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The Miner Jun 10, 1898

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 Daily Edition. No. 27.
Nelson. British Columbia. Friday Morning, June 10,  1S98.
Eighth Year
3S.Uimtt.toL
Received
A shipment of the famous
Julia Marlowe
American Footwear
FOR LADIES
Come Early and
Secure
\
a Pair.
LILLIE'S  SHOE  HOUSE
WEST BAKER STREET.
Fred Irvine & Co.
33   BAEEB   STREET
DRY GOODS BOOTS and SHOES
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Our Stockof High Class Dry Goods is now complete in all
departments and we invite special inspection to
our Dress Goods Department of
Summer fWins, Lawns, Grenadines & Organdies
SOLDIERS WANT CONVOY
ABE AFRAID OF A STRANGE GRAFT
SAID TO BE CRUISING IN
FLORIDA STEAITS.
Sampson lu Enough Marine* to Attaeh
Santiago Without Waiting tor Soldier*.���He Got a Map of the Harbor
From the Insurgent* Showing the
��� Whole Cape Verde Heel.-Schley's
Tactic* In West Indian Water*.
CANADIAN  NEWS.
PROROGATION OF CANADIAN FAR-
I4AMENT FIXED FOR
SATURDAY.
The fe����te Vnten-tfment to the Franchise
Will Kot Aretp'.eil hy th�� ��o����e of
CoiDlRons.-lter. t- Yf. Pcilley f*lee|e��l
Chairman of 1h* Congregational
l'��|o��.-*eglita ��arrl*|er Hewarfleil.
-MHlier ��J��w����llait ��������������
over 22,000 packages of general merchandise, valued at a quarter of a million dollars, all Canadian goods. An
additional shipment of 650 tous from
the same company will follow on the
Tordenskjold.
ACQUITTED OF MANSLAUGHTER
Montreal, June 9.���Joseph O'Mearaj
the woll known lacrosse player, was
acquitted of tho charge of manslaughter yesterday.
ONTARIO WORKMEN INJURED.
Ottawa, June 9.���When the house
met tbis morning Sir Wilfred Laurier,
first minister,agreed to the wishes of
the opposition in pastponing discussion
of the Drummoud county railway committee's report until the next session.
Hon. George E. Foster, acting leader
of the opposition, asked the leader of
the government an intimation as to
when prorogation may be looked for
and saw no reason why the business
should not be cleared off the order
paper by Saturday. Premier laurier
concurred in this view, which practically settles the question that prorogation will take place on Saturday.,,
The government's reason!for the
non-acceptance of the senate amendments to the franchise bill were read
from the chair, setting forth that suggestions offered by the upper house
violate the principle of the bill and
virtually restores the old franchise;
further, that the procedure proposed by
the upper house for securing, the revision of the voters' lists is wholly inadequate, and finally that the country
has practically prouounced in favor of
the bill. '; - - '   ���
CONGREGATIONAL   UNION.
Rev. Pedley,  Formerly  of Winnipeg,
Elected Chairman.
Toronto, June 9.���At thc Congregational union this morning the first
business was the election of a chairman. There were 21 nominees, and
on the first ballot Rev. T. P. Hyde and
Rev J W. Pedley headed the list. On
the second ballot Mr. Pedley was
elected. The only other business of
note was the report of the membership
committee. Then was considered the
case  of Rev.   J.   F.   Madill, now of
Toronto. .',,'-"���" * ���
Last  year   Madill   was    suspended
from memebrship in the union for  a
period of one year at least, on account
of conduct while pastor of the church
at  Sarnia,   which was  considered by
the committeeunbecoming to a pastoj.
The   committee now  decided there
was   no   reason why   the  suspension
should at present be removed.    A vote
on the report was  postponed until to-
. morrow. . ���	
GOODS FOR ; THE  NORTH.
Victoria, June 9. ���The Alaska Commercial company's steamer Portland
sails tomorrow for  St. Michaels with
Berlin,Out., June 9.��� George Ebbert
and John Hagan were thrown to the
ground by the collapse of a high
scaffold today and sustained serious injuries.
A FATAL FIRE.
Windsor, Out, June 9.���A seven-
year-old daughter of George Peony of
this city was fatally burned yesterday.
RICH OIL WELL-
St. Thomas, Ont, June'9.��� An oil
well producing a thousand barrels
daily has been struck two miles from
Thamesville.
REGINA REFORMER REWARDED.
Regina, June 9.���Reginald Rimmer,
barrister, 7%vho^was==secretaryuto_:the
Regina Reform association during the
last Dominion general election, has
been appointed law" clerk at a salary of
$2000 a year.
THE THIRTEENTH VICTIM.
St. Hyaciuthe, June 9.���The thirteenth victim as a result of the fire is
dead. Mrs. Burgeois received fata injuries by jumping fromc a third-story
window.
SITUATION  CONSIDERED.
Spanish Cabinet  Taking Steps to Vigorously Prosecute the War.
Madrid, June 9���A long cabinet
council to consider the situation, especially the resources required for the
campaign and the war plans, was held
today. The minister of marine sub-
mited important documents for the
consideration of the ministers. It is
announced that he will proceed shortly
to Cadiz ostensibly tb inspect the defenses of that place, but it is said he
"may make an important decision during his stay there."
The minister of marine will also devote considerable attention to the available naval reserves.
THE PHILLIPPINE QUESTION.
Powers  Will  Not Allow  the United
States to Hold the Islands.
Madrid, June 9.���Since the last advices from Manila there is apparently
an undercurrent of intensity that is
repressed only on patriotic grounds.
The newspapers are printing violent
articles demanding, that the responsibility for tlie present situation be determined. Political circles themselves
are being "satisfied : that the powers
will not permit the United States to
hold the Philippines, '���'
Washington, June 9. ���It became apparent this afternoon that the war department through the energetic offices
of the censor has succeeded entirely
in its purpose to keep the movements
of the United States troops a secret.
Beyond question, at. the close of the
day, it was impossible to learn where
the United States troops, which had
been for weeks gathering under command of General Shatter in Florida,
were.' "������   ��� *���-" ��' 7-    *''���'-,
Stories of the appearance of a mysterious warship in Cuban waters
floated through the navy department
during the day. The officers quickly
condemned.them, declaring that if the
boats were Spanish they were nothing
more than small armed launches and
not to be feared by any number of
transports-convoyed by such fine gunboats as the Helena and Bancroft.
But when these stories reached the
war department they were received
with a different spirit. Nothing is
more helpless in warfare than unarmed troop transports full of soldiers.
They would fall an easy victim to the
smallest gunboat, and the soldiers
knowing their weakness in this respect are loath to undertake to cross
the Florida straits until these disagreeable visitors have been removed from
their pathway. Without respect to the
character of the strange craft that are
said to be dodging the blockaders at
Havana they will-be removed from the
scene of action in short notice, and'if
is understood that Samspon has been
made acquainted with the situation
and will be pleased to redeem his promise to provide safe conduct to the army
when called upon. He has ample force
to conduct the operations at Santiago
to a successful issue and still spare
vessels of any power desirable for use
in the Florida straits.
.It was pointed out today k by a naval
officer that the admiral since the arrival.of the marine battalion on the
Panther has at his disposition what he
may regard as sufficient force of men
to capture Santiago even before the
troops arrive. The 800 marines on the
Panther added to the marines already
with the fleet would make a total of
about 1500 men.
Without impairing the efficiency of
his ships Admiral Sampson could spare
1000 blue jackets for a landing party}
and with this total force of 2500 men,
if the insurgents, who have been
armed hy the United States government, do their share, it seems possible for Sampson to capture Santiago
at short notice.
There seemed to be a very decided
air of ^jxpectatign this afternoon
among the officials who are acquainted
with the government's plan in the
campaign that almost warranted a
conclusion that an engagement of spine
kind was expected today.
COMMODORE SCHLEY'S TACTICS.
Off Santiago de Cuba, Saturday,
June 4, via Kingston, Jamaica, Monday, June 6, 9 a. m.���Every effort is
being made to cut off Santiago de
Cuba's connection with the outer
world, and it is believed that within
48 hours there will be a practical accomplishment of the design. Since
Sunday last when Commodore Schley
found Admiral Crevera's fleet trying to
leave the harbor and headed off the attempt, it has been the policy to so surround the city and harbor that no assistance either in supplying arms or
ammunition could reach there.
After driving the Spanish fleet into
a more protected position iu the harbor by the bombardment of Tuesday,
Commodore Schley opened communication with the insurgents 88 miles off
from Santiago to the east. They were
urged to obtain, if possible, the names
and number of the vessels of the fleet
inside the harbor. On Friday afternoon Lieutenant.Sharp of the Vixen
went to the place of rendezvous and received from the insurgents a map of
the harbor, showing the entire Gape
Verde fleet with the exception of the
destroyer Terror, inside and close up
to the city, under the protection of the
guns mounted on the Blanco battery at
the northern extremity of the harbor.
