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Mining Review Dec 22, 1900

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Array - Vi*.&Zitelzii:jJi i^-miai L*  r������j m m ������k*j- a *��������� .duMt-MViaUiYM/JUi fti(M- t>U������'i>.  yi~-"3  >.^������--  W^."^ 7.'  A  h VOL. 4.���������NO. 28.  SANDON, B. C, DECEMBER 22, 1900.  $2.00 PER YEAR.  THE LOCAL GRAFT.  Chits. Lambert, contractor, took his  departure for Nelson on Tuesday.  1 There will be Midnight <Mass in St.  Joseph's church on Christmas Eve.  Jalland Bros, have a good display of  groceries and candy for Xmas trade.  Jas. Williamson has ,his window nicely decorated with Xmas attractions.  Stein Bros, have windows loaded down  with groceries for the holiday trade.  Miss Doville, a sister of Mrs. Dwyer,  is expected litre  shortly for a long visit.  The city council has remitted the  taxes on the hospital and both churches.  Presbyterian church services will be  held on Sunday as usual in Crawford's  Hall.  The surveyors are at, work laying out  a railway between Feiguson and Trout  Lake.  Mr. P. Dwyer, this city, has secured  the foremanship of the IJewctt on Slo-  can Lake.  Chas. McLaughlin and Clia?. Pyphers  left on Monday for Toronto, to' spend  Christinas tit home.  Miss Tfatt, agistor, and Miss Burpee,  a friend from the coast, are visiting  with Mrs. F. L. Christie.  The Hunter-Kendrick Co. have their  windows, neatly decorated witli dress  goods, crockery and groceries.  Kaslo must be going to die, or rather  some of the people in it when the council is purchasing land for a cemetery,  A. Dick, of Nanaimo, has been appointed provincial inspector of metalli-  lerous and coal mines for   the  province.  The Ilobsland Record, the oldest daily  newspaper in the Isootenays, has suspended publication foi   lack  of support.  CONTSULjT  :,.V"F. O. M. CI. ;.'������������������   .  ���������Professor of Ophthalmology,  '       Doctor of Opticts  and Scientific Optician  about those headaches, pains in  he eyes, eyes crossed or diverged,  "Rouble or indistinct vision, loss of  'musclar, power, errors of refraction or fitting of spectacles that  are'absolutely correct at Geo. B.  Knowles' Jewelry , Store, until  Saturday, December 29th; hours  10 to 12 and 2 to 5.  j). CaiiiDkll Bayles. S Co.,  Consulting and Analytical Chemists.  SOLE OWNERS AND   PATENTEES  OPTJIB  LATEST HANDY. P&OSPEROW SIBLTEft.  Apartado 83,     DURANQO, MEXICO.  To bo in the swim, the Ri:vri!W wishes  all its friends and patrons a Merry  Xmas and a bright and prospermia I^ew  Year.  F. AV. Peters, late of the C. P. 11.  freight department of the interior, has  been called higher up���������to perform like  duties on the coast.  The choir of all denominations that  did such excellent service in Sunday's  church opening,, are having bouquets  showered at them from eveiy hand. ���������  Capt. Campbell has bought the steamer Marion for +198 all told. When  steamers can be got at such a price, it  will pay to buy tiieni for Santa Claus'  gifts.  The Review is prepared to support  every member of the present council for  their respective positions, unless new  aspirants can show how they are going  t j improve the situation of the city.  Max Krakf nberg appears to be doomed to sleijjh accidents. Last week again  he met with another mishap, but fortunately it was not of very serious moment as lie was around again in a day or  two.  AH members were present nt Monday's city council meeting. Folliott it  McMillan were voted >I10()6 on city hall,  on recommendation of Architect Brown.  Pedlar's licenses weic raised to $500 a  year and the by-law amended accordingly.  Mr. A. W. Wright is convinced they  have the vein in the Palmetto that has  recently produced sucli a valuable Strike  on the Queen Bess. They have now two  feel on fine ore In a vein al a depth of  fifty feet.  Mr. Trueman got word Wednesday his  photo gallery at Vancouver got a 'baptism 01 (ire and smoke. All ins finished  and unfinished goods were spoilt by  sin ike; but, * fortunately the building  and goods not easily damaged by smoke  were saved.  It is a big undertaking to tunnel the  hills between here and Silverton ; but  still a company is advertising to do it,  and it will yet be done. A tunnel less  than four miles in length may be made  to t-ervo the purpose.  All told thts Methodists took in about  $90 in Sunday's collections, and the  ladied cleaied about $125 in their sales.  They freely thank the Catholics, Presbyterians. Episcopalians and all other  denominations for the help they gave  them in makinc the church opening a  success, and will endeavor to reciprocate whenever called upon to do so.  Thousands of people who are unable  to distinguish 'the light of day from the  darkest, nijht, could easily have retained the faculty of sight had they given  due attention to the. plea for sleei) which  comes from every eye before it is over-'  come with disease. W. J. Harvey, F.O.  M.C.I;, is giving afree consultation and  fitting spectacles' that are- absolutely  correct for all visional defects, at Geo. B.  Knowles', until Saturday, Dec. 29t.h.  Hours: 10.to 12 and 2 to 5. ad.  Slide accidents.are commencing , very  early this year on account of the tliaws.  We have just heard that Ole 01sen: was  killed in one of them yesterday morning  in the Idaho basin. Deceased -was a  Swede and well-known in the city. The  body has been found, but has not yet  been brought down because of the small  slides of frequent occurrence. Olsen was  on horseback on the trail at the time,  and the avalanche took him and horse  down the hill.  are light, sweet and wholesome,  while others are sour, heavy,  Bitter, unpalatable The . same  flour, butter, eggs and sugar are  ���������used; what makes the difference?  DR. PRICE'S CREAM BAKING POY/DER  can be depended upon always to make the food light,  sweet,-delicious and wholesome. This is because it  is scientifically and accurately combined and contains the purest grape cream of tartar, the most  healthful of all fruit acids, used for a hundred years  in the finest leavening preparations.  PRICE BAKING POWDER CO.,  CHICAGO.  Note.���������There are many alleged cream of  tartar baking powders upon the market  sold at lower prices, which prove, upon  analysis, to be alum powders in disguise. Alum is a corrosive poison,  which must not be taken in the food.  HINES: AND TUNING.  Sandon Ore Shipments.  The followinu shipments of ore  were  shipped from here this week: ;  Mine. Tons.  Payne : IS4  Reco...  19  Last Chance  07  American Boy,... JO  Slocan Star.........  60  Ivanhoe  42  The Slocan Chief is now a shipper.  The Lavina-Butte near Kootenay lake  will ship this winter.  Slocan Lake points have shipped over  4,300 tons of ore this year.  There are 32 claims located on Irish  Queen mountain near Crawford Bay.  Shipments from Three Forks for week  ending.Dec. 14th were: Idaho Mines'55  and Queen Bess 22 tons.  It is not unlikely the Fisher Maiden  near Silverton may be bought or bonded  by the Slocan-Kilo Co.  The Mountain-View and Blue Jay,at  the head of McDonald creek have been  bonded by Nelson parties  water 17G and  Sunset (Jackson' Basin)  20>������ tons.   Total 196^ tons.  Work on  the  Trade   Dollar,  largely:  owned by Mr. G.W.Hughes, shows that  property is yet likely to rival the largest  and best mines in the caropl  The Great Dane group, consisting of  the Great Dane, White Star aud Fisher'  claims on Crawford Bay, silver lead and  copper ores, has been bonded by a  French syndicate for if 50,000. There'is a  12 foot ledge on some of the claims, with  assays of i������00 from the ore.  The late find on the Slocan Star is.''���������  turning out to be more valuable than at  first expected. It is something unusual  to get ore worth s|;lG00 to the ton, but  the Star has it, and in apparently large.,  quantities. In a few days we will have  a full report of what, has lately been  J done on    that   property.    The   work ln-  The American  Boy has ore in all its j eludes new machinery and much devel  workings, and -will  shortly be'shipping  all its ore over the Last Chance tram.  The orehouses of the American Boy  are completed, and it is expected nearly  200 tons of ore will be shipped this  month.  The Dardanelles Co. are going to borrow $45,000 to pay oil' $11,000 debt and  prosecute development work on an extensive scale.  Shipments from Whitewater for the  week ending Dec.   20th' were: ' White-  opment work.  Some time ago Mr. G.. W. Hughes  bonded the Utica on Paddy's peak for  $76,000. Shortly after he "paid sj;20,000,  and had $5.r>,000 coining due on the 1st  January next. This week he paid $25,-  000 of that amount, and secured an extension of time on (ho balance. This is  evidence he has confidence in the property, and the further fact that he has  sent up several tons of supplies is an assurance he is going to prosecute work  vigorously in the near future. n  THE BEITISH WAR OFFICE,  ROBERTS'    NEXT   CAMPAIGN   WILL  BE DIRECTED AGAINST IT.  I.or<! Woltt-li')', llie I'ivhcii* <'ciiiiiii:ui������l������T-  lii-Chlel', Ho ii 1(1 Xol liilUc He:.������l-w:iy  Against llic Ofllctals���������licrt Tai>o Kulcs  T!il- Most Imporlnm l><-fi;ir(nioiil.  Though General Lord    'Roberts has  closed, up the Boor wari another campaign is opening before him. in the reform of the War Office, in London. In  spite of Lord Roberts    great'    ability  there  are  those' who say,    that,    the  chances  are  that  he wouldi not have  made much moio headway against the  red. tape of the War  Office than did  ,. Lord Wolseley if he had become commander-in-chief five years ago.      The  gallant    Wolseley    was put in!    with  great popular hope that he would stir  up things, and he went  at it bravely.  He was going to turn out, of their comfortable berths a lot of officials whose  only qualification  was a society pull ;  he was going to put'   in    the    empty  places men who really knew something  about the needs of the army, and had  sufficient) energy to accomplish something ; he was going to  cut ofi a lot  of heads that had no, brains in them,  leave the useless places empty and save  that much money for the government;  he> was going to reduce  the power of  the civilian and of the War Office up  in Pali Mall, and was going to see to  it th'at the army end  of the concern,  down at the Horse Guards, had something to say about purely military affairs.  And thereby Lord Wolseley merely  got himself disliked. The Secretary  of State for War, the Marquis of Lans-  downe, knew far better what was suitable and becoming in a fashionable de-  pal iineiit than Lord Wolseley did.  The Marquis had been an "Under Secretary in the department long before he  became its head. His wife, a daughter  of, the Duke of Abercorn-,. was one of  the' most exclusive hostesses in London  society. His father and his grand-  father had been of [personal service to  the Queen. His friends and his wife's  friends were all interested in .the social  success of the department, and to have  some of the bluest blood in the. place  spilledi by an ambitious fighting man  whose father was a mere Major, and  .whose wife was simply thef daughter  of Mr. A. Erskine, *wag[ not "conven-  ���������a'ble," ."comma il' faut" or "de rigu-  eur."    ��������������������������� l  : So Lord Wolseley's career as a reformer came to a sudden end. His  suggestions were not approved, and  without the War Minister's approval  he found he could :do precious little,  even' in matters that pertained: exclusively to the army and not at  all to the civilian end of the War Department. Public opinion was not  much concerned with the army, and it  appeared that there was no good making a row. So little by little the commander-in-chief settled down to his  routine; red tape bound itself about  him and,he proceeded to rnako the  best of a bad situation, like the wise  old General he is. ,    '   .  It seemed as good as settled that  after ilio Boer war had been rapidly  disposed of by General Buller, the  Duke of Connaught the Queen's youngest sou would be made commander-in-  chief. But the Boer, war was not  rapidly disposed of but instead developed unexpected complications. A  Cabinet war council suddenly met and  appointed Lord Roberts    to supersede  MOUNTAINS OF SALT.  where  Wolseley  failed ? The question j  is of international interest, for it af- i ������������������  fects the whole standing oil the Brit- j A s"w ������������<i������"\������ Which  ish  army.  The real incarnation of red, tape in  the War Office is   said   to be Sir Ralph j  H. Knox who has never    seen    active  service,  but who has spent his whole  life iu the routine work! of  the War  Office.   'He entered    the    department  forty-four-years' ago, at    the   age' of  twenty as a junior clerk.      Ho    rose  through every grade of the service and  before being appointed to his present  position of permanent Under Secretary  of State for War,1 with a salary of������2,-  000, was for fifteen years   Accountanl-  Genoral, .where he wielded a great influence.   SHo is said to have all the af-  | fairs of this great    department*   well  j hi hand, but that with him the internal  I arrangement 'of the office bulks more  than ihose things which go for efficiency in the field.     Lord Roberts task  will bu to transform this great .social  and red tape institution into the head  of a thoroughly efficient and perfectly   equipped   Army.   The task is  a tremendous one, but Lord Boberts  is  not  a man to be dismayed, and with public  opinion.' thoroughly    aroused, he    will  undoubtedly  succeed.      