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The Miner Jun 15, 1898

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Daily   liclition,  No.  31.
Kelson.  British Columbia. Wednesday Morning, June 15,   1898.
Eighth Year
RjciyaPateill
Just
Received
A shipment of the famous
Julia Marlowe
American Footwear
FOR LADIES
Come Early and Secure a Pair.
ILILLIE'S  SHOE   HOUSE
WEST BAKER STREET.
JUNE SALES
Ladies' Corsets.
<%%
LADIES'
'���''.Materiafs,
Lawns, Organdies,
Prints and Summer
Muslins, Linen and
Pique Dress Skirts,
Denham Suits, Alpaca and Serge
Dress Skirts.
It reduced prices.
CREST
Corset
IS
UnbiT
D  &  K
"CREST'
CORSETS
Stand every strain. Always
comfortable and absolutely unbreakable, every active woman
needs one.;
Unrivalled for golfers and
bicyclists.
Cost only 25c. more than
regular D & A styles, and made
io all sizes.
Ask to seo tbem. (,)
PRICES LOW.
Fred Irvine & Co.
fe THINKS THIS IS A PBOPITIOUS
TIME TO APPROACH
THE U. S.
hncrly V.��. Sbowcrt Xo inclination la
"MeeroSHnlt Way^TlicJIclllwleyr
Ptngley ��u��l Allen I*iM��r J*w�� nre
Cvtaence ot Tltla.
|Liondon,   Juue 14.���Sir Charles Tup-
the Cauadiau statesman, who has
arrived  here   from  Canada,   is
|ited as discussing at  some  length
relations   between    the    United
I ites and Canada.    He said:
1 Canada  sympathizes very  warmly
ch the  proposed  approachment  befell the  United   States  and   Great
^tain. It has always been our   desire
have the most friendly  commercial
litions  ��� with    the    republic,   but
fherto   the   United   States has  not
|wn any disposition  to reciprocate.
fa McKinley and Dingley bills and
_ alien labor law   presented conclus-
, evidence on this point.    I believe,
vever, that the  present   time  is   a
ipitious one for the settlement of all
;stions, owing to the changed temper
che  American people, and I  think
y can be   approached with   a fair
spect of a just settlement."
london, June 14.���In the house of
imons Mr. Douglas H. Coghill,
servative member of Stoke-on-
snt, asked if in view of the im-
ved relations between the United
tes and Great Britain the former
Id not be induced to modify its cus-
is tariff. The parliamentary secre-
���7 for the foreign* office, Mr. George
Curzon, ^replied saying that her
jesty's government would be glad
.vail itself of an opportunity for im-
ving the commercial relations be-
jen the two countries, but he ex-
f.ned  that  Great Britain now en
joyed the "most favored nation"
treatment in all matters of commerce
and navigation, and the government
had no ground for believing that more
favorable treatment would be accorded
Great Britain.
TRAGEDY IN MONTREAL.
A  Colored Woman Is   Shot Without
-    .Reason.
Montreal, June 14.���The colored society of Montreal is much excited over
a shooting affray which took place at
Mrs.���Johnson's���boardings house,~508
St. -James street. The victim was
Mrs. Paris, the wife of George Paris,
a well known amateur runner.
He left for the Pacific coast yesterday and his wife spent the evening
with a young man named William
Wallace. They returned to Mrs.
Johnson's at midnight and sat dowu
in �� the parlor. Mra Paris became
alarmed at the conduct of Wallace and
ran out in the hall. As she did so
Wallace drew a 32-calibre revolver and
shot her near the right lung. The
noise^attracted the police, who rushed
in and arrested Wallace. The prisoner
is about 30 years of age. He was perfectly cool and admitted that he did
the shooting, giving no reason for it.
Mrs. Paris was removed to the general
hospital.
::* The doctors have been unable to extract the bullet and she is in a dangerous condition. All the parties concerned are colored.
SPOTTED BY A WOMAN.
DESPERATE   EilTII.
A   Female    Detective Catches   Some
Smugglers.