The ships there, according to the
chart, are the Cristobal Colon, the
Vizcaya, the Almiraute Oquendo, the-
Marie Teresa and the Reina Mercedes,
the last named destroyed by the American warships since this despatch--was
written.        'y'
All the cruisers of the lirst class are
heavily armed, together with three
torpedo boats. The definiteness of this
information   naturally  gave   Commo
dore Schley great satisfaction. Although he had known that the several
ships of the enemy were there, he was
not certain that some 'had hot succeeded in getting away or had not
been sent in another direction.
With Admiral Sampson's arrival
Wednesday the blockade was much
strengthened, and although the plans
to starve out the city, its troops and
the enemy's fleet were pushed vigorously, a cable boat was sent to find
and cut thfr-Cables communicating
from Santiago to Jamaica and Hayti,
cables which had been alleged had
been cut by the auxilliary cruiser St
Louis. The boat was put to work,
but up to today had not found the
cable for which she was- searching.
Guarded, by the battleships Massa-
chusetts and Texas she worked on Friday morning within two miles of the
formidable fortifications on shore, and
strange to say without any attempt of
the Spanish gunners to hit them, although in the. early morning the guns
were fired very of ten at'Schley's flagship.
FRESH CONQUESTS.      .
The Ladrones Will Be Taken and Used
��      as a Coaling Station.
San Francisco, June 9.���The Evening
Post says that the cruiser Charleston
will not go to the Philippines immediately, but that her destination is the
island of Guanahan,' in the Ladrone
group, which are controlled by the
Spanish, and which are about 1500
miles from Manila and 8500 from Honolulu. The chief city of Guanahan is
well fortified for such a small place,
and affords one of the best harbors and
coaling stations in the Pacific.
About six months ago the fortifications were strengthened by the Spanish to present formidable resistance in
case of attack. The Post says that the
United States will seize the group and
use the island of Guanahan for a Pacific coaling station, in addition to any
others she may seize in the future.
The Charleston, the Post continues,
was ordered to wait in Honolulu for
the first fleet of transports that left the
cily and' to take the ships to the La-
drones.   *
.' It is asserted that the artillery which
went on the Peking- was - really intended to garrison the forts at Guanahan, and that after quiet * is restored
and' the islands, -* are under control df
the United States, tbe Ofearisatpn -with
the transports will go to Manila.. Itis
said that the Monandock will not stay
at Honolulu but will proceed to the
Ladrones and there remain as a permanent guardian of the island for the
United States.
PROVINCIAL ELECTIOM
RETURNING OFFICERS APPOINTED
AND PLAGES OF NOMINATION FIXED.
List
or Returning Officer* For the Mainland Con*tltnencles.���The,. Election
Campaign 1* Now Open.���Premier
Tamer, Melmchen, Mall and Me-
rhllllp* Nominated In Victoria City
In the -Government Interest.
TROOPS HAVE SAILED.
Have
Twenty-seven Thousand Troops
Left Tampa.
London, June 9.���The Washington
correspondent of tbe Paily Chronicle,
with the approval of General Greeley,
cables the following:
The army sailed from Tampa at
noon today (Wednesday). The force
numbers 27,000 men, composed of infantry, cavalry, artillery/engineers
and signal corps. The infantry consists of 27 regiments, 16 regulars, 11
volunteers, and are .as follows: Of
regular regiments there are the 1st,
2d, 4th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9tb, 10th,* 12th,
13th, 16th, 17th, 21st, 22d, 24th and
26tb.
The volunteer regiments were the
71st New York, 82d Michigan, lst and
5th Ohio, 2d New York, lst District
of Columbia, 5th_Manirland,__=l8t, 5th
and 7th Indiana and 3d Pennsylvania.
Total infantry force, 21,600 men. In
addition a battalion of engineers, a detachment of signal corps, five squad
rons of cavalry, four batteries of light
artillery, two batteries of heavy artillery went along. General Shatter is
in chief command. The force is convoyed by the battleship Indiana and
the gunboat Helena.: The transports
are due at Santiago Friday night or
Saturday. A landing will be attempted
on Saturday. It should be effected
without difficulty. By Sunday, at
least, the stars and stripes will float
over Santiago de Cuba. ���-���������-.'
WARSHIP'S   MOVEMENTS.
Victoria, June 9.���Today's official
Gazette contains notice of the appointment of the returning officers for the
forthcoming elections. Those for the
mainland constituencies are as follows:
John Bowden, Cariboo; J. M. Lind*
say, Alexander, Cassiar; Stephen Redgrave, Kootenay east, north riding;
Chas. M. Edwards, Kootenay east,
south riding; John D. Sibbald, Kootenay west, Revelstoke riding; Fletcher
S. Andrews, Kootenay west, Slocan
riding; Wm. J.Goepel, Kootenay west,
Nelson  riding;   Wm.   B.   Townsend,
Kootenay west, Rossland riding; Frederick Soues, Lillooet, east riding; Caspar Phair, Lillooet, west riding; Wm.
H.   Keaiy,   New  Westminster   city;
James D. Hall, Vancouver city; Justinian Pelly, Chilliwhack riding; Henry
T. Thrift, Westminster,   Delta riding;
John   A.   Caitherwood,   West-minster,
Dewdney  riding;    Leonard    Norris,
Yale, east riding; George C. Tunstall,
Yale, north riding; Wm.   Dodd, Yale,
west riding.
The nominations are to take, place
at the following places:
Cariboo, courthouse, Richfield; Cassiar, government office, Port Simpson;
Kootenay east, north riding, court
house; Donald; Kootenay . east, south
riding, oourt house, Fort���'. Steele.;
Kootenay wost, Revelstoke riding, government .office,' Revelstoke;' Kootenay
west,,Sloean riding, government office,
Kaslo; Kootenay west, Nelson riding,
government office, Nelson; Kooteuay
west, -Rossland riding, government
office, Rossland; Lillooet, east riding,
court house, Clinton; west riding,
court bouse, Lillooet; New Westminster city, court house, New West- -
minster; Vancouver city, city hall,
Vancouvey; Westminster, riding of
Cbilliwhack, riding of Delta, school
bouse, Ladner; riding of Dewdney,
Odd Fellows'hall, Mission city; rid-
ng of Richmond, school bouse, Steve-
son'; Yale, east riding, court house,
Vernou; north riding, court house",
Kamloops; west riding, government
office, Yale. 	
CANPIDATES FOR VICTORIA.
Victoria, June 9���The provincial
government supporters had their nominating convention tonight and chose
as candidates for Victoria city Messrs.
Turner, Helmcken, Hall and McPhillips. The only other name placed
before the convention was that of Gor- ,
don Hunter, who also received strong
support.  '
A NGLOtCHINESJ���CONVENTIONV���
Gibraltar, June 9.���The Spanish battleship Pelayo and three torpedo boats
are constantly cruising in the straits
of Gibraltar. Tho Italian armored
cruiser Carlo Alberte sailed for Cuban
waters today. ���
FORCED THE BLOCKADE.
Key West, June 9.���There are persistent rumors here credited by some
high naval officers that three Spanish
warships forced their way into Havana
harbor. ��� *.
DISTRESS IN CUBA.
London, June 9.���The Pekin correspondent of the Times says:
��� The Anglo-Chinese convention, signed
Today, leaves to England an extension
of the boundaries of Hong Kong, including Kou Long, of altogether 200
square miles. Japan, under the protocol of October, 1896, demands that
settlement be established forthwith,
giving the exclusive use to the Japan--
ese of Fu Chau Wo Sung, Sha Shi Fu
Wing, Ye Chau and Cliing Wang Tao.
THE QUEEN REGENT ILL.
London, June 9. ���The Madrid correspondent of tho Daily News says:
The Queen Regent is in ill health.
She hardly ever appears in public,
though she daily drives in the wilderness behind the palace.
CAPTAIN HART PARDONED.
Washington, D. C., June 9. ���The
president today granted a pardon to
Captain John B. Hart, now serving a
sentence of two years for engaging in
filibustering in Cuba.
CORRESPONDENTS   EXPELLED.
New York, June 9.���Captain Low of
the fruiterer Alleghany, which arrived'
here last night witth a cargo of fruit
from Savannilla and other West Indian
points, says that from what he learned
on the trip the condition c: things in
Cuba is deplorable. Nearly all peaceable Cubans have been starved to death
and the Spaniards on the islands are
in a very bad way for food. The greater proportion of the people have perished since Consul General Lee left
Havana. The Cuban race, says Captain Low, has been practically exterminated.
Havana, June 9.���Yesterday afternoon the British cruiser Talbot sailed
from Havana. On board were Messrs.
Phil Robinson and H. J. Wigham.
English newspaper correspondents arrested some time ago at Matanzas. Tlie
Talbot also carries Messrs. Edward and
Pinkey, expelled from the island on
suspicion of being ; spies. "Sister
Mary" Wilbreforce, of the British Red
Cross, against whom the order of expulsion was issued lait January- but
which was not enforced, was expelled
on the charges recently brought- against
her. Miss Wilberforce was taken
aboard the steamer by force though
treated with all possible gentleness. .J"a-., ".t*> kVfJSS  tm ~}~
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THE MINER, FRIDAY, JUNE io, 1898,
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Published Daily except Monday.
