  is  well supplied  with ammunition.  When  setting off  to attack  tho  foe,  the ammunition is distributed as follows: Every man of the infantry and  cavalry has the magazine of his rifle  or carbine, as tho case may be;  filled,  and'he. carries lOOsrjare rounds in his  pouches.       Further    supply    of    200  rounds  per  man   with   a suitable  allowance for the quick-firing machine  gun which is attached to each infantry  battalion  is conveyed directly  in   the  rear of    each    regiment in    a wagon  bearing a distinguishing mark to shovi  to  which   corps  it   belongs,  and   this  fonm-.   tho  first  reserve,  from   which  Lho soldiers'  pouches  are  replenished  as fast as thoy are emptied.  'MIDST FLYING BULLETS.  A email detachment of tho ammunition column accoinpanius every regiment into action to convey the sup-  p.ics from tho wagon to the firing line  The work which these men perform  is pjrhups the bravest of any" on the  field of battle, but it is a work of  which we hoar -little. a Their duty  compels them to keep well up with  the'firing lino, and yet they take no  part in the firing, though the enemy's  bullets may be laldug round them in  all directions. , Their business is tc  hurry forward tlie ammunition and  never mind what is happening in front  of them, and lo this they devote themselves.  Aa   the   battle  rages,   however,   the"  6Upply of ammunition in  the wagons  at   the   rear of   tho position  becomes  depleted, and it is at  this stage that  tho  real   work  of   the  main   body' of  the  ammunition  column    commences.  This body has for some timo previously   bean  hanging in  the   background,  well out  of    reach; of    the    enemy's  shells,  in  chargo of a long string  of  wagons  filled with projectiles  of every description.     From these  tha regimental    wagons  aro refilled.      Not  only., does this column carry tho ammunition  for the small  arms, as  the  rifles, carbines and machine guns aro  described,   but   tho shells  for   tho  artillery  as well.      These  shells  are of  many   kind,  such    as   common   shell,  plugged shell, shrapnel, and canister,  and  wherever the guns go these wagons, must   bo'close   behind   them,   no  matter   what   tho hazard,   for  a battery   without  ammunition   in   abundance is in the same state as a first-  class modern battle ship  with empty  coal  bunkers, and with  the warships  of tilt foe rapidly bearing down upoo  it-  Tho stock of these wagons Is in tMru  replenished  as soon as  possible from,  the main supply, which is maintained  at the base, of the army-  UNDER A STRONG GUARD.  The ammunition column as constituted to-day: is a modern innovation.  Formerly every regiment taking part  in the campaign detailed' so many of  its men to take charge of the regimental ammunition and to distribute  it, but this somewhat rough-and-  ready system has been abolished in all  modern  armies,  as it  was found  ihat  sary to mention the discovery in one of !  the tombs of what must have, served  as a baby's nursing bottles in the, long !  ago. It was an tMirtheui vase,, .with a j  hole in tho side, into which"a bit of ���������  cloth might be inserted that (he baby '  might draw hi.s milk from the. vase. Is 'I  there anything now undsr tho sun?     I  j one regiment might have ample ammeters, and in 1878, at Plevna,, the] During the Crimean War of .1P51-55,-I munition, and yet the next one to it  Turks, though, very iuk.vpttrre.imed, I hnspil-i! gangrene broke out at the7 P'Sht bb reduced to its last cartridge;  opened fire at distanca of 1,500 and 2,- j same lime as the cholera, scurvy and '. DUt- the feeding of the firing line of  OOJ maters. At the present time 1,- ; typhus, and showed a high degree of'i t-na British army has now been reduc-  500 meters is no-'longer a groat dis- [ severity. It was observed: in the [ ei' to a perfect state, and it should be  lance,   but   a normal, firing   distance, j Chersonese  DOGS OF WAR.  troops  are  drawn' up-two  deep.       At  the average fighting distance two   or  Itral  .1 niiii;iN Valuable, liui Km-khf die   tliref-  men  may  be  wounded   by     tho  Wimiiu Tlmi-. j sum1!   bullet     nt   that   shorr  distance,  <pi,���������'    ������������������ ���������. ,        '",'���������     ",     ,   ,.    ,  .   '      without        saying anything of  ..There-is only ono drawback that can; tha greater' (hickucss, now given (o  possibly attend the taking of dogs on j works of fortification on the battle-  war expeditions, anil that is that they ! fi'-dd, a single projectile, would havo  may bark when a night surprise is iri-"\ioro? enough _to go through tour, five  tended; but even this does not apply   ._-,  in  Constantinople, mid ou ' "'"^   to- impossible   nowadays   for . a  especially .in defense. ; The porfor- [, tho. transports bringing th������ wounded ' .ri'Kiment u> he put. out of action ow-  ati.ng power is such that it is mani-J from (.he Crimea lo Constantinople lnff-t& *-ke failure of the ammunition  fested  far beyond 2,0M meters. i and   from  Constantinople    to  France.   "Wy-      This was tho. case, however,  "' " ' with   ihe    two British    regiments  at  Nicholson's Nik a few weeks ago, but  that was an abnormal oircuinstauci/  brought about by the slanipedn of tlm  At  a. distanca of 2,pf������   meters  an   8' It made equal ravages among the Eng  mm.  bullet  has still��������� enoi; ;:h  force.  to!|ish and Russian wounded,  pass   through  a front  rank   man   and j     During  the  war  in  Italy  wound     the ' mau  in  his    rear   when ; reappeared in    the Kalian,  in   185!l  it:  Austrian  when due precautions aro taken, and  in recent campaigns the presence of  favorite dogs of officers has beeii. repeatedly   referred  to.   .  In the German army a groat number of dogs are trained in connection  witn the ambulance corps. At tho  command "Seek,"'and a gesture indicating some point of the compass, they  start off and when they come across  one of the men specially lying down  in imitation of the wounded, they take  up his cap, helmet or handkerchief and  and bring this back to the, ambulance  men,, whom th.ey 7 lead, back to the  spot. Theso dogs were a striking  part of the show at the last maneuvers.  or six men. Thus, in Dahomey, it -was  observed that a bullet, after penetrating a. tree 45 centimeters in thickness, sti-11 went through five men..  These are astonishing facis which  will riot be seen in reality as of Inn as  some, people say. For this to bo the  case it would be necessary not. only  that the bullet should undergo no deviation, after having passed through  tho first obstacle, a thing which always happens at least after the second, but also that its point should not  be deformed. Now Lagarde's experiments have proved that- this happens in half the number of shots.  :    IN THE BULLET'S WAKE.  It is seen nowadays that, the wounded aro more numerous, but tho killed  much    fewer.   A supreme consolation  ntid French hospitals- It broke out  during the Civil war in the States, in  Germany during the wars of 1804 and  J8(;I5. and finally' during tho campaign  of 1870-71. It has even reappeared in  "more, recent wars, but in a loss intense form, much more.mild than at  the beginning of the. century or that  of 185l-5fi. Hospital gangrene is a  microbinn malady ami gives way to  antiseptic treatment. ��������� War must, bo  made,  against  it  unceasingly.  A comparison of the surgical results  of wars i.n former days and those of  tho present time is all to tho advantage' of  tho latter.  ; mult.s which bore the spare aminuni'  j tion, thus leaving tho men with only  jw.hat. cartridges they had in their  I pouches, and it is unlikely in the- ex-  ������������������tremc that such a .case will oyer hap-  j pen. again.  ;    .In. addition  to feeding  with ammu-  ��������� nition   the   soldiers   actually   engaged  : in  the fighting line,  the ammunitior  i column  has oilier duties, such' as at-  | ta.ching   the   fuses   to  tho  shells,   and  j aiding; the artificers in  the repair oi  damaged  guns or gun  carriages,  and  during   the   whole-,   time   a war .lasts  one  >:>f the  hardest .worked  bodies  of  men are those employed in serving out  the ammunition.  QUICK DISEMBARKATION.  .'.  A remarkable piece of disembarkation work was accomplished when, tlie  Hawarden Castle reached Cape Town  receintly. Iter troops, which numbered 1.700 men, together'with stores,  ordanee. and rations for 14 days, were,  landed  and entrained in  10 hours.  A RENEGADE ENGLISHMAN.  The editor of Voortrekke.r, a Krug-  ersdo.rp paper, which has gained notoriety of I ate. by its vioh-mt attacks  on the British nice, in general and (Ik  troo;,." lit particular, is an Eng lis!  curate, and lale. head master of-AH-  ������ill   Public   School.  *vs  ^cm  &;'  ���������sp-  \ .  "ft.  V-*V  Tj  I-        '  -'  .    .     **   ^f -     -1.  -. rt  i 1.1  I   . -.  IT.-?  if s" -" 1  l������*l 4"  Y������  'tf  ,"*��������� V.'  ,v>  .I' .  , r-  fa  ���������a  T"f.  -���������K  ��������� *!���������-  1 .  '-      i  *���������    v      ���������  -. -' * *"������������������*������������������  - ...rt'   2*.  y.'-'M'i-  tf-1  "vyi''JFf*".  ���������J&Se,  ��������� v  1 ��������� 1* l".  .1- , '  I I.  'If.  _s.-,.'j3r.n.'  ���������������������������������..���������  Hi ���������<i-\  \ , ^"   Jl fki  \    *i**     -��������� .  -I THE MINING-REVIEW���������-SATURDAY,,JANUARY>o, 1900.  S-i-������s-i  as  ������S  SATURDAY, JANUARY 20,1900.  'FAIR. PLAY, GENTLEMEN.  "���������-' We very much regret that Thi: Review cannot fully please our Unliable  confrere, of'. the Silvertonian. ' The  present Slocan,trouble has many sides  toil, ;"!nd because wo arc disposed to  look ut them all,instead.of chasing the  0110 blindly, its our neigebor 'Iocs, in its;  ,��������� eyes we are sadly at fault. Onr cotom.  justifies the intcai'breiioo of the Western  Federation of Miners in purely British  Columbia matter*, lo.lhe.delriment.of  this country, because, the Workmen, K.  ��������� of 1'.   11 nd,other, secret sooities,  with  . head olliccs abroad, operate in this"  .'country.1 In tlie 'first place, we may  say that many of these latter societies  aroin corpora Led under Canadian laws,  unci own much property in thisjeoiin-  -.-. try, while the only interest the W. F.  ol'M. has, in Canada,.- is its.disturbing  ��������� "-influences."  'But apart ,1'rom this, there  ,: is   no   analogy between   them.    The  secret societies named   confine   their  ���������:- Operations;.wholly t0  their-'members.  They  never 'send emissaries' through  the country,iikc the foxes of old with  tails niire to burn the'corn/ields of the  ,,. Philestines..   They never supply residents with money to block the progress  [   of. the. country, stilling commercial and  other enterprises of everyclass, robbing  the   provincial   treasury of. its .legitimate'iihd much-needed revenue, witli  leaders at borne like B6yo7 advocating  success  by  the, > sword and    abetting  destruction of life and,' property.   No ;  . tho secret   societies   named   leave 110  trails like these, but still for a purpose,'  1 they are represented sis''parallels'to the  ,W.F. of M. -,; .'..-' .'������������������������������������ *���������  .Brother Silvertonian,. be fair and do  not misrepresent us for the' sake of  generating fuel,for a- flame. The "Ite-  ��������� view never said the Legislature had no  right to shorten the hours of labor. It  has said just what the editor of the Sil-  verlbnian has told the writer, that the  eight-hour law should not have been  passed when it was not asked for. We  say further, when .-passed it should  never have deprived free citizen's,, of  -their right to buy and sell 'their labor  ���������as best served their purposes. Neither  is this paper in any way influenced by ���������  the Conservative platform, as that does  liot say the present eight-hour law  : should stand without modifications���������it  only 'declares iii favor of "the- principle"  of the eight-hour law. The law of the  land is in favor of allowing money  'loaners interest oh loans,as si principle,  but it doetr not endorse 2 per cent, a  ���������moiitli as a practice.  "The Review nover declared unions at  'fault for taking in men "abo\e the'  average"; but it has blamed.them, as  all honest men must, for taking in men  "below the average," and endeavoring  to force the owners to pay them the  ���������'���������highest- wages. This is rank dishonesty; and the Silvertonian knows it as  ���������well as we do.,; Tl,;-Silvertonian knows,  -and every honr-st: man in. the unions  knows, that there ure in the Slocan today, on the basis, of #3.50 being fair  pay for good men for ten hours work,  'tf3.5Q1.$3..2f>,'!?3.00, '���������.���������-ml, even 32.75 men,  ��������� for eight hours, and the injustice of  the ..whole situation is in trying to.  ���������build a Chinese .wall around the coum  try to prevent the. importation of oilt-  . eiders, -and forcing tho owners to pay  ������8.50 for these men all around. That  is what the peregrinating stalkers of  tho W. F. of M7, who arc now traversing this country daily from north to  south, are trying to accomplish ; and  what We regret is that many papers  and men, in. other matters honest and  fair," are doing their best to, justify  it. This is a sectionalism for miners  endorsed by the pot-house politicians  of the country, merely because the  former have votes. The Review -desires, tlie cost of living and nature of  work considered, to see. every man in  British Columbia get the highest wages  he is worth, on the basis of eight hours  a'day, with privilege to work overtime  when all the conditions are satisfactory/with the law making no distinctions because of calling.  