Simultaneous  with this change in system.' there will  be going on a change in environment,  for ground has  been    broken    for    a  handsome  new  building for  the  War  Office to replace the old Horse Guards,  so long a land  mark of London. The  new, building while,   perhaps, not   as  striking    as the old   will    be a  noble  structure and much1 more roomy, better, lighted, heated and ventilated; in  a  word more    commodious,    healthful  and      comfortable    than    the    Horse  Guards.  I deposits it in beautiful crystals oh the  I bottom, forming: a layer several inches  '*������'���������������   thick.    Again using a hydrometer tho  ! manager  knows  when the water has'  Immense salt gardens have recent- ' loBt  all th<J salJ.  u ^ glve up in x  ly  been established in  the neighbor-  Mill  Help  of Auslr.illit.  CAUSE OF THE TYPHOID.  How l*r. Rrycr. llic I'rovlnr.iiil'IIrnltn.'OI'  fleer, Accounts for so .1Iiiclij|of cite Itls-  CJl.SC.  'Speaking of the high death rate  from typhoid fever in the province,  during the month of October, Dr.  Bryc.e, the Provincial Health Officer,  says there, can be no doubt but.that  the unusual Tengtli of time during  which mild weather continued this  autumn, there not being- any frosts  practically up to the end of October,;  has played an important part in extending , the period during which  typhoid fever from polluted wells  tend to spread.  From all over the country water  samples have been sent to an unusual  number, to the provincial laboratory  for analysis. In almost every instance  the samples have been well waters,  and in very few instances .have no  direct evidences of polution by waste  matters been proven. Speaking gen-,  erally it may be said' that in 110  towns, cities and villages in Ontario  where public water supplies exist,  typhoid fever cases are almost invariably traced to parts of the places  where the wells have not been closed,  while of course all water; supplied in  rural districts is from wells. . Until  people have learned to prevent the  pollution of soil around and in the  neighborhood. of wells with excretive matters from housos.stablcs, factories, etc., says Dr. Brycc, the present state of things will continue  when conditions of temperature are  favorable.  hood o������ Geelong. along the Bay of  Stingareo, in Queensland; Australia.  The site was, until recpntlj, a barren  waste of swamp and samphire scrub,  and thought good for nothing whatever. Tho present proprietors, however, have converted it into a place of  interest, employing a large number of  men, and turning,out a valuable commodity, with the sea water as their  raw material.  .The wtarks, or salt gardens, present  tho appearance of a chess board of  shallow 'tanks. 'About 300 acres are  cut up in this way by miles of walls  the tanks, or " paddocks," condensers  and crystallizers vary from one to fifty acres in size, and there are about  100 bf them. The whole area under  usc| is cut off from, the sea by a large  wall, containing sluice gates, to admit the sea water as required. The  dividing walls keep the water uniformly spread oyer tho ground, presenting all tho surface possible to tho  evaporating action of the sun and  wind. The rainfall is an important  item; the average is the lowest at the  sitei chosen of any point on the whole  coast.  iWhen the waLer enters through the  sluice gates it is held in the largest  paddocks until the evaporation raises  its density considerably. It is then,  by smaller sluices, run into, or pumped up on to higher levels,  CALLED CONDENSERS.  Here it remains until the evaporation raises tho density to that of  brine, and by this time it has lost  many impurities, such as lime, which,  as the water gets denser, are deposited. Then the manager knows., by  testing, with, a hydrometer that the  brine is ready for the crystallizers,  and) it is pumped up into them. By regular Jpuinping the brine is let into  and kept in the crystallizers, which  have already had their bottoms levelled at a uniform, depth, and as' the  evaporation goes on the water" be-  eoimss'-tod dense to hold the salt, and  pure slate; and when this point ia  reached the remaining water is drained off. This residue Ls called mother-  liquor, and contains magnesium, sulphates, chlorides, potassium, etc. Those  impurities would be deposited on top  of the salt and make it impure if the  mother-liquor were not drained off at  the right time. Thus pure salt only,  is obtained.  The sail is then harvested by shovelling it up into cocks, which give the  crystallizers the appearance of a military camp. When the salt has drain-  ell in the cocks it is harrowed out  into sacks of several hundreds of tons:  each. The stacks are then thatched,  to prevent tho rain from dissolving,  them. The company has also a refinery, at which tho salt is dissolved ia  water, and again evaporated in iron.'  pans by artificial heat. In this way  a beautiful white and superior salt  isi obtained. A grindery has also been  erected to dry and crush the crude  crystals ; it is here that tho fine table  salt   is   made.  Just' as it is, ate bay salt, it is used  largely for packing meat for export  and preserving meat and rabbits,  sheep, cattle; for glazing bricks and  pottery  and other purposes.  IN THIS QUEEN'S REALM.  The total income of the CKurch of  England is about ������200,000 a week.  Australians hold a world's record in  tea consumption, drinking nearly eight  pounds  a head yearly.  Tho Financial Times of London has  undertaken to drive tho bucket shops  out of  business.  There are about 100,000 Indians in  the Dominion of Canada located upon  reserves  in  different districts.  The municipal authorities of Glasgow are considering a proposition for  the establishment of a city savings  bank. ���������.  iSotaei time ago 32 children in Liverpool, England, contracted typhoid fever on the same day from partaking of  ice cream from an Italian vendor.  How Speedily and Certainly the Wretched Itching and Uneasiness of Piles is Relieved and Thoroughly Cured by  OUT OF  SIGHT.  Mr. Crimsonbeak���������That artist spent  Gen. Buller, Lord Roberts went down, ! throe days paiintiug tho picture, of a  brought order out of chaos, became a j goat .[ never saw anything artistic  popular hero, and comes    back,'    with j in  a goat. ���������-  public opinion behind him and. the j Mrs. Crimsonbeak���������Yoii didn't? Do  post of commander-in-chief waiting ! y0u remember that goat that ate up  for him. \ my    beautiful      hand-worked    pillow-  Will  the fact  that he   is backed by I cushion?    Wasn't     there      something  public interest enable him  to succeed   artistic in him?  It seems wonderful that after all  these years of investigation and research the physicians are still helpless, to relieve and cure one of the  most ' common and most distressing  afflictions to which men and women  are subject, ' .viz., itching, bleeding  piles. In nine cases out of ten the  doctors still recommend a surgical  operation, with its . expense, extreme pain and danger, iis the only  cure for piles;  Prejudice alone kcep.> the physicians  from prescribing Dr. Ohase's., Ointment in all oases of piles. It' has  made for itself a world-wide reputation, and is Bold under' a positive  'guarantee to cure any onai>. of piles,  no mutter how many operation.'! have  failed, and, no matter how intense  has been  the. suffering.'  This letter i.s but a'sample-of scores  of hundreds of cas^s ini Canada a!ono  in. which Dr. "Chase's, Oini ment has  proven a -truly magic remedy. This  letter Ls quoted because Mr. lhiprau is  well known throughout Ontario as an  earnest minister of the Gosp.d,' undone who has at heart the well-being  of fellow-sufferers. ��������� ��������� ���������  Rev. S. A. Duiprau, Methodist minister, Consecon, Prince Edward County,  Ont.,'states;���������"I was troubled with  itching and bleeding pi\tss for years,  and thoyultimately attained to a very  violent   form.    Large   lunip3    or  ab  scesses' formed, so tihiat it was with'  great difficulty and considerable pain  that I was able bo stool. At this)  severe crisis' I purchased .a box of Dr.  Ohase's Ointment, but I had little or  no faith in it, as I had tried various  remedies befjorp, and to no purpose.  "Now, imagine how- groati and joyous was my surprise to find that  just the one box cured me, so that  the lumps disappeared, and also the  external swelling. I feel like a different mau-ho-day, and have| not the  least doubt'that ��������� Dr. Chase's Ointment saved mo from a very dangerous and painful operation! and many  years -of suffering. It is with tho  greatest pleasure aind with a thankful heart that I give this testimonial,  knowing (hat Dr. Chase's Ointment  hay. dr.ine so much for me. You are at  perfect liberty to usa this testimonial  as ymi see fit for (he benefit of others;  similarly   afflicted."  Yoni are'invited td make this/test  and- prove to your own satisfaction'  the almost magical power , of ,.-' Dr.  Chase's Ointment. Ask your neighbors . who have used it what they  lihiiink of Dr. Chaise's Ointment. Use  it. when, you luwo the opportunity,  and rermember t'hait it' is guaranteed .  to cure amy caset of ittohimg, bleeding  or protruding' piles; 60o a box, at. all  dealers, or by miail from Edmansoaj,  Bates & Co., Tor onto.  Jj  >i  J'"  V*7 L  ���������511  a i  H'.  (m MlqttttMMum,  ':!  r* ><  All Japan teas are colored.  S5*fc  CEYLON GREEN TEA  is pure and uncolored.  A NEW ARMY RATION.  f.crmui)   Ti'o<>5>s   Vvtl ' Hrjxui   :i   \im:l    D'rc-  ii:u-:il������<>n <>!'<:!ioco':it>-.  German military correspondents  speak very, highly of a new, ration  which has been;.-tried during the recent maneuvers of tho Austrian ,toops  in Galioia Owing (o the nature of  the country and the extensive- area  covered .during the exercises, it became necessary to provide the troops  with some portable food which could  be prepared in a very short time or  even eaten without preparation. Various forms of nutriment were tried,  but the one which gained most favor was a so-called "chocolate ration."  This was invented by a doctor, and  consists of ordinary chocolate .with an  admixture of albumen and certain fatty matter, hi a few minutes this can  be cooked either in milk or water and'  eaten as it is. The nourishing value  of the preparation is very great,'100  giaiamcs affording as much sustaining value as nearlyiialf a kilogramme  or five times the amount of bocf.  Moreover, the chocolate keeps remarkably well, and is affected neither by  - heat nor by long storage in damp and  badly-ventilated magazines.  A PROPHETIC SERMON.  A''Vlrrsvmiin froni SlollamI I'l'MC.Silus lit  ISocrs "orcfulri lhc 6*r<\si!ul. Sd'ii^^lr.  The Gape Times says;���������"Do Patriot  has reprinted a remarkable sermon  delivered by the Rev. Mr. Epoelstra  at Pretoria oh June 13, 1897. The  reverend gentleman came out as assistant to the Rev.. iVIr. . Goddef roy,  but soon tired of the 'cunning, deceit,  and corruption, he saw around, and,  speaking this mind too freely, was requested to return to Holland. In! his  farewell sermon, on the sins of the  nation, he used . these prophetic  words; "I liear in the spirit the. sound  of .marching of the hosts of great  armies, who come up from air sides  to this land. I hear the 'clash of  swords and. the: rattle, of musketry,:  also .the..roar, of cannon.. A hopeless  strife follows,, a life. and death  struggle. It is decided. ; The inheritance of the fathers falls into the  hands of the enemy. For-the God of  the fathers hath been deserted by the  children, and He executeth judg-  numt against a faithless and apostate,  people.'"  INEVITABLE.  Bobby'came home one day, covered  with dirt and bruises, and trundling  ,a broken  bicycle '  What on earth have you been doing, my child ? exclaimed his terrified  mother.  I ran over a big dog and took a  fall,   explained , Bobby.  Couldn't you see him and give him  tho. road ? .  .  Yes, I saw him ami was turning out,  but when I got within about ten feet  of him I shut my eyes, and before I  got 'em open again, I'd run into him.  For the land's sake, what did you  shut  your eyes for ?  Couldn't help it. Had to sneeze. It  you 'think'you can hold your eyes open  when the sneeze comes, just try it  soine  day.  If the reader thinks Bobby's expuso  was  not  a valid one  let him  try    it  some day  "when  the sneeze comes."  AN  ELOQUENT ANSWER.  A colored citizen gave a justice of  llhe peace a big, fat 'possum as a wedding fee.  Meeting the justice n'year after his  marriage,  the former wild;  Well, Jim, [how, do you, like married  life?  Well, sulh', was (he reply, all I  kiu .say is���������I wish' I'd eat dat 'possum.!  oman's  A woman's! reproductive  organs are in the most intense and continuous;sympathy with her kidneys.  The slightest disorder in the  kidneys brings about H  corresponding disease ,in.  the reproductive organs.  Dodd's Kitlney Pills, byre-  storing the kidneys to their  perfect condition, prevent  and cure those fearful disorders peculiar to women.  Palo young girls, worn-out  mothers, suffering wives  and women entering upon  the Change of Life, your  best friend is  -.rkx^Mivcnracrj  REWARD OF MERIT.  Nollicl���������Gracious! How do you  manage to knit no much in so short  V time?  Ninette���������Every time I do ten rows  I give myself a chocolate cream.  ���������������������������i.rcsY ivc-: i-'oittirr."  Ladies of Canada ;  The bond of union between the mother country and ' her colonies, is  strong. ' In . time of necessity the  colonies have always been loyal.  Patriotic Canadian ladies, while they  cannot bear arms'in time of war, can  assist their brother colonists in a  substantial way. Ceylon and India  produce the finest Green teas. Drinkers of Japan teas should try. them.  