Windsor, Ont., June 14.���A dozen
women were pounced upon as they
came off the ferry on Saturday night
and were taken into the Windsor customs house. Smuggled goods were
found concealed on their persons to the
value of about $10 each. Their addresses were taken with a view to
prosecuting them. A female official
of the Dominion government is acting
as a spotter in Detroit.
APPEALS DISMISSED.
MAEINES     HOLD     THEIS     OWN
AGAINST GEEATLY SUPEE-
IOK F0E0E3.
HnrliHx Ilnvc Su lime For S1ccji.-T��o
Xlght AllailiS Already.���Auierienn
Losses���The Meet Is Their ttssiy Stife-
iiuard Fram Annihilation.
Camp of the United States Marines,
Outer Harbor of Guantanamo, Monday, June 13, Noon, by the Associated
Press'Despatch. Boat Wanda, via Kingston, Jamaica, June 14.���After two
nights of hard fighting t-he. American
flag floats on Cuban soil over the encampment of the 'marine battalion.
Thus far the marines have had the best
f  the   fighting,
grave,   and   they
repelling   almost
They   have   little
themselves   by
the arrival of the
certain.    Were  it
ing guns  of   the
would be annihilated
troops,   who   come
but   the sitation  is
are exhausted with
incessant    attacks.
chance   to    refit ore
and the time of
relief- troops "is un-
uot for the protect-
fleet   the little band
by the   Spanish
in   overwhelming
the machine guns down on the water
were lipping open the pickets, and the
cracks of field guns could be heard as
they were firing in caunister where
the fire of the Spaniards was thickest.
Then there was' the screech of the
'Marblehead's shells. She took a hand
in the fight, and the sharp flash of a
Celt rapid-firing one-pound gun from
the ship's launches added to the scene.
The Dolphin this morning located tho
Spaniards water station on the ocean
side of the harbor entrance,which supplied the water for the attacking force.
The arrival cf the fleet to com pio te
the bombardment-of tlie town and its
defenses is expected this afternoon.
Ottawa, June 14.���The supreme court
this mornng dismissed the appeals of
Ontario and Quebec in the matter of
the arbitration in respect to thc common school fund lands.
numbers from Santiago de Cuba. As
it is they can probably - hold their position, but they cannot move forward
until reinforced by the troops.
What first, with the white tents on
a bold eminence against the tropic
background, looked like, a -holiday
camp, is now grim reality. The touts
have been struck and rolled into breastworks, supplemented by ��� trendies
around the crest of the hill. The spot
is lamentably exposed on the bare
ground, while surrounding it on all
sides is heavy brush..
The least movement in the camp is
the signal for instant -target. practice
on the part of the Spanish sharpshooters,* whose//rifles, carry much further
than these of the marines, though their
owners very rarely hit. anything they
nim at. It is impossible to accurately
estimate, the Spanish attftoking^forces,
but they are numerous enough. About
two-thirds of the force surrounds tho
camp nightly with a deadly ring; and
the spatting of the Mausers, -makes
things quite lively for the Spaniards
who are daring enough to ciawl up
and take a pot shot at the marines
from the bushes about 30^ yards from
the camp. Every yard" of chapparal is
an ambuscade, and picket duty is
flopping coins with death. :
After, the first, attack on Saturday
night, Colonel . Huntington decided
that another attempt would be niade
on Sunday night, and he caused entrenchments to be thrown up on all
sides of the camp, and in the trenches
the main part of the battalion last
night waited for thc attack. The colonel was certain it would come. It arrived within a short time after dark,
and from that time until daybreak the
firing was incessant and at times very
heavy.     ���
On the American side two men
were killed and four injured. The
dead are Sergeant Major Henry Moode,
of the marines, shot thi-ough the right
breast, and Private Tauuiau,was injured
and fell off the cliff and was instantly
killed^   ;_._
The injured are Private Wallace", who
fell off the cliff and sustained a fracture' of the leg; Private Martin, shot-
through the left leg,��and Private Rox-
bury, shot through the ann. The above
are all privates belonging to Company
D. Private Burk was shot through
the arm.