The unions represented that 1,000  miners, British subjects, were being  .disjdaced by aliens, and;the inflamma-  iory section of the piess repeated the  ���������cry and the'.echo;, but, when before  Commissioner Clute, they were unable  -to prove that, in the eye of the law, a  single alien 'had been brought in.  Loud declamations were heard on every  hand against alien laborers, when they  saw but the shadow of one man ; but  .there is a full and free endorsation of  the importation of alien money from  an alien organization to ruin  the bus-  Better stopil-iat'  cough now with/  a few doses of  Dr.   Wood's  Norway , Pine  Syrup, than let  ii: run on to end ���������  "r-t,''  1      *&������     t  ������  pernapsm iiron  chi*';"'"   p  ;is,. Pneti-  nonia  or  Cbn-  sumption. ." It's ���������  awonderful lung  healing rcn'kx! y -'  that, cures tlie  worst- kinds'' of  couch's and colds  Vwicn-othergfai!:.  'Price 27;c. & rvo  a'r.-'a'c/'iS :���������:���������=.���������!'!'������.���������  K35ni^5S^ '..���������  IP&KS' ���������������������������,���������:'���������  All dealers.  v cl.,.., Ciu'ti cor.r,i:io.".i.ioi.'., biliousness, r,Jc������:  headache e.iul   dy^peps:."..    'iv.-ery  ���������'i'r'S'p pi!i::6"jar.'intec.U ������>c-r:Vt:t and to' act  ���������^-.i-lt \7;tI,oat any ��������������� J};!::;,-', wi?.3.!tMl:R^ cr  ^,s������U������������-=s:'.2iiV.cts. ''=ic.:'.it-iil'tliys.,  .&;���������������   RistS. ,- . "'.,''������������������  iness'community and stifle the'growth,  of��������� the country by protracted inactivity. Supported in.this way,tlie minor's  are enabled to monopolise the .legitimate wotk of other residents���������carpenters'," wood-cutters, common laborers,  etc., and drive these' out of 'employment. .This. is. all right because it is  winked at by miners'unions.  ,,  The Review wants fair playfor all,  and all used alike. If Chinese walls  must be erected, they must protect  others as well sis .-miners,' and. if not  erected in tlie interest of others as well  they must not be at all. The miners  have no right to be called the Israel  of the country.  . The Silvertonian know* that through  the importation of alien news papers  and job printing from outside, the publishing business is not worth tlie name.  It knows that by the importation of  goods from the States, from, Eaton's  and other Eastern houses, by'tho min-:  ers themselves, who ore insisting on  protection from alien competition and'  enabling their most inferior men to  get the most superior wages, the retail  business men and'hotel keepers���������those  who pay the rents to the bind lords,,the  revenue and other taxation tliat support the institutions of the country,  that support the woodcutters and, very  often, the miners themselves-���������are -left  open to every description of plunder  from the outside. - The Silvertonian,  and other papers like it, and the politicians, who are hunting for votes, say  this is the proper way to build up the,  country.  The Review savs exclude Chinese  and other exceptionally low-priced nationalities, Dagoes and other people,  that ure the forerunners of crime ; but;  throw the country open for tho incoiiie  of all people who will make thrifty,  desirable citizens. , Open plenty of  works by government and municipal  assistance to have capital .hunting for  labor; give the ballot to nil who have  an interest in the country and are likely to remain -permanent .settlers ; give  equal privileges to all and special'legislation to'none ; and in time we will  have with us the best and most prosperous of all nationalities; and the  country will be well in the race to recover from the disabilities under which  it has fallen, by the recent legislation,  and the subsequent troubles arising  therefrom.  We arc aware the Silvertonian will  not agree -with these views; but if,  while criticising, it will only publish  this article side by side with its own  criticisms, that all its readers may  have both views before them, we shall  be more than satisfied.  leaves the lungs weak and  opens the door for the germs  of Consumption. Don't  wait until they get in, and  you begin to cough. Close  the door at once by healing  the inflammation.  n  makes the lungs germ-  proof; it heals the inflammation and closes the el&ors.  It builds up and strengthens  the entire system with  wonderful rapidity.      ���������  toe. and $1.00, all druggiitt,  SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists, Toronto.  7: POLITICAL.   ..���������.'���������;  - -Premier Semlin "may, well declare  "Uneasy lies the head that wears',the  crown." His lot. has been anything  but a, bed of roses since he took oflice.  In,.the first place he got it,; through a  'ilujce, by. a trick of the, Lieutenant-  Governor" .altogether' unworthy of any  man in, .Iris" position. When-ho dismissed.Turner ho hfid ho moans of  knowing whether or not the late premier had-ii. majority -in,the.House. He  should not have played the "partisan,  and taken: the partisan press as his.advisers instead of tlie then government.  . Semlin then, after taking oll'ce, instead.of buying his majority us he did  by: tlie. purchase of his present attorney'-general, arid'placing confidence in'  Martin, who is, now turning out to.be  the' serpent' warmed in his bosuni,  should) after securing his colleagues,  have dissolved the House and held a  generaLelection,,. .So much for bis mistakes h-t the Outset. 7   \-'���������.';..  In oflice his siots are,: to a, large'"extent,-.-a betrayal of those who assisted  hi'ni in the last elections. Ho promised ;economy, and weiiaye a huge deficit, that, will be, made larger- bybon-  using railways built under TFederal  charier; that carry land grants with  .them.".   , ���������'' ���������   ' ' .'"��������� '[' ,7  ��������� Iu opposition, he and his promised  less tinkering with' the mining laws,  and then follows, stolen through in the  darkness, the eight-hour law that lias  thrown the whole country.into, confusion confounded. We.were, promised equitable representation through  proper-redistribution.' and.'''sine'e there  is .110,'word of/it. We want, money  for roads, trails and schools.1 We are  told there isnone'in the treasury, but  a million can bo ���������given"* Pacific cable  that .'can'"bring, but 'questionable' results/ We want, municipal, institutions to control local taxation for local  improvements,'and:are given wholesale  rows in the cabinet for supremacy.  With the present volcano underneath  the cabinet, it is hard to say what a  day may bring.forth ; but in.any event  tbe country can never again place confidence in tim what-do-rou-call-ifc we  have at present for a government. -.-,:  'The whole cause' of all this c lab or  trouble'in, Canada and the States is the  liberality of the franchise, Hnditis a  mistake. When the ballot, is once put  into the hands of a promiscuous lot of  people, who have no interest in the  country but to squeeze out every dollar  they can in wages, by brute force, or  otherwise, it becomes a poor lookout  for the development of the country.  If our parliamentary aspirants were all  men of backbone and principle, who  would rigidly adhere to proper legislation, whether 'they., sank, or swam in  the effort to get it through, it would be  all the less matter, for if one. man did  not succeed with it another would.  When, however, tlie people take up  for these positions men whose ruling  motive is legislation that catches the  irresponsible vote, the. country must  suffer in consequence. Manhood suffrage, sounds well,: and would bejust  the.thing required if .the ruling motive  of every elector was the.: proper,.advancement of the country; ��������� As things  are this cannot be the case. Mob influence in too many eas'.s prevail with  politicaldemftgogues, and the country  suffers by it..   '  There is great rejoicing among the  eight-hour chaps over Mr. Houston's  magnificent victory1 in the mayoralty  contest in Nelson. It is a great triumph for the labor party. Let us look  at it. A year ago, before the eight-  hour law was passed, Mr. Houton was  ben ten by a majority of 7 and now he  is elected by 11, or 11 change of exactlv  "9" votes by the labor element, for his  great, work in their, interest. When  nine of their number so changed sentiment in favor of the man who writes  "dampbool" by able advocacy, of-the  Tribune,their gratitude must bo unitizing and only excelled by their nine  votes. ci      '.  TO CUKE COLD IN ONE DAY.  Take LaxativeBromo Quinine Tablets.  All druggists refund the money, if it  fails to cure.   25 cents.  CHUfiCH NOTICES.  Methodist, llev.-A. M. Sanford, B.A,,  pastor.���������llegular services will bo held  to-morrow at 11 a.m.   and 7.30 p. m.  PiiiffiBYTEitiAN, St. Andrews.���������Rev. J.  Ferguson pastor ; service at 7:30 D.m.  Union Sabbath School in the Methodist church at 12:15 p.m., after close  of morning services. Everybody welcome.  Are more than a' disfigurement of the  skin;'they are a handicap to a young  mail,, alike in love and business; . The  pimply face looks dissipated and both  merchant and maiden look askance at  tlse,unfortunate fellow whose face is his  misfortune. An almost certain cure  for pimples and  similar disfiguring  eruptions 15 d'ouud  in Dr. Pierce's  Golden Medical  Discovery.'' It purifies the blood of  the corrupti 11 g  cause of ordinary  eruptive -diseases,  cleanses the skin  and builds up the  body with . sound  wholesome flesh.,  '} Discovery " contains neither alcb-  , hoi nor narcotics.  ��������� "I am well' pleased  with your medicines,"  ' writes John A. Callo-,  way, Esq.,' of No..'218  26th ' St., ..Columbus,  Ga. "Iu 1894I was  working at uight; aud  I broke out iu lumps  all over, and, when  these left the skin  peeled off. ��������� I took six  bottles of 'Golden  Medical 'Discovery,'  and two of Doctor  Pierce's Pellets, and  I do believe that it  am sound and well. I have a good appetite, but  before I commenced treatment! had 110 appetite'  at all. My eyes were sunken and mv face was'  pale. I had pimples and brown spots 611 my  face. . Now these are all gone. I have used,  many kinds of medicines hut received 110 benefit. Last year I weighed' one hundred and  thirty-four, pounds, and now I weigh one hundred and forly-five. Please accept my thanks.  I am so glad I 'found the right kind of medicine."  Medical Adviser is sent,/ree on receipt  of stamps to pay cost of customs and  mailing only. Send 31 one-cent stamps  for paper covered, or 50 stamps for cloth  binding, to Dr. R.V. Pierce, Buffalo, N.Y.  mww  ������������������'S'R'D '-.OTHER: IHVESTIBEHTS.  Every Representation Guaranteed.  IF  SANDON. B.C.  H" ffia W/ H -5 T-; -i & %   I    S ������  S3  This.dangerous Blood Disease  always cured by BuMock  Bipod Bitters, ���������  ;   Most people are aware how  seripus a disease Erysipelas is.  Can't rdut.it out, of the system  with ordinary remedies.  '.������������������"��������� Like other- dangerous7 blood  diseases,   though,   B. B.'B.'7 can:  cure it every time.. ';."','     ;,���������;,.:;:, - ,  Read what,.; Rachel  Patton,  Ghin, Bruce  Co., Qnt.,  says:.,!..���������;.,���������"';;.,. ...V';1'./-'-^'^;.;;.:^ ,:  "I wish to state that I used Burdock Blood'Bitters for Erysipelas in  my face and g-eneral rtiii down state  of my health.    I  tried many rem-;  edies but all failed to cure.    I then  (tried B.B.B.    T\v67 bottles   nearly  !, cured jne and,four bottles completely  I cured me."  Cape;  m  111 CI'  an it  -*ISS> -*SS- -^to- ���������03a-'  ,. The machinery is .tho<:best to be had in the country���������  the workmen are all experienced,���������so that nothing but  the best .work is turned out.     ���������' " .    ,  Orders from a distance solicited.    .  Goods sent in by express or otherwise have immediate  attention and are promptly returned.  .LI������TT ���������.'&'" McMILL  Contractors-  ���������:     and, Builders.  Factory opposite the C. P. It. freight shed. \  Plans unci Estimates  . Pnrnished on all  Clnsscs of Building.  P.O.Box 155.  Sash and Doors, Frames and Mouldings on hand or to order  ' . on short notice. '.'  Dealers in Rough and Dressed Lumber,  Shingles, Lath. Lime and Brick.  CALL AND GET PRICES.  SANDON, B. C.  Dry Goods! p^ Goods pry Goods!  We have just received 11 larctc shipment from the east.  NEW DRESS PATTERNS.   '��������� KtW FANCY SILKS.-  NEW/FLANNELETTES.      MEW EIDERDOWN.  Ladies', Misses' and Children's (Health Brand) Underwear.  We also carry a full line of Carpets, Linoleums, Floor Oilcloths,1'  Curtains and Window Shades.  The lining Review, $2.00 A YEAR.  liiiiiiiniiiiHuiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiHiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiuiiiir  rs  >'"-   V:  ^1.  J^gT^^^^  :*.' THE MINING ^REVIEWS-SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, .1900.  