Monsoon,    Salada.   and Blue    Ribbon  packets  are  known   to all.������������������Colonist.  ���������        -   ' .-    ��������� ;:���������-.-���������,  ACCORDING TO CONTRACT.  House Owner���������You' didn't pay' the  rent last month.  Tenant���������No ?, Well,  I suppose you'll  hold  ine to your  agreement.  .Owner���������Agreement ��������� what    agrec-  'anent ?.   '-.  -��������� Tenant���������Why, when I rented you  said I must pay in advance or not at  all.  The "Balmoral,"...Frea Bus ^b*  Policies n*y Chanjjcy Opinions May Ch������nsre. but one tiling th������t noyer change*. th������*  in (lie quality of  Kksseb      m  tea  CWX-X^OXsT  TE.^, It always remains th3 boftt.  In Load Packets    25, 30, 40, 60 and COo,  Poultry, Butter, Eg-grs and other Produce,  If you have any correspond with us.     We want IOO CARLOADS  to   supply our. tr ade.  The Dawson Commission Co., Limited, Toronto.  Am. Plan,  up  AVENUE   HOUSE MoQUI���������Oolleg*    Awnua  HtBWUB  nUUOE     Family  HoUl  rutas  $1.50  V <Ur.  IMAGINATION.   " '  .   Grace���������Cliolly has a wonderful  im-  agiuatiian.  Nell���������How?  Grace���������die calls (hat fuzz on his lip  a  mustache.  TIIIIIJMtt.V J AUK'.  which floats over Britain: and all her  colonies is emblematic of the adage,  "In union there is, strength." The  patriotic ladies of Canada can ex-  emplyfy that adage, ' and indulge a  patriotic .sentiment, hy assisting  their linglLsh, Scotch and Irish cousins .-who produce the pure niachine-  inade Green teas of Ceylon and India.  Tea drinkers will find the Blue Ribbon, , Monsoon and Salada green teas  a pleasant change from Japans.���������  Colonist.  II OMAN EXPERIENCE.  The biggest  boom don't always bring  The very   biggest gains;  The. little  baby sometimes  has  The very   biggest pains.  SWA  Ihli signature Is on every box of the srennlao  Laxative Bromo������Quinine Taueta,  tb* remedy that cures o cold to onojtoy  ARE TOO PROUD TO BEG.  No' matter how poor a native of tho  Hawaiian islands maj' be, he is never  seen begging.' The only begars there  arc chiefly tho impoverished Portuguese residents.  FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS  MRS WINSLOWS SOOTITINO. SYRUP Ins been  used by mothers for their children teething. It soothes  the child, noftena the gums, allayspalu, cures wind colics  snd I s tho best remedy for diarrhoea, 25c a bottle. Sold  by all druggists throughout the world. Bo sure and ask  for "Airs, winslow's Soothing Syrup."..  MARKETING IN BUENOS AYRES.  Vegetables'are usually said in piles  in Buenos Ayres, so that you have to  measure quantity as well as quality  by the eye; and butchers' sell their  meat by the chunk, rather than by  weight. .;'-..  '���������, $100 Reward, $100.  Tho renders of this paper" will bo pleased to  learn that there is at least one dreaded disoase  that science has been able to euro in all its  staaes and that is Catarrh. Hall's Catarrh  Cm'O is the only positive euro now known to  themedicul Iratcrnity.. Cmarrh beinir a constitutional disease, requires a constitutional  trofttmonf. Hall's Catarrh Curo is taken internally, actons directly upon tho blood nnd  mucous surfaces of tho system, thereby destroying tho foundation, of tho disease., and  giving tho patient strength by building up the  constitution nnd assisting naturo in doing its  work. , The propriotois have so much faith in  its curativo.powers, that thay oll'or ono Hundred Dollars for any case Mmt it fails to cure.  Send for list of testimonials. '  - : F. J. CHKN'EY& CO., Toledo O.  Sold by druggists, 75c.  ' Hull's Family Pills are the boat  A  GOOD GUESSER.  Bride, formerly a widow,���������Oh, Harry, what would I do, if you should die?  Harry, doubtfully���������I ,don't know,  dear,  but  I think I can  guess.  SPEAR POINTS.  There  are  no dead  saints. _.  The better days will came only as!  yofci do your best to-day.  The ttiore intensive your faith the  more extensive your influence.  The church without a prayer meeting is a body without .a heart.  If you give no place to the devil you  will not go to the devil's place.  iWhile we are cliase to Christ we  never find any weight in his yulce.  The Christian who knows God, will  praise Him every day of his life,  whether., he feels dike it or not.  W I������ C 105.5  CARBOLIC  For all skin ailments.  J. C. Calvert & Co:, Manchester, England  Sausage Casings���������New importations finest English  Sheep and American Ilog TiMngs���������rcliablo goods at  rwht prices.   PAKIi., BLACK YVJiLI. t CO., Toronto.  TORONTO CUTTING SCHOOL "3 ..  Latest, up-to-date, reliable systems taught for gentle-  men's Karment'p. Terms moderate. Write for Particulars. '    r   .  PILE   CURE  Atrial package of Cox's Positive    Cure for Piles will be sent free ta.  any address on receipt of tivo cent stamp.    No knife, na  greasy salve.   Address, THE HUTCIirXG      fR������E  MEDICINE CO., Toronto, Out ,"���������  SLATE, TILE and      douoxas Bros.,  METAL ROOFS ���������m>S2&S������"11 ** So'kt.  QARPET    DYEJNQ  ^^  and Cleaning. This is a specialty with tile ^-*"  BRITISH   AMERICAN  DYEING CO.  Send particulars by post ana ivc arc sure to satisfy.'  Address Sox 158, Montreal.  To Bond for our  Oorr.ploto Catalogue . of Sheet  Music and Booh*  wllh Special rate*  of discount.  WHALEY/  ROYCE & Co.  158 Vonge St.  Toronto, Ont,  MILLS, KILLS & HALES  BurristoiY, etc.  Jvemoved to Wesley Buildings,  KichmotidSt. \V.t Toronto.  CathoSic Prayer "Ars'.'Su'iSS;  IEeligious Pictures, Statuary, and Church Ornaments-  Kduoatioual Works. Mail orders receive prompt atttn,  tion. D. &J. SA0LIER&C0., Montroal.  "ON2I POUND CAKES"  FOR     BC,oTrss33a:or.ao     tjsh  Laundry, Washing Clothes. l"-oning, Sealing Presorve*.  PAEAPPINB  C/i^.  7JL&f-y &7L$/ <������tf~iurL/d -&L������,< &���������&<&<������ 'invitees  nc  irns  Asr^jL   /iftMi/   l{/-t������3 C������f1^Urfl������tC %������<������ t������9  i  I  THB QTJEJ5N CITlr OIL CO.. ���������Limited,  Eam'l Koffers, Prest.. Toronto  Auk your deut������r for ic.  ~"     THE MOST NUTRITIOUS.  SJ  QRATEPUL-COMFORTING  BREAKFAST-SUPPER.  W(  ^^l^smi^sM^^^^^^i^mm^s^m^^m THE MINING REVIEW���������Saturday, December 22, 1900.  c  The Mining Review.  SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1000.  Though the Silver-Lead Mines Association do not give the publicall their business   secrets, enough   is  known of the  proceedings   at   Kelson   last   week,   to  Bhow they are  veiv  anxious   to   secure  better markets for their ores. The Smelter combine on  the other   side   are not  disposed to pay what the ores am worth,  so another market is not only deisirable  but highly necessary.   Nov, supposing  they would   urge   the   present   Federal  government to do for them what the late  Conservative government did  m ��������� 1871),  for the producers of eastern Canada.   At  that   time   Canada   was importing the  great bulk of all its required  manufactures   from   the United States, and producing   but   little.   No v, however, our  agricultural    implement    makers,   our  wooden ware producers, <&c, are exporting to   Australia, South   America,  and  even to England and the United States.  In   the  late election, the Liberal party  boasted of our great volume of exports���������  nearly all  the   result of   Sir John Mac-  donald's protective duties.   The United  States   are  not  alone the only country  that requires our silver and lead and  their products.   Many  other countries  are willing to pay high figures for them,  and besides our own local  markets are  growing.  Then why not set to work and  encourage by proper duties, manufacturing our metals instead   of selling them  abroad in a raw state?   Why not niaim-  facturet hem   for export, under proper  protection, employ our own people in the  work at our own1 door-steps?   The idea  is a feasible one, and should be acted on  not only by the mine owners but by all  others who   desire   to   see   the country  grow and prosper.  cipal ticket, .would show how the money  can be got on any reasonable terms to  make the purchase. The Review endorses the buying idea, it the money to  buy can be brought in sight on any  equitable terms. Can any one show  where the means to make the purchase  can be got?  The Review' has before how suggested  the propriety of  purchasing the water  and electric light systems of the  place,  ,if   they can   be purchased at  a proper  ' figure, and the money for their purchase  can be got on advantageous terms. , The  ' place requires.with good fire companies,  plentiful water and light supply ,to secure  reasonable insurance rates .and ample  street lighting, and if these can better  be got by. purchase than by rate payment, then the purchase should be made.  However, the price asked and the question offinancing -a chief factor in the  consideration.,   We  believe   too   school  -matters should secure some of the attention of the incoming' council. The government is paying now about $120 a  month for salaries, and some $75 to $100  a year for incidentals; but this is not  enough. Nothing is more necessary to  keep families' in. the place and bring  others here, who ought to be here, than  a good school, and it must be .apparent  to every one, two good teachers cannot  be retained here for a total of $120 a  month. The amount should be at least  $400 a year more,' and this should be paid  bv the city.  The Labor party says "Buy out the  railways, the telegraphs and all such  utilities and give them to the people."  The idea is a good one, if it can be carried out on any equitable basis; but it  takes two to make a bargain in this  country���������one to oiler for sale and the  other to raise the money to buy. San-  don people would today be much better  off if they owned the water and light  ���������systems of the place. No ,doubt the  owners would sell, and it would be a  bright idea if the Labor party, or some'  other party, even the Paystreak's inuni-  COMMUNICATION.  To the Editor of Tub Mining Review:  Deab Sik,���������In view of the fact that I  expect to leave Sandon in a short time  and my work as Principal of the public  school, there are a few things I should  like to say, through your columns, to  the people of Sandon���������at least to those  who are interested in school matters. I  wish to do so in my own defense as well  as in the interests of my pupils.  Various  complaints have  been made  against me by different individuals, and  some one-sided reports circulated, and it  is only fair to myself and to my friends  that 1 should be allowed  to say a word.  I regret that I have failed to commend  myself to the good judgement of some of  the parents, for I   desire   to   have   the  good opinion of everyone as far as possible.   That I have made   mistakes I am  leady to ��������� acknowledge; still   I   think I  can   honestlv   say that I   have   always  had, and still have, at heart the walfare  of my pupils here, and that I have tried  my best in every way   to   promote their  interests.  It has been my aim', fiom the  first, to make the   Sandon public school  one of the best   in  the  province, and I  think everyone will bear me out when I  say that there have been  many difficulties   in   the way from   the first for both  teachers and pupils to face.  I think I have had a full share of difficulties in shape ol loss by slides, by fire  and by lost time, as well as fiom otlier  sources, though I.am thankful for the  preservation of health and life and limb.  Some parents have complained that  their children have not made good progress under my teaching; Well, in the  first place, this may not be true. And,  in the second place, if it is true, it may  also be true that the fault does not  wholly lie with the teacher. ' But whatever the facts may bs, I know this, that  a number of my former pupils have been  very successful in the public and high  schools of other parts of this province  and of the Northwest, I may say, in  passing, that no one would be .more  pleased than I to have some of my Sandon pupils do likewise.  With regard to the high school entrance examination held last summer, I  wish to say that it was a.very difficult  oneJ This will be evident when I state  that out>'of 374 candidates thioughout  the province only 113 (less than one-  third) succeeded. Of GO candidates in  schools outside the cities, only 5 passed.  Our central examination for this district  was held at Three Forks, the Sandon  school having been burned. In order  to pass, pupils required to take G0C per  cent, of the total maiks in all subjects.  One candidate took 63 per cent. One of  my pupils took 59 per cent, and another  48. Now, when one considers that we  lost all all our books, maps and apparatus by the fire and nearly a month of  our time, I think that my pupils maae a  very good showing indeed, and I do not  feel at all discouraged at the complaints  against my ability as a teacher.  FOR 5ALE.  Mine, Mill ami Smeller Supplies; Asaayers'  Supplies; HoistiiiK Plants; Steiun, Gasoline  cir Horse-I'owor Machinery of every description supplied on the shortest possible notice, at  the very lowest prices, direct from the neaiest  manufacturers to you.  The National  Ore  &   Reduction   Co.  APARTADO 83. DURANGO, MEXICO.  Highest cash paid for Mntte and Bullion.  Write for price list.     U. H. representatives,  Howard Chcruienl Works, St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A.  J. W. BALMAIN,     ,  Civil   Engineer,  Architect,   Etc.  , 1'. O. Uor 170.  SANDON, I1K1TISII COLUMBIA.  