The first attack of the Spanish was
made at 8 o'clock and the last shot was
fired by them at 5 o'clock in the morning. During the night whilo the
Spaniards were attacking ..the camp of
the marines on shore the Marblehead,
believing that the marines had been
driven out, threw several shells into
the place. Thc attack, however, was
repulsed by the small detachment of
marines in camp. The shells of the
Marblehead'struck among the marines.
The fight was the . first .of thc war
without Cuban co-operation.
At times during the afternoon whenever the marines were firing on a
small detachment of Spaniards that
made their appearance a short distance
from the camp the Cubans began firing
without orders aud sent a" volley right
among the Americans. There were
several narrow escapes, but no one was
injured. Lieutenant Neville was .sent
otit on scout duty on tlie previous day
and he attacked a small stone fort.
A hot fight followed aud the Spaniards
were driven off with loss. It was during this fight that Wallace and-Tau-
man fell over the cliff. Fifteen dead
Spaniards, including one lieutenant,
were found in the fort during the attack. Several shots struck the ships in
the harbor, one penetrating the pilot
house of the Associated Press,despatch
boat Dandy. No one was injured on
board of her.
The night attack was a picturesque
and striking spectacle. The crack
of Mauser tongues of fire from every
brash encircling the camp, the twitter
of the long steel bullts overhead, while
Havana June 14.���Tlie United States
cruiser Montgomery about 4 o'clock
this afternoon approached nearer than
is usually the case to the Santa Clara
battery and fired three shots at the
Punta Brava. The first shot was fired
at eight thousand metres aud the
others were fired at nine thousand
'metres. The Montgomery then resumed her place in tlie 'blockade lino.
Her shots fell very near the battery.
A Spanish battery'east of Morro Castle
fired one shot at one other warship.
The Union-Constitution says the in-
surgont chief Don Cablero arrived at
Santa Clara a few days ago to join the
brigade being organized by the former
insurgent chief Mosso, aud the correspondents ��� of newspapers assert that
Cablero declared that the opinion of
the-majority of the insurgent leaders
who met in assembly at Boyamo were
against American intervention.
Ea- Taveta commenting on aT cable
despatch received from Madrid, saying
the resignation of the whole Spanish
cabinet is probable and that it is
likely other another cabinet will be
formed under Marshal Martinez de
Campos, the former captain general of
Cuba, says:
"If Martinez do Campos forms a
cabinet including thc silvolaists, Spanish policy may become more complicated. Spain now needs a strong and
energetic government."
BERMAN INTERVENTION.
SPANISH  PRESS TflINK THEY OAN
BUY    GSEMAN
SU1P0ET.
TJilak Germany Mill I'revent au American Iloiubarifiuciit of Manila.��� Mill
t.ivc CcriMtiiiy t'ttallUK Station* and
Free KniMl In Manila.
BLOCKADE  TOO  STRONG.
Tho     British     Steamer    Eaveusdale
Ordered Off.
Capo Haytien, June 14.���The British
steamer Ravensdale arrived here Saturday from Port Dopax after trying
unsuccessfully to run* the' blockade at
Guantanamo. Captain Luke, the commander, informed tho consular agent
thero that ho brought a cargo of 600
tons of coal from New York to
Nashua. After discharging he proceeded towards Guantanamo to take a
cargo off the Cuban coast. Tho United
States battleship Oregon fired* across
the bows of the. Ravensdale.. The latter
kept on running at increased speed towards the entrance of Guantanamo
bay. Eventually the Marblehead also
fired at thc Ravensdale when very
near shore.
Tho steamer hove to and a United
States naval officer went on board and
notified Captain Luke of the blockade
and ordering him out of Cuban
waters.
SAMPSON' S REPORT.
The   Spaniards   Mutilated   the   Slain
Marines.