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ImHre efcaage.
INVASION OF CUBA.
The reports of the great daniage done
to tbe fortifications at Santiago appear
to" have been correct, for on Wednesday-last an army of invasion sailed
from Tampa, Florida, to Santiago de
Cuba. Such a step as this would never
have been taken were the authorities
not satisfied that the Spanish batteries
were so far disabled as to be unable to
-seriously impede the debarkation.
With the exception ofthe Manila expedition, this is the first army of invasion that however sailed from the shores
of the United States of America. Tlie
force consists of 27,000 men of all
arms. Of; the 27 regiments of infantry
16. are regulars and 11 volunteers, and
there Will, be some curiosity to observe
how. the inexperienced volunteers will
shape, but as the regular troops ore in
the majority, there should be sufficient backbone to the force to give the
whole the necessary steadiness under
fire. ;
The plan of campaign bas naturally
not been made  public, but the probability, seems to be that   the Americans
will endeavor to.land somewhere near
Santiago and form a juuotion with the
insorgenta Then a combined attack is
Apparently  to  be  made on  Santiago
from, the   landward  side,   while  the
American fleet, covers their advance
with ��   bombardment.    Santiago is a
place of considerable natural strength,
but is .more  susceptible of  attaok by
land than by sea, and there seems little
reason  to  look  for  any result other
than the success of  the American assault, though possibly one or tWo tem-
porary repulses may be inflicted.    ,,,
" One of the most remarkable features
of the war has been the ease with
which  the   Spanish  have been vatt-
quished    in    every   encounter. The
Spaniards do not seem to be. lacking in
brayeiy.bnt they appear, to utterly lose
thej* heads when excited, with the i&-
sult that they send their shot and shell
in every direction but the right one;
If the Spanish army are nd better in
,this���respect^than^the-navy,-we^may-
expect -to see another succession of
easy, if not quite bloodless, victories.
out would have defeated the by-law,
while those subsequently declared to
bo official barely cbnstitrated the necessary majority- ih its favor. It is generally, and justly, felt that where a
mistake in 11 votes has been made,
which has the effect of changing the
verdict of the.: ratepayers, it is only
reasonable and fair to all parties that a
recount should take place. This is especially,the ea��c where scrutineers haye
not been.admitted and both sides have
not had an opportunity of chocking the
results/* We feel sure that the council
will offer no opposition to such a demand, should it be formally made, as
they must be more anxious than uny-
oue that it should be made plain.to
the public that the will of the rate-""
payers has been correctly .expressed by
the result of the balloting.
THE CANADIAN GLADSTONE.
.''What Spain needs is heroes," says
the New York Sun, and since the
American newspapers manufacture so
many * new ones every day, Spain
might be able to borrow a few from
her Amerioan enemies.
We wcjrp under, the  impression  that
the  Rossland .Miner was advocating
the cause pf the government in  the
approaching provincial elections,   but
from the editorial in its last issue we
are tempted to think  that it must really be voicing the views of  the opposition electors of the Boundary Creek
district.    Such    unaffected sympathy
on  the  part  of an opposing journal
must* be  a solace  to. the. souls of Mr.
Bogle's supporters, provided   they are
as   broken-hearted   as   the   Rossland
Miner, would have us believe.    There
is,   however, one  gleam of light. for
the supporters of Mr. James Martin,
at any rate, in this unfortunate affair,
anpl that is  th-at". if. Mr. Martin were
not: ajyery strong candidate the Rossland Miner would  not  be so upset at
his nomination.
In the political forest of Canadian
statesmen there is * one tree which
from its extensive roots, majestic trunk
and the beautiful symmetiy.of its wide-
spreading branches, coupled;with its
commanding; position, -stands: as the
most conspicuous object in the political
landscape: of the present time���that
tree .is Sir Wilfrid^Laurier. His ��� fune
as : a patriot, orator and. statesman is
not confined alone to the American
continent, but' has spread : abroad
throughout every portion of Her Maj-;
esty's empire. He is also revered in
France, the home of his ancestors���as
well as in many other of the countries
of Europe���and although he might be
pardoned had he shown a decided leaning for the cradle of that chivalrous
and illustrious race, he has been: a true
British subject, whose motto has been
"Canada first, Canada last and Canada
always.r' Tp him more than any
other Dominion statesman * is honor
due for narrowing the breach between
the,twoi great religious classes. In
bringing his'country. prominently before the world at the Queen's Jubilee
his bitterest enemy must admit that
he was the most potent actor. Since
taking the helm of state he has shown
a breadth of view on political questions and an unswerving determination
to.do the right|and what is best for his
beloved Canada, worthy of the immortal lord of Hawarden, who has always
been his prototype.
It was therefore a scene long to be
remembered when the Canadian Gladstone, with stately dignity arose in
the house a few days ago to represent
the people of this broad territory and
pay a fitting tribute to the memory of
tbe distinguished man who had departed this life and had left footprints
on the sands of time that will never
be effaced.
Happy were those who came under
the spell of his glorious oratory and
majestic personabty. To those who
were not so fortunate as to hear the
magnificent piece of word-painting,
the reading of the eulogy which appeared in our columns must ...nevertheless stir their souls. One cannot peruse it without having, a deep conviction that Sir Wilfred Laurier was
tremendously in earnest and his resolution to follow in- the footsteps of
the greatest statesman of modern times
cannot fail to instil into the minds of
the people of Canada the belief that
the interests of ? tbeir country will be
furthered to the greatest extent by
being left in the hands of one who
now holds the highest office in the gift
of the people. ���Vancouver World.
FLOODS AT BOUNDARY CREEK
Reports ;from - Midway say v the
Boundary creek: district has suffered
from an; unprecedented rainfall, and
the , temperature; keeping up, the snow
in the mountains melted rapidly, causing heavy floods. Kettle river, already
in, floods came down bank high, the
Waters overtopping: the: level' of 1$94.
The waters of Ronndaryxreek became
SHADES
3^
GLASSES.
SPECTACLES.
Eyesight Tested Free-
W. F. TEETZEL & CO. Nelson, B. C.
PERSQRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COHPOUNDED.
WEST KOOTENAY
BUTCHER COflPANY
All kinds of Fresh and Salted Meats wholesale and retail. Fresh Fish received daily.
Mail orders receive careful and prompt attention.
E; C. TRAVE5, Manager.
P. BURNS & CO.
Itiolesale and Retail Meat Merchants
HEAD OFFICE NELSON, B. C.
'   <&^2r+'��bOb'bO'OS*$
Branch Markets in Rossland, Trail, Nelson, Kaslo,
Sandon, Three Forks, New Denver and Slocan City.
Orders by mail to any branch will have careful and prompt attention.
530
Official Directory.
DOMINION DIRECTORY.
Governor-General - Earl of Aberdeen
Premier -    .     - Sir Wilfrid Laurier
Member House of Commons, Dominion Parliament* West Kootenay    >    Hewitt Bostock
PROVINCIAL DIRECTORY.
Lieut.-Governor - Hon T lt Mclnnes
Premiei ��� - Hon J H Turner
Attorney-General - Hon DM Eberts
Com of Lands and Works        Hon GB Martin
Minister Mines and Education'  Hon Jas Baker*,
President Executive Council   Hon CE Pooley
Members Legislative Assembly tor West Koot-
enay-North Riding *    J M Kellie
South Riding J F Hume
NELSON OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
Mayor - ���     .     John Houston
Aldcrmen-Chas Hillyer, W F Teetzel, J A
Gilker, J J Malono, E P Whalley. Thos Mad-
don. ,.!
City Clerk -
Police Magistrate
Chief of Police
Chief of Firo Department
Auditor
Water Commissioner
Health Officer
City council meets every Monday, 3 p.m.,
city hall, cor Victoria and Josephine st
J R Strachan
E A Crease
A F McKlnnon
W J Thompson
John Hamilton
TMWard
Dr. LaBau
at
WAR IS STILL ON!
and War Prices are now reigning in every line
of goods, prices having greatly advanced within the last few days. Contemplating- the advance we were fortunate enough to secure several carloads of commodities, which will be
sold to the best interests of our customers. It
will be money in your pocket to deal with us.
We solicit your patronage. . . .
M. Des Brisay & Co., Nelson.
Letter Orders get Careful and Prompt attention. <dl8)
peter QENE^E & CO.
: : NELSON BRANCH : :
We are prepared to furnish kiln dried lumber at regular
prices and carry Rough and Dressed Lumber, Coast
Flooring and Ceiling, Turned Work and Mouldings,
Shingles and Lath, Sash and Doors. Estimates
Cheerfully given. -^-
SCHOOL TRU8TKM.
Dr. E C Arthur. Dr. G A B Hall, Geo Johnstone.   Principal���J R Green.
SOUTH KOOTENAY BOARD OF TRADE.