FAT  BABY     ,  Fat is the cushion that nature fills out and surrounds the  little ones with, to protect their  tender parts���������the same with  kittens and puppies;���������fat is not  tender. Fat they must have;  and fat they must be.  If your baby is anyway short  of his rights, give him Scott's  emulsion  of cod-liver oil.  We'll send you a littlt to try if you like.  SCOTT & BOWNE,   Chemists, ��������� Toronto.  Then,  again,  complaints   have   been  made that I have used  undue severity  in discipline.   I wish   to say that I caii  recall only a single instance in which 1  have left myself open to the charge, and  I   am  confident that anyone, who will  take the trouble to investigate the matter, will approve of  my  action  therein.  At the same time, I  legret  that  it  has-  ever been necessary to resort to extreme  measures.   Hut I "believe there are fen  sensible people who will   suppose   for a  moment that a public school can be carried on without proper discipline.   I am  sure, too, there must be discipline exercised in a family as well as in a school, if  things are as they ought  to be.    I wish  to go a step farther and say that parents  who encourage their children  to disregard   their  teachers'  authority   and to  act  disrespectfully   towards   them   are  guilty   of doing "their children a great  wrong.    Those who really desire thebest  interests of their children will rather uphold the teacher and seek  to co-operate  with him or with Iki-.   To  have  a good  and efficient school  it is necessary thai  parents, teachers, trustees  and children  co-operate instead of being   continually  at loggerheads with each oilier.  I wisii to say here that, if in any instance, it can be proved that I havi  acted unjustly to any pupil or have  given unnecessary oll'ense to any parent,  I am ready to oiler an apology to thai  pupil or to that parent. Rut if this car  not be shown, then I apologize to no  one, however much I may be threat  ened.;  There is just one more item I wish tc  speak of, viz: 1 have been' told that 1  have injured myself in Sandon by tiik  iirg an active part in matters relating tc  public morals and good laws. I am ven  sorry if I have antagonized anyone, bu  I believe it to be the duty and privileut  of everyone to uphold his country's laws  and the moral and social interests of tin  community in which he lives. I belitne  it,to be our duty and privilege as Britiil  citizens and Christian people to  honor the relieion and laws which have  done so much to make this Canada ol  our the free and noble land she is. . And  it is hard for me to believe, that, in trying to act as I believe a good citizen  should act, I have injured myself in the  opinion of the good people of Sandon.  In fact. Ido not believe it.  Hoping these remarks may commend  themselves to the good judgement of  all who are in any way interested in the  school. *���������>'.���������;'  I remain, vcur trulv.  .'���������������������������������������������   "T. J. Ba'ukon.  Sandon. Dec. 17th, 1900.  . S. DltEWKY  Sandon, U.  H. T. Twice  >.ew Denver, H. C.  DREWRY & TW1GG  Dominion and J'rovincial Land Surveyors.  Civil and Mining Engineers.  Bedford <fc McNeil Code.  A. R. HEYLAND,  ENGINEER,  AND PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.  SANDON, B.C.  M. L. GRIMMETT, EL. B.  ���������  Barrister, Solicitor,  Notary  Public, Etc.  Sandon, British Columbia.  '.. We deeply sympathisu with Mr. Barron in   the   connections with which  he  deals in the foregoing, for we know from  absolute assurances he  did   his   best to  make the school a success.   In his failure, however, the acts of parents are for  the   most part responsible.    We know  thati.n the city there are several families   at   loggerheads with one   another.  They hash and rehash their grievances  in the presence   of   their   children who  imbibe   the   poison,   carrv   the   consequences to school, and fight it out.   Mr.  Barron endeavored to adjust differences  as he met  them without reference, of  course, to the parents'row, and  for this  10 fell often under   the  ban.    We wish  here once for all to advise all such parents, as long as things are  run this wav  there is no hope for the' school  even i'f  run by an angel from   paradise.   If the  school is ever to be got into- shape, parents must settle their disputes outside  the hearing of their children���������they must  endorse   the   teachers   and treat  them'  with respect, and assist in every way in  securing   regular attendance and good  behaviour.   There is one  thing we have  however, to assure Mr. Barron of, and it  is this, that he has  the confidence and  respect as a man and a citizen, of everv  resident of   the place  whose opinion is  worth securing; and all wish him every  manner  of, happiness and    success   in  whatever field of labor he mav later cast  his lot.���������Ed. Mining Review."  The Denver House  0060  Headquarters lor Travelling Men and  Miners.  The Table Is first class.  The Bar is always stocked by the best  Imported Wines, Liquors and Cigars.  The Rooms are all that can be desired  for comfort.  NELSON & CO.. Proprietors.  Established 1858.  ML. R. Smith & Co.  flannfacturers of all kinds of  Plain and Fancy  p 1 csraiEi.  VICTORIA, B.C.  *RANCH--VANCOUVER, B. C.  Lovely  Diamonds.  When on a diamond buying1 trip to  the cutters at Amsterdam, we never  forg-et to supply ourselves well with  four "special" sizes, viz. :  For our $15 Diamond Ring:.  For our $50 Diamond Ringr.  For our $75 Diamond Ringr.  For our $1 00 Diamond Ring.  Every one of these diamonds must  be of such a quality that the most  critical cannot find a fault, for a  " Special" Diamond Ring- from  Ryrie's must be of "first quality"  always.  Send for our Ring: Catalogue.  . DIAMO'ND  HALL,  Established 1S54.  RYRIE BROS.,  Yonge and Adelaide Sts.,  ITORONTO.  ('?  i  lTM  MS  if*  ���������Hp:\  'ft'  i')-:t-r  M  T""'i?'TP>"^-������T*7~ 'Il������������S*.J3   J*.*U������aA������ r|i������u,  J   THE MINING REVIEW-Satdrday, December 22, igoo.  I "ST OF  PERSONS   ENTITLED TO   VOTE  In the  City of Sandon,  IN THE APPROACHING MUNICIPAL ELECTION, iqoi.  JTame,  QUALIFICATIONS  1  .    Armstrong, WJ  f>  .    Atherton.ER  .'j  .    Alexander, H B  4  Buckley, John  o  Burns, P  G.  Barr. J R  7.  Bigney, 0 A    ...  8.  Byers, Murray  9.  Burns, EP     ...  JO.  Brown, Thomas  U.  Cameron, Rory  12.  Cameron, E a.  13.  Cameron, S    ....  U.  Creech, Robert  15.  Crawford, Alex  10.  Cunning, Robert  17.  Clifle, Charles  18.  Cliffe, C V  19.  Clifle, Byron  20.  Cameron, J 11  21.  Carmichael, D A  22.  Doolan, L  23,  David, Albeit  24.  Duffy, Thomas  25.  Eccles, Willie  26. Folliott, T B  27. Fulhnore. A  28. Fleishman,' J  20.  Gomm, W E  30.  Gilhs, J D     ...  31.  Grimmett, M L  '32.  Grimrnett, Mrs. -M L  33.  Grimmett, Geo W  34.  Grant, George  35.  Gusty, John S    ...  30.  Hunter, CD'  37.  Hutton, F  38.  Hall, HS     ....  39.  Jalland, Robert    ���������" ���������  40.  Jalland, Thomas   ...  41.  Jackson, Harry  42. Karr, William  43. Knowles, George  44. Kleinschmidt, Y  45. Karr, Albert    ....  40. Lowery, R T  47. Lilly, W H'   Trader's License  Owner  Owner .  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Pedlar's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's Lfcense  Owner  Trader's Licence  Owner  Trader's License  Trader's License  Owner  48. Lovatt, George  49. Logan, R  50."   Lowiis, John  51. McDonald, J J  52. Morrison, Kenneth  53. Morrison, Neil  54. Main, G N  55. Main, J G    ...  56. McDonald, Robert  57. McDonald, Neil  58. McDonnell, Alex  59. Melvin, J G  , 60. Melntyre, Mrs.  01. McDonald, A A  62. Murhard, ���������  63. McLeod, Angus  64. McDonald, J G  05. McAdani, William  06. McPherson, George  67. McKinnon, Mrs,  68. McLeod, Edward  69. Nash, Harry  70. O'Donnell, Neil  71. O'Neil, Mrs.  72. Pitts, II I-I  73. Parham, William   .  74. Powell, G B        75. Robertson, D J  70. Rae, AD  77. Ross, Albert  7S. Strelly, W R   ....  79. Stubbs, Williom  SO. Stubbs, Eugene  81. Stubbs, A W  82. Sewell, F C  83. Sandilands, E M .  ,84. Stevens, II M    ..  S5.    Taylor, Eli  80.   Trevor, RD   ...\;.  87. 'Thompson, John ...  88. Vallance. James  89. Waite, Georga .......  90. Walmsley, William  91. Williamson, James.  92. Wright, AW.:.   93. Wilson, William .....  94. Walmsley, Charles...  95. AVood, James   90. Walmsley, George....  97. Walmsley, William .  Trader's Licence  Owner  Trader's License  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Pedlar's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Owner  Trader's License  w 11'"  THE MINING REVIEW-Saturday, December 22,  1900.  The Mining Review.  SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1900.  Though the Silver-Lead Mines Association do hot give the publicall their business aecrets, enough is known of the  proceedings at Nelson last week, to  show they are very anxious to secure  better markets for their ores. TheSmel  ter combine on: the other,; side   are not  cipal ticket, .would show how the money  can be got on . any reasonable terms to  make the purchase. The Revikw endorses the buying idea, it the money to  buy can be brought' in sight on any  equitable   terms.   Can   any  one  show j The National  where the means to make  can be got?  FOR SALE.  the purchase  ,. , . ,     ���������r "vicuanuuuua snort  time  disposed to pay what the ores are worth, a������d my work as Principal of the public  so another market is not only desirable f5jnool> there are a few things  I should  but highly necessary.   Now, supposing {,.   *������JF'^i1���������1??"  *our.   columns, to  COMMUNICATION.  To the Editor of The Mining' Revikw:  Dkab Sib,���������In view of the faSt that I  expect to leave Sandon in a short time  and my work as Principal of the public  Mine, Mill and Smelter Supplies; Assayers'  Supplier; Hoisting Plants; Steam, Gasoline  or ilorvo-I'owor Machinery ol every description supplied on the shortest possible notice, ut  the very lowest prices, direct from the neatest  iiianufaeturors toyou. '.'       -  r .��������� i>  Ore &   Reduction   Co.  Civil  AHARTADO 83. DURANQO, MEXICO  Highest cash paid for Matte and Bullion.  Write for price list.   ' U. S. representatives,  Howard Chemical Works, St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A.  J. W. BALMAIN,  Engineer,   Architect,   Etc.  IV O. Box 170.  SANDON, BRITISH COLOMBIA.  \V. S. TJltKWItY  Sandon. B. C.  H.T. Twice  mw Denver, B. C.  but highly, necessary,  they would   urge   the   present  Federal  government to do for them what the late  Conservative government did in  1879,  for the producers of eastern Canada. At  that   time   Canada   was importing the  great bulk of all its required  manufactures   from   the United States, and producing   but  little.   Nov, however, our  agricultural    implement    makers,   our  wooden,ware producers, &c,yare exporting to   Australia,'South   America,  and  even to England and  the United States.  In   the   late election, the Liberal party  boasted of our great volume of exports���������  nearly all  the   result of   Sir John Mac-  donald's protective duties.   The United  States   are  not  alone the only country  that reouires our silver and lead and  their products.   Many  other countries  are willing to pay high figures for them,  and besides our own local markets are  growing. . Then why not. set to work and  encourage by proper duties, manufacturing our metals instead   of selling them  abroad in a raw state?   Why not manufacture! hem   for export, under proper I  protection, employ our own people in the  work at our own door-steps?   The idea  is a feasible one, and should bo acted on  not onlyby the mine owners but by all  others who   desire   to   see   the country  grow and prosper.  1 supposing  the people of Sandon���������-at least  to those  *   w���������'---���������   who are interested in school matters.    I  wisliito do so in my own defense as well  as in the interests,of my pupils.  Various complaints have  been made  against me by different individuals, and  some one-sided reports circulated, and it  is only fair to myself and to my friends I  that I should be allowed  to say a word. I  I regret that I have failed to commend  myself to the good judgement of some of  the parents, for I   desire   to ��������� have   the  good opinion of everyone as far as possible.   That I have made   mistakes I am  ready to  acknowledge; still T, think I  can   honestlv   say that I   have   always  had, and still have, at heart the walfare  of my. pupil6 here, and that I have tried  my best in every way  to   promote their  interests.  It has been my aim, from the  iirst, to make the   Sandon public school  one of the best   in   the  province, and I  chink everyone will bear me out when I  say that there have been  many difficulties  in   the way from  the first for both  teachers and pupils to face.-i =:  I think I have had a full share of difficulties in shape 01 loss by slides, by fire  and'by lost time, as well as from other  sources, though I,am thankful for the  preservation of health and life andlimb. , - ~~ -..-,���������������������������������> ���������.���������������  Some parents have complained that.lone,'however inuch  their children have notmade good pro- je'iied.  Then,  again,  complaints   have   been  made that I have  used  undue severit}  in discipline.   I wish   to say that I can  recall only a single instance in which I  have left myself open to the charge, and  I, am  confident that anyone, who will  take the trouble to investigate the matter, will.approve of my action  therein.  At the same time, I  regret that  it has-  ever been necessary to resort to extreme  measures.    