11  II:  k  f I  '���������U  7 :   .NOTICE.: ,,���������'���������  ������������������ , ,'���������  I'.,   Notiee'is hereby given, that., an' application will bo  made  to ..the  Legislative  :��������� Assembly, of the Province of British Gol-  ' nmbia,  at.its next session, for an act to  incorporate a-   Company with following  powers :���������  To carry 011 the business of miiiers of  every description ; to advance^ promote  and foster the mining industry'of British  ���������Columbia and more especially "to advance,  foster and protect tin.", interests oi'Silver-  ��������� Lead producing mines; ���������to ciiriy on evory  description of commercial or financial  business ; to piirehase,.li'-ase or exchange,  mines, mineral hinds, or...mining rights;  '��������� to deal in mines, metals :uid minerals of  ��������� every kind'and description ;.to acfjmrcv  'bv.ii'ny  lawful means, "water ��������� rights and'  ��������� privileges, and to'-1 Ornish  wafer .power;  to build mills and factories of every kind-  and description.;  to aci.piire timber limits  'and timber lands; toorgani/.e and promote ��������� jomt'.stoek' companies and manage  and control,the same; to take shares of  "other interests in such companies; .to  build" operate-and in any manner ileal  '���������"with''' samplers,    concentrators,";   mills,  ���������smelters, refineries prfoundaries ; to buy;  sell  and. deal  in ores,  metals,   mineral  ' 'substances of all kinds ; to deal in, make,  si"ii and execute promissory notes,..bills,  of exchange and all kinds of. negotiable  instruments; to deal in 'real:.estate;  to  'build, ' operate, bay and soil, and. to  generally deal in all kindsr;.pf factories  and plants lor7 tlie manufacture, of  machinery of all kinds ;; to,, build -ships,  railways and. train ways.;.'to, use water,  steamy electrinity7or any, other power as'  '.a-'motive'power; to deal in stocks, shares  -or bonds or debentures of any. Company  or association ; to act as ..a principal,  factors or agents in relation to individuals  or corporaUons: to acquire 'from any  government, or 'legislature any rights,  privileges or. franchises;, to procure the  Company to be:registered in.any foreign  country ; to Construct,1 .improve,control  or subsidize, baths', parks, churches,  hospitals, sanitariums and private and  public works of any kind ; to establish,  subsidize and. .maintain ������������������newspapers, and  ���������.publishing , and printing plants; to  establish -and maintain clubs and' associa-,  ������������������ tions ; to., carry- on the ' business of iron  and   steel   converters,    wood ' workers,  "machinists',���������'metallurgist's, and to manufacture and deal' in every, kind of explosive- material;: to: construct., operate  and maintain, bridges, ways, ferries,  wharves, railways, '.tramways, telephone  and telegraph = 'lines, and': "to, .'carry-, on  the business of-,' transportation, and express, with jiowdr to act as. bailees, and  common carriers; to generate electricity  for .the supplying . of. light,' heat and-  power; for the use of the: Company' or  for private' or'- public use; tb; carry on  the business of mining,-smelting and refining in all its branches; to expropriate  lands for the purpose of the Company;  tb deal iii coal and timber lands and all  kinds of real and personal property ;".to  I'aise or borrow.money by or upon the  issue of bonds, notes, mortgages, debentures   or' the   pledge   of;.any   of- the  'Company's  assets; to act  as  trustees;  ���������to acquire, all the other rights, privileges  and franchises as may be. incidental to  or conducive to the attainment of the  objects of the Company as set.out above,  or any of them. '.'���������'���������-.'.'������������������'  Dated at Sandon, B.C.,- Nov. Sth, 1S90.'  FRANK L. CHRISTIE,  .Solicitors for Applicants.  .������������������' ���������'.'���������      MOTHERS JCNO\V-  How serious a thing it is to have their  kttle ones' f=u fl'ering from worms. " Dr.  Low's Worm Syrup is a pleasant i-pni-  edy to take and quickly rids the system  of' those   dangerous parasites.     Price  2octs.  CERTS F! CftTE.^QM ������11P ROj EM ERTS.  ^~"     "^^       KOTi.CE  'jlorn   Fracliona.,  ,TotW!:i - Fractional.   HlRh  Ore  Fractional- ' unci   M'izeppa   Mineral  Claims situate in 111'1 Sloean .Minim; dlvl-  : sion of  West, KonLon'iiy  ilisuict,.   Where  located: ��������� Adjoining thelrialio a a J Alamo  ..mines. ,      ��������� *  , , Take notice that T.lrerbortT. Twins', njrcnl  iorGeorgo W. Hughes,  Free Minor's Uertili-  catc  No.  U-1075,   and "I he  ScottishColonial  Sold Fields, l".td., Free Miner's Certificate S<>.  1.1S59,  intend, sixty days I'rom date hereof, to  apply lo tlie Mining Recorder lor CerLlii.-.-ilis  ol lmprrvements, for the purpose of ob:aln-  a Crown Grant of each of tho above claims.  And further takbiiot.lcn tliat, action, under  Section 37, must bo-commenced belore.the  Issuance ol such Certificate of! improvements.  Tlated tills 23rd day oi.N'ovomber, ISil'J.  HIORllEllT T. TAYIGG.  .NOTICE.  Ferry No. 2  Mineral   Claim, situate in   the  Slocan  jrinlnt; division  of West Koote-  nay  uistrict.   "Where   located:     Wilson  creek.  Take notice Unit, T, AVilliain A. Bauer, net-  hiK as n'Kent- for Slocan  Lake Milling Com-  ''pnu'i. Limited/Free  Minor's Certificate No.  .'B ITtiS'i,   intend,  sixty  days from   the date  nuivoi, lo apply to Hie Mining 1,'econler for a  tlcrtiflcatc of I inprovements, for the purpose  of obtaining   a Crown   Grant on  the above  claim.  And further take notice that action, under  Section 37, must, be coinmcncod belore tho  issuance of such Cert illcale of 1 inprovements.  .Dated this lSth day of January, 1000.  \V1 LU AM A. HAUKlt. P. J/. S.  50   YEARS'  EXPERIENCE  tD������ Marks  Designs  Copyrights &c.  Anyone sondlng n skotch nnd description may  quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an  invention is probably pnlont.able. Communications strictlycontldontial. Handbook ou Patents  aentfroo. Oldest .agency for securing patents.  ,  Patents taken throuch Munn & Co. receive  special notice, wltliout charge, In tho  A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest circulation of any scientttlc journal. Termo, $3 a  Tear: four months, $1. Sola by ull newsdealers.  iUNM & Co.36,?ro!id^ New York  Branch Office, C25 F St., Washington. D. C.  , Tlie three gi'.eat vital factors '������  of this body of ours are the 1  heart, the nerves ahdtho blood. fc������  It is because; of the. .triple p  power possessed \by Milburri's M  Heart and NervePills of making %  weak,' irregular, beating hearts  strong, and steady; toning tip  lim down, shattered, nervous  systems - and: supplying , tboso  olornehts necessary to make  thin,' .watery bleed rich, arid  red, .that, so'- many -wonderful  eureo havo been accredited to  S ".this remedy." "���������',������������������   ,.'',''  Hcreistbo cti-se of Mrs. Ri  J. Arnold, VvToodstoek, 7N.B.,  who says:  Sti      "I v,-as troubled for, somo  S3 timci with nervous prostration  !S| mid general weakness,, feeling  ^���������'h;i'itabl6, debilitated and sleep-.-'  -''  less nearly all. tho tiino.    My  ent.iro1 system    beeaiae    run  doivn.   As; soon as ' I,: -began  talcing   Jlilburh's. Heart  arid '  Korvo Pills.    I  realized that  they .had a calmiiig;  soothing',.  ���������jiilluende  upon ��������� the    nerves.  ^3 Every dose seemed to help the,  Kk  euro., Theyrestoredmy sleep,  ���������M  ly. sfcrengthoned   my nerves   lind  M gave tbiie tbmy,eiitire':sy8teiii.:  Heart:  -������������������'��������� Xrv  <L'OJJ?HIS:ii������TK������N nnil .  , :ii! E.S.ING ������1S������5.4SES.  SI������8H"������'SK������ of K2.������������JB>,  c������w������!M.'jn>a������'  OF AffETBTS,  WEIillLLV.'V, tho Jtcuc-SU'i of tills ariJelo  nrn :i:o.-.i- isiaKi5r<.'5.l.  By ths'o!'! of T!;o D1-..& ];. Envjlsion.I.have  gotieu !���������!���������! t-:' :\ haci-.mj; co-.ial'-'-ybicli had troubled  aic for cvt>. ;i ye;:,-, ?.:������������������ - !:������vo ^aiiitsd considerably in v.::,: ;ht.  .��������� . ���������; ������������������.  T. H. WINCH AM, C.E., Montreal.,;  .iOc. and ������1, per Bottle  ,"  DAVIS 2c LAWi-llvkcH CO., Limited,. .'.  .MuMHUi.  M. L. Grimniett, ll^b.  baiuustkr,'   solicitok,   ]stotary -  Poplic, Etc."'  .'Sandon,    B. C.  :-.:. wantbd: -,"  A partially developed mining property, nny  class ol ore if it lias commercial values.   A  dividend-paying mine, or one within sight of  being- dividend paying is preferred..  HOPK GRAV.lflL'TCY&CO.,  '5311 Hastings Street, Vancouver.  PRIVATE LESSONS.  In 'French, German, or on the Violin,  .hy T.J-. Barron, B. A. (McGill), aiul  violin pupil of Jules Hone,, Montreal.  Terms, &.c, on application at ��������� CJill'e's  bookstore.      '���������' .      ,      ,  ^Cook's Cotton Boot Compoimrl  ��������� ^l Is siiceessfully used monthly by over  J10,000 Ladles. Safe, effectual. Ladles ask  your druggist for Cook's Cotton Root Compound."Take no other, as all Mixtures, pills and  imitations are dangerous. Prioo, No. 1,41 per  fcos; No. 8,10 degrees stronger, $S per box. No.  1 or 2, mailed on receipt of price and two S-cent  stamps. Tlie Cook Company Windsor, Ont.  85?-\Noa. 1 and 2 sold and recommended by all  responsible Druggists in Canada.  Sold in Sandon by the McQueen Co.  and F. J. Donaldson; Druggists.  AND SOO LINE.  m    DIRECT  1     ROUTE.  ��������������� TO $LL FOIMTS.  First-class Sleepers on all trains from  Kevelstoko and Kootenay Landing.  TOURIST OAKS pass Medicine Hat,  Daily for St. Paul, Sundays anil Wednesdays for Toronto. Fridays for Montreal and Boston. The same cars pats  Kevelstoko one dav earlier.  ..DAILY. TRAIN  S.O0 Leave Sandon       Arrive 10.30  Connections daily to points reached  via, Kakusp and Sandon, to points  reached via Rosebery and Slocan City.  Tickets issued through and baggage  checked to destination.  For rates and full information address the nearest local agent, or to  S. A. COURTX EY, Agon t, Sandon  "W. V. Andorson.Trav. Pass. AgU, Nelson  K.J. Goyle, Asst. Gen, Puss. Agt.,'Vancouver  Slocan  Kaslo and  ^"/���������\Tl!m z^m. v/7,:  Trains run on Pacific Standard Time  ?t$^*$Hfc*$p *$?���������������$? ^^ *$? ^^^e4^'':  Goiiig West.  ���������Daily.  'KilRlo"  Going Kast,  Arrive 3.55 p.in,  Leave S.00 u.m  ",.  ,   S.32 ���������'.",- South '-Folk     :."���������     S.iM  ��������� "-     0.W)   " ���������"       SpoulOK ��������� '���������   '"     ,2.25"  ,'���������      'J.-15 '" ��������� ���������-Wlilion-aler      ���������'      2.10-   "  "   :  9.S5   "      , KearT,ake  '.   "    < 2.(10    "  ��������� ���������������������������'.'     in.12'"'  . ���������'���������McOnlunn .'"-,"      l.-ir, "���������������  " .  30.25   ".    .,     Jj!i!lo\ 's   .     "    ,'l.:5.|    ."  "  "     ll).?,-'!   "   Cody Junction  '" '   1.23"'"'..  ArrlvellMp. ."     .:   Sandon      Leave 1.15   ,"  ,���������'.������������������',','    '.OODY-mtANCH.     . ..;'���������'  Lenveil.'inn.m.      Sandon    Arrive 11.-10 a.m,  '-.'������������������   1.1.15 '",        Cody",      ,- ;     ��������� 11.25   " ���������  ''''���������' ''\     ;     '���������������������������,.:    GEO. F.OOPELAN15,  '.  Superintendenl,  ForcliciipRailroad and SleainsliipTicKets  to and.from nil,points,apply to'S. CAMi'ifi:r.i.  Agent. Sandon. .    .',..���������  Northern  Pacific  ,P  <y  THE, FAST 'UNB  TO ALL. POINTS. v  The Dining Car Route via Yellowstone  'Park is safest-and best..  Solid Vestihnlo Trains equipped with  '.- Pullman Palnco Curs, ,,  ..vEJegant Dining Unrs,    ::  . .Slodern Day Coaches,  7 Toiirist.'Sleeping Cars.  Through ticketsto all plonts in tlie United  Statesn'nd O.-innda.  'Steamship tickets to all parts of the world:  Tickets to Cliinn and Japan via Tacoiiia  and Northern Pacific-Bteainsiiip Go: .  Trainsdepartlrom Spokane:   .     ' ,   :'  'Np-1, West nt 3.40 p. in., dally.  ..   No. 2. Kasf at,7.30 p: in., daily. ,,..'���������������������������   '  For information, lime cards; maps and  tleketsapply to agents of the S.V. 'AN.,.  " 'F. D. GIUBS, Gen.Ageut, Spokane, Wash.  A. K.CHAHLTON, A.ssf.Gen.Pnss."AKent..  255 Jlorriso'n St., Go    ilrd, Portland, Ore.  ���������;/' n FEW /INTEREStlNSi .  ^;;'^v/::;F^tT5^:^:,7;';  When people are contemplating a trip  ���������whether on bu.sinessor pleasure, they naturally want the host.service obtainable so far as  speed, comfort, and safely is concerned. Employees oft he Wiseonsin Central Lines are  paid lo serve the public, and our trains are  operated so as to make close connections with  diverging lines at all Junction points.  Piillinan Palace Sleeping and Chair Cars on"  through trains. :.-.,..  Dining Gar service excelled. Meals served  a hi Carte.  "    ��������� ' . <  ��������� ,  In order to obtain this first-class service,  ask tlie ticket agent, to sell you a ticket over  THE W1SCQN8!������ CENTRAL UNES  iind you will niakedirect connections at St'.  Paul for Chicago, Milwaukee and all  points  Cast. ��������� .- ��������� ;      ;,   ���������   '    i;      .  For any  further Information ,call on any  ticket, agent, or correspond.with . ���������-.- ������������������  Jas..Pond,;       ,     or Jas. A. Clock,  Gen. pa's-.'Affent-, '���������     General Accent, '"  -"���������'-,   ,Jtilwaiik6'e,\Vis.       . 2-16 Stark St.,    .  -Portland. Or.  COMPANY.    .  Operating Ivnslo ���������& Slocan Eailway '  International Navigation & Trad. Co,  Schedule of Time  Pacific Standard Time  ���������KA'SLO -fi SLOCAN ^RAILWAY-  _Passeiit,'er . train for' Sandon . and way  stations leaves Kaslo at.S a m; Daily, return-  inc, leaves Sandon ill 1.15 p m, arriving at  3.55 pm.   .  .  .International Navigation .tTradins Co.   .  Operallnjron Kootemiy Luke and Ttlver.  SS. 1NTERNAT3QNAL    ���������  ..LlU'-l  I'll    I'i.tUlU       11 U I I I IJ1MI IIW1      .T '   I'M    I ,������   , ,    1 LI til I V/(  also S F cS N train to and lrom Spokane at  Five Mile Point.   ������������������-..-  SS. ALBERTA  Leaves Nelson !:!r=Bo:inor-iSiEarry; Tuesdays and- Saturdays at" a in. connecting  with Steamer International from Kaslo at  Pilot Kay: returning, leaves Uonner's Ferry at  S a in,; \Yednesdays. and Sundays, .connecting with Steamer International for  Kaslo, Lnrdo and Armenia. I>"h'cct connections made at. Conner's Ferry with the Great  Norihcrn Kailwny for al.'. points east, and west  LAiino-PiiNOAN l.livi.sio.v.���������Steamer International leaves Kaslo.for Lnrdo and Argenla  at-S.