President - J Roderick Robertson..
Vice-President - Jamies Lawrence.
Secy-Treas. - John A turner.
KOOTENAY LAKE GENERAL HOSPITAL
President
Vice-Pres.
Secretary
Treas.
MedicalS:)pt*.
John A Turner.
W. A. Jowett.
D McArthur.
A H Clements
Dr.GABHall.
Close
8.00 p.m.
8.30 a.m.
1.00 pan
5.00 r.m.
NELSON POST OFFICE
United States, Ontario. Que
bee and Eastern Provinces
DuiH
S. 15 p.m.
Points on N. Sc F. S. line.
Victoria and Rowland.
Sew Denver. Sandon andH3.3 p.m,
Slocan Lake Points.
(Casio and Kootenay Lake  7.45 a.*i.
Points
llossl-aud.  Trail,   Nakusp.  7.00 a.m.
Itobson. points on main lint
3. P. It..   Vancouver and
A'innipeg	
OFFICK 1IOUI18. .   . y.
Lobby opened (rom 7 a. m. to 10 p.m.; General'
Delivery, 8 n.m, to 8 p.m.; Registration. '���8J30'i
a.m. to 7 p.in.; Money Orders and Savings Bank'
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday I hour (10 to 11 a.ro).
J. A. GILKER, Postmaster.
DISTRICT DIRECTORY.
Government Inspector of Agencies W J Goepel
Gold Commissioner - O. G. Dennis
Mining Recorder-Tax Col - R F Tolmie
Collector of Customs - Geo. Johnston*
Provincial Assessor -" John Keen,
County Court Judge . J A Forin.
Registrar    ,   .      .' BTHSimpkins.
PROVINCIAL JAIL DIRECTORY.
Warden . ,   Capt, N Fittttubbs.
u RJUddell.
Geo Partridge,
John McLaren
��� H Jno*.
First Jailer
Second Jailer
Third Jailer
Senior Guard
a torrent. At the sawmill above Midway the, dam, with 100,000 feet of logs,
went ont- The water went over some
bridges and washed several away.
OFFICE AND YARD C. P. R.
STATION.    ,    .    .
A.  E.   YOUNG, AGENT.
PB^TIStBY
DR.H. ��. HAU-
Haying returned from a trip
East, desires to announce
that he has resumed practice
in Nelson, and can now be
found at his office,
OOR-WARD ANO BAKIR 8T-
Thi? electric light by-law was voted
on yesterday, :and- to all appearances
obtained the -necessary majority. Still
we do not think that the fight is over
yet. Considerable dissatisfaction has
been expressed by, those opposed to
the   by-law   in   regard  to the way iii
& CO.,
Notice of Dissolution.
Wall Papers,
Fishing Tackle,
Garden & Flower Seeds.
99999099
LACROSSE,
BASEBALL,
and TENNIS GOODS.
Brewers of Fine Lager
Beer and Porter.
. ,.:      lJrop in  and see   us.
nelson;
B.C.
Householders Plfese Note.
The humble daddy, long-legs;.the
flying and cheerful ant; the irrepresr
sible blow fly and the genial winged
bug can be kept out of your houses
by uping SCREEN DOORS
2 ft. 6 x 6 ft. 0 at $1.50.
2 ft. 8 x 6 ft. 8 at $1.75.
2ft.10 x 6 ft.10 at $2.00.
Screen  Windows made to order in
all sizes at the
which, the results of the balloting were -.-_- ^fykr tit a "rrrrrn -aa-n-T r*
aimb^ced. As will be seen in another j JN LLbUJN rliA NIN(t MILES
column,   the figures originally   given' T, W. GRAY,   Proprietor.
6XS-
'7*e>
CANADA DRUG BOOK Co.
Notice is hereby given that the partnership
heretofore subsisting between us as Brewers in
Nelson, B.C., has this day been dissolved by
mutual consent. All debts owing to the said
partnership are to be pnid to tho undersigned
William Gosnell and all claims against the
said partnership are to be presented to tho said
William Gosnell at the Castle Brewery, Nelson. B.C.. by whom tho same will be settled.
Dated at Nelson, B.C., this 28th day of May
A.D., 18S8. 3 wltt
Witness:
Kdward A.
Crease
WM. GOSNELL.
AUGUST STADLBlt
d5
LIMITED
Purchase
Your tobaccos.
AT THE
Post Office
Xigar Store
CHURCH JHRSCTORY.
Church of Esiot.AND-M<iUn U��.ro.; Even
Song. 7.S0 p.m. erery Sunday. Holy Communion on 1st and 3rd Sundays in tbs month after
Matins; on 2n*3 and 4th Sunday* at t n.m.
Sunday School at 2.�� p.m. Rbt. ��. 8. Akehurst. Rector.  Cor Ward and Silica ���tr*>t-s.
PnKSBVTKRUN CHUBcn-Service* at u asm,
and 7.30 p.m. Sunday School at 2.30 p.m.
Prayer meeting Thursday evening at $ p.q��.j
Christian EndeaTor Society meets erery Monday evening at 8 o'clock. Rer. R. Jftew.
Pastor. ���--���������-.���_.'-
Methodist Cnuncn-Corner Silica an*
Josephine Streets. Services at U am. and TM
p. m.; Sabbath School, 139p.m;: pSyo?mei"
ing on Friday evening at 8 o'clock: Kpwortfc
League CK.. Tuesday at * a.m. Rev.6��fcBT
Morden. Pastor., -\*   ���'���
Roman Catholic CiiDiicii-MaM at NeW
every'Sunday at8and 1030 a.m.; BeoadictiS'~~
at7.:<Oto8p.in.   Rev. father ForM PriSt?
Baptist * Cuvitcn ��� Services morning and
pvenina at 11 n.m. aiid 7.30 p.m.; Prayer meet-.
ing Wednesday erealng at 8 o.m.;   Meotinm
are held in the school house.   Strangera cordially welcomed.  Rev. G. R. Welch.Paator.-^
Salvation ABMV-Services every evening
1fcJ ?c,?^,,,in -*��*aobn on Victoria streeS
Adjutant Millner in charge.
liODGB MEBTING8.
NELSON LODGE. Ko. ��! A. W. tdA.
M. meets second Wednesday in oach
month.  Visiting brethren invited.
O. h. Lrnnox. Secretary.
I. O. O. F.    Kootonay Lodge
No. 10, mocU every Monday night,
at their HaU, Kootenay street.
Sojourning Odd Fellows oordlally Invited.
WM. HODSON. Secretary.
Where  you will alwajs find a well
assorted stock of Imported   and
Domestic Cigars, Cigarettes Tobaccos and a full stock' of
Pipes at reasonable
Prices.
S. J. MIQHTON.
dl9)
H.M;TINC��NT.
NELSON ^LODGE No. 85, K. of P..
Ameete in Castle hall, McDonald bloclt
'���fevery Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock,
All visiting knights cordially invited,
J. J. Malone. CC. '
) Gbo. Partridob. K. of R. and 8.
NELSON LODGE, I. O. G. T. Meets ia
Castle Hall, McDonald Block, every Monday
evening at 8 o'clock.  Visiting Template coi'
dially invited.
John Telford/
Chief Templar.
George Nunn   Sec'y
NELSONS QUEEN NO. 1411
SONS OF ffNGLANIV meets
second and fourth Wednesday of
each month at K. of P. Hall, Mae-
Donald Block, cor. Vernon and
Josephine streets. Visiting breth-
rn cordially-invited. Ernest Kino,
Qhas. H. Farrow, Worthy President
Secretary.
UiLt��LmLtLUk..kklkkklkk.m.i.....l.i
|   MERCHANT  TAILOR   j
Baker Street, VF��st       ���
BTelseB
, ^^PSP^J^',10v- NO.3138meet*
1st and 3rd Wednesday in each month in the
KofPHall. F XV Swanell, CD. S.C.R.; J R
Green. CR.: J. Purkiss. Secy. '    n
NELSON LODGE. NO. 10 A.O.U.W.. meet*
every Thursday in the I.O.O.F. hall. F VT
SwaneU, M.W.: W Hodson. Rec.-Sec; J. J.
DriscoU, Financier r. J Squire.- Reeciver and
P.M.W. THE  MINER, FRIDAY, JUNE 10^1898.
1E8AL LOCAL NEWS.
[VENTS   OF   1KTESEST   IN   AND
AROUND NELSON.
flcr   Mention    or   Happening*  In   the
llls'rict During llie I'nst
:..:"' 5 \ ,7.\l^v.'nayn..A': .':.'  ,A.  ������
LW. M. Clarke, representing the Van-
luver World, is at the Hume.
IS. -Y. :Paar is-bnilding. a residence
Victoria street on lot 12, block 10.
���Work on the now Baptist church on
lauley street is being rapidly pushed
liead.
|The following Kasloites registered
the Hume yesterday: C. M. Arnold,
P. Montgomery, D. W. Moore.
|The list of voters in the Nelson elec-
iil district will appear in the weekly
liner tomorrow.