Hut I   believe there are fen  sensible people who.will   suppose   for a  moment that a public school can be carried on without proper discipline., I am  eure, too, there must   be discipline'exercised in a family'as well as in a school, if  things areas they ought to be.   I wish  to go a step farther and say that parents  who encourage their children  to  disregard  their teachers'  authority   and to  act disrespectfully   towards   them   aip  guilty   of duing "their children a great  wrong.    Those who really desire the best  interests of their children will rather uphold the teacher and seek  to co-operate  with him or with hrr.    To  have  a good  and efficient school  it is'neeessary that  parents, teachers, trustees  and children  co-operate instead of being   continually  at loggerheads with each other.  I wish to say here that, if in any instance, it can be proved that I havi  acted unjustly to any pupil or have  given unnecessary oll'ense to any parent,  I am ready to offer an apology to that  pupil or to th.lt parent. But if this can  not be shown, then I apologize to no  I   may   be   threat  DREWRY & TW1GG  Dominion and Provincial Laud Surveyors.  Civil and Mining Engineers.  I-Bed foid <fc McNeil Code.  A. R. HEYLAND,  ENGINEER,  AND PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.  SANDON, B.C.  1- fn  !'     A  greds under my teaching:    Well, in   the  TnE Rkview has before now suggested  the propriety of  purchasing the water  and electric light systems of the place,  if   they can   be purchased at a proper  figure, and the money for their purchase  can be got on advantageous terms.   The  ' place requires,with good fire companies,  plentiful water and light supply,to secure  reasonable   insurance rates   .and ample  street lighting, and if these   can   better  be got by   purchase   than by rate   payment, then the purchase should be made.  However, the price asked and the question of financing a chief factor in   the  consideration.   We   believe   too   school  matters should secure some of the attention of the incoming council.   The government   is   paying   now about  !j>120 a  month for salaries, and some $75 to $100  a year for incidentals; but   this   is   not  enough.   Nothing is more necessary to  keep1  families   in   the   place and bring  others here, who ought to be here, than  a good school, and it must be apparent  to every one, two  good teachers cannot  be retained here for a   total   of  .-F120 a  month.   The amount should be at least  .f.400 a year more, and this should be paid  by the city.  first place, this'may not be true. And,  in the second place, if it is true, it may  also be true that the fault does not  wholly lie with the teacher. But whatever the facts may bs, I know this, that  a number of my former pupils have been  very successful in the public and high  schools of other parts of .this province  and of the Northwest. I may say. in  passing, that no one would; be more  pleased than I to have some pf.rny Sandon pupils do likewise.  With   regard   to   the high school entrance examination held last summer,���������'I  wish to say that it was a very difficult  one.   This will be evident when I state  that out of 374  candidates   thioughout  the   province  only ' 113 (less than one-  third) succeeded.   Of 60 candidates in  schools outside the cities, only 5 passed.  Our central examination for this district  was   held   at  Three Forks, the Sandon  school haying been   buraed.   In   order  to pass, pupils required to take   00   per  cent, of the total maiks in all subjects.  One candidate took 63 per cent.   One of  my pupils took 59 per cent, and another  48.   Now, when one considers   that we  lost all all pur books, maps and   apparatus by the fire and  nearly a month of  our time, I think that my pupils made a  very good, showing indeed, and I do not  feel at all discouraged at the complaints  against my ability as a teacher.  There is just one more item I .wish tc  speak of, viz:    1 have been   told   that]  have injured myself in   Sandon   by taking an active part in uiatlPrs relating t<  public morals and good laws.   I am von  sorry if I have antagonized anyone, btr  I believe it to be the  duty and privilem  of everyone to uphold his country's laws,  and the moral'and social interests of flu  community in which he'lives.   I believe  it to be our duty and privilege,as' British,  citizens    and     .Christian      people    to  honor the religion and  laws which have  done so much to make   this   Canada oi  our the free andndble land she is.'   And  it is hard forme to believe  that, in   trying  to   act   as   I believe a good citizen'  should act, I have injured myself inthe  opinion of the'good   people   of  Sandon.;  In fact. I do not believe it.  Hoping these remarks may commend  themselves* to the good judgement of  all who are in'any. way interested in the  school.      ��������� ��������� ���������'     ".������������������.���������>  I remain, vrur truly.  T. J. Bahkon.  Sandon. Dec. 17th, 1900.  M. L. GRIMMETT, U,. B.  Barrister, Solicitor.  Notary    ,  Public, Etc. "    .  Sandon, British Columbia.  The Denver House  0000  Headquarters for Travelling Men and  Miners.  The Table Is first class.  . The Bar is always stocked by the best  imported Wines; Liquors and Cigars.  The Rooms are all that can be desired  lor comfort.  NELSON & CO., Proprietors.  Established 1858.  I  ifl  V  ���������  :   >i!  '-a-.:;J?l  1  M. R. Smith & Co.  nanufacturers of all kinds of  Plain and Fancy  tl  fflfl  i4V  VICTORIA, B. C.  1 RANCH���������VANCOUVER, B.C.  FAT  BABY  The Labor party says  "Buyout the  railways, the   telegraphs   and   all such  utilities and give them to . the   people."  The idea is a good one, if it   can be carried out on any equitable basis; but it  takes   two   to   make a bargain   in this  country���������one to oiler for sale and the  other to raise the moDey to buy.   Sandon people would  today be much better  .oft'if they owned   the water   and   light  systems   of   the   place.   No  doubt  the  owners would sell, and  it would  be a  bright idea if the Labor party, or some  other party, even the Payscreak's muni-  Fat is the cushion that nature fills out and surrounds the  little ones with, to protect their  tender parts���������the same with  kittens and puppies���������-fat is not  tender. Fat they'must have;  and fat they must be.  If your baby is anyway short  of his rights, give him Scott's  emulsion  of cod-liver oil.  We'll send you a little to try if you like.  SCOTT &HOWNE,   Chemists.     .       Toronto.  We deeply .sympathise with Mr. Barron iu   the   connections,with  which  he  deals in the foregoing, for we know from  absolute assurances he   did 'his   best to  make the school a success.   In  his failure, however, the acts of parents are for  the   most part responsible.    We know  that in the city there are several families   at   loggerheads with one   another.  They hash and rehash their grievances  in the presence   of   their  children who  imbibe   the   poison,   carry   the   consequences to school, and fight it out.   Mr:  Barron endeavored to adjust differences'  as he met   them without reference, ,of  course, to the parents' row, and  for this  he fell of ten.under   the  ban.    We wish  here once for all to advise all  such.parents, as long as tilings are run this way  there is ho hope for the   school  eVen if  ' run by an angel from   paradise.   If the  'schoolis ever to be got into shape, parents must settle their disputes outside  the hearing of their children���������they must  endorse   the   teachers   and treat  them  with respect, and assist in every way in  securing   reirular attendance and good  behaviour.   There is one  thing we have  however, to assure Mr. Barron of, and it  is this, that he has  the confidence and  respect as a man and a citizen, of everv  resident of   the place whose opinion is  worth securing; and all wish' him every  maimer of happiness and   success   in  whatever field of labor he may Intercast  his lot.���������Ed. Mining Keview.  Four  Lovely  Diamonds.  When on a diamond buying' trip to  the cutters at Amsterdam, we never  forg'et to supply.ourselves well with  .four " special" sizes, viz. :  . For our $aj Diamond Ring-.  For our S501 Diamond Ring:.  For our $75 Diamond Ring-.  For our $i 00 Diamond Ring.  ���������Everyone of these diamonds must  be of such a quality that the most  critical cannot find a fault, for a  "Special" Diamond Ring\ from  Ryrie',s must be of "first quality"  always.  Send for our Ring- Catalogue.  DIAMOND  HALL,  Established 1854.  RYRIE BROS,  Yonge and Adelaide Sts.,  ITORONTO.  ( '..  0  !  I ���������  ��������� \i'  !������������������������'  r.' a  .*,'  (���������'���������  ><���������  *  *  ���������3..  ���������  1  ?.  )"'  ^  i  X  *M  i  V-l  ������'  $���������  I 1  1  i  WmWMi 1 (.;   ,'���������..'���������' ' ;��������� .'a '���������'':';;'���������������������������  '���������'���������'.���������'': : '���������:. ' '. '-i; .,"."'���������''.'/'���������,���������'I' ' ������������������'. '���������.','���������;'.",":'': '���������'���������'���������'''  THE MINING REVIEW���������Saturday, ; December 22, 1900.  LIST; OF  PERSONS   ENTITLED TO   VOTE  In the  City of Sandon,  IN THE APPROACHING MUNICIPAL ELECTION, 1901.  "Njvsik,  QUA1JFIC.VTI0.VS  V. ���������������  ������' i'  tf  \  ill  1.  Armstrong, W J  2.  Atherton, ER  0  0.  Alexander, H B  4.  Buckley, John  5,  Burns, P  G.  Barr. J R  7.  Bigney, C A   ...  8.  Byers, Murray  i).  Burns, E P  10.  Brown, Thomas  11.  Cameron, Eory  12.  Cameron, E A  13.  Cameron, S  14.  Creech, Robert   ...  15.  Crawford, Alex  10.  Cunnimr, Robert  17.  Clifle, Charles  18.  Clifle, C V  19.  Clifle, Byron  20.  Cameron, J II  21.  Carmichael, D A  22.  Doolan, L  23,  David, Albert  24.  Duffy, Thomas  25.  Eecles, Willie  26.  Folliott, TB   ....  27.  Fullmore, A  28.  Fleishman, J  29.  Gomm, W E  30.  Gilhs, J D     ...  81.  Grimmett, M L  32.  Grimmett, Mrs.-M L  33.  Grimmett, Geo W  34.  Grant, George,  35.  Gusty, John S   ...  30.  Hunter, C D         37.  Hutton, F  38.  Hall, II S       89. Jalland, Robert  40. Jalland, Thomas  41. Jackson, Harry  42. Karr, William  ���������18. Knowles, George  ���������14. Kleinschmidt, V  45. Karr, Albert     ....  4G. Lowery, BT .  47. Lilly, W II  Trader's License  Owner  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  .Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Pedlar's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's Lfcense  Owner  Trader's Licence  Owner  if  Trader's License  ��������� (i   ���������       <i  Trader's License  Owner  48. Lovatt, George  49. Logan, R  50; Lowes, John  51. McDonald, J J  52. Morrison, Kenneth  53. Morrison, Neil  54. Main, G N  55. Main, J G   ...  50. McDonald, Robert  57. McDonald, Neil  58. McDonnell, Alex  59. 'Melvin, J G  60. Mclntyre; Mrs.  01. McDonald, A A  62. Murhard, ���������  03. McLeod, Angus  04. McDonald, J G  65. McAdam, William  06. McPherson, George  07. McKinnOn, Mrs,  08. McLeod, Edward  Trader's Licence  Owner  Trader's License  69. Nash, Harry  70. O'Donnell, Neil  71. O'Neil, Mrs.    '  72. Pitts, H II  73. Parham, William  74. Powell, G B        75. Robertson, D J  76. Rae, AD  77. Ross, Albert ,  78. Strelly, W R   ....  79. Stubbs, Williom  SO. Stubbs, Eugene  81. Stubbs, A \V  62. Sewell, F C    ...  83. Sandilands, E M .  84. Stevens, II M ...  85. Taylor, Eli  86. Trevor, R D   .....  87. Thompson, John  8S. Vallancc. James  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Pedlar's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  Owner  Trader's License  89.  90.  91.  92.  93.  94.  95.  96.  97.  YVaite, Georgo   Walmsley, William ..  Williamson, James   Wright, A W   Wilson, William   .Walmsley, Charles   AVood,  James.. ;  Walmsley, George   Walmsley, William ....  Owner  Owner  Trader's License THE MINING REVIEW���������Saturday, Dkcembkr 22, 1900.  M   i  Owtr? to ffie fact of HJuyfiv? Oar  Stock for CasK aRd direct from  ������ke I^aivufactarers  We are this season in a better position than ever  '. to sell at greatly reduced prices.  ."if :,  A/,  v i:  We do not advertise any Special Prizes or attractions, as  the stock is NEW,  and will sell ���������all are Prizes:  Our stock comprises Toys, Fancy Goods, Xmas Cards,  Fancy Papeteries, Books, Crockery, etc.  This line of goods we want brought forward, as we have  something NEW in the way of Mechanical, Steam and  Clock-work Toys, besides the cheaper goods'.  DOLLS ! We have a nice assortment of Dressed and  Undressed Dolls���������which includes the kid body line.  We handle all the Latest and Standard Games.  AT ROCK BOTTOM  PRICES.  We have a complete stock of Bound Books suitable for all  ages, and a number of the Poets bound in leather. The latest  Novels are carried in stock.  Papeteries  We have just received a consignment of Writing Papers  which will do Xmas correspondence ; more particularly we  draw your attention to the fine class of Boxed Papers which  are artistically and tastefully done up.  Crockery  Here will found something useful in the Crockery line���������  Bric-a-Bracs, Vases, Water Sets, Cups and Saucers,  Shaving Mugs, Etc.  As it is impossible to enumerate our various Xmas lines,  we invite one and all,  whether purchasers or not,. to call and  see our stock.     We have moved into our new store,  opposite .  theC. P.R. depot, where we have ample room to. show goods.  & TQe'rry Christmas to ^TT. .., '.  'CLtfPE'S. BOOKSTORE, Sandon,  ���������*  >!"���������,  'Ztmomipv*���������������*^^ ' *  ������BBiMffl������S2H^^  m  dS  '1  $1  Ji'    >1  If  '.    