-lo.pm, Wednesdays and Fridays.  Steamer Alberta leaves Kaslo for Lnrdo and  Arnenta nt.S p in, Sundays., ...  . Steamers rail at principal landing's in both  direclions.and at other poiiils.wlien sljriinlled.  ���������' Tickets sold to all points In Caiiadaaiid the  United States.  To ascertain rales and full information,  address  ItOHEUT I H.V 1 KG, Jrahago'r. Kaslo.  SPOKANE FULLS 8 HORTIiERN  NELSON S FORT SHEPPA H* RY.  7   red mm mm  The only All-rail route without change  of cars betwen Nelson and   Poss-  land  and   Spohano  and   Kossland.  i.ka'vb      , DAILY AKHIVIC  (1.211 a.m Nelson fi.'So p.m.  12.(15 a.m Rossi am! U.20.p.'m.  8.80 a.m  ..Spokane. ...3.1(1. p.m.  The train that, loaves'Nelson at IS.20 a.m.  makes close connections- at Spokane with  trains for all  F/iaFIC C0/35T'  POINTS.  Passengers for Kettle T\ivnr and Eonnd-  ;   flry_Oreek connect at Marcus with  Stage daily.  C. G.Dixon, G. P. T- A.  G.T. Tackahury, Gen. Agent, Nelson.  ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP TICKETS  To and' from .European points via  Canadian nnd American line.a. Apply  for sailing: da-tea, rates and full information to any 0. P. R. agent or  S. A. COURTNEY, Agent, Sandon.  yVP.F.Cumiiiings,  Gen.S S. Agt.,  Winnipeg'     '  WHEN IN, NEED OF A GOOD  Made in.the  latest  styles and finest goods, ,with the  best workmanship, try  G-EO. KAY, The Tailor.  Opposite Hotel Sandon. ���������  lastiHiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiiniiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiMiiuiiiniiiiiuiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniitiiiMiiiiiitiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiainil  Who buy small a quantity of writing paper and envelopes at a time  lose money. Figure up your cost of writing material for. the  past year, and try a 500 or 1000 printed order���������then you will  save money���������besides having neat advertisements on your own  stationery, which will help your business.      The Mining Review.  =i:iiii!ii!nii!!!iiMiiuiisiHuifiHiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiit!!i!iiii!iiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:!iiiiiiiniii]i!i:iitiii:iiiii!ii:i:iiii!;iiiiiiii:iiiii:i::i:iiir.ii!ii  'PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES.  E. A. CflnERON,  Agent  for Sandon, New Denver,  Silverton.  m  gift  rr1"?  ���������:������Vi,;^";.:5  T-lL|-*X!.1l  , 11 J*1.. 1������  *i-     C*    ���������i,.*"V.  JlF    ������-j t   ������������������'���������^ifcit* ,"���������'"1 BJHKrwsat&nonrn^rw  THE! LIVED IB 6000 B. 0,  ������������������  aim  refnffik  FACTS FROM VERY ANCIENT TOMBS  '.'    OPENED IN.EGYPT.  Fiirsiiis   ICodlcs   Xierv . Ilsi-<l   Tlicn ��������� The  Habit-   or the  IVoplc   ������crc  Very   ������>������-  lercnt  - frWi'ii    fflial    Tliey   Are    Now���������  Tiinlly Wsi������ roll.  ���������   How long   has man   been on   earth?.  The answer lo this question  is being  modified, by every turn of the explorer's  spade.     The expedition  sent  out  by the   University    oi    Pennsylvania,  which h.is been at work ai Nutter, has,  through Prof. HJlprecht,  its  Ass'yrio-  logist,   sot   tho    date of C.COO or 7,000  B.C., on some of the monuments discovered:    Now comes M. E. Amelineau  ''to re-ontorce these dates by discoveries in prehistoric -Egypt. The full report of the discoveries has not yet been  published but this investigator has  prepared, tho way to it by issuing tho  first volume of .his account' of the ex-  cavatiousc at AbyJos, the sacred residence of Osiris. Here he has found  p-ro-historic tombs, some 150 in number, the contents of which go back at  least 8,000 years. Fortunately for us,  ,who. feel curiosity as tcx tho doings of  those distant ages  and  the  men who  -lived then, the Egyptians had the  notion that death was but the bridge  from this life to the next, which would  resemble this one so closely that'   the  : very food and furniture used here  .would be useful thero. On this account, they furnished, tho tombs as  they would furnish homes. Therefore  ;.... in them have been found the very food  and the utensils which the. men and  ,women of that time used while alivo.  It is to this fortunate accident that  is due the exactness ��������� with    which    a  , nineteenth century oxoavator can say  precisely how those who died 6.CO0  years B. C, lived, what1 they ate, how  they dressed and what was the- rango  of mind and civilization, jn that an-i  cicnt time.  OLD CEREALS,  .hn the jars and', vases of those old  tombs Amelineau has found various  cereals, like wheat and rye, proving  the agricultural tastes of those people.  Date stones aro excellent evidence that the date palm' was even  then appreciated for its food, products.  Nor were these pre-historic people  vegetarians, for if they were why  should there bo the bones of oxen and  the horns of the gazelle in their tombs?  Amelineau has actually taken us back  to the stone age and' the beginning of  the uso of metals in, Egypt, for he has  found innumerable arrow heads cunningly 'chippsd'out of flint, and knives,  scrapers an J saws made.of the same  hard material. The decorative instinct  was already alive, or why should theso  old w.orkrhen have spent days on polishing and chipping stone bracelets?  INLAID WOOD.  Besides the. common pots tor kitchen  use, and the fine vases for tho parlor,  ���������thero were discovered pieces of wood  .wonderfully inlaid with pieces of colored glass, showing that the secret of  manufacturing glass was known even  then. This seems to indicate a long  period' of preparation or development,  for men did not invent glass when they  were crude and uncivilized, lri fact,  tho discoveries at Abydos open so wide  a vista of. 'possibilities that we aro  scarcely surprised to hear that the  tombs of the goda of Egypt have been  actually found. . But before this  startling' discovery was made. M. Amelineau stirred up the world's Egyptologists by the announcement that he  had found the names; of 10 royal personages hitherto unknown, lie knew  that they were royal, for their names  .were written in a public device, and it  was just as if the. .sculptor had engraved King So and So. It is from these  designs that the word Pharoah is derived, or rather the devise signifies  Pharoah, from the Egyptian Per-aa.  "Great Hotise," ihat is, tho place of  tho court.  AVheu M. Amelineau opened souio of  these graves lie found them to bo the  tombs of these great unknown kings,  already acknowledged us kingc; ot Upper and Lower Egypt, but not yet  known as Sons oC the Sun, the t'ule  of the late Egyptian uionarch.s.,Among  these was one whose name he leads  Dan, and another Qa, and 11 besides,  some of whose titles could not bo  read, as" they were entirely now. For  instance, ono was indicated, by tho  sculpture of a serpent, but how this  Is to bo pronounced or, what, it means  no Egyptologist has yet found out. On  comparing the names juat found with  all the long list of Egyptian Pharoahs,  not one like any of them could bo  found, and it was very logically concluded, that these antedate Menos,  and that oniy now arc we reaching  the earliest history of Egypt. ,  PRIMITIVE TOMBS,i   .  The tombs are. primitively constructed, some of the walls being so irregular  that it is to be doubted whether the  plumb line was then known. But,  nevertheless the interiors       of  the tombs were most interesting. Some  of them were so short that it was* evident that no humnn body could have  been laid here at full length, and tho  explanation was forthcoming that at  last in a tomb which no vandal Arab  tied reached, a body was found all curled up and surrounded with e.a n hen-  jvare pots, -containing for.fl,' o'ntmrn s, ,  etc. Of course', thero was no thought  then ot" oral a m ng an I it was entirely  due to the dryness of. the soil that the  body had been preserved at- all. In tho  tomb of the Pharoah whose name was  in !io ted by a si"p.nt,   ii    was   found  that Ihiire was a numbjr oi!. adjo.ning  chambers, probably intended    for    ihe  bodies of his wives or of his prominent court officials..   The tomb of ono  of these, by , name    Nebnofer,    "good  master," a royal   scribe,    was   among  those found.'    .The. floor of  this timb  ! was made of heavy tyenmore planks,  ! which may well siarul    as    the oldest  ! plunks, in the world, being some 8,100  land  odd yeurs old,  as  well  as can  be  1 estimate J.      Instead of    having-  been  I nailed down to cross pieces, they wero  j simply   tied    together    by    bands    of  1 bras.*, which were still found in place.  The mortar,' too, was - found    to have  lbee.11 mixed with fibres of palm loaves,  much as hair is now used to miX( wilh  plaster,  proving that this secret  was  known a tew thousand years ago.   ,  CIVILIZATION TRACED.  It is almost potsible to trace tho development of civilization step by step  through these remains, for hero are  earthen plates so rudely shaped as to  prove that tho potter's wheel, one of  the first inventions of primitive man  the world over, was not yet known.  Then como other plates and pots and  jugs just as surely turned on thai very  useful machine,;showing the next step  upward. TLj following evolution of  inventive genius shows itself in tho  more, elaborate pottery, and the use of  metals for making ;rudo tools. Hard  stone was how cut and shaped, diorite,  onyx and rock crystal jara and vases  were made with so much art thatlh.dr  highly pohi>h3.1 surfaces astonish tho  modern discoverer. It seems as if the  use of the diamond or some , other  hard substance must have been known  by the people who hollowed out some  of those vases, on tho Inside of which,  are still to be seen the marks of the  cutting implements. It was found  that some of tho tombs were paved  with a kind of rose-colored marble,  not native to Egypt, and therefore this  in which the shading of (he plumage is  must have boon imported from .soma  distant country, showing that the  men of that time travelled and believed in imported, goods much as wo do.  PERFECT WORKMANSHIP.  iFrom 3tagc to stage the perfection  of tho workmanship and the caro displayed in ornamentation increase constantly. The primitive geometrical  designs on the earliest pottery give  way to drawings from life, arid- there  are representations of 'ostriches so  lifelike as to be easily recognized; a  carving of a duck's head in hard schist  brought out, and a carving of a hu-  mn.n hand in the samr, hard'material,  whe.ro tho lines of the. finger nails are  well defined. , As to wood carving  theso old artists were experts. They  took the ebony which' they had, to import and carved perfect statuettes of  lions; or of Nubian women/ which- can  be'identified as such by the Low forehead, angular ��������� face, small eyes, prominent cheekbones, large mouth, thick  lips, arid hair parted into! a number of  tresses. Hero is a frog carved) out of  diorite, as unmistakable as if it had  been done by a modern artist.,   1   ���������'  The men and women were alike fond  of personal adornment, for beads, of  clay covered with blue enamel, of  cornelian, amethyst, emerald and rock  crystal, all pierced for stringing, the  strings having long since rotted away,  w-ere found in largo numbers. Here,  too, were ivory and wooden' instruments with which the eyelids 'and  brows were colored red oi\ black to  make the eyes appear larger. Vanity  is then at. least 8.C0U years old.  ROTTEN WOODWORK.  The furniture, was only found in bits,  for the woodwork had generally rotted  away,: an 1 all that remained ws. the  ivory legs of sofas���������tho most remarkable finds made. These were so largo  that it is certain (hey. must havo been  made of the tusks* of the hippopota-i  mus. That this animal, was! hunted! by  the'.early Egyptians is'well established  by wall paintings, but the proof furnished by the finding of these tusks is  far more conclusive, carrying tliej eusr-  torn back,several centuries. The manner in which these legs; are carved to  represent the legs df oxen is one of  the marvels of all who have had the  good fortune to sec them.  The work of tho jeweler's of this early age is by no means primitive, for  there arc bronze bracelets, cunningly  turned into serpents, alloys of silver  and gold, copper and brass,' and other  tools of the earlier stage whon pure  copper was used. To illustrate how  near akin mankind has been through  these my raids of years it. is only necessary (omontiqn the discovery in one of  the tombs of wlm;tl must have served  as a baby's nursing bottle in the long'  ago. It was an earthen,' vase, with a  hole in the side, into which ri bit of  cloth might be inserted that' flic baby  might draw his milk from the vase. Is  there anything new under the sun?   ���������  DOGS OF WAR.  1   Krai  Animals  V.-ihiatilr,  ICnl li.'u-U nt, the  Wrong Time.  There is only one drawback that can  possibly attend tho taking of dogs on  war expeditions, and. that is that they  may bark whe>n a night surprise is intended ; but even this does not apply  when duo precautions are taken, and  in recent campaigns the presence of  favorite dogs of officers has been repeatedly  referred   to.  In the German anhy a great number of dogs are trained in connection  witn the ambulance corps. At the  command "Seek," and a gesture indicating some point of the compass, they  start off and when they come across  one, of tho men specially lying clown  in imitation of the wounded, they take  up his cap, helmet or handkerchief and  and bring .this back to the ambulance  men, whom they lead back to the  spot. These dogs were a striking  part of the show at tho last maneuvers  WAR BOW LESS HORRIBLE  EFFECT OF IMPROVED MACHINERY  AND MODERN SURGERY.  