IA.   Macdonald   of    Winnipeg,   the
lad of the wholesale firm of A. Mac-
[nald & Co., is in the city oh a busi-
[ss trip.
Tice   President Shaughnessy of  the
P. R. and party left yesteiday after-
on' for j the   eafct   via   Robson   and
hvelstokei ���"': "  '��� ���.v
Lmong those registered at the Phair
sterday   were:   H.   G.   Henderson,
jctoria! F. J. Hill, \yhitew,ater; G.
Copeland, .Xaslo; E. J. Matthews,
|lot Bay;... -.'; *������ ���"-'���'.  '
B.   Bright,   C.   E., who is cou-
Icted with the  survey of  the Crow's
est Pass railway, arrived iu the city
|;t night and leaves this morning  for
iskonook.
The Nelson Band is practicing hard
[A the outlook is ' that Nelsoirvvill be
tsated to; iome" excellent music on
pminion day.     . ���  y
[One   of   the   large   transfer  barges
Itely   built   was yesterday placed in
sitiori to.receive!   a  cargo of  bridge
iber fqr the Crow's Nest road.
fThe drill Wednesday evening of the
elson company, Kootenay Rifles, at-
locted a large number of spectators,
Id it is needless to say that the spec-
Itors .appeared to enjoy the
fill more than the participants.
���Telson is sorely getting the bicycle
Baker street in the evening is
egular race track, and from the speed
Eiined by some of the '' scorchers'' it
likely that the bicycle race on Do-
jnion day will cause considerable ex-
pment and a little speculation.
. French, one of the owners of the
, Patch group, denies the truth of
h report that it is bonded to Mac-
Jusie & Mann. He cannot underbid how such a report could have
an, as there has never been auy
espondeuce on the subject.
M&tTIN   NOMINATED.
nines Martin has been nominated to
esent the opposition   in the Ross-
district.    There  were originally
r   candidates, but  Hugh McCutch-
landF. C. Patton withdrew,   leav-
I the choice between James  Martin
j P. B. Bogle. S- JJach candidate eri-
ed the platform presented him and
lised  to support -<the nominee of
convention.   On a ballot James
Itin ^aaelectedby;24 votes to 10.
the warmer weather we are now
lying,   the  iwivantages of   screen
and    windoAVs    are   obvious.
eholders who wish to: keep out iu-
should note the' reduced prices at
[jlTth-BaiTletticler^M^bepiirchased
lie 1-Telsou Planing Mills.    See  ad-
Isement.
HAVE
isjRecpivei)
a Ibt of
YESTERDAY'S POLLING.
All   the   By-laws Passed���A  Recount
Probable.
Polling was going on yesterday on
four by-laws, viz. i" The waterworks
by-law, the cemetery by-law, the
electric light by-law and the sewage
by-law. Thc first, second and fourth
of these were passed by large majorities and do not call for special comment.
They were all objects worthy of the
proposed outlay, and wore recognized
by the citizens as such. Tlieir respective majorities wore: By-law No. 32,
201 to��4; by-law No. 33, 220 to 15;
by-law No. 35, 200 to 36.
Public interest centered round bylaw No. 34, commonly known as the
electric light by-law. The voting on
this by-law was much closer. Both
sides made great efforts to bring their
supporters to the poll, some of the supporters of the by-law going round iu
hacks for the conveyance of intended
voters.
The west ward cast 50 votes against
the by-law aud only 45 for it. Thus
everything depended on the voting iu
the east ward, where the results were
published later.
After a considerable amount of waiting the numbers were put up
in the window of the city offices,
which was the polling both of the east
ward.
The numbers announced wero 87 to
52 in favor of the by-law. This, however, taken in conjunction with the
voting in the west ward did not con-
stittite a" sufficient majority to pass the
by Jaw, so the small crowd that were
waiting dispersed thinking all was
over, and at least one bet was paid by
a prominent, supporter of the by-law.
Later on The Miner representative
was informed by J. K. Strachan, city
clerk, who was officiating-as returning
officer, that the numbers had been
hoisted prematurely, and without
authority, ancl that a mistake had been
made, the correct figures being 98 to
41 in favor of the by-law.
This was tantamount to transferring
11 votes from one side to the other,
making a total vote of 143 to 91, or 2
more than the required majority of
three-fifths.
No scrutinees were allowed, and Dr.
Arthur, who desired to act in that
capacity, was refused -admittance.
The only persons present when the
ballots were., counted were J. K.
Strachan, R. Renwick arid, we believe, Alderman Teetzel.
There was considerable dissatisfaction expressed in town last night at
the result, and it is probable that a recount will be demanded.
CANADA'S NATIONAL GAME.
One of the features of the Dominion
Day celebration at Nelson will be a
lacrosse tournament for which a purse
of $125 has been hung up. A match
has been arranged with the New Denver club for July 2, for which the
Nelson team are practicing hard and
are getting in first-class condition. As
the New Denver boys are a crack
club, an interesting game may be expected. The match will also carry
with it the championship of the Kootr
enays. There are several veteran lacrosse players in the city who should
assist by turning out to practice as
regularly as possible. ��� A
THE SILVER CUP.
jhich no well appointed
lome should be without
luring the warm weather.
tq have also constantly
hand a full line of . t
briber's Supplies,
Steam Fittings,
and Ifardware
of every description
which we are offer-
ingat very lowprices.
[com Hardware Co.,
icouver & Nelson, B. 0.
;��D.��� G. Eaton returned last night
from San Francisco, where he went
last moiith with a shipment of ore
from the Silver Cup mine, situated in
the Lardeau country.
The shipment consisted of 850 tons
and was consigned to the Selby smelter
situated about 30 miles from San Francisco. The returns were very favorable,
the ore averaging 200 ounces to the ton
in silver and running from $12 to f 16
to the ton iu gold. The Silver Cup is
being operated by the Sunshine Mining company, commonly called the
Home Payne syndicate. Since last
September about JOOJtons^of^lore^have
been mined and sacked, but only 850
tons of this were shipped, as it has all
to be hauled by teams and rawhided
about 24 miles to Thompson's landing
on the Arrow lakes.
C. P. R,   OFFICIALS   IN NELSON.
Interview With  the Deputation From
the Board of  Trade.
As annoimced in our last issue, a deputation from the South Kootenay
Board of Trade had an interview yesterday with Mr. Shaughnessy, vice
president of the ,C. P. R.
Mr. Shaughnessy was very non-committal, and there is nothing material
to add to the information already
gleaned by our readers from tho interview obtained by our representative
immediately after the vice president's
arrival in Nelson.
Iu response to the representations
made him, Mr. Shaughnessy stated that
while nothing would be settled until
the table of distances was made out,
yet he was of the opinion that Nelson
would undoubtedly be made a divisional point and have the machine
shops, located here.
He repeated the assurances already
given to The' Miner representative
that the intention of the C. P. R. to
bring the Crow's Nest Pass railway
into Nelson was unchanged.
With regard to the question of a new
depot, Mr. Shaughnessy said that he
had been over the ground, but that no
change would be made until the
Crow's Nest Pass railway came into
Nelson.
It was pointed out that the existing
scale of freight charges discriminated
against Nelson, and Mr. Shaughnessy
gave the assurance that as soon as the
Crow's Nest Pass railway was completed the existing tariff of charges
would be revised in such a manner as
to ensure Nelson taking her rightful
position as the commercial metropolis
and distributing center of Kootenay.
���������������������������������������������������������
i WHAT
1 DO
| YOU
| WANT
| For One Cen^a Word?
X ~~A   .*���
X     You can find a buyer for VAny
Old Thing " it" you advertise.
Classified Advertisements.
All advertisement* in thia column are
1 cent a word each insertion. No advertisement taken (or less than 25 cents.
������������������������������������<
FOR SALE
Old papers at The Miner office. 25 cents
per hundred.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOUND.-A small ker. National Cash Register.   Apply "Miner" office.
WANTED���A strong Girl for housework in
family living at Silver King Mine, Toad Mountain.   Apply "N" Miner.     , 29-3t
LOST.���A pair of gold-mounted spectacles. Suitable reward for recovery.
Apply to Miner office.
1IVXGABIAN ��YP8Y WOMAN.
DONT FAIL TO CALL ON THE HUNGAR-
ian Gipsy woman, who tells your fortune only
with the Gypsy cards; without askingaquostton
she tells what you came for, your past, present and future. She will be here only a few
days, so call early. Room i. Grand Central
hotel; use the parlor for a waiting room.
23-306L
THE  NELSON   CAFE
Gives a first-class meal for
25 CENTS & UPWARDS
ICE OREAM &   CAKE   l6o.
JAPANESE * TEA *  PARTIES
Every Afternoon.     ...;������"<;
EXPERIENCED WAITRESSES.
OPEN ALL NIGHT.
AN UNLIKELY REPORT.
St. Johns, N. F., June 9.���Nothing
further has developed concerning the
report that warships, presumably
Spanish, had been sighted on the Grand
Banks. The British cruiser Cordelia,
flying the flag of Commodore Burke,
arrived today from the west coast by
way of the French island of St. Pierre.