I  <   i' m  ,ti  '-���������; n  ��������� ���������. 'I.  n  111  r-il  U  :>P- fiiaisauL2a.tt1*UiL  THE MINING REVIEW���������Saturday, December  m  d  m  ������3  '.&l  22,   I9OO.  NOTICE.  ,.-V,ciou������t of "ovisfon 011 the Oitv Voters'List  ������ ill be hel<l in the Coiincil Chamber on the  {-veiling of Monuuy, the 17th. -VII who pay  Uicir taxes before that date will be entitled to  1 o ie at the Municipal Elections.  \Y. II. LILLY, Citv Clerk.  Transfer of Business.  1 beg to notifv all I hnve transferee! my drayinir  business for several months, or until my return  from tho east, to John Tyo, who will attend all  caltsas well as I did myself. My Coal business  will be in chargo of Kobt. Cunning, who will  fill all orders for cash. I thank all patrons for  past favors, aud.hope they will be continued  with my successors until ^������^MER0N.  "COMPANIES' ACT, 1897."  Notice is hereby given that Thomas Mc  Guigan, mine superintendent, of Cody, U.O.,  has been appointed the attorney for the  American Hoy Mining and Milling Company,  in place of George B. McDonadl, of Cody,  aforesaid. ,���������������������������  Dated this 1-1 lb. day of November, 1900.  S. Y. WOOTTON,  ,   Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.  The Big Store  .  Is Department  e  Alta Lodge, No. 29.  A. F. AND A. M.  Regular Communication of the lodge.  Meets first Thursday in each month at S p. m.  Visiting brethren cordially invited.  TIIOS. 1IROWN, Scu'v.  THE CHAMBER OF MINES  SOUTHERN BRITISH   COLUMBIA,  (.KOOTENAY AND YALE).  New Silk Waists, New Dress Patterns  "       " [; Skirts ������   Eiderdowns  :     "    Umbrellas "   Fianneletts  New Silk Handkerchiefs.  Any of these make a nice Xmas Present.  See the Dinner Set we are Glvfr? i? way.  Coupon with every $5.00 purchase.  e  o  0  e  ������  a  9  e  e  s  ������  NOTICE.���������THE CHAMBER. OF MINEF  wants thoroughly reliable correspondents in  every camp in the distiicts o' East and Wes:  Kootenay ind Yale, to whom reasonable compensation will be paid for their services.  t  A NEW DEPARTURE,  Correspondents will be expected to furnish  the Chamber of Mines with all development  gofng on Bll at the mines, the installation of  machinery, shipments of ore and value, and  generally such news as will attract attention  of capitalists and cause .them to investigate  and invest.  Applications to be addressed to  CHAMBER OF MINES,  Southern Dritish Columbia,  (Kootenay and Yale)  P. O. Box 578. ROSSLAND, B. C.  1 y  B?mr^i  .^*> 1 ^^.  [rSa^A^ra^^^!  [IgjSBgHjf^f ' / i L^IS  fill -L^^  ^//IIkI/  A V^"*55  B8L#If   u*  ^AJ\Y!hr  W-t-  ^^/  A/ 7^    i  In addition to our made-to-order department, which i  will always be kept up to the pink oftperfection. we have f  put m a fine assortment of all %  Miners' Clothing  Gent3' Furnl3iilng$  Our Boots and-Shoes, Underclothing, and, in fact,  all supplies���������just what's wanted in the camp. Call and  inspect them.  J. !R. GA-lVEEIROJNr.  ���������>���������*���������������������������������������������������������������������>**���������**<������**+**  ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  YOU  Are Going;  To Build!  See C. K. SKALES,  THE EXPERT PAPERHANOER  Who will give you close figures  on Painting, Paper/hanging and  Signs. . We are quick at the  busines-���������uprto-date mechanics in  every way.  folliott & McMillan  Gontraotors  and Builders.  Canadian   Pacific  and SOO   Line;  A PCMNTER  ���������������������������:,...'v\eCOAL-r ���������  Everybody Wants  the Best Coal.  Try Lethbridge Coal, then you will  have the best and cheapest. This coal  will make the hottest and brightest fires,  besides it is earily handled, as it is very  clean.    We have it for all kinds of grates  E-$- Cameron.  Dealers m Rou������rV and Dressed Lumber, Coast, Flooring,  arid Jo'fnt FfnfsKin������ Lumber: TnouTdfn.'g, Etc.  SASH AND DOOR ON HAND TO ORDER.   JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO  ���������FACTORY ON MAIN STREET.  Dealers in.Treats  AT SANDON  j ROSSLAND, NELSON, KASLO, PILOT BAY, THREE FORKS, SLOCAN CITY.  For your Eastern Trip, is to see  that your ticket reads VIA  CANADIAN PACIFIC.  fr��������� r������"clBi88i Sleeping Cars on all trains  from Reveistoke and Kootenay Landing  TOURIST CARS  pass Dunmore Junction daily for St  Paul; Saturdays, for Montreal and Bos-  ton ; Monday and Thursdays, for Toronto  Same cars pass Reveistoke one day  earlier. ���������        '  Train departs S a. m., except Siindav  7Wlklr P' ^e]Btoke, Mail, Line and  Pacific Coast, connecting at Ro-=ebprv  for Slocan City, Nelson, Wiand  Boundary Country, and all Eastern'  points via Crow's Nest route      ^bwn  For time-tables, rates and full information, call on or address nearest "oca!  agent, or uca'  H. \Y. Hahiiouu, ^gent,  TO P   , Sandon, B. C. or  i. 1. A., Nelson. A.G.P.A..Vancouver  rates and full Information.o unVc r Rff ?'"e���������s,'  w pr^VW- "hour, A^ent, Sindon   - aSCnt  dm Dizziness and Nausea  CAUSED BY OVER-STUDY AND CLOSE  CONFINEMENT.  POMPEII AND &ALYEST0N.  A COMPARISON OF THE  DISASTERS  THAT BEFEL THEM.  Him a roimlnr -i-Ii.iol Ii-m-Ii.-r .������i������f!Vri,������l ���������  .tint tlini tclliiK ���������><��������� :' C'ri������'it������r������ A������l������'������������������������������  Mir li-lt'd l������r. Mllll.i5!J>* I'liiK fill-:iuil  >t:i-. Ki--.(oi-i-cI 11> lli-it.III Jiiiil Mii-nalli.  "About the most thorough and  popular teacher we have ever had  hero," i.s the opinion expressed by the  people of Canaan, N.3., of their pres-  enl young lady school teacher, Miss  Nellie Ciuten. Miss Cutter* is possessed of keen intelligence and engaging  manners, and has been peculiarly successful in her chosen profession. At  present she looks tho picture of  .health, and one observing her good  color and buoyant spirits, would  never think of associating her with  sickness, li was, however, only last  autumn that, she was almost hopeless  of continuing in her work on account  of iie-r ill-health, and 'her condition'  was a source of alarmi to her -friends,  '���������yes,'' she said to an Acadiam reporter who called uponl her recently  to learn the particulars/ of her case,  "I suppose it is' a duty I awe. to Dr.  Williams' Pink Pills, luul i should  make public the wonders, they worked  for me, but perhaps 1 would not  have thought c������ Lt if you had not  called."  "You see, in addition to my leaching, lhad been studying very hard  over my 'B' work, and then 1 was attacked with whooping cough, which  did noi leave me. [for a long1 liimo. and  so'I became pretty well run down. I  was always considered the einDodi-  ment of health at home, but last,  autumn I was really alarmed over  iny condition. Sometimes in the  schoolroom 1 would be seized with  dizziness, and often I would faint  away. I would take vomiting turns,  also, and had a feeling ������������������.of. nausea  and languor all the time. I lost my  color and became thin and pale, and  it'seemed as if my blood had turned,  to .water.  "This condition of things was so  .different from anything which I had  previously experienced that I sought  medical advice at' once, t was informed that I was suffering from  anaemia, and I at once put myself under medical treatment. But although  I tried several bottles of prescriptions, my condition seemed to bo getting worse all the time. When I-  went home for my Christmas vacation, I was almost in despair. It  was while I was at home, however,  that my friends advised me to use  Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. Acting up-,  on their advice, I took up their use.  The, first box made its.effect felt, but  I used four or five and then the cure  ���������was complete. Ever since then my  health-has been excellent and I have  felt my real old time self, and am  able to attend to my duties, which  are by no means light, without the  iatigue and languor that, made the  work irksome. You may depend up-  ���������on it I will always have' a friendly  ���������word to say for Dr. Williams' Pink  Pills."  If your dealer does not keep these  pills in stock, they will bo sent post  paid at 5U cents a box or six boxes  for ������2.50, by addressing.the Dr. Williams   Medicine  Oo.,   Brockville,   Oat.  AN EXCEPTION TO THE RULE.,  Benhami���������When two men quarrel,  there is always a woman at tho bottom, of the trouble.  Mrs: ��������� .'Ben-ham���������I have, never heard  any lady's name mentioned in connection with that Cain and Abel affair.  .iMful (i'iil.miil.v 111iii-li (Itrriiioli J'oiu;!!-!!���������  I>icr','.(ll|j !'(<i-.i>iis IN-i-Uhi-il- On<-TIili'il  Mul'l- l';ll.illlli>s (ll'i'lill'l'd ill l!lO <;.'il"  Wililll   IIiilrli-.'llK-.  Pompeii is believed to have had rather more than 20,000 inhabitants. Tho  city stood on an elevation overlooking the sea, the whole of tho Bay  of Naples being in view, while in Ihe  backgroung loomed grim Vesuvius, t ho  destined destroyer, close by flowed the  River Sarno. which was crossed by a  bridge. The volcano was supposed to  be extinct and its sides were cultivated all the way up to the summit  Grapes were largely grown and wine  making was an important industry in  the neighborhood which likewise produced cabbages famous for their excellence.  It was the city of the clan of tho  Pompeys, founded by the Oseans, an  ancient Italian tribe in the sixth century B. C. or earlier, afterwards conquered by the Sammies, a rival tribe  and eventually absorbed by mighty  Rome. The culture of I he people was  very Greek ; they worshipped various  Greek gods and used the Greek names  for their weights and measures. Being so beautifully situated and having  a delightful climate Pompoii, was a  favorite resort of wealthy Romans  many of whom had villas there. Cicero  had a handsome "cottage," as it would  nowi be called, and tho Imperial family maintained a palace close by. Tho  villas were mostly on the high ground,  back of the town toward Vesuvius and  facing the sea.  Small earthquakes were- frequent,  but not much was thought of Ihem.  On' the 5th day of February, in the  year 03 A.D., there came  A  TREMENDOUS SHOCK.  which! was a warning of what was to  follow. It threw down a largo part  of. the city, including the beautiful  temples of Jupiter, Apollo and Isis,  but most1 of the damage was repaired by the time of the great catastrophe.  The eruption which was destined to  be so memorable began early in the  morning of Feb. 21, 79 A.D. Spectators  looking from a great distance/saw; a  mighty cloud spread and overhang the  city like a vast and amino us umbrella.  There was still plenty of time to get  away in safety, and doubtless a majority of the. people did escape, before the  impending volcanic storm began. Judging from the number of skeletons thus  far discovered, it seems probable that  not more than about 2,000 persons  actually ' perished. However, a great  many who attempted to leave in boats  may have lost their lives.     -  Admiral Pliny, with a fleet, was not  far- away, and letters brought,by  mounted couriers reached him as early as 1 p.m. that day begging him  to come as quickly as possible with  his ships and help to rescue, the people. He sat sail immediately, and, arriving, within sight of Vesuvius at  nightfall, ran into the rain of pumice  that was then falling. It was impossible to make a landing at Pompeii,  and so he disembarked . at Stabiao,  where  it   was  HAILING CINDERS  at such a rnte that during the night  he was obliged to leave the room in  which ho slept for fear lest the door  might be blocked up. On the following morning he died, being suffocated   by volcanic fumes.  Early, in the afternoon of February j  2-1  the  hail of  pumice  began   to   fall  upon doomed Pompeii, tho pieces averaging about the siza of a walnut, together with torrents of rain, lt  must then have ^een almost loo late  for anybody who remained in the city  to get away. Repeated shocks of  earthquake contributed to the horror  of the scene, incidentally demolishing  tho bridge over tho Sarno and so  shutting off escape in that direction.  Meanwhile, rivers .of pumice mixed  with water flowed down the slope of  Vesuvius on the other side and  overwhelmed the neighboring Hercul-  aneum.  The pumice fell in Pompeii until the'  streets of the city were covered eight  to  ten  feel deep wilh it.  Its  weighl  broke  in  the roofs-of 'many  of    the  houses   and   the  destruction  of   lives  .must   already   have    been    frightful.  Nevertheless many of the people still  survived, seeking refuge in cellars and  other   places  of retreat.    They   must  have   imagined   that   there   was   still  hope  when   early  in   the   morning  of  the  next  day, Feb. 25.  there  came  a  great  shock  and ashes  began  falling  in a continuous shower with the rain.  Though day had arrived il grew darker than ever, if possible, a cloud of  FRIGHTFUL BLACKNESS  ! settling  down  over    Ihe  land,   while  '' Ihe  lightning   and   thunder  were  ap-  ��������� palling.    Shock  followed    shock   and  ! the survivors must at last have concluded   thai   their  last   hour   was   at  , hand.    Such   was   in  truth   the   case  ' Tho. storm of ashes lasted nearly all  day long.    They drifted in through the  windows of  the houses and suffocated all who remained alive. They covered   the  city with a  sheet  of   death  six  to  seven feel   thick.  Thus was completed the destruction  of Pompeii.    If"the estimate of fatalities   above   quoted  be   fairly   correct  the  loss  of  life  was not  more   than  onc-l'hird  as   great as  during   there-  cent   hurricane  at    Galveston    whose i  terrors   may   be  said   to   have   fairly.;  equalled  those of this ancient catas- j  trophe.   