Washington, June 14.���The navy department today posted the following
bulletin: '���'���.���
Mole St. Nicholas, June 13."���Lieutenant Blair has just returned after a
detour of 70 statue miles while taking
observations -of"theharborof Santiago
de Cuba. He reports-tliat the Spanish
fleet i.s all there. The Spanish attacked the camp at Guantanamo vigorously at tho outposts and four marines
wero. killed and thoir bodies mutilated
barbarously. Surgeon Gibbs was also
killed. ���
(Signed) SAMPSON.
DEWEY MUST  FIGHT AGAIN.
Madrid, June 14.���The Spanish press
is more optimistic than ever owing to
its belief that. "Germany intends io prevent a bombardment of Manila by
making a naval demonstration. The
newspapers urge sacrifices with 'tlie
view of. seepring Germany's assistance
aud political concessions iu return for
her "taking the initiative in checking
America."
These are to be, firstly, naval stations
aud coaling depots in Spanish
Oceanica; secondly, Spanish concurrence in the development .of Germany's commercial and political relations with-Morocco.
London, June 14.���According to a
despatch' from" the Madrid Financial
News three Spanish ironclads from
Madagascar have arrived in sight of
Manila, and Admiral Dewey's" ships
have gone *to moot them.*
SAMPSON 'WILL SUCCEED.
London, .Tunc 14.���The mqrning
papers publish further long accounts of
the bombardment of Santiago on June
(i. continuing tlie reports from the
United States th-fit Morro Castle and
Estrella battery were, both set on fire
by lhe American shells, and that the
Spanish fortifications were --immensely
damaged. Tlieir versions say that' the
Massachusetts and Swauee wero somewhat injured by shells.
When the troops arrive Admiral
Sampson intends to force the entrance.
He-expects to lose a ship or l*wo, but
he i:i convinced tliat he will siiccedd;
AWARD   PAID AT  LAST.
Washington. June 1-J.���In the senate
this afternoon the house joint resolution appropriating *i>4'74,loi topay tho
Behriug sea award, was adopted. The
appropriation is carried in the sundry
civil appropriation bill, but thatmeas-
nre is still in conference, and the
award has to be gpaid on the Kith inst.
The resolution passed the house yester-
pay and is therefore now a law.
Berlin, June 14.���Advices have been
received from Shanghai by the Frankfort Zeitung saying that news has
been received there from Manila to tho
effect that there is fighting every, night
around tlie town. The insurgents are
trying to capture Manila and establish
au independent government before the
Americans land. The German consul
at Manila, it is further reported, has
300 German and Swiss soldiers on
board a refugee steamer in the harbor.
GERMANS IN MANILA.
London, June 1-1.��� The Berlin correspondent of tho Times remarks tho
fact that "with four warships already
at Cavite and with the Darmstadt on
the way with 400 men, Germany will
have a force of 3000 men at Manila "
BRYAN   AT'OMAHA!
He   Deprecates   Any   Acquisition    of
Territory  by the War.
Omaha, Neb., Juno 14.���The No- .
braska building at the exposition was
dedicated today amid the plaudits of
thousands of the state's citizens. The
principal speaker of the day was Hon.
William J. Bryan. Mr. Bryan's oration
Avas his first public declaration of the
war issue.    He said: "
"Our nation exhausted diplomacy in
its effortis to secure a peaceful solution
of the Cuban question and only took
up arms when it was compelled to
choose betweeu war and servile acquiescence in cruelties which would be
a disgrace to barbarism. History will
vindicate the position taken by the
United States in the war with Spain.