Lous Jlanse  Itnllets Jlorc Humane  Than  T!x>,c   or  OI<l-H;ili:l-I,>-ll.,ll(i .Conlllcli  Itclc^alcil 10 Itarbiii-laiiH ol' (he I'h.hi���������  IiilcrcsdiiK Suliji'cl IHscimecl.  Powder    has spoken.7 It rests  with  that great agent, now to put an  end  to  the' Anglo-Boer conflict.'" A signature  of' blood    will  alone    settle  tho  proposed  suggestion   to intervene.  Ono can only deplore this struggle,  which brings into play so many human vices and destroys so many lives.  If it causes joy to the monstrous but  happily scarce apologists of war, under the fallacious pretext that-wars  are regenoratbry, it plunges into consternation and too often into-mourning those, who do not think men were  created to detest and destroy one another.  Each people seeks to do better than  its neighbor. It is a constant tendency, a regular game with a record to  beat. In 185G the Germans held the  record with the needle gun, but this  record has often been beaten since. In  1870 they held the record for' superiority in numbers, thanks to which  France was suddenly invaded.  In the. days of Napoleon victory was  largely a matter of speed. So it may  be said that the great Captain won  his battles with his soldiers' legs. Today, when railways have made the concentration of troops rapid and easy,  the god of battle does not favor as  much as at tho beginning of the' century those who arrive first on the field  of action. And inis because a new  factor has made its appearance ���������tho  rapidity, precision and efficaciousness  of fire.  HOW VICTORIES WERE WON.  The victors of Austerlitz, Jena and  Wagram were only armed with rudimentary flint guns, the. smooth bores  of which took only a round leaden bullet, carrying from, GO to 80 meters.  And, even then, rain had only to fall  during the battle to silence their  weapons, since, if the powder in the  pans was wet it would not light by  the spark: from the Clint! As for the  cannon, they discharged solid shot and  bombs, hilt not to any" great distance.  After 100 years nearly all the conditions which govern the art of war  are changed. Hahd-to-band fighting  is a mere accident; engagements begin at a distance of several kilometers,  and with weapons so perfect that the  two sides hit without seeing each other, and generally produce wounds sufficient to stop a,man's advance' and  put him hors de combat without seriously  endangering  his life.  For the last 20 years ballistics have  progressed continuously, and firearms have undergone, and are continually undergoing, fresh improvements. ... Tho modern weapon, at once  more complicated in its structure and  more simple in its use, has tho enormous advantage over the old of a  more powerful fire and perforation,  more simple, more sure and more rapid, which requires of the sliooters a  minimum of instruction and effort.  Projectiles have beea fittod with a  metal casing which enables them to  be made longer. Tho uso of smokeless powders of great explosive power  has extended. Lastly, as. a consequence of recent researches, it has  been possible to reduce the caliber of  weapons, fhus reducing the weight of  the rifle and projectiles to a minimum,  and consequently enabling each  marksman to carry a larger number  of cartridges.  GOOD LONG RANGE WORK.  It is sufficient how. to shoot in front  of    one    to:, be    a practically    useful  marksman.   As far back,as at Saint-  Privat in 1870 man wore shot at 1,000  meters,   and  in  1S78,  at  Plevna,     tho  Turks,   though    very    iniexiperroiioed,  opened fire at distanca of 1,500 and 2,-  (XK) meters.     At  the present time 1,-  r>00  meters  is  ho   longer a great   distance,   but   a normal   firing   distance,  especially   in    defense.      The   perfor- j  ating  power is such  that it  is  mani-1  fe.stcd  far bcyu.nd 2,0:)!) meters.  At  a distance of. 2,000  meters an   8  mm.  bullet  has still enough  force  to  pass   through  a front  rank  man  and  wound     the    man  in  bis    rear  when  troos>s  are drawn  up  two  deep.      At  the average fighting distance two    or!  three  men  may  be  wounded  by    tho.'  samu   bullet    at   that  short  distance,!  without        saying anything        of  the   greater  thickness,   now   given   to!  works  of  fortification on   the  battle-j  field,     a single  projectile  would   havo  force enough to go through four, five  or six men.     Thus, in Dahomey, it was  observed   that  a    bullet,   aftor   penetrating a treo 45 centimeters in thick-1  ness, still went through five men.  These are astonishing facts which  will not be seen in reality us often as  some people say! For this to be die.  case it would be necessary not only  that the bullet should undergo -'no���������deviation, after having passed through  I he first, obstacle, a thing which always happens at least after tho second, but also that its point should not  be deformed. Now Lagarde's experiments have proved (hat this happens in half the number of shots.  IN THE BULLET'S WAKE.  It is seen nowadays that, the wounded are more numerous, but the killed  much    fewer.   A supremo consolation  I103 in the fact that the wounded not  only receive less serious wounds, but  are surrounded with such immediate  caro that they more frequently recover their health. As a last analysis  the wounded, though they are, more  numerous,  show   a lower  mortality.  With the ballistic power of modern  weaiponn men are hit at great distances. Under these conditions the  bullet only passes through tho tissues  without tearing them, or perforates  the bones without producing real sequestrum. And the dressing to be  done is much,more simple. IU is sufficient to place at tho orifices caused  by the ingress and egress of tho bullet  pads of. aseiitic or antiseptic gauze  kept in place by. a bandage lo see tho  wound become cicatrized. If tho  wounded man shows a little feveron  the evening of his wound the diei,sing  is tfilcm off and tho passage made by  the bullet syringed with antiseptics to  drive/out the foreign bodies which  cause the fever.  What happened of old? Many soldiers , succumbed tb slight wounds,  carried off by complications which it  was not known how to foresee or pro-  vent. It is a very little thing" not to  touch the wound, but simply cover it  with stuff from which all the germs  have been removed. And if tho  wound is infected either by earth or  by fragments of clotheB, or from any  other cause, the use of sterilized  probes to sound the flesh, or ascoptio  bistouries to open it if necessary, and  of antiseptic liquids suffices to put  matters right and to keep tho wounded man from, the danger of putrid infection, which used to make so many  victims.  OPERATIONS LESS PAINFUL.  Supposing that it is a question of tho  shattering of the knee by the bursting of a shell, or the comminutive  fracture of a thigh, the present progress of surgery gives tho patient  more chances of , recovery than of  death. Formerly the limb was sacrificed, and the operation was accompanied by tho most horrible sufferings. At tho xwesent time the uso of  ether or chloroform renders the operation as easy for the operator as it  is painless for the patient.  The average traumatism necessitated a great use of the knife. For an  open' fracture : exf the tibia necourse  was at once had to amputation of tho  leg. Injury to the bones of tho foot,  led to similar consequences. Now,  neither tho knife nor the saw comes  into use, except in very rare cases. It  is aseptics and antiseptics which allow  of seriously wounded soldiers being  preserved from complications. Tho  preservation of limbs is the general  rule, and it is only when everything  else fails, when everything is shattered or torn off, that the surgeon do-  cider) to'amputate.  A surgeon had to possess an unusual  degree:of nerve to- preserve the necessary calmness during an amputation made without'anaesthetios. As  a consequence tho principal idea was  speed in , the carrying out of operations, with, as a result, an unfavorable influence on their success.: Tho  skillof this or that' surgeon was legendary; to-day this equality is relegated to tho second or third place.  There is no necessity to hurry ; chloroform allows the operator to proceed  quietly, surely,and efficaciously. The  surgeon has all the time he needs, but  his work must be irreproachable.   ,  Accordingly, recoveries aro very  rapid; generally there, is no suppuration, whatever, may have been the  condition of the limb, while formerly  they were very stow, even if death did  not follow.  ADVANCED SURGERY HELPS..  Tho performance of an amputation  resembles but-little that of former  times, though.the cutting of the flesh  and bone: is necessarily the same. But  what was not done formerly was the  forcing back of the blood toward the  base of the member by means of an  elastic- band, thus preventing the flow  of the vital fluid, and allowing, the  surgeon to operate "a see." Then  there is tho cleaning with soap, alcohol and ether of the parts to be operated upon, the heating of 130 degrees of 140 degrees centigrade, of the  instruments and the bandages, the  sterilization of tho hands of tho  operator with soap and prolonged immersions in autisespitc liquids, the  employment of absorbent ligatures,  the minute' coaptation on tho wound  and the exact suture of its edges. The  consequence is a rapid local recovery,  so much so that in. 13 or 15 lays the  wound of an amputated thigh is healed, which formerly was ii matter of  months, if indeed, no fatal results  supervened  the aiimtm; train,  MORE BRAVERY NEEDED THAN IN  ANY OTHER SERVICE,  ~"~" ��������� r  AIvrayH In the Thlciicsf. br the Fight,. Hnt  Are Ocr<'iisclcHS-Ttii-lr Kustucnx Iu Sii| J  ���������ply  Slml .'mill  Slitll ������<> II11:  l'lrlns Une  Ifejrar<Uc*H <>!' <'<iiisi'iln<'iict;-..  It has been announced in the newspapers of late that among  the troops  leaving for South Africa have bednso  many   men   of   the "ammunition   column."     This tells nothing to the average reader,  howovor.      He  has hoard  of the Lancers and of the Dublin Fusiliers,   but   the  "ammunition  column"  is  a body   of  whoso existence  ho has  previously   been    ignorant,      and    at  Whose work he can only guess.   ;  Briefly, this ammunition column is  a branch of the Army Service Corps,  a bodj which acts as a sort of "Universal Provider" for the British army  iin the' time of war, and its duties are  to keep well up wilh tho firing line  during an engagement and seo that  it is well supplied with ammunition.  When setting off to attack the foe,  the ammunition is distributed as follows: Every man of the infantry and .  cavalry has the magazine of his rifle  or carbine, as the case may be; filled,  and he.carries 103spare rounds in his  pouches. Further supply of 200  rounds per man with a suitable allowance for the quick-firing machine  gun which is attached to each infantry  battalion is conveyed directly in the  rear of each regiment in a wagon  bearing a distinguishing mark to shew  to which corpa it belongs, and this  forms,the first reserve, from which  the soldiers' pouches aro replenished  aa  fast as  they  aro emptied.  'iJIDST PLYING BULLETS.  A small detachment of tho ammunition column accompanies every regiment into action to convoy the sup-  p.Jos from the wagon to the firing line.  The work which these men perform  is perhaps the bravest of any on the  field of battle, but it is a work of  which we hoar .little. Their duty  compels them to keep well up,with  tho firing line, and yet they take no  part in tne firing; though the enemy's  bullets may .be'falling', round them in  all directions, i Their business is ta  hurrj forward : the ammunition and  never mind what is hapx>ening in front  of them, and to this they devote themselves.  As the battle rages, however, the  supply.'of ammuni'ution in the wagons  at- the rear, of the position becomes  depleted; and it is at this stage 'that  the rear work of the anaiih body of  the ammunition column commences.  This body has for some time previously been hanging in tho background,,  well out of reach of the enemy's  shells, in charge of a long'string of ���������  wagons filled with projectiles of every, description. :Frcan. these the regimental wagons aro refilled. Not  only does this column carry the ammunition for the small arms, as the  rifles, carbines and machine guns are  described, but: the shells for .the artillery as-well. These shells'are of  man} kind, such as common shell,  plugged shell, shrapnel/and canister,  a,nd wherever the ������uus go these wagons must be close behind them, no  matter what the hazard, for a battery without ammunition in abundance is in' the same state as a first'  class modern battle ship with empty  coal buukers, .and-, with-'the..warships  of the foe rapidly bearing down upon  it.  "The stock of these wagons is in turn  replenished as soon as possible from  the main supply, which is maintained,  at the. base of the army  UNDER A STRONG GUARD.  The  ammunition  column  as  constituted  to-day  is a modern  innovation.  Formerly   every regiment   taking part  in  the  campaign detailed so many of  its  men   to  take charge  of  the   regi-v  mental  ammunition and to distribute  it,- but     this    somewhat    rough-aad-  ready system has been abolished in all   .  modern  armies, as "it  was found-that  ono regiment  might have ample am  Du'ringTbe Crimean War of 1851-55, | munition,  and yet the next one to it  from  the Crimea    to    Constantinople ���������' ���������"* ^ 'he failure of the ammunition  and from Constantinople to France.  It made equal ravages among the English and Russian  wounded.  