though  so different  in  kind, ;  When   it   was all  over, tho  roofs    of i  many  o'f  the'houses    still    emerged;  above ithe- volcanic debris,  which'had j  i  overwhelmed   the   city. Herc.ulaneum |  however   had wholly disappeared uii-i  der the streams of mud, sixty-five feet'  deep in spots, which had flowed over |  it.   This' mud being a sort of natural j  concrete,   soon    hardened Into'stone, j  which is to-day of such solidity as to !  make excavation work extremely dif-i  ficult. ..'���������>���������'���������       ' ���������'���������'  - "i H  '   BOER EYE SIGHT.  VfliyJi Is Siiiti-i-loi- (.��������� Jluii ������r llii:   ICi-lllsh  MililN-r.  Sir Redvers Buller's statement thai  (he ordinary Boer could see a man  coming towards him two miles before  the man could see the Boer- excites  neither surprise nor scepticism  among  the eye specialists.  "Really," says a high authority, "if  you apply your common sense, to Ihe  matter you will .see It must he so. The  Boer is, comparatively speaking, a  barbarian. At least, he has few indoor occupations and does little read- '  ing. For generations he has been  training himself to see long distances,  for -hia livelihood depends on sighting  liis catlle or on tracking-down game.  Mr. Atkins will never possess such  fine vision until his eondilonsi of lifo  ���������approximate to those of the Boer.  Like all civilized peoples, his vis.ion  lis confined to a limited range. Even  at the butts ho is not called upon for  any very special effort of long- sight,  anil ho ia not  there very often."  The f jut. was mentioned that several officers had come homo from the  war wilh greatly improved eyesight,  S������me, who had worn glasses, now  found their sight quite cured, and attributed the fact to the effect of  the tine clear air of tho veldt.  "A clear atmosphere," said the authority, "would be an important factor in sighting tho enemy, of course;  but the real truth is that these officers have benefitted by their experience in South Africa. It is all a  question of the ciliary muscle. Here  is Lho ciliary muscle on this diagram,  attached t.o the choroid coal of the  eyeball. The ciliary is an involuntary muscle���������one of the few muscles  we cannot control. Its functions is  to adjust the vision to different distances, and it acts something like the  screw of an opera glass. At long  ranges there is practically no call on  the ciliary muscle, but when,: for ex- ,  ample, when (you want to read/ it:'  screws up. till the proper focus has  been obtained. 1 have known; too  rhiuoh study induce a kind of artificial  short-sight, easily cured by months of  rest. We use our ciliary muscle too  much'���������tho  Boer  hardly at' all."  !A CHILD'S PLEA TO KIPLING.  The plea of a child for   more, animal  stories  has  induced Rudyard Kipling ���������  to   add   to his  series of  funny  "Just:  so "tales yvhich'have appeared in The ���������  Ladies' Home Journal. After tho fain-;  ous author had published the last of t  that series there was a flood   of let-!  ters came to the Journal asking   for :  more.    One among these was address-!  ed to Mr. Kipling personally, and was j  forwarded to him in England.'.It prov-j  ed  to   be  a Tetter  from  a child   who j  pleaded  with   the author  to " give us j  some more stories about animals; wo'  enjoyed your others very much. There j  is   not   much  written   that   we   little i  folks   can on joy, so -please, dear  Mr.  Kipling,  write  something    about  my I  pussy."   The   earnestness  and   siucer-i  ity of the child appealed very strong-  fco   Mr.  Kipling,    who   is exceedingly  fond of little folks, and he writes to  the  Journal  saying that  he  is  going  to grant  that child's request even  if  he   has  to disappoint   all  his     other  friends.  WATCH WHEELS.  ,By   the   aid    of  modern  machinery  one man can cut~10,000 watch wheels  a day.  BOOK CLUBS FOR SMALL TOWNS.  '(��������� A writer in the Ladies',,Homo Journal, telling how to ' organize book  clubs in small communities, says that  one successful club, was started, in a  small country town of from 1,000 to  1,500 inhabitants, in which there was  no public library of any kind. Its  charter members numbered 17. Each  member, except one, who was chosen  secretary and gave service instead of  money, paid' into the general treasury  five dollars a year.,. With the suni so  raised the cltiV -was able; to subscribe  for 17 periodicals, weeklies and  monthlies, and to buy from 17 to 34-  books 'chosen in general from among  the .new publications.    ,  I   ,     i DETERRENT.  You have not gone to Europe, then,  as you expected, said Mrs. Fosdick, to  Mrs.  Spriggs.  No, was the reply. Tt Is so difficult  for Mr. Spriggs to leave his business,  and I really couldn't go without, him."  And, then, I read the other day.about  a ship that broke her record. Think  how dreadful it would be to boon a  ship in the middle of the ocean with  her record broken.  it ,' i  *        e  >; <������  1!  ... i' i  <';   ii It  W i|  ..<  n  lAm  'ffln  '.'Mi  \, -Vl,.!-:  ,- !*���������>��������� L  '��������� 'M&'i  '.("������������������'i  IV  "ft"  I'  ���������.ts  n  it,  THOROUGHBRED.  "Mamma, I've found out my dog's  pedigree."  "AVhat is it, dear?"  "Uncle Jiim's hired maai says he's; a  full-blooded mongrel!"  m 'tmm,  i^r^A^c.}^.  IS.  Ia   MMRi     GLD   MmLAjjlJi    menfof   war Torses Tvls  drawn^at  Manchester by the Rev 1 F. Lawrence  I  INTERESTING   ITEMS   ABOUT  JOHN  BULL AND HIS PEOPLE.  IIor������ 'niifl Tlicrc. In I lie Liimi or tile Itnse���������  e������������lu-is In, Mii; - Jlciu-l of'ilio MljilUj'  Itrlll.xit Kmpiro.  Several;lots from the library of tho  late, Duke of Argyll have been sold in  London.  '._ The, Dflike of Fife has accepted the  presidency of the" Soldiers' and Sailors' Help Society.  ,iA Leyton evangelist uses a gratna-  phono for the purpose of attracting  a ,crowid to open-air, meetongs.  A    new   Theatre-Royal,  which   has  been built at Portsmouth at a cost of  '  over  ������40,000  has1 been , opened.  Sheffield is the smokiest city in  England. In^ proportion to its'size it  consumes eight times as much coal as  London.  It was officially stated in Parliament, the other day, that the Post-  office has an income of ������300 a year  from  found  stamps.  It is computed that there is ������800,-  000 'worth of gold and jewels at the  bottom of the sea on the route between   [England   and India.  The' death has -occurred at Hastings  of Diana Bacon, who was 107 years  and! six months old. .She retained her  faculties almost  to the last.  The hottest day experienced in London in recent years was August 18th,  1898,  when  the  thermometer  reached  94 degrees' Fahr. in the shade.  ''A thick black, inky, foul-s'melling,  : flowing. sewer  hon. Secretary of the Church Society  for  the  PrOkhotion    of  Kindness    to  Animals.   He  said   Worses on    board  ship were continually   falling.'. Some  were trampled   to death;    all    were  sometimes  panic-stricken,   biting and  kicking wildly. At tho scene of war,  many  feeble  from    hardships,   would  eat each toher's tails and gnaw wheels  of  waggons.   After    a    battle,    they  were  Often   left  in   lingering  agony,  Why, he asked, should not the Geneva  Convention foe extended so as to afford protection to persons mitigating  or  terminating       the   sufferings     of  wounded , animals.  RUSSIA AFTER THE POLE.  Ship   Tli.it Will   < in   II������-l- Way lln-oii^h  (lie (frozen  Ill-Ids.  r  An entirely new departure in Arc-  j       YOU KNOW. WHOM I MEAN.  He plays when asked without a word  The- funniest   music  you ever  heard,  But, eat a square meal.from a round  plate he can^t, ���������   ���������  You know who Irneun, his name is  A. J.  Grant.  Ho  sings   the  songs that  have   been  sung before,  And expects every time to receive an  encore,  I hope he'll forgive this innocent joke  You know who I mean his name    is  George Prk.  Ho  can   lick  any  cripple  who  comes  his way,  And out of Emp's bar he will not stay,  He would ra ther borrow than lend a  dollar,  You know, who I mean, ��������� his name is  Fred: Pollard.  Ho says he  does  not keep a secondhand store, I  THE DIVINING ROD MYSTERY.  An i:iiKllsIi ITiiroiM.iV, i:x|iliuiatloii After  ('arcJill Inquiry.  The second  installment of  an  elaborate report by Prof. w. F. Barrett"  od  tho "so-called divining rod"    haa  just    made   its    appearance.      Prof.'  Barrett  is    a member  of  the   Royal  Society,    occupies   the    chair   of  experimental physics in the Royal College of Science for Ireland at Dublin  and -has taken an  active part in tho  wcurk of the Society for Psychical Re-  fbearcih.  Three or four years ago Prof. Barrett undertook a thorough investigation of the subject, collect in;? all the  stories he could obtain regarding, tho  use of  the  forked   twig far  the  dis-  And if caUedTjew feels  very sore  ' ?���������������Ty ������f   wa������r  and' "a^-uls,  sift-  He is sadly addicted to telling lies,   ' | in'= lbonl carefully, seeking such cor-  You know who I. mean,    his name is  Bill Ives. '  lie   can   recite  Ben  Bolt  as   well  as  -  ���������      grind  meal,  tic    exploration     will  be   made  next   He nearly died laughing when Fred-  summer,  says  a London  letter.  Rus- die chased   the Automobile,  sia will send north her wonderful ice   IIe's a &������}% l^ky e������"t- and  that's  ���������,,:~    ,,.-'-          ...                                          no bluff, '  You know who I mean,   his name is  ship, the Yermak, with instructions  to try to cut' her way through to  the pole. The performance of this  vessel in cutting and tearing her  way at three or, four miles an. hour  through the immense ice fields of the  Baltic Sea and other Russian ;waters  has'excited amazement among all who  have witnessed it. She is now being  equipped and improved for. the greatest of all tasks.  The   Armstrongs  at    Elswiok have  just   completed  a new bow   which   is  is the   description of   especially  designed   to  encounter  the  the, Thames as seen and smelt  by-a  man who has been to .Woolwich.  A scheme is on foot for an important  purchase of rifle ranges for the London volunteers. Tho scheme will'involve  an   expenditure of  ������161,000.  The    Birmingham     Public   ��������� Health  Committee have purchased for ������6,000  17 acres of land, in connection with a  scheme for the housing- of the poor.  At' the annual meeting of the Manchester Ship Canal Co. it was announced that dues would bo charged on ships  after 1900, and it would no longer be  a free port.  The freedom ; of   the  borough    of  .  Keighley  is to  be   conferred on  Mr.  'Andrew 'Carnegie,   in   recognition of  :  his' gift of ������10,000 to the town for. a  free library.       '������������������.,. :j  Miss^ Emily Frances Dalton, of Leicester,:   has     bequeathed   ������50,000   to  charitable institutions^' including ������10,-  '000 to  the. Gordon Boys'. Home,  and  ������1,000 to Dr. Barnardo's Homes.   ,  V Lancashire    has    contributed over  ������100,000 to  the Indian, Famine -Fund,  '"besides ������35,000 sent direct from! Liverpool, St. Helens, and Southport, making  ������135,000   fr,om   the  county  palatine.  'At' the age of 100 a Lynn lady has  100 descendants, including seven great j  great  grand-children.   Married  at 20 >  she had  tab fewer than  17  children.  One grandchild has had 21   sons and  daughters.  The British; 'Admiralty has placed  'orders: with Cardiff firms-for    150,000  tons best Welsh steam coal at prices  ranging'froot: 2Gs. to 27s. Od. per ton,  delivery to be within the limit of the  next four months.,      "'���������'..  The London Missionary Society  have received an offer of ������10,000 from  Mr..Robert Arthington, of Leeds, for  tho purpose of commencing missionary work among'the Awemba tribes,  to the south-west of Lake Tanganyika.  An American crossed tho Channel l  by the steamer Alma, and left a let  field of ice in the Arctic Sea; which is  heavier and  thicker  than  any which  the Yermak has yet attacked. //The  original    bow  was easily , capable  of  ,dealinig with any.of the enormous ice  fields   which 'Russia   produces.      She  went   to   a high   latitude  on   an   experimental trip last summer and accomplished  all  that, could be expected of her in her assault, upon tho external ice which she then encountered.  The alterations.now being made were  suggested  by   this   experience.      Admiral  Makaroff,  who is superintending the changes, has the greatest confidence that the ship mil cut her way  witvhout delay straight to. the pole and  will return safely in the same season.  Eivery precaution has been taken to  fit,- her  out for a long stay  In case  of accident or blockade.  Admiral Makarott   uas refused    to  give out details of the plans.or'even  to admit  that the expedition will be  undertaken, but there is no doubt on  this   point.      No   information   is -yet  available as- to the route to ,'be taken or  how the ��������� coal problem will be  solved.    : There will be supplies atone  or  two points in Arctic Russia'    and  probably  a collier  will  carry- an additional supply, as far as the ice will  permit.    ','  .  .,'.   ���������"������������������' ~o-.������������������-    ,..���������"'������������������'���������  Weaymoth.  He once  in a while  gets a beautiful  jag-.  (And when ever he does my, how his  tongue  does  wag,  I hope when ho reads; these few lines  ���������he   won't   hurt   us,  You know who I mean, '��������� his name is  Bill Ouirtis.  