Her officers ridicule the idea of a fleet
of warships being anchored on the
banks. They say a Spanish fleet would
be far more likely to be seen iu some
uninhabited harbor on the north coast
for coaling purposes. Moreover, no
preparations are being made at St.
Pierre to coal Spanish ships, as has
been .^reported^in some ^recent^des-^
patches from this point.
MENS
CLOTHING. .
When looking for a Suit
of Clothes you will have
made a mistake if you do
not inspect our Assortment. They fit the best,
wear the best and are the
best in Nelson for the
money.
A well selected stock
of Waterproof Goods,
Boots and Shoes, Gents'
Furnishings and Hats.
All at very Low Prices.
J. R WEIR,
Men'a..
Outfitter.
and SOO--PACIFIC LINE
Sign of the Big Red Hat,
. . Baker Sfcr-aet . .
THE DIRECT and SUPERIOR SERVICE E0TJTE
To all Eastern and European
Points.
To Pacific Coast and Transpacific Points.
TO the Rich and active Mining
Districts of Klondike and the
Yukon.
New Tourist Oar Service
Daily to St. Paul.
Daily (except  Monday)  to Eastern Canadian and U.S. Points.
Tickets  issued through and Bag-
. gage checked to destination.
DAILTTTRAIN.
To Rossland and Main  Line points.
6.40 p.m.-Leaves���NELSON���Arrives-10.30p,m
Kootenay lake���Kula Monte.
Str. Kokanee
Except Sunday. Except Sunday.
4  p.m.���Leavcs-NELSON���Arrlves-11  a.m.
Calling at way ports in both direction*.
Kootenny River Boate.
Str. Nelson.
Mon. Wed. Fri. Mon, Wed. Fri.
7 a. m.���Leaves���NELSON -Arrives���8.30 p. m.
Runs to Kuskanook (formerly Armstrong's
Landing) calling at way ports and makes close
connections at Pilot Bay with Steamer Kokanee. Steamer may.make additional trips pro-'
rlded business offers, ;
Trains to and from Bloom City, Sandon
nnd Slocun Lake Points.
(Sundays Excepted)
9 a. m.���Leave8���NELSON���Arrives���2.20 p. m.
Ascertain Present
Reduced Rates East
and full information by addressing nearest
local agent, or GE9. S. BEER, City Ticket
Agent. Nelson,
\V. F. ANDERSON, E. J. COYLE,
Trav. Pass. Agent,      Dist Pass. Agent,
Nelson Vancouver.
Write for Klondike folder and Map.
KASLO & SLOCAN RAILWAY
T!ME OARD NO. I
Ooino West. . Dally . Oowo East.
Leave 8.00 a. m. - Kaslo .        Arrive &S0 p.m.
"    8.86 a.m. South Fork      "     3.15 p.m.
"    9.36 a.m.  Sproule's "     3.15 p.m.
"     9.51a.m.  Whitewater    "     2.00 p.m.
"10.03 a.m. Bear Lake       "     1.48 p.m.
"  10.18 a. ra. McGuigan       "     USpW
" 10.38 a.m. Cody Junction " 1.12 p.m.
Aro. I0.fi0a.tn. Sandon  .    Leave 1.00 p.m.
CODY LINE.
Leave UKMa. m. Sandon
Arrive 11:20 "      Cody
Arrive !l:i5a.ra.
Leava 11:25 "
ROBT.lRVINOI#u-GEO.F. COPELAND.
2M1 O.F.tP. A        Superintendent.
ATLANTIC
From Montreal
Lake Winnipeg���Bearer Line..........June 15
Lake Huron���Beaver Line June 22
From New York.
Majestic-White Star Line June 15
Germanic���White Star Line .......June22
���Struria���Cunard Line.. June ll
"inia-Cunard Une June 18
From Montreal
v'orkshirr-   >minion Line June 11
L��o.L.'.-���-'���">���Doi..l-!f>ii Line June 18
Laurcnuu..   ��� "���<n  ^'���* ...JuneU
Parisian���Allan ��_:- June IS
Cabin, |45.00, $50, pat, ����� -��� - -- ���   ,f1 upwards.
Intermediate, $34.00a.-dup>.   ~-
Steerage. $22.50 and upwards,_>.-        ^^^���
Passengers ticketed through to all point*!��
Great Britain or Ireland, and at specially'low
rates to all parts of the European conti lent.
Prepaid passages arranged from all point*.
ApplyJtfTGEO. 8. BEER.   C.pSL 1 clre.
Agent. Nelson, or to,    WILLIAM STITf ,
554)  General Agent, C.P.R. Ofllces. Winnipeg,
THE  SURVEYOR'S   CHAIN   HADE   IT
TEE SHORTEST
TRANSCOOTENTAL    RODTK
It 1* ike Most Modern In S��alnntent.
It Is Ike Heaviest Sailed I4ne.
It kas a Koek-KallMt Keadbed.
It Cresses Xo Saad Desserts.
li is tke Only Une Banning I.nxnrlens
Clnb Boon Can.
It Is Noted tar tke Conrtesy of IU Employes.
It Is tke Only Une Serving Meals en tke
a la Carte Finn.
THROUGH   THE
GRANDEST      SCENERY
IN AMERICA BY DAYLIGHT.
Attractive. Tours during Season of
Navigation on Great Lakes via Duluth in
connection witb Magnificent Passenger
Steamers Northwest and Northland.
For maps, tickets and complete information
call on or address Agents, K. & 3. Ry., C. Sc K.
S. Nav. Co., N & F. 3. Ry., or
C. G. DIXON, Cemeral Agent,
Spokane, Wash.
r. i. wurnkt, 6. r. a t. a.,
101 M. rani, Mlaa.
International Navigation �� Trading Company
UNITED
Time Card Effective May 16,1898
Subject to Change withont Notice.
S. S. International.
Leaves Kaslo at 3.30 a. 'in. every day except'
Sunday, calling at all way points.
Connects at Five Mile Point with S. F. & N.
train at 6,-la a. m., arrives Nelson at 7.20 a. m.
..I^ve,8 Nelson at 5 p. m.,connecting at Five
Mile Point with train from Spokane, arriving
at .Kaslo 8.30 p. m.
Connects at Pilot Bay with S. S. Alberta for
Bonner Ferry and Kootenay Hirer points.
U. ��. Alberta. -
Leaves Kaslo on arrival of K, & S. train on
Saturday and Tuesday at 5.30 p. m., and Thursday at 6 n^ m., touching atall way points. Connects at Bonner's Ferry with G. N. trains.
ufe��ve5 Bonner's Ferry at 2 p. m. on Sunday.
Wednesday and Friday, arriving at Kaslo 1 p.
m. next day. >
Close connection with East Kootenay point
via Jennings and Bonner.s Ferry.
d n t>    ,M��;,APKXANDER. Oeu. Mgr.
P. O. Box 122, Kaslo, B.C.
Spokane Palls &
Northern R'y.
Nelson <fc Fort
Sheppard R'y.
Red Mountain R'y,
The only all rail route without change
of can between Nelson and Bossland and
Spokane and Bossland.
(Daily Except Sunday)
Leave 6.20 a.m. NELSON Arrive 5.35 p.m.
**   12:05 "  BOSSL'D   "  11:20  "
"    8.30 a.m. SPOKANE   "   310 p.m.
Train that leaves Nelsou at 6:20 tun.
makes close connrc'ions at Spokane (or
all Pacific Coast Points.
Passengers for Kettle Biter and Boundary Creek, oonneot at Marcos with Stage
Daily.
COLUMBIA & WESTERN RY.
Schedule
EFFECTIVE   MONDAV NOV.   22,   1897
WESTBOUND   ' BABTBOUHD
P.M.   P.M.   P.M. P.M.    P.M.   P.M.
No. S Ko. 3 No. 1 No. 2 No. 4 No.
S:45 9:00.. ROBSON... 8.-00 2:30
5.00   2:00    10:00...TRAIL....7.00  12:53    1:15
3:15    U:15.ROSSliANO.G��0 12.-00 m.
' No's. 1 and 2 connect with C. P. R. main line
steamers, and trains to and from Nelson at,
Robson*:
No's, 3 and 4 are locnl trains between Trail
and Rossland.
No's, 5 and 6 are local trains between Trail
and Robson. No. 6 connects with train No. I
trom Rossland.
All trains daily.
?, P. OUTEUUS, Gen. Supt.
WHEN
... GQJNGEAST
Use a flrst class line in traveling between
Minneapolis, St. Paul and Chicago, and
the principal towns in Central Wisconsin*
Pullman Palaco Sleeping and Chair Cars
Hervice        .        .        ...
The Dining Cars are operated in the interest ot
ite patrons, the most elegant service ever
inaugurated.   Meals arc served a la Carte.
To obtain flrst class service your ticket should
read via        .        ...        .        .