Iii saying this I am sure that the
principles which were invoked in the
inauguration of the war will ha observed in its prosecution and conclusion. If a contest undertaken for tho
sake of humanity degenerates into a
war of conquest we shall find it difficult to meet tho charge of having
added hypocrisy to greed. Is our national character so weak that we can-
not^-withstaiid --*= tlie- temptation^ of ap^
propriating the first piece of land that
comes within otir reach to inflict upon
the enemy all possible harm is legitimate warfare, but shall we contemplate a scheme for the colonization of
the Orient merely because our fleet
won a remarkable victory in the harbor of Manila. Our guns destroyed a
Spanish fleet, but can they destroy that
self-evident truth that governments
derive their just power not from superior force, but from the consent of the
governed? Shall wc abandon a just
resistance to. European encroachment
upon the western hemisphere in order
to mingle in the controversies of
Europe and Asia? If otlters turn to
thoughts of aggrandizement and yield
allegiance to those who clothe land-
covetousness in the attractive garb of
national destiny? The people of Nebraska will, if I mistake not their
sentiments, plant themselves upon the
disclaimer entered into by the congress and expect that good faitli shall
characterize the making of peace, as it-
did the beginning of the war. ".'.
YELLOW  FEVER  ABATING.
Washington, June 14.��� Official, despatches received- by the marine"hospital service today regarding the yellow fever situation indicate that effectual vigilance on the part of the
authorities at McHenry, Miss., has re-:.
suited in the report that no new cases
have been reported there, and the
number of cases has been reduced
from ten to .six.
ESQUIMAULT   FORTIFICATIONS.
Montreal, T June 14.���The steamship
Montevideo, of the Allan line, brought
over a number of gun carriages and
other appointments which will be
shipped to Esquimault for the fortifica-
! tions there. sw^Jssu*==a&at&SBJ��Bai3��'*i
THE MINEJt, WEDNESDAY, JUNE  15,   1898
Wit ffitMX*
Published Daily except Monday.
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TROUBLE AHEAD.
torday.' Our readers will remember
that he was drowned on the loth of
May, while his hody was only found
on Monday last. The list will he
found in another column.'-
In our report of the city council
meeting, in our issue of yesterday, wo
stated that_Hebden'& Hehden's bid for
the pipe to he laid down on Kootenay
street waa 18 cents a foot higher than.
the Lawrence Hardware Co. 's bid. This
was an error,, as their bid was only
one cent per foot higher. We are extremely sorry that this mistake should
have been inadvertently made, and are
grateful for having it pointed out to
us.
We observe in yesterday's issue of
the Kaslo Morning News an editorial
note on a letter sent out by Mayor
Houston to that paper a propos of Dominion day celebrations. It appears to
us extremely impertinent for the
Kaslo newspaper to try aud force their
views upon us as to how Nelson people
should spend Nelson money. It also
seems to us quite irrelevant to attempt
���as the Kaslo News does���to drag
partisan politics into such a matter,
but probably it is only what is to he
expected   from the  source whence  it
comes.
It is possile, not to say probable,
that General Merritt, commander of
the American forces and military governor designate of Manila, may find
himself, face to face with a serious
dilemma on arriving at the Philippines. It is, judging from the latest
despatches, quite within the bounds
of possibility that Aguinaldo will have
made himself master of Manila and
the other Spanish garrison towns by
the time that General Merritt gets
there. The position will then be this:
Aguinaldo, the chief of the insurgents
Who are striving for independence, will'.
be in possession while General Merritt, an alien and at the head of an
alien army, will arrive with the intention of taking over the islands in the
name of the United States.
The    question    that    immediately
arises   is   this:   Will  the insurgents,
now   that   they have Jattained  their
ends, recognize the United-States?   It
seems most probable  and natural that
they will  not.   No  doubt  from  the
point of view of. an  independent and
disinterested observer, the- insurgents
are not fit to  govern  themselves, and
will    indisputably  be happier under
American rule.    But can the insurgents be expected to recognize this? The
less fit they are to govern  themselves,
the less they are likely to recognize the
fact.    The  United  States   authorities
say   that  they anticipate no trouble
from Aguinaldo, who- is said to be a
very   level-headed man, but   he  must
also be a man of exceptional  character
and of exceptional personality   to -be
able at once  to forego his own ambitions and. induce his followers to" give
up their cherished hopes.