During the war in.Italy in 1RSJ it  reappeared in the Italian, Austrian  and French hospitals. It broke out  during the Civil war in the Stales, in  Germany during the wars of 18G4 and  supply. This'was tho case, however,  with the two llriti.sh regiments at  Nicholson's Nek a few weeks ago, but  that was an -abnormal cirouiustiincu  brought about by tin- .'ji.tmipedo of the  mule.s which bore the spare ammunition, thus leaving the men with only  what     cartridges     they   had   in   theii  18(16, and finally during the campaign ! l1^11^^, and it^is unlikely^in the.ox-  of 1870-71. It has even reappeared in  more recent wars, but in a less intense form, much more mild, than at  the beginning "of the Century or that  of .1854-55.' Hospital gangrene is a  microbian malady and gives way to  antiseptic treatment. War must be  made against  it unceasingly.  A comparison of the surgical results  of.wars' i.n former days and those of  the present time is all to the advantage of  the latter.  QUICK DISEMBARKATION. .  A remarkable piece of disembarkation work was accomplished when the  Hawardoh Castle, reached Capo Town  recently. Her trotops, which numbered 1.700 men, together with stores,  ordance and rations for 14 days, were  landed and entrained in  10 hours.  treme that such a ease will ever.bap-  pen  again.  In. addition to feeding with ammunition' Ihe soldiers actually engaged,  in the fighiing line, the ammunition  column has other duties, such as attaching the fuses to the shells, and  aiding -the artificers in the repair of  damaged guns or gun carriages, and  during the whole (ime a war .lasts  one of the hardest worked bodies ol  men arc those employed in serving out  th'.1- ammunition.  ,. A RENEGADE lEXOLISHMAN. ;-  The editor of Voorfrekke.r, a King-  orsdorp- paper, which has gained notoriety of late by its violent attacks  on-the British race in general and the  'troops' in particular, is an English  curate, and late head master of .Aii-  wal   Public   School. One   Man's  Idea   of   What  Bieht.  is  TO REACH THE If ORTH POLE  A STEEL-CLAD RAM WILL  BE FITTED WITH SHARP SAWS.  I'clrolcnm Will Re. lf-eil as (lie Fuel tor  tin- New Cr.il'l, Which Will Hare K<!������ a  .limli-r.-tli* SjM'cd.  A new plan has boon devised by an  English   inventor  for  cutting  a pathway   through    the   ico   barrier     that  puard's   the  North  Polo.  It.is  an   ico  nrusher that  is to be attached  to tho  prow of a steam vessel nnd to be used  for   cutting   through   the   ice   just   as  a drilling  machine carves   a   passage  through   rocks.  . The idea originated with Mr.  Warrington  Caden-Powoll,    elder  brother,.      ......... .  of Sir George Baden-Powell, M.P.. and, ing the fast winter I was frequently  ��������� , , r. i T������ ,, i ��������� u ,���������.���������.>i- ' trombb?-d with lemo ba-k, so much so  Colonel B-iilen-Powell, who is now mok-| (il.nti j  w{jb unabl(l nt Umps  to sLoop  ing such a gallant defence against iho| w-,thaut a great dea^ ot pain and mt  DOING BIS DUTY.  Darlinni  Brown, of Kniinorc, Wna   Cnrril  of ttliciiniatl'iiii anil Eturlinrlii���������S js  It It HI* Only fo Jtrci. iiiuii'ml llio  Bleillrliic That  tlurcil    llliu���������  llotlil'i   KKIury   I'll in    Do  e:\cn .11 >ri- Than   Is  Claimed (or Tlii'i:i  Kenmore, Jan.  8.  Gentlemen :-  For some time; past I havo contemplated writing concerning the merits  of the well-known nnd wonderful medicine, Dodd's Kidney Pills,, but  (.hnomgh n>'g!nvt havo failed to accomplish what I now term my duty. Dur-  Bjors in Mafeking. The ice-crushing  craft will resemble the ocean wh.ilo-  baok. The deck oovering is to bo of  steel, studded with heavy rivets, tho  whole welded to stand extreme tem-  pernture such as would be met with  in   tho   Polar  regions.  At the apex of tho bow is a curious  screw, not unlike a series of circular  snrws. As the ship lies in tho water  this screw saw is seon to project several feet, and is partially out of the  water. At the end of tho shaft, which  is made of the toughest steel procurable, is a massive point that can bo  operated  as  a ram.  O   SAW   THROUGH  THE  ICE.  The idea of ,tho inventor is to send  the craft ahead at an ico pack or floo  . under a full head of steam, the propeller at tho stern and the screw at  the bow, both working together, although ono receives its power from an  aleotric engine, while the power of the  other comes from an engine driven  by   steam. __  The rapidly revolving screw and  ram combined will first crush into the  ico, impelled by tremendous power, ft  will then saw and bore its way  through the pack floo, throw.ng tho  ico upward and backward. In order  that tho flying ice may not injure the  vessel, a shield has been constructed  which will answer tho dual purpose  of withstanding tho heavy shocks of  tho waves and the bombardment of  the flying  ice.  PETROLEUM  AS  FUEL.  When built for moderate speed only,  this craft is especially designed for  battering and ramming ice, and its  propelling engines, which are to bo  compound triple expansion, will be of  fully' 1,500 horse-power. The latest  principle in the way of fueJ will be  followed, and' tho flame which heats  tha boiler will have petroleum as its  "  arce.'  The petroleum will be carried in a  tank heavily protected by steel, in that  portion of tho craft in which coal  bunkers are ordinarily located. Tho  tank room is made exceptionally largo,  considering the size of a boat, and will  contain enough oil to last for a long  voyage.  Well- forward in tho bow is placed  the powerful engine which runs the  Ice-crushing screw. Huge electrie motors and powerful gearing are the features of this engine, which will only  bo used when it is nocessary to cut a  channel through tho ico. The electricity is to be supplied by an immense  dynamo driven by tho main shaft. Below and around the electric engine aro  the steel tanks in which the petroleum  is stored. i  Marine engineors and explorers aro  watching the construction of this  unique craft with much interest. Tho  inventor declares that the voyago to  the Polo will bo made in the ice-crushing boat, but theTo are many who aro  skeptical. ,   i   ,  ���������-������������������ ������  CITY OF CRIME." .  Place  Where "Sudani UcntliH" Arc  "In-  chlents" of l������:illy 1.IIV.  The Italian city of Artena, situated  about. 10 miles from' Rome, is known  as' the City of Crime. ��������� Ever since the  Sixteenth Century every criminal who  has escaped from prison or done his  times has emigrated to Artena. and today practicably every inhabitant is  a criminal or the child of criminals.  Every family takes tho law into its  own hands, and it is reported not a  day passes without many murders being committed in tho streets. Tho  Italian authorities have now come lo  ��������� look upon Artena as hopeless, and remark that', it is far belter Criminals  should kill criminals than that innocent persons should be thiSir victims.  R is said that on ono occasion, when  23 murders had been committed in  that city in one day. the fact was reported in one of tho Italian papers in  tho following' terms; "Since our lust  issue, 2-1 hours before, there have been  23 sudden deaths in Artena." And no  further notice of the murders was  taken  or expected.  SOUND OF CANNONADING.  Though the distance is not les3  than 3J miles, tho sound of firing at  Ladyumith is said to be so plainly  heard at Estcourt that the reports of  heavy guns, supposed to be the two  naval 4.7-inch guns, followed by tho  bursting of lyddito shells can be easily distinguished above those of tho  Baer forty-pounders and the smaller  guns on both sides.  KKUANCE  CIQA3  l.-'.C'ltiKV .Montren  UNLIKE ANY OTHER  La Toscana, 10c.  NO DANGER FROM BOOTS.  George���������When is the best time to  sp2aL-  to your father?  She���������Oh, I should say when he's enjoying himself in slippers and smoking jacket in the library after dinner.  Blemishes a^NT"D Complexion  ���������x'iiE!-<i^a?avrE33sra?.  Send one cent .lamp for circular.    W.J. UKQUHART  Analytical Oliunmt, <������ <J ecn St. Vf��������� 'loronto.  RUSSIAN  PHOTOGRAPHER'S  WAY.  The  Russian   photographers  have  a  remain,  Very  sincerely,  DURHAM BROWN.  strango way of punishing those who,  having received the'.r-.photographs, do  not pay their bills. They hang the pictures of the delinquents ups do down  FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS  MRS. WINPLOWS SOOTHING SYRUP baa been  used by motherr for thrir childien teething;. It.oothei  the cbilil, Euftons the s������'������������. alla>������ I'ain, cures mini  colic, ami is the best remedy for diarrhoea ?.5c a bottle. Solil by all druKUtj Ihronrliout tlieworla. B������  ���������ure and & K fo    '"     " ' '"  Mrs. Winslow'l noot-binif Sjrup.  SATISFIED.  (ion. I experienced other well known  symptoms peculiar to Kidney Iroub'e.  t nl'-o was afflicted with Rheumatism  in my right hjg nnd hipi to an extent  th.it  I was constantly, while  at   my  work, suffering agonizing pains in the      _.    _  p;irts nffe-ted. My wcrlc dur'ng tho at the entrance to their studios  rammer month's consists of cheese box  making and this required me to be  seated driving nails. Prev'ous  to taking Dodd's Kidney Fi'ls  I was forced to look to the  invention of a machine to nail  covers on, which I named Jack in a.  Pinch. After taking on3 box of Dodd's  Kidney Pills I found an improvement  in my condition anil before I had finished six boxes I found myself nailing  in the natural way and Jack in a Pinch  was discarded. I was ab'T to si', up in  my chair as of old and drive five hundred onc-and-a-qutirter-inch. nails in  eighteen minutes. My brother and I  worked together, and if necessary he  can testify to tlie cure I havo received  through Dodd's Kidney Pills,  In conclusion I would say that  Dodd's Kidney Pills are all and even  more than is claimed for them. If  this is of a"y b"n"fit to Ihe proprietors  in any way ilisy are at 'iberty to make  u (c of it a.-i ih--y may deem advisab.e.  Wishing them continued success,  Professor, who is the happier, the  man who owu3 a million pounds, or he  who has seven daughters ?  The nun who has seven; daughters.  Why so?  Hj who has n million pounds wishes  for more; the man who has seven  daughters does not.  Deafness Cannot bo Cured  by lowil application*. n������ they ounnot reaoh rhi  rllneH-������rt portion of the eitr. TWoro in only oni  whv to cure deafnn-ss. ������nrt Clint i������ by ������on*tlru-  iiorinl temarllvs. I)ui������fn������j������ la cauied by mi In  fUmod condition of Iba raucous llnlnp-of th<  Etmn-chlan Tube. vv Uen llila tuba la inflam  ml von bare a, rumlilltiff oun't or Imperfect  hearing, and when it i������ entirely elr������ed detfn������������  is thn result, aarf uulowi the inflammation eon  be u.ken ont and thU tab- re������t-oreil to lta nor  uaM oondiilon. hoarlsu will, be destroyed for  evnr; nl������o c������������ei������ out of ten are ������������u������oa by Cn  turrh. wMoh l������ nothing bat an inflamed oondi  ili>.> of the rauconsmirfacoa.!,  Wu will give One Hnndrsd Dollar! for any  oino of Denfneeii (cnaxd by catarrh) th������t oan  not be ear������d by H*Ti Catarrh Cure.   Send foi  cUfcnlcrJ, f'ee.     ������������������" ': '���������'���������'.''���������. "���������_.'-'  K. J. CHUNKY & CO, Toledo, 0.  S-ild by Dntssl������t������, 7So.  Hall'i Family Plll������ ara the beeb.  has a dl.tinct flavor of lis own whKh milc&i  firrry oi,o that h.is once li led it trout It ac^in.  Lead packages.  25- "j������> 4������. 5������ &6oc.  POULTRY, BUTTER, EGGS, APPLES,  ������ud other fUODUCK, to ummra boat ru.ilti con.lio to  The   Dav������on,  CommiSiian   Co.,   Limited,  Oor. West-Market & Oolborno St., Toronto,  Carters c&LD CURE 10a. Onrea in a Jiffy,   p. Ho  **       * Cormaoit k Co., A^enn, Mouireal.  THEDZIt MOIHES IHOUBATOft-Baet and oheapoal  O. Uollaiul, kole aconl. fur tlie Doiaiulou.  8> nd 3cti  ���������������������������tainit for cacalugua.   373 St. I'&'il Street, Monvreal  Catholic Prayer ���������^���������."^SSSS:  geliflon* rictures, Statuary, and Church Ornauirurt,  duoaUonal Wo-ks.   Mail order, rac-elve prompt atun*  tioo. '   D. & J. SADLIER & CO., Montreal.  niiohigan Land for bale.  8 003 AORZS CQ0O FARWItNC LAK33���������A HEN AC  3 loicn. Oyeinaw and Crxuford Couaties. Titlepor*  feet. On Mich'i;aii Cun4r.il, Uo'rol* tc .Mau^inau and  Loon Lake R.ulroulb, .it iiric^i tanciiii; from S'i to So  per acre. Theae I.nmls arn Cloun to Kiiteniriainff New-  Towns, Churdies. SchtioU, t-tc, and will bo sold on osl  rea^ooablo terni3.    Apply to  R. M. PIKKCB. Agent, Wcat Hay City, Mich.  Or J.W. (JUlUld. Whit.em.,rd. .meh.  ILL Instantly relieve a ticMing- oougrlx  Or. Braw's coinpouml Syrup of Lloorloo- aik  Dr fipi-ta for it->noiit liy mull on receipt of 25c  Boson Medical Dljponnlry, Montreil.'s  ~^��������� -  Mltlej. MlllB & Halm'  Br.rriolorH.etc.Cremoved;  to Wenler Bldgo., Rloh<  mund BE. W.. I'oronto.  For th* very heat fiend your work t'> tha  " BRITISH AMERICAN DYEING CO."  Look for agent in your town, or seud dirock.  Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebeo  EVODUTlON.7';,?..' ,  It is real!} wonderful, mused the  deep thinker, how a thing or an entity will hava its beginning, run its  course, and end exactly as it began.  You follow m/3,'I, hope ?  1 think I do, replied the worldly one.  For instance, a man will get a jug  and hit it up. Immediately a, jag is  developed. Then he may produce a.  jig, and very likely he'll wind up;in  the jug.  