He licked Airtio Stemiar,; a boxer of  note,  And  did  it  without  even  taking off  his coat;  If    he    ever    had  to be whipped I'll  swear I'd not risk it,  You,know who I mean,   his name is  George   Prescotl.  Ho went  with the boys' to Kingston  to  camp,  And I'm told he drank lager, the filthy scamp,  The soldier's clothes that he wore all  fit but  the pants,  J You know who I mean,    his name is  MoCanse.  from.  ITEMS OF INDUSTRY.  The   wolrId's   coffee   crop  is  800,000  tons:.-  '��������� .������������������'.���������;".  Britain makes 300,000,000 yards of  linen a year.'  British fishermen catch 210,000-tans  of herring and 8,000,000 cod every  year.,;. -  In the Black forest district of Germany are 1,400 master clockmakers  and 0,000 workmen.  Eight million 'pounds'-worth of fish,  are landed, at English ports every 12!  months. This includes shell fish, but I  not' salmon.  The output   of copper in this coun  try   from   January  1 to   October  lie  hustles    the    way-freight  morning  till night,  And he'd carry any load no matter  how light,  He  can  do a step dance to any old  time,  You know who I mean,   his name is  Jim Bryan* '������������������'������������������������������������  He went to a party given by George  Hays, ..,.-:^  He got back all right, but not for two  dayp,  ���������    .._'���������;"., '  He sneaked home on   the quiet, liko  a fox hie was crafty.  You know who I mean, the boys call  - hiim Gaf ty.   :  He can manipulate a razor with ease  and grace,  And hustle the hair all,joff your face,  When the time comes to pay he won't  -  let  you  hide.  You know who I mean,    his name is  Dan Lloyd.     - .'..-���������������������������  the rock  for'8 long  9  'ft  1 of     J the present year has  boon estimated  tor of credit for ������500 and ������25 in loose I at 448,000,000 pounds.  gold  in his stateroom. When he -dis- I    The New Jersey man who hit upon  covered his loss he -was in Paris   but j th<J M      o������ attaohjDg a rubber erasing  at   once  wired  the  chief steward   of I ..    ..      ., ,.   ,      ,  the steamer, who found the money and I trP to the end of a lead Pencl1 made  forwarded it to the owner. J ������200,000 from his invention.  He stayed  on  -   months,  And nobody guyed him or, he'd give  them their bumps,  There's   no  use  advising him for  he  won't listen,    .  You know who I mean,    his name is  ���������.   Tug.. Wilson. ::      ���������  He writes up all the boy's who lives  around town,  He docs it quite nice,' in fact; does it  up brown,  Some of    the   thinskins    declare his  skull they  will, crack,  You know who I mean,  it is Editor  Mack.   e���������:���������.  TWO QUESTIONS.  Householder, to suspicious character  ���������What do you want?  Suspicious Character, thoughtfully,  ���������I dunno;   what ycr got ?  CHANGEABLE EYES.  Mrs. Brown���������What color are your  little boy's eyes? '  Mrs. Robinson���������. Black generally,'  He's a terrible fighter.  roboration as (might bo available and  planning    experiments    of his  own.  The first part of  his report,  which  came, out-  in 1898,    cited   152  cases.  The    second    furnishes    many  more,  some of them having been,conducted  under   Prof.     Barrett's    own   supervision.   A third installment is promised and  will1'deal  largely with  tho  hunt for metals with the divining rod.  In    describing    the    operation   , of  ."dowsing," as this use of the forked  witch' hazel ,twig is locally calicd in  England, Prof. Barrett says that the  operator usually holds the Y by the  prongs, so that"the stem projects in  front of him    and    inclines upward  slightly.     When the dowser passes a'  spot where water is supposed to exist  the  twig rises to  a vertical position,'  striking him on. the    breast. .   The  dowser  himself    often    appears   exhausted    by  jbis    effort,    even  com-'  plaining of sickness or giddiness and  breaking into    perspiration.      These  are so  marked in  instances that he  discards  the  twig altogether and  is  guided  by  his sensations: alone.  DURING THE. OPERATION  t|he dowser fixes, his attention oh the  tip.o-f the twig and becomes oblivious to the world.around him.  Eminent    people  as  well as  those  who    are not    conspicuous in public  life in England employ dowsers. Prof.  -Barrett includes,Lords Salisbury and  Lansdowne    among     their    patrons.  There are scores of professional dowsers in   the  United, Kingdom,  to say  nothing  of   Continental   Europe,   the'  United   States    and Canada.     Amateurs also practise the art.     In his.  first report Prof. Barrett'pronounced  I fairly  successful   140  of  the  150  attempts recorded.      Rejecting the experiments of amateurs, he gets ninety-five successful  results out of  105  cases.    In the second report he finds:  the proportion  about  the same, but  he admits that dowsers, may not reimport their failures so fully and frankly, as   their hits.      Still  he does not  estimate   the  failures  at  more   than '  10 to 15 per cent, of the-attempts.  Two sets of experiments have been r  tried . with  a view   to   ascertain   the  genuineness  of   the  phenomenon;   In :  one  a second  or   third  operator was  taken  over  the same  ground as. the  first, and the results of their divination    were    identical and successful.  Some of the leading spirits in the Society for Psychical Reshcrch hold that  when   the ordinary senses are lulled  to  inactivity  by    sleep,     natural  or  hypnotic,    a few  persons  of a peculiar organization  exhibit a power of  perception    and    a susceptibility    to  influence which is unlike that experienced by other people or by the .same  people     under   other    circumstances.  Prof.  Barrett regards this possession  of a "supernormal" faculty the most  satisfactory,   theory    regarding    tho  discovery of water with a witch hazel,  twig.      Ho   thinks   that   the successful operator is self-hypnotized by fix-  j ingi his   attention  on  the  twig.      He  j says; "This    subconscious   perceptive  power,    commonly    called    'clairvoyance,' may provisionally be taken as  the explanation of those successes, of  the dowser which are inexplicable on  any  grounds   at   present   known     to  science." I  ni  THE MINING REVIEW���������Saturday, December 22, 1900.  The Mayoralty.  _ Our  neighbor   is   trotting out a new  ticket   for   Mayor and aldermen.    Any  one  qualified, who desires office, is at  perfect liberty to make the run ; but in  the interest  of the place, the aim   of  candidates   for   such   offices -should  be  higher than  turning  employees   out of  office merely because  there are others  who   want .the   salaries.    Mr.   Doolan  when   chief  of  police made an efficient  officer, and most people think he should  have kept the post when he had it. This  city cannot   afford   to   pay  salaries   to  either Mayor or aldermen ; and the people should not elect, to office men who  would require salaries when elected.    If  any of our confrere's ticket has a- new  policy   for   city government, he should  announce it, that  the electors may give  it full and fair consideration before polling day. It should, however, as we have  said, be more   than  turning present incumbents out of office 10 make room for  personal friends.  EByeif&Co.  Jobbers and Retailers in  Hardware  150 Barrels  and  Mining Supplies  0 9  Choice..  Notice of Dissolution.  MOTICE is hereby Riven that the partnership  * ' heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned as co-partners, under the name and  style of "Pitts Brothers," in the City of Sandon.  B. C, has this day been dissolved by mutual  consent.  All debts due to the said partnership are to  be paid to H. H. Pitts, at his office iu Sandon,  B. U., and all claims against the said partnership are to be presented to the said H. II. Pitts  at SaDdon, B. C., by whom the same will ba  settled.  Dated at Sandon', B.U., this 1st day of November, A. D. 1900.  Witness:       (Signed) H. H. PITTS.  J. C. PITTS.  'T' Kails and Track Iron,  Crow's Nest Coal,  Bar and Sheet Iron,  Jessop & Canton Steel for Hand and  Machine Drills,  Powder, Caps, Fuse,  Iron Pipe and Fittings,  Oils, Waste, etc.,  Mine or Mill Supplies of all kinds,  Agents Traux Automatic Ore Cars.  Head Office���������Nelson, B.C.  Stores at  Nelson, B.C.   Kaslo, B.C.   Sandon, B.C.  Ontario Apples!  Just Arrived.  Northern Spys, Bell Flowers, Russets, Greenings, Baldwins,  Spitz and Ben Davis. Call and see them, they are all ri������-ht  in quality and price, at &  IHL Gieperioh's.  IF YOU WANT  ANYTHING IN  , CDxjL-bl&iry  Stoves  Slay Bolls  We can show  you  some nice lines in  these goods at reasonable prices.  HARRY NASH.  In the new stand, oppositeC.P.L. -lepot.  issued!  N   E,  W  edition!  :ers  Here Again, Xmajs  And Grimmett  Is Here Also  j With what you want in Jewellery  ���������in solid gold. In sterling silver  and silver plate���������Spoons, and  Fork Novelties.  Watches in great variety from  the smallest to the largest in lowest and highest grades.  A special line in .Ladies' Long  Chains from $2.50 to$40.    Pearl-  set Brooches fit to adorn anybody.  Cut Glass, Clocks, old-fashioned Scotch  Pottery���������a  motto on  every price.  In  fact  I  have- the goods at  prices  as  low as  anywhere else.  Come early, and have first choice.  My store  will  be open  till   10  every   night   till   after     Xmas.  Don't   forget   below   the union  hall,   the sign of the Big Watch.  G.w.GRinneTT  Change of Business...  LOGAN & PHILIPS  Will continue the tailoring business lately carried on by Armstrong &  All fits and workmanship will be guaranteed.  Co.  THE WE HAMILTON MANUFACTURING CO.  LIMITED.  PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO,  ' CANADA.  Dictionary  New    Plates    Throughout  125,000   New   Words!  Phrases    and    Definitions  !# Prepared under the direct  supervision of W.T. HARRIS  Ph.D., LL.D., United State3  Commissioner of Education,  assisted by a large corps of  competent specialists and  editors.  I Mch  Bindings.       H       2364   Pases  5000   Illtiatratlons  (BETTER  .THAN   EVER  ]FOR   GENERAL   USE  BUREAU   OF PROVINCIAL   INFORMATION  We also publish  Webster's    Collegiate     Dictionary  withGlossiirvof ScottishWords and Phrases'  "First class in quality, second class in size."  Specimen pages, etc. of both  books   sent on- application.  JG.6C.MERRIAM CO.j  Publishers  Springfield, Mass.  . IN ORDER that the Government may be iu  1 possession of definite information with  which to supply those seoking investments in  this Province. I am instructed to invito particulars from those who have properties for sale,  and who may feel disposed to forward such  particulars to this olllce lor the purpose in  question.  In view of the proposod early re-organisation  of the Agent General's Olllce in London, England, the desirability of having on file a list of  farms and other properties for sale, with full  and accurate details, is obvious.- Properties  submitted may include farms and farm lands,  industrial and commercial concerns., timber  limits, water powers, or other enterprises affording opportunities for legitimate investment.  It is not proposed to recommend properties to  intending'lnvestors, but to afford the fullest  access to the classified lists and all available  information connected therewith, and to place  enquirers in communication with the owners.  The fullest particulars are desired not only of  the properties themselves, but of tho localities  in which they are situated, and the conditions  affecting theru. For this purpose printed  schedules:will, upon application, be foiwarded  to those desirous of making sales.  R. E. GOSNELL,  Secretary, Bureau oi Provincial Information.  I  GHRIBTMAG I  <4-                 ^t.l>i^W,*k������.9.,.k,������������.l*,^l.������*b,.|.,-h,Mc,S^t.������.^������.laUM.,.kX������.fS^I.������H,.������.#���������������.t,^,M.f ,M.,>ti���������.r>������,M.I*%, U" jl  A full  assortment of Confectionery,  XMAS -������������������  TREE ORNAMENTS, Fruit and Nuts. X  TOala^a Grapes Direct from the  Mediterranean +  Special rates will be made   for parties   and X  Xmas trees at X  ��������� ��������� X  I   VVxLliarri.son.'s, f  -���������4H������fT-H^HtVT+H-H~H-H-++������ M ��������� M H M ��������� ��������� f-H ��������� + ������������������������������������+-*-f X  TEACHER WANTED.  A head master wanted for the Sandon Public  School. Must hold a first-class certificate of  some grade, and must have recommendations  of a successful teacher. The government  salary is !60 a month; but the city would  supplement the amount to a good teacher.  Duties to commence as early in January as  possible.  W. H. LILLY,  Secretary Sandon School Board.  Tills Month It's Apples-It Dried Apples,  But fresh Winter Apples���������fresh from our farm in the Okanagon  valley���������Norther Spys, Bell Flowers, Kings, Baldwins, Spitzburg  and all other varities.  Cody Avenue.  JALLAND BROS.  '    aSBm  i  i  '-    >m  aSSi  ���������������     1  4 'mm  1   m  m  S-aimmt  m  mm  ^ B  ������������������m  ] m  mm  /'.'HH  ���������' flSS  Timmm  '     MM  *  ��������� 91  .t^mmmmmm'  mmm  1     HI  1   mm  \ y'\wSBSa  <;      ^111111  '' i'^IBmSH  '.   -Wsm'  .���������>   I  ' 'f,ll  "; '/'-;,{  o   A- -I  if   ft  ? "  -'  \i  ���������; u  r      i  \  S J>*  ,\ 'US'  ill'  ��������� !���������   '($ |.  H       5 8  7 m  \ 'flip  ���������$mJ  \m  A

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