The insurgents will be flushed with
victory, and, unless they have been
much maligned, will be looking for
Homething tangible as the result of
their success. They have never known
What it is to enjoy civic liberty, and
probably expect to be gqyerned dicta-
torily even under the new regime, but
they will also want to be allowed to
plunder a little for themselves and
"hSvera'rnlcjrrof "theirr^own"race""over
them, whether he be called president,
governor, dictator or general.
They have hitherto, probably, looked
Upon the Americans as friends, their
saviors from their oppressors, but it is
very doubtful if they will continue to
do so when they find that their wishes
do not count one way or the other in
the matter, and that they have merely
changed masters. To the rank and file
one foreigner is probably veiy much
the same as another, and all masters
equally abhorrent, so itis not at all improbable that General Merritt will find
his part anything but abed of roses.
The Spanish authorities, too, may confidently be relied on to do their uttermost to spread these ideas among the
people, aud generally to foment discontent.
Another, very .potent "factor in the
situation are the priests and religious
orders, Who exercise an unbounded
sway ove^ the people In fact, it was
probably due to their influence, alone
that the last insurrection was put
down., These latter have been allowed
a free hand , by the Spanish authorities, and the result has been the enriching of the religious orders rather than
he people. The Americans are notjlike-
ly to be so lenient, and if the priests exert their influence against the newcomers, General Merritt will have
troublous times indeed.
ABOUT DIVINING RODS.
We have been asked to give publicity
to the list of subscribers to the funeral
pf J. Hutcheson, who^ was buried yes-
Some Remarkable Cases of Discovering
Wafer by Their Uise.
The pros and cons of the theory of
the divining rod are again being discussed in the English newspapers.
The superintendent of the fire brigade testifies to a case within his experience in which a water-finder was
commissioned to operate on an estate
of the existence of which he was previously ignorant. He got to work, soon
found the presence of water, and. fixing upon the nearest and most convenient placed spring gave the probable depth at which water would be
discovered in sufficient quantities at 75
feet. At 70 feet the water came in
and had to be stopped, as the flow became too heavy. Some of the tools had
to be left in the well, as there was not
time to remove them all. The well
supplied the cattle, horses and pigs of
the farm on which it was bored
through the dry summer of 1896, never
failing in its flow. Twelve months
after a second well was sunk barely a
stone's, throw, from the first. This correspondent regards the power to find
water as the result of a force, magnetic or otherwise, over which the
finder has no control, and-which he is
unable to explain. He also says that
thc operation of finding water produces
a marked degree of nervous fatigue to
the operator.
On the other hand, the discomfiture
is announced of a professional water-
finder who made a tour of the island
of Jamaica, where in the dry season
water is a precious boon. He traveled
through the island, rod in hand, but
met with little success. At oue village
in the Santa Cruz montains he pegged
out part of the course of a subterranean stream and then retired to lunch
at a neighboring hotel. In his absence
some wags removed his pegs and lined
out a totally different course. On his
return the diviner took up the new direction and continued it for 100 yards,
not discovering his mistake until it
was pointed out to him. At one point
where he predicted water at a depth
of 40 feet there was no sign of it when
150 feet had been bored, and after
going down 200 feet the borer could
not be extracted. The same result occurred in many other places, and finally
the diviner left the islands abruptly.
People are now asking who is responsible for the money paid him.���St.
Louis Republic.
WOULD NOT   ACCEPT.
Admiral Dewey has a son in New
York city occupying a clerical position
on a salary of $65 per month, says a
Washington despatch in the Chicago
Record. He is a young man of 23, and
graduated from Princeton university
in the class of 1896. Shortly after the
battle "of ��� Manila Mr. Dewey, jr., was
visited by the editor of a yellow journal and offered a position as a reporter, with a salary of $5000 a year.
He inquired what would be expected
of him, and was informed that he was
needed to write articles on the war
and kindred subjects. He might be
sent to the front; he might be detailed
to go on a fleet; he would have to accept any assignment that was given
him, but of Course all of his expenses
would be paid. The young man explained that he had had no��newspaper
experience and no knowledge of the
newspaper business; that he had never
been inside a printing office nor had
he ever written an article for publication in his life. Therefore he did not
see how his services would be worth
$5000 a year. It was explained to the
innocent youth that experience,knowl-
edge and literary talents were entirely
superfluous. All he would, have to do
was to sign the name of George
Dewey, jr., to articles that other people would write for him and draw his
salary. Mr. Dewey indignantly replied that he was not that kind of a
ihan and declined the offer.
EYE
SHADES
GLASSES.
SPECTACLES.
Eyesight Tested Free-
W. F. TEETZEL & CO. Nelson, B. C.
PERSCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COHPOUNDED.
DEATH ~ SENTENCE^OMkJjffcb!
San Francisco, June 14.���The death
sentence passed on Salter D. Worden
has been commuted to life imprisonment by Governor Budd. Worden is
tho man Who, during the great railroad strike of 1894, helped wreck the
Southern Pacific train near Sacramento, killing the engineer and three
soldiers.
WEST KOOTENAY
BUTCHER COflPANY
All kinds of Fresh and Salted Meats wholesale and retail. Fresh Fish received daily.
Mail orders receive careful and prompt attention.
E. C. TRAVES, Manager.
P. BURNS & CO.
lesale and Retail Meat Merchants
HEAD OFFICE NELSON, B. C.
Branch Markets in Rossland, Trail, Nelson, Kaslo,
Sandon, Three Forks, Now Denver and Slocan City.
Orders by mail to any branch will have careful and prompt attention.
530
WE WOULD LIKE
In some way, to induce every man, woman and
child in the country who buys in Nelson to come and inspect our
stock and prices. Wc would have you do this for we are sure
that you would become our customer and friend. We have the
largest and best selected stock of .Groceries in the city. The
famous products of every country in our line are represented on
our shelves.
EVERYTHING FIRST CLASS.���Never behind the times. No retrograding
here. Our business is run to serve its patrons to tlieir best interests,
us" well as our own, and you cau always depend upon our best service
being afforded you.
The fairness of our prices throughout our entire lins atall times shows onr
grasp upon the market.     CAN'T BE BEAT AT ALL;  THAT'S ALL.
iW. Des Brisay & Co., Nelson,
GBOCEHS AND PROVISION MERCHANTS.
PETER QENEIXE ft CO.
: : NELSON BRANCH : :
We are prepared to furnish kilri dried lumber at regular
prices and carry Rough and Dressed Lumber, Coast
Flooring and Ceiling, Turned Work and Mouldings,
Shingles and Lath, Sash and Doors. Estimates
Cheerfully given.
OFFICE AND YARD C. P. R. STATION.    .    .    . s
A-  E.YOUNG, AGENT
Wall Papers,
Fishing Tackle,
Garden & Flower Seeds.
LACROSSE,
BA8EBALL,
and TENNIS GOODS.
CANADA DlillfiyiJIJUo.
do
LIMITED
Purchase
Your Tobaccos
^otice-of^DissoJutionr
Notice is hereby given tliat the partnership
heretofore subsisting between us as Brewers in
Nelson, B.C., has this day been dissolved by
mutual consent. All debts owing to the said
partnership are to be paid to the undersigned
William Gosnell and all claims against the
said .partnership are to be presented to the said
William Gosnell at thc Castle Brewery. Nelson. K.C., by whom tho same will be settled.
Dated at Nelson, B.C., this 28th day of May
A.D.,1888. 3wke
Witness: WM... GOSNELL.
Edward A. Crease    AUGUST STADLER.
Official Directory.
DOMINION DIRECTORY.
Governor-General        ,7 Earl of Aberdeen
Premier - - Sir Wilfrid Laurier
Member House of Common-?, Dominion Parlia-..
ment, West Kootenay Hewitt Bostock
PROVINCIAL DIRECTORY.