* tM WISCONSIN     *
* CONTRAIL UNPS  '���*������
Direct connections at Chicago and Milwaukee
for all Eastern points.        ���        ��        ,
For full information call on your nearest ticket
agent, or write        ,        ,        ��
Jas. A. Clock.       or      Jas. C. Pond,
General Agent. General Puss. Agent
216 Stark Street, Milwaukee, Wis.
Portland, Ore.
MINES EXAMINED
AND HKI'OKTED ON BY
F. M. CHAPBOURN
Twenty yoars* experience in mining.
Thorough knowledge of mines of British
Columbia.   Terms Reasonable.
"8 NELSON, B.O.
W. A. JOWETT
MINING it REAL CSTATI BROKER
IWftUBANtiE an4 ��� ��� ���
cviuuiwiosr Atiwrr.
VIOTORIA ST..    fM NELSON, B. O.
AROHITEOTS, BUILDERS
and J0INEKS
When reqniring thoroughly seasoned
Umber should apply to
The Nelson Planing Hill
T. Av. GRAY.
In stock.1,000,000 f t.of Flooiing.Lining
Mouldings, Doors, Sashes and
every description of Joinery.
BCEEE5  DOOtUI AXD    1TI.\DOW��   MAP
VOOBDBK. ," A"S t >"*.'".' T^S"S'SSl','i:-!i1iSA "-1 '.'Wi -Sffi'Sf'i''
SSSySSlj&'^'Sl tiLi^jzJ'jl ���":: ij:'��!U.'^ wi..' _"F":'Cr>K--. i-^i^-^i^���!i-*��2^,J_AL:?^^s��^^i'���l������,������-"���-',!
A-i'<***-xv-;tf,7,.'*i,ffi^^
THE MINER. FRIDAY, JUNE io. 1898.
ia
fk
lb "
I-   *
'1
Ih
���ft
is
!
I
I
i 1
' t
s
. ' 1
Ji
A
AO0D3ED OF GIVING INFORMATION
TO THE UNITED STATES
GOVESNMENT.
Waller Bett, Secretary of Hie British ��-oii-
nalale nt Sah Jnau Imprisoned In a
Dungeon for I'lHy-SIx llonrs nntl
Crossly Mallrenled.���Hundcd His
Passports and Ordered to Leave
Porto Bleo.
New York, June 9.���A despatch
from St. Thomas, West Indies, to the
New York Journal says:
On account of being suspected of
having furnished information to the
United States government of the mining of San Juan harbor, Walter Bett,
secretary of the British consulate at
that port, has received his passports
and has been banished from Porto Rico
by order of Governor General Macias.
Mr. Bett was imprisoned in a dungeon for 56 hours, and during that
time was subjected to gross maltreatment. British Consul General Crawford made a formal protest to his gov-
enrment, and serious international
complications are imminent.
General Macias has practically declared war against the British colony
at San Juan and made an open accusation that it is responsible for the disclosure of his military plans to the
United States consul general, Philip
Hanna, who is now at St. Thomas.
The day after the bombardment of San
Juan by Admiral Sampson's squadron
Macias caused extensive systems of
mines to be installed in the outer harbor. He suspceted the British consulate of notifying Consul General Hanna
of this and peremptorily summoned 30
British subjects before him and questioned them. Upon Secretary Bett,
Macias visited most of his wrath.
English officials here are practically
accused of having revealed military
preparations, and Bett was dragged off
to a dungeon. He was released after
56 hours, handed his passports and
ordered out of Porto Rico. He has
left for St. Thomas.
The military plans of General Macias
were not disclosed to Mr. Hanna by
British officials or subjects, bnt by
several trusted officers attached to
General Macia's staff, whose 'sympathies were enlisted in thc American
cause. How Mr. Hanna succeded in
securing the imjwrtant information
from the Spanish officers is not
known.*
Washington, June 0.���At the British embassy, after consulting the foreign office list' brought down to date,
it was said that no Walter Bett was'
in the British consular service. . It is
possible tbat Bett is a clerk in the consulate, in which case, it is said, be
wonld have the official recognition
and protection of the British government whether a British citizen or not.
A case of this character would be re-
Sorted to  the  British embassy here,
ut it has not been reported up to this
.time., :
A BEMARgABIiE PAPER.
In Which President Heureux of San
Domingo Peclares Neutrality.
Washington, June 9.���A remarkable
state paper is that which President
Heureaux of San Pomingo has issued
in declaring the neurality of that
country in the present war for the flrst
time in an official manner. The president has clearly set out the great extent of the injuries inflicted on the
small neutral states in the West Indies
- by^the-existing-conflict-^The^presii
dent says:
"" By preserving strict neutrality we
can succeed in avoiding the gravest
contingencies of the bloody conflict,
but we cannot succeed in protecting
ourselves from its fatal economic consequences. The first injurious result
for us, oue already experienced, is the
reducing of credits by which commercial interests are affected, resources
depreciated, the source of action-limited and serious perturbation produced.
Everyone who has not ready money
with which to make his purchases in
the producing market meets with loss.
Prices are higher than usual, and will
continue to increase. The provisioning of our markets perhaps cannot be
accomplished with the usual regularity, and even if this adverse posriblitiy
were met, auother one serious and
difficult to overcome will remain in existence. The United States, our principal granary, is organizing a great
army for which the government will
be compelled to provide enormous
quantities of provisions, reducing  in
, this manner the quantity open for export and! causing an advance in
prices."
The president urges his people to be
brave jn bearing up under their affliction, and particularly entreats them to
cultivate small fruits, grains and pota-
toes; that might save, the country from
-suffering. ,
FAVORS RECIPROCITY.
New York, June 9.���At a regular
meeting of the Maritime association
today resolutions were adopted favoring a reciprocity treaty with Canada
and Newfoundland.
ANNEXATION OF HAWAII.
Washington, June 9.���The president
has in contemplation the submission to
both houses of congress a special message calling for the immediate annexation of Hawaii as a military necessity. . . . ^
FROM THE   DOMINION CAPITAL;
���  The Franchise Bill���The Superanua-
tion  Bill Discussed.
Ottawa, June 5.���(Special Correspondence. )���So the dear old seriate is
not going to oppose the franchise bill,
but only render it "workable and more
palatable." Real kind of it. What
would we do without our senators to
fix up things and keep the affairs of
statemnning smoothly? We wonder
if the vsenaotrs ever heard of a. little
incident in the history of the imperial
house of lords���its great prototype���
when, some fifteen years ago, it undertook to meddle with the franchise bill
which the popular house had adopted,
a tremendous . agitation swept the.
country. The venerable lords came as
near ignominious extermination as
they had ever done, and when the next
session came around the bill was once
more presented without a scratching.
Possibly the senate, relies upon the fact
that hitherto Canadians, have scarcely
proved as responsible to great political
educational movements as have the
masses in the old country. But if they
are well advised they will not experiment too often with public patience.
THE GENERAL HITS BACK.
General Gascoigne, the retiring commander of the Canadian forces, has replied to the vicious assault made upon
him in the house by Sir Charles
Tupper, and in his answer shows pretty
conclusively that the petulant baronet
did not exercise great care in preparing the "facts" used in his statement.
While the general has no reason to be
ashamed of his. share of the controversy, it does seem a pity that an officer and a gentleman possessing the
confidence of his sovereign and the
esteem of his fellow-countrymen generally should be subject to the attacks
of those who have a personal grievance"
against him because in the course of
his official duties he has found it
necessary to interfere with arrangements "which provided positions of
emolument to the Tupper administration.
SUPERANNUATION ABOLISHED
The civil service superannuation
scheme, which has long been a scandal and a source of ,indefensible expense to the country, has been reformed
.out of existence and the government
has once again shown that its pre-election promises were made in dead earnest. In future, attaches of the public
service will have to do its othor men
do���make reasonable provision out of
their quite sufficient salaries for ' the
future and not leave it to an indulgent
country to not only pay them all they
are worth while they are actually
working, but keep them in affluence
when the time arrives that from age
or party exigency they have to make
way for others.
NOTES.
The cost of administering the affairs
of the Canadian Yukon and of establishing a social - condition there which
is the admirations is coming pretty
high, bnt it is very gratifying to hear
thait the receipts from tbat country
have so far, exceeded the cost of government. Next year we shall be edified witb the conservative criticism of
the dreadful expenditures and the vast
sum the government is taking out of
the pockets of the people.
Gold in paying quantities in the
Peace river and gold in paying quantities in northern Ontario, and again
down by the seal Is there any part of
the Dominion that is not made of
gold?
The latest Yukon railway canard is
that the minister of  the interior tried
mander in chief, has a normal garrison
of about 1000, made up of two'artillery
garrison, companies, a- submarine mining and'a'fortress company . of engi-
ners, and the second battalion of t'.e'.-
Worcestershiro- regiment, besides the
local militia,.'artillery and rifle volunteers. On tho Canadian coast the 1(500
regular troops maintained aro at Halifax, N. ���*. S., where Major General
Montgomery-Moore���who is shortly to
be replaced by Lord William Seymour
���has the same royal artillery aud
royal engineer establishment as exists
in Bermuda and the Second battalion
Leinstcr regiment, which is shortly to
be sent to strengthen the forces in
Jamaica, its place at Halfiax being
taken by its own First battalion from
Ireland. When this movement has
been effected the portion of the Royal
Berkshire now at Jamaica will join
the rest of the First battalion in Barbados.