To Curo Catarrh and stay Cured  You must uso7 the most up-to-date  and most approved method of treatn  ment. This can anly be had in Catarr-  hozono which cures by inhaiatiou and  is surei to roach: the right spot. Treatments requiring the use of sprays,  douclics, suuifj, ointments, are a thing  o������ tlie past,    and   the   medicated   air I   treatment supvirsedes them all   There   gj  JAMES> H0TEL--������wTb1ocSTrou.DoPp'  is no danger, or risk in using Catarr- J RMyl%j   pir.t-ola^ CommenniTHouw.'" ItSS&iS  ' : 7."','" EASILY "MENDED.  An old maid suggests that when  men break their hearts it is all the  samavaa'when a lobster breaks one of  ���������his cta.ws���������another "sprouts immediately.. ;..- ���������" ~ '  M0NTBBAL HOTEL DIRECTORY.  Hotel CaVslake, T���������%':������\RaZ'  O.T.K. Illation, Montreal. Geo. Caralake k Co.. Pi  AVENUE: HOUSE--  -ill������ STEAMSHIPS  Portland, Me., to Liverpool, via Halifax.  Large    and    fast   Steamers    Vancouver,  ^ Dominion, Cambroman.  Itatsi of pai.SBge :���������Firtt Cahin, $d0 upnrardi; 8ocond  Cabin, $33; Steeraze, $22.50 and $^3 50.  Vox furLner information apply lo local sgenta, or  DAVID TOJ1HANCK k CO.. General Agonta,  17 St. Saorauoat tit. Montreal.  WILL FINK VERY DESIRABLES  FLATS. Stesim Heated, Steam Power,  Elevator and ail conveniences*  Truth Building, 73 Adelaide St. VVes>t,  TORONTO.  To Manufacturers  N0RTHEY STEAM PUMP���������6 x 4. 7 ������ncl>  stroke, in good working order, capacity about 200 horse power.   Price $75.  FEED WATER HEATER���������65 horse power,  in good order.   Price $25.  ONE No. 3 8TURTEVANT FAN -14  inch,  in perfect order.    Price $25.  ONE NO. 4  BUFFALO  FAN.��������� 27   inches  high,  upright discharge, in excellent  order.    Price $35.  S. Frank Wilson,  Truth, 73 Adelaide West, Toronto,  MoOill-Colloje   Arenue.  "Family Hotel ratea $1.50  per day.  hozone. It is both pleasant and ef-  fecLivo to employ in any case of .Irritable Throat, Jfotid Breath, Bronchitis;  Catarrh and Asthma. For sale at all  druggists. For trial outfit send 10c, in  (stamps to N.'C. POLSON & CO., Box  518,  Kingston, Out.  RAPID PAPER MAKING. .',  The art of paper making has reach-  ad the point whore it is possible to  ''���������ut down a growing tree and convert  it into pflper suitable for printing  purposes within 2-t hours.  " Pharaoh 1 Co." PS ^SSiSr  LEAVING ICELAND.  The depoipulatiou of ^Iceland is going  on steadily. The depreciation in' the  v:ilue of the land has been,very marked of late, wbilethe taxes have considerably increased, and the Icelanders  axe said to be emigrating in shoals.  pfoveme&tfl���������Rates Moderate.  TO CIIKB A COI.D IX ONE l������AY  Take Laxiitlro Bromo Quinine-Tnblofes. All  drugifistH refund Iho money if it fulls to cure,  25c.     1C W". Grove's xiirnauire la on each box,  " A CUP OF WATER.  A cup-of hot or coLd wator taken on  rising in the marning is of much value  with some people, for the mucous cout  o fthe stomach is w.-ushnd away, and its  juices are more quickly brought into  contact  with  the food.  O'K E E FE'i'iv^r M ALT  Inru'nr.-itei anil Stri-n^MiotiB.  LIX>YD WOOD, Toronto. GKNKUAJL, AOENT.  PHONOTYPEWRITER.  An Englishman, Mr. William Marvin, is th elatcst claimant for the  credit df having a.<ei'fected a practicable. ." hoinotypowriiter." ��������� It will be  the i.nvenlion of the century if it ful-  fiilJ.-s all that Mr. Marvin stoutly claims  for it. ll is an instrument for recording spoken language., and will reproduce on paper and in a readable manner anything that may be uttered in  its presence. : A sermon, a speech,  legal evidence, s'poken in any language, is recorded by it on paper which  can ha sent by nuli.1 liko an ordinary  letter or document, and read by tho  reetpio-nt n_B easily as a typewritten  communication. ' ,  THE OLDEST CHURCH.  The oldest building in Iho world that  ha.s been uninterruptedly used for  church purposes is St. Martin's Cathedral, at Canterbury, England. 'The  buitding was "originally erected for a  church, and., has been regu'.arly used  as ������ place for religious gatherings for  mrir". thnn  l.SO.'i yenr.������.  ACCOUNTED FOR.7;  How is.it, Dootor, that we don't see  you any more with that old flame.of  yours,  the   banker's  daughter?  She  is married.  Married  to  whom? ' '   ���������  To me. :....'."���������,'���������  WPCldOfi  CALVERT'S  Carballo Disinfectant*. Soapo, Ointment, Tooth Pow������l������r������, etc., have been  awHivled 1UU modfcls a-tid diplomas for imperlor  excellence. Their regular nsa prevent infectious diseaseo. Aak your dealer to obtain a  supply.   Llata mailed free on application.  F. Ce CALVERT & CO.,  ttANOHESTER.   ���������   ���������    ENQLAND.  Sausage Casmgs-������-nlr8^*pl0."B"d,,Am?  irican Uok Caalnaa���������relUlile (food.������ at rirht nriea.  PARK, BLACK WULL, A CO., Toronto.  -SSPRgSEHiATiVE ?������*&*��������� ">������vt,,,rni  Liiico Income���������Ploisanl  position���������1'ny iiionipt. Liko ),o-<itioiir, making flO iiui  wei-k. Write quick for p,irticnlcr������ and furuiah rcfei>  ������"������������*. s������' flcKinnoa block, Toronto.  HARRIS   LEADfcWPERTBKAis!  WqoIm������1o onli.    Lom Dlatonoo Tol������phon������WM.  VSIUIAM  3T���������  T0R0HT0.  To tend (or our  complots SHEET  MUSIC CATALOGUE  and SFSCIAL RATE  OF DISCOUNT. W������  aro equipped lo  supply every MUSIC  TEACHERInCanada  WhaSey, Eojce  S Co.,  lEBYonge St.,  TORONTO.       ONT.  ���������'*?) Cw       U?      ^      j������       Catarrh uf nme,  trfSaat rm ^Awi^ n   ;5aun**' m threat,   itowach  ami bladder.  5SoA*l������boi.   Write fnr partlcolara, Tha  | Indian Ostavrh Coro Co., 14S St. Jasaoa-M., UoutreaL  i.���������������������������- ' .  i llQMUaii Stn:ii Ki^LS iio.iclius, U������i i  U Un>{*, Kata and Mica. Sold by all [  DruarfflstK. or SSI Queen V. Toronto.  $f#tl, &U7V fH&tis&t/ #������v>?C*XrVl/, ��������� fipteCS  iM. B. ANHETT, Manager.  JOHN J. UAIK, SupL and Trea*  Esplanade,,/     Toronto  0pp.^horbourne St., -JL--L--lll_.  High Class  Water  Tube  Steam  ': Boilers, for All Pressures,  Duties and Fuel.  SEND,, FOR    DESCRIPTIVE   CATALOOUB.  /���������'Toronto Bleotrio Ivicht Co., Limited.  The T. Eaton Co., Limited.  The Manarj-Harrii Co., Limited.  Tha Outta Percha Knblior A Uf J. Oe.  (���������The Wilton Fubllahlns Oi., Limited.  (AU ������f Torasto vaer* bollara miftm toan ������orking.'  A TORONTO MERCHANT  Bears Important News to His Fellow Citizens.  I had been a sufferer like a great  many other women with a disease po-  culiar to my sex. I tried everything  I could read or think about to help  me, but was getling worse instead of  better.' My condition was terrible���������]  was lonLng flesh and color, and my  friends were alarmed-^L-cpn.sulted a  doctor of this town und he said 1  would never get better; that I would  alwayti be sickly and delicate, and that  medicines were of little uso to mo.  Hearing what Dr. Ward's Blood and  Nerve Pills had done for others I determined to try them myself, and today I weigh one hundred .and forty  pounc'.s, while before I weighod only  one hundred and eighteen pounds, and  I novi have a constitution that is hard  to beat, f have not suffered any pain  in months and earnestly hope that  Dr. Ward's Blood and Nerve Pills will  reach every woman suffering as I  did. ���������"���������'���������'.'  . Sincerely yours,  "   SiAY COLE, Simcoe, Ont.  Price 50c. per box, 5 boxes for ������2.00,  at druggists, or if not obtainable al  your druggist, mailed on receipt ol  price by Sam. Williams & Co., Toronto.  Book   of  Information  Free.  Toronto, Jan. ,5.���������Here us.,a. letter  we hope every one of our readers will  peruse:���������"I   am   39 /years old..  ' Hava  i been     troubled     for  four  yeara   with  what   I   thought    was  Rheumatism���������t  ietiffness in the muscles of my legs,  later Ln the arms. Soon the stiffness  changed to soreness. Went to Hot  Springs, and came back a little better.  Was a moderate, driinker, but quit us*  ing liquor altogether, . and. carefully,  regulated my diiet. One day I got  wet and then the trouble was worso  thani ever. Had to lay off for three  weeks. Have had similar attacks at  intervale ever since, each one Worse  than Lis predecessor. Had headacho,  pain in tho small of the back, urine  dark, scanty and scalding. Began  using Dr. Arnold's English Toxin  Pills a short time ago, and am already-  wonderfully improved. Feel confident they will euro me, and I shall  give them tho chance and report. I  have not felt so well' for years', as I  have since I began using your pills..,  H. LEWIS,  477 Tonge St., Toronto.  Dr. Arnold's English Toxin Pill*, tho onlv modicina  on'earth that.cures diseise by killinir the. ffcrms thi������  came it. are sold br ail ilructfials, at 7uc. a box ; samnlo.  fire 25c, or sent post-piid on receipt of price, by Tliej  Arnold Chemical Co., Limited, Canada Life Buildiaff,  t2 King Street West, Toronto.  THE MOST NUTRITIOUS.  GRATEFUL���������COMFORTING.  cmmn������*KMy&iim*i+.?i#av>xzKn  BREAKFAST-  -SUPPER-  A most efficient substitute for  cod-liver oil, pleasant to the taste,  and agreeing with the most sensitive stomach. Used by physicians  ^1111 in the treatment of all throat and  lung troubles, and ��������� if results  count for anything���������almost.no'  ���������limit to the good it can do.  f; J li/fiil sin! Lisw(b  D������MftM   A|*af<M  IJ ������l*������Ul  Sample "bottle mailed to any address on receipt of 10  ccnU to cover postage.  Arigkr -Chemical Co. ^^:an Toronto  %mvsargeaaa!rs  ���������i::i3y: THE MINING REVIEWS-SATURDAY, JANUARY  20,  1900.  MOUNTAIN  ECHOES.  ', '     .  The  old tu<i" Kaslo" wns burned  fit  "Nelson on Sunday last.   ,  ."������������������."-.,  Judge Lilly is likely to be appointed  ��������� coroner for this district shortly.  The I'.iyho mine is already-making'  ��������� .',���������   a showing  having shipped 105 tons ol'  ore during the last.few days. ���������'.;'���������'  ��������� '.." Mr. Green is losing no time in piish-  {��������� ing through tho .. amendments  to   the  .'���������.7 Sandon Incoi por-ilion charter.     7  7. Tlu7;Eiith tram has been bringin g  "l down ore ,tqtl^ concentrator for sev-  ��������� eral days, and is said to work well. ".  '?     .7 Even the' city saloons  feel the  bu r-  7, den of. hard times, and three or.four of  tbem have  refused to renew their  ii-  7''celiac's.-  ��������� There is no decided change   in   tlie  war situation'yet, but the British have  '���������'������������������re-takcii'some strong positions held by  the Boers.     ���������  ..."   Milburn'sllheiiinatic'Pills arc a spe-  .' cific remtdy ibr-rbeumatisni, sciatica,  7neuralgia,''lu!nb:igo, and gout.-    Tlioy  ������������������cure''when other medicines fail.    Price  '.-.������������������ 50c;"���������'���������, '7 7"7     ,    ���������  ..:-77",".'_'..:  7 It   is  understood   that   some    new  in en have gone  to work at  tho En'tor-  7   prise  on Jibe Lake at Ten Mile, and a  large number are  coming in   for. tlie  . c   Hope Graveley Co. '   .c  ��������� '  , L-Vdies. who suffer from constipation,  sick headache, biliousness or dyspepsia'  : find Laxa-LiVor.Pills a,perfect, remedy.  Tliev 1 are small in size, do not gripe  sicken or-weaken.   Price 25c    ���������    .,,  We are glntl to hear,- as the Tribune  7 puts it, that Nelson is ari������"eduoational  -centre,"   as wo  know of no . place  in  which education' can be used to better  advantage with some of its citizens.  '. Hagy'ard's Yellow Oil relieves all  pain, "takes out inflammation,.reduces  .swelling, prevents discoloration of a  bruise or blistering.ofV.a burn. Does  not stain the skin or soil the clothing.  Price 25c.  It would be a good idea if all inclin ed  1 that  way would -look-up the, criminal  ���������i   code of this country and see  tho  risk  " they run   in   intertering   in auy way  with men coining' to woik or  at work  .." in the mines. ,:������������������''.  .'���������''.  ''' Those who, went to hear the Rev. T.  Crosby, missionary among the Coast  Indians, in his address Wednesday  evening iii'llie   Methodist church, en-  '-,joyed "an" intellectual-treat as well as  ^   ; some hcarty'liuighs.  Look at Youit Face -And see" if it. is  ' reflecting health or disease. Karl's  Clover Root Tea beautifies the face and  complexion, and assures perfect health.  All druggists, 2oc. and.50c. Money refunded if results are" not satisfactory.  Sold at McQueen's Drug Store.  If the '-citizens'- had all used the  proper suasion with the men, , it  appears to us the mines would have  opened long ago with the old hands on  the basis of Ihe Star's offer. Bucking  the owners, is not the best way to re-  yive business in a camp like this.  So.far the only liquor licenses taken  out this year are : Hotels���������The Reco.  the Balmoral, the Sandon, the Clifton  and Palace; Saloons���������The Jvandhoe,  ' the Kootenay, the Miners and tlie Exchange., \Y"e understand tho Klondike,  Eilbertand' the Star will not take out  licenses. The other houses are undecided yet.  The C. P. R. hnd two smashes within  the last few days, but'fortunately without loss of life or limb. The lirst accident was on Sunday last near Creston,  on the Crow's Nest branch, and the  second on 'Monday morning, near Nelson. Two or three cars and a bridge  were smashed in each case, with a  shaking "up for a few passengers.  The junior'hoekoyists should feel  proud .of tlie interest taken in their  welfare as'manifested'by tho large attendance at their dance on Tuesday  night. Every one present seemed to  havo hurl an enjoyable evening with-  ''the boys." It surely will not be .expecting too much to see tlie,band dance  on Thursday evening, Jan. 25, equally  well patronized.'  