Lieut.-Govcrnoi' - Hon T R Mclnnes
Premier -        *   - '        Hon J H Turner
Attorney-General - Hon D M Eberts
Com of Lands ahd Works Hon G B Martin
Minister Mines and Education Hon Jas Baker
President Executive Council Hon C E Pooley
Members Legislative Assembly tor West Kootenay���North Riding J M Kellie
South Riding                 - J F Hume
NELSON OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
Mayor - - John Houston
Aldermen���Chas Hillyer, W F Teetzel, J A
Gilker, J J Malone, E P Whallcy, Thos Madden.
City Clerk - - JK Strachan
Pulice Macistrate - E A Crease
Chief of Police . A F McKinnon
Chief of Fire Department . *W J Thompson
Auditor - John Hamilton
Water Commissioner - TM Ward-
Health Officer - -,       Dr. LaBnu
City council meets overy Monday, 3 p.m., at
city hall, cor Victoria and Josephine st
SCHOOL TRUSTEES.
Dr. E C Arthur. Dr. G A B Hall, Geo John-
stone.   Principal���J R Green.
SOUTH KOOTENAY BOARD  OF  TRADE.
President -J Roderick Robertson.
Vice-President -     '    James Lawrence.
Sccy-Treas. - John A Turner.
KOOTENAY LAKE GENERAL HOSPITAL
President - John A Turner.
Vicc-Pres.        . - . AV. A. Jowett.
Secretary - D McArthur.
Treas. - ' AII Clements
Medical Supl, . Dr.GABHall.
Close
8.00 p.m.
8.30 a.m
1.00 p.m:
5.00 p.m.
NELSON POST OFFICE
United States/Ontario. Quebec and Eastern Province.'*
Points on N. & F. S. line
Victoria and Rowland,
���"few Denver, Sandon and
Slocan Lake Points.
Kaslo and Kootenay Lake
Points
Rossland. Trail. Nakusp.
Robson. points on main lin<
O. P. It.. Vancouver anr!
Winnipeg
Duo
5.15 p.m.
1A3 p.m..
7.4o.a. tn..
7.00 a.m..
OFFICE HOURS.
Lobby opened from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.; General'
Delivery, 8 a.m, to 8 p.m.;  Registration, 8.30'
a.m. to 7 p.m.; Money Orders and Savings Bonk.
0 a.m. to i p.m.; Sunday 1 hour (10 to 11 a.m).
J. A. GILKER, Postmaster..
DISTRICT DIRECTORY.
Government Inspector of Agencies W J Goepel'
Gold Commissioner - O. G.Dennis ���
Mining Recorder-Tax Col       -       It F Tolmie
Collector of Custom 3       - Geo. Johnstone
Provincial Assessor - John Keen,.
County Court Judge ��� J A Forin.
Registrar - E TII Simpkins.
REISTERER & CO.,
Brewers of Fine Lager
Beer and Porter.
Drop in   and see   us.
NELSON,
B.C.
��� AT THE ���
Post Office
Xigar Store
Where  you will alwajs find a well
assorted stock of Imported   aud
DomesticCiKars.'Oigarettes Tobaccos and a full stock of
Pipes at reasonable
Prices.
S. J. JVHGHTON. dl9>
Householders Please Note.
The humble daddy long-legs; the
flying and cheerful ant; the irrepressible blow fly and the genial winged
bug can be kept out of your houses
by uFing SCREEN DOORS
2 ft. 6 x 6 ft, G at S1.50.
2 ft. 8 x 6 ft, S at $1.75.
2 ft.10 x C ft.10 at ��2.00.
Screen  Windows made to order in
all sizes at the
NELSON PLANING MILLS
T, W. GRAY,   Proprietor.
PROVINCIAL JAIL DIRECTORY.
Warden -              Capt. N Fitzstubbs.
First Jailer -             ���               R Liddel!..
Second Jailer ���               Geo Partridge..
Third Jailer -               John McLaren,
Senior Guard -                   ' R Ince, ���
CHURCH DIRECTORY.
Church m*1 England���Matin 11a.m.; Even
Song. 7.30 p.m. every Sunday. Holy Communion on Jst and 3rd