St. Helena is now but very lightly
garrisoned by detachments of artillery
and engineers and part of the West
India regiment. The troops in all the
colonies, however, are more or less
supported by militia and volunteer
corps, there being beside the large
forces of this kind in the Canadian
Dominion corps of various arms of the
service in Antigua and the Leeward
isles, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tabngo.
���London Daily Telegraph.
to get half of million dollars put in
the supplementary estimates 4 to compensate Messrs. Mann and Mackenzie
for the loss they are supposed to have
sustained through the defeat of the
railway bill. If it were not that
some people are led to believe these
yarns they would be intensely funny.
WESTERN BRITISH FORCES.
Number 6t Imperi air Troops ""at'West
Atlantic Station.
. Though the war between the United
States and Spain has not caused any
proposal for strengthening the British
military establishments in the West
Indies or the posts on the Canadian
Atlantic seaboard which are garrisoned
by imperial troops, attention is being
given by the military, authorities to
maintaining the forces usually in garrison at their full strength, and the
more so as the co-cored West India
regiment���lately augmented by a third
battalion���has recently been more than
usually occupied on the African west
coast. Some movements in connection
with this regiment are now in progress, but actually the headqarters of
both the First and Second battalions
are now .in Sierra Leone; and the
headquarters of the Third battalion,
though now on the way to St. Helena
to Jamaica, are making the journey by
a vessel which comes to England
first.
The ordinary strength of imperial
troops in the West Indies is about 3000,
rather more than half of whom are
kept in Jamaica and the remainder in
Barbados. In the former colony there
are a garrison company and the Jamaica company of Royal artillery, the
West India Submarine Mining company, half a company, of fortress engineers, three companies of the First
Royal Berkshire regiment, and the depot and four companies of the Wost
India regiment, of which, however,
two companies are under orders for St.
Helena* In Barbados and neighboring
isles there are the headquarters and
five remaining companies of the First
Royal Berkshire, a garrison company
and the St. Lucia company of artillery
aud a few fortress engineers. The
Jamaica troops are under Major General Hallow es, and those in Barbados
are under Major General R. F. Butler.
Bermuda, a very important naval
and military station, with Lieutenant
General Barker as governor and com-
THE PHILLIPINE QUESTION.
London, June 9.���Whatever maybe
the policy of the United States towards
the Phillippines,.the English capitalists
whose investments there give them the
right to speak with authority upon the
conditions and needs of the colony are
of one mind. Delegations of leading
men representing some of the most important interests in the Phillippines
have called upon Ambassador Hay to
urge him to make representations to
the government of their desire that the
United States should retain permanent possession of the Phillippines.
They are agreed in thc belief that
with the guarantee of a stable government the Phillippines would become
richer and even a more desirable possession than Cuba.
Should the islands remain under
Spanish sovereignty that government
might make conditions burdensome
for business men who were on record
as desiring a change and who had
made revelations about Spanish misrule. They can make known their-cle-
sires only through secret diplomatic
channels as they have done. The president of an important Phillippine company having its office in London, who
presented a statement to the ambassador, discussed the question with an
Associated Press representative. He
gave the usual recital of extortion by
the officials, who go from Spain to
these islands, its they go to Cuba,; with
the sole purpose of acquiring as much
money as possible in the shortest
time. Under proper treatment the inhabitants of .the islands, although consisting of several different races, would
be entirely tractable. The greatest
difficulty the United States would encounter in managing the islands \yould
come from the religious orders, which
had been accustomed to squeeze the
natives, and had accumulated much
valuable property. The present insurrection was as much an uprising
against the church as against the government and was conducted by a secret
society which had been organized to
oppose the priests���a sort of free masonry, which had spread throughout the
islands. Investigations by the most
efficient engineers had proven the gold
deposits of the Philippines were among
the richest in the world and he
thought would surpass Australia and
South Africa.
' In conclusion, he laid fhe American
government need not be deterred by
the climate. During a residence of ten
years he had known of but one epidemic of disease, and that was not of
ajerious nature.   .
Kirkpatrick fe Wilson
are receiving Seasonable Goods
for the best trade of Nelson in
the lines of
GROCERIES, TEAS *nd COPPE]
The quality is the best and prices
right.      As always, our stock of
CROCKERY and GLASSWAR]
is full and being added to as needed.
Kirkpatrickand Wilson,BAKER STREE'
BASEBALL SCORES.
June 9.���At Philadelphia���Philadelphia 5, St. Louis 2.
At Baltimore���Baltimore 8, Louisville 6.
At Washington���Washington 9,Pitts-
burg 1;
At Brooklyn���Brooklyn 2, Cleveland
11.
At New York���New York S, Chicago 10.
At Boston���Boston 6, Cincinnati 5.
MANILA HAS FALLEN.
New York, Juno 9.���A despatch to
the World from Hong Kong says:
A report has reached here that Manila has fallen and is now occupied by
Phillippine insurgents commanded by
General Aguilando. The rebel junta
and wealthy Phillippine islanders hero
are jubilant oyer the news.
Waff Paper,      Sooptina Goods,
��� '\ .Hammocks,.'-���
Cameras,; Kodaks,
������'Phbtoaraphic Supfe.
������������������������
Thomson Stationery Co.
LIMITED (d22)
isrEXuSOisr
Sufoscrifoe for The Miner
One Year - y.   -      - $10.00
Half Year     -A       -       -      $5.00
One rionth      -       -       -        $1.00
BY MAIL OR r.APPiFP ^
BEAR IN MIND
That everything you BUY here
is GUARANTEED.   If not as
represented return and your
money will be cheerfully refunded. .*..���. .*.
FISHING TACKLE AT COST.,
P. O. Store
J. A. GILKEI
Lawrence H^^ware^
Points ready mixed and dry.
Boiled and Raw Li 11 Seed   OH,
Turpentinj
Varnishes, White Lead
Paint and Varnish Brushes KalSOtTlittj
Builders' Hardware Miners'Supplk
Telephone 21.   Prompt Delivery
CamBfe .8 OMi)
-Civil Engineers,
Provincial Land Surveyors
Real Estate and General Agents
Financial and Insurance Agent*
Notaries   Public,   Etc.
w
e have for safe the followinl
Valuable Property.
Yes, but we don't advertise the
prices, as we lose money by
doing so.
List and Prices on Application
at qui' Office. ..**,.,
Call and see our full list of property for sale in  MHwJTn
and "A" Additions ]
Ten L'ots. in "Hume" Addition at a Bargain.
Gamble & O'Reilly, Agents.
Baker Street, NELSON, B.I
LONDON & BRITISH CQWWWA B0WFW1
UIWTJ3P.
HEAP OFFICE, WNPONv^q^AIW).
All  Communications relating to British Columbia busii
w:_��� to__b_e_aM^ . C,".
J. Roderick Robertson,
General Manager
S. S. Fowler, E.M.j
j Mining Engineer
NEt-SQN, fr
GENTS  -** CLOTHING
Repaired, Altered, Cleaned, Pressed
and Dyed by the New Process at
Reasonable Prices,
STEVENS, The Tah.ok.__^s^
Room I). Hillyer Blk., NELSON.
1*. S.���Ladies Wool Dress Goods Sponged
before Making Up.
O.&J.OBftJST]
NOTICE.
IMPERIAL MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate in the Nelson Mining Division of
West Kootenay District. Where Located:���About IJ Miles From whebe
Porcupine Creek empties into the
Salmon River, on the South side and
about * a Mile From said Porcupine
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Kenneth L. Burnet.
Free Miner's Certificate No, 5397a, acting
as Agent for G. F. Whiteman, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 8918a. intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the
purposo of obtaining a Crown'Grant of the
above Claim.
And further take notice that action, under
Section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
KENNETH L. BURNET,
Dated tMs 24th day cf May, 1898,
OENERAL BROKER,
INSURANCE, REALE51
MONEY TO LOAN.
Several Houses.to rent.    Proi
for sale in all parts of the
Accountant    Work.       Si
graphy     and      Type-Wr|
done on shortest notice.
NOTICE
JUBILEE MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate in the Nelson Mranro Divisi
West    Kootenay    District.���Vj
Located:���About two Miles Soui
of Ymir, on the North side of 1
pine Creek and about i a Mile Fr|
HPAKE NOTICK that'll, W. J. Nelsot*]
JL Miner's Certificate No. 979U. H
sixty days from date, hereof, to apply]
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of laments, for the purpose of obtaining a-*
Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action;
Section 37, must be commenced befo
issuance of such certificate of improrem]
W. J. Nl
Dated ihla 2fth day tf May UN.

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