To give Mr. J. Stockham his due he  was right and far-seeing, and most, of  the union now admit it, when he urged  the 'acceptance of the Star's, oiler of  $3.25 a day seven mouths ago. TJ-Iml it  been accepted alt the mines Would  have pnjd it ivithotit shutting down.  and the men .would have been seven  months' wages ahead. Many who re-  lused then will be unable to get it now,  after all this loss of time  It is said that petitions arc' being  circulated, and largely signed, praying  that the eight-hour law be not repealed.  There is no trouble in getting people to  sign anything. You cculd get plenty  to sign a document seeking the execution of Queen Victoria, without judge  or jury. Very often people sis;n petitions without knowing what is in  them, and often because of personal  regard for those presenting them.  As St. Valentine's day comes in the  Rosslwnd carnival week, which will  likely take away our hockey team and  several rinks of curlers, with their admiring friends, the Sandon band lias  decided to give their dance on Thursday evening next, January 25th, instead of the 14th prox., as announced  last week. Tins change waii made  when it was learned that the Scots of  the city would not hold a Bobby Burns'  celebration. Dance in Virginia hall;  Tickets, including supper, $1.50. I  We are having the  January thaw of  the. east all winter, this season. ���������  With, the   shipments   on  the way.  Great Britain' will  have 16GL000  men,  82,0(10 horses and  Africa.  44.6 guns  in   South  ' There is a mining man; and an  American at that, in town who says if  he could pass muster he would enlist  to shoot Boers.  . It WtLi7T)o You Goon.���������A blood "purifier and tissue builder is Karl's Clover  Root Tea.' Sold for half a' century, on  our guarantee. Money refunded if results are not snf'afactory. Price 25c.  and 50c. Sold at McQueen's Drug  Stored,'  ��������� ."���������: ;'.;��������� 7 ������������������      77 ��������� '        7.    .������������������ ���������  , Wm. Hugler, sec'y of the Miners'  Union.,.was arrested yesterday, nt.the  instance of tlie manager.of the Pnyn<\  charged with unlawful acts and using,  grossly ;abusive language, ITis ease  will come before the P. M. at 10 o'clock  today. '���������:  '7    .,        ';  Don't forget the band dance on the  svenin'g of January 25, "Bobbv" Burns'  day; instead of St. Valentine's, ns first  announced. Good music has, been secured and a jolly time is promised..  Tickets, including suppqr served in the  hall'(Virginia)'. S1..50.    ;.;. ,\  Rive TtirirGs.���������The five diseases, for  which Shiloh's Consumption Cure is  especially recommended are coughs,  colds, whooping cough, croup and consumption. No medicine ever made by  man is equal to it in any respect. ; Sold  under. s, - positive guarantee. Money  back if it fails. 25c., 50c. and $1:00.: a  bottle. Sold by McQueen's. the Druggist.    , ���������-  ���������Established in 1S92.  Jobbers and Retailers in  3*.  TETow often,mothers are perplexed and. driven nearly to  despair by their little ones-losing appetite arid refusing a 11  "manner Of food when children will take '   7'  ������oo  ^  0-0  at nearlyany tim'2  There is a great deal of blowing  about Lord Strathcpna's (Sir Donald A.  Smith)'liberality in spending a.million  dollars in equipping 200 men for South  Africa. There are hundreds of men  quite as liberal as Strathcona, if they  only had the means to show it.  Are You Married���������To the old-time  belief that consumption- is incurable?  If so, youL.are wedded to a mistaken  notion. Shiloh's Cough, ami Consumption Cure has overcome many a serious  case, and it never fails when taken in  the early stages. One bottle will prove  more to you than a whole column of  argument.. Try it; Every bottle g'tiarr.  ivhteedi ,25 cts, 00 cts. and ������1.00," Sold  by McQueen the Druggist.  '*m*I������>- Wpba'Sr'Phoflpiofline,,:  J^^WjTj       ^lc Great English Remedy. ...  aP^Sw^n     S������ld and recommended tiy all  Wcsyvi   2h druggists in Canada. Only reliable medicine discovered.   Six  _ .. .^iir'z&Bk^P'Mkagcs guaranteed to cure , all  forms of Sexual Weakness, all effects of ahuso  or excess, Mental Worry, Excessive use of Tobacco, Opium or Stimulants. Mailed on receipt  of price, one package $1, six,'$5.   Oneinillplea.sc,  six will cure.  Pamphlets free to any address.  ���������XIio Wood Company, Windsor, Ont.  Sold in Sandon by F. J. Donaldson,  and the McQueen Co., Druggists.  ���������Jfltllf$f  ^X. '. is the most perfect of nourishment to give the children for  , 47* ''������������������,..: "���������,.���������''.' ���������������������������"''.-��������� "7 "'������������������ ;,'.������������������"'���������-���������.'        ',:  ���������*'���������  Renovated in all appointments.  A good table always.     ., :���������  Choicest liquors and cigars in the bar.  "%&mm������^  :'T> Rails and Track Iron,,; ?'���������.���������-'    7  r. ..Crow's-'Nest Coal,   7 .,-.;". '���������.,-.- 7. (, ���������-.-      :.-  ,jBnr and Sheet'Iron,,:     .:.-.; r-'-'  Jessdp & Canton ...Steel for Hand and  Machine Drills, ���������  Powder, Caps, Fuse,        :  Troii Pipe and Fittings,   ,:   -  Oils, Vi'iiste,:Etc;, 7-7     '7. '.'..-���������  Mine or Mill-Supplies of all kinds. ..  Agents Truax Automatic Ore Cars.  Head Ofiice���������Nelson B.C.,   l  7    .Stores at   '.- ,.,      '.'- 77  Mrs. Snowman, Proprietress.      'Nelson., B.C.   Kaslo,B.C.   Sa.hdon,B.C  FOR RENT,  .     FOit OVKRFlL'Ti YEAHS.      .  Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup has been  used by millions ol'iiioUiers' for their children  while teething. If disturbed at, night and  broken ol" your rest by a sick child, suiloring  and crying with pain of cutting lecth. Solid  at once and get a bottle.o! "itrs..Winslow's  SoothingoSyrup" for clilldren teething. It  will relieve the poor little- .suHCrer iininodiat-  ly. Depend upon it, inothcr-' there is no  mistake about it. It cures dial. urea, regulates  the .stomach and bowels, cuius Wind Colic,  solteiis tliegums and reduces Iullaminatiort,  and gives tone and energy lo tho. system.,  "Mrs.\\riiisIo\v's Soothing Syrup" lor children  teething Is pleasant to the taste and is tlie  prescription ol one of tlie oldest and best  l'emiilephy'sicians and nurses in tlie United  States. friee twenty-live cents a- tottlu.  Sold by all druggists throughout tho world.  He sure and ask lor" Mrs. Winslow's Soo tiling  Syrup."  ;   1IOTJIL RliCO.���������65 rooms, well furnished, stc.im  heated,  electric lights, liotinul coM w.iter.  HOTEL GOODENOUCII.���������oj rooms, liost.fiirnisliwl hoiel  in Ihe K'ooteliays, steam he.itc-il, electric lights, will remotlel to  .suit tenant.. '���������  OOOniiNOUGII STO'Ki:.��������� 34x70, with cellar same size,  steam healed, electric lights.  SAXDON' S'riiA.M -LAUN'bKV.���������In first-class riu,nir-.s  order. Il.-is I'eltun wheel for power, anil can,be run at moderate expense.    Kent cheap.  STOKKS AN'13 OI"l-iCliS,--Inthe Dank buildinp;. ivntcr,  steam heal and electric lights.    '  ��������� ON'K tSTOUE. ���������tn tile'Virginia-block, larye plate j,rlass  front, incluflini; water ami steam iieat.  OI-I'tCES.���������In Virginia Mock, $15 per month, inclmlini:  water, steam heat ami electric lights. -  ,,, ..ONE .S't'AHLl-:.���������I-*ur 12 horses, 2 story.   Cheap.  Till-: (Jlll-liX I.oor.INr, lIOtlSE.-? email stores, and  livine; rooms on second story.    Cheap. ���������  SKVUN 1MKST. CLASS LIVIXG ROOMS.���������Second  story,opj,osite Clifton house, electric lights.  TWO STORV 11U1LDIXG.���������Nest door to above, = small  stores and liviny; rooms 0.1 second floor,  1-TRST-CLA.SS ,-PLU.M IIIN'G "SHOP.���������Iiiclmliiiir So.^oo  stock of tools and uttiniis, ami ^ood-will of the Waterworks Lu.  and business.  I;IR1E-PK00I; CI-:l::AK.���������Op|iosile R'jctenay hotel.  FIRST-CLASS TWO STORV J1ARN.���������30x80.  -    ON'li CtlTTAGl;.���������4 rooms,  next door  west of coiniquc,  $10 per month. ���������      .  ' Several  other  cottage;  and   buildings   fumishetl and un-  uniished, to rent, or sell, or ivill build to suit tenants.  'Apply to J. M. HARRIS. Virginia block Sainton. B. C.  18 kt.,plump���������made by the best workmen, and michinery in  Canada. ' They are rolled and burnished, making them specially  hard and durable.    ' .. '. ' a  ���������  (S 7 ,    A QUICK CUR.F. FOR  1 COUGHS AND COLD,  j})       Very valuable Remccy in all  (ft "  ��������� affectious. of' the   ���������  ���������I  THROAT or  LUNGS |  iTl Large. Bottles, 25c $  ft������   " DAVIS &".LAWRENCE,Cb., Limited      ������g  %,        Prop's, of Ve.rvy Davis' Pain-Killer        t������  ������i3S������SSS���������:6Sfi���������iS������S������������������$���������SS'S<iGr  W. S. Drkwky  Sandon, B. C.  ���������     .   ' H. ,T. TWTGG  Now Denver, ll.O.  ���������D'REWRY & TWIGG  Doniinion  and Provincial Laud Surveyors.  Civil and Mining Engineers. .   .  Bedford-JfcXeil Code.  .&LT������L LOQ$������,  NO. 29.  A. V. AXD A. SI.  ilognliir Communication of the lodge.  iUoets 1st Thursday  in caeli month nt  S   p.  in.    Visiting  t brethren   cordially  Invited.  s,  THOS. MOWN,  See'y.  My shelves wereeriiptied at Xmas, but.are now  filled again with the newest and best patterns in,  'SILVERWARE���������BEST QUALITY.  Q. W. QRIHttiHT, JEWELER ������25 OFTICIflN.  CERTIFICATE OFIfilPROVEftiEKTS.  ge  Sa<t to seo peoplo  adviineeil in years  si'i ITei'i ngfi'oinHnck-  aolio, Laino Jiack,  Uri nn.vy Troubles  and Kidney Weakness. A halo old  iifre, fi'eo from sains  and a'clii'-s, can only  1)0 al t a i nod by keep -  nud tho'blood pure.  DOAfS KIDNEY FILLS  bofrit.'rid tho nfjfd by i'rooing lliem from  pain and poi'ivctinft" all disorders of tho  Kidneys anil Urinary System.  Mr. Thomas Ash, an old- rosidont of  "Renfrew, Out,, spolto-'as follows:  "I am 72 years of ago, and havo been  troubled for a TiuiflliGrkof years with pains  across my buck. Vi'hcn I -would stoop  over it pive ngunixiu^ pain to straighten  up. , I was so bad Unit'I could searcoly  walk. I havo taken many kinds of modi-  eiuos, but, got nothing to help me. Being  recommended to try Ooan's Kidney.Pills  I g;ofc a box. After taking throe doses I  noticed a great change _for the better,  nnd I can now got around as smart as a  cricket. I can split my own wood aad am,  in faot.-just like a now man. "  NOTICE;  NuiilheKOnniindJJiinibcr'J'wn Mineriii Claims  siiiiiiie in tliti .Slocan  Mining division  ol  .   Wet Kootenay district.   Where located :  On Xo'Dlc Five "mountain..  ���������Take notice tliat I,' A. S. Karwell, acting as  agent for .Tohii A. Whitlicrj Krco ."Uiner'8  Ccrllllcate No. 1177SA, Intend.sixty davs from  date hereof, to apply to the ;\[inlng iiccorder  for Certificates ol Improvements, for the purpose ol obtaining Crown Grants on tlie above  claims.   ' , ��������� .  And further take notice that, notion, under  Section ;17, must be commenced belore tho  issuance ol such CerliHoatcBOl iniprovcnients  2-12-00  A. P. FAItWEI.L.  A fine, purej dainty, tasting Ceylon production put up in a neat one-half and  one pound full weight packages.    Having secured the agency of this favorite  brand of Tea,   we are prepared to recommend it to all,   feeling assured that  one  trial will  establish  its   superiority   over   all other package Tea for its',  delightful flavor and reasonable price.   ,       . '���������  My blend of Mocha and Java is acknowledged to be the best.  All o therlines of pure,' clean and fresh Groceries on hand.'-'  xoTrc.i-:.  'i  Omuga and TwllIKht Mineral Claims situate  in the  Slocan   Mining  division of West  -district.   Where located:   On Noble Five  mountain.  Take notice that I, A. ii. Farwcll,'ncling as  agent tor John .M. Harris, Fiec Miner's Ccrti-  ticate Xo. ICUSS A, ��������� and P'rcd T. Iv'.'lly, \-'rue  .Miner's Certificate Xn, SHSii A, liUciiii, sixty  sixty days from Ihe dale hercor, lo apply to  theiMInim; Recorder lor Ccrlilicale ol Improvements, lor the purpose ol obtaining  Crown Grants ofllic above claims.  And further tas-e notice that action, under  Section ������������������;". must, be commenced belore the  i-siiRiico of HiieliCort.llieales of improvements  9-12-ilU -      - .  A. S. KAItWBUi.  NOTICE. '  X'otice is  hereby given  tliat the Kaslo it  Lardo-Duncan Kailway Company will apply  to   the  Parliament  of Canada  at   its  next  session for an act to extend tho times limited  for Ihe construction  and completion   ol  its  works, and to authorize the Company to convey or dispose ot Its railway and works.  WHEALI/ER & MARTIN,  Solicitors (or Applicants.  Kaslo, 13. C��������� 1st of December, 189a.  SANDON..  ie  KASLO.  AINSWORTH.  I desire to inform the  LADIES.  Of Sandon and vicinity that I have  opened in Dressmaking and Millinery  in Crawford's stors, opposite the Reco  hotel, where I hope, by attention to  business, to secure a liberal share of  your patronage.  MRS. J. PIENDERSON.  suffering from DRAINS, LOSSES, WEAK BACK, IM-  POTENCY, VARICOCELE, etc., I say to you, as man  to man, as physician to patient, DRUGS NEVER CURE.  Why not use nature's own remedy���������  .'.ELEGTRIOI-TY?  With my ELECTRIC BELT and SUPPORTING SUSPENSORY,   I cured   5,ooo,last  year.     Book���������"THREE   CLASSES   OF'  MEN," explaining all, sent sealed free upon request. ' Or, if you live near by,  drop in and consult me free of charge.  (There is but one genuine Electric Belt, and that is tho Sanden. Don't be deceived by cheap, worthless imitations. I,have had 30 years' experience and  control patents coveting every part of my belt.)  DR, I. SANDEN, 156 St. James Street, Montreal, Que.  laft^fctaimsCTOg^  M Sandon, Rossland, Kelson, Kaslo, Pilot Bay and Three Forks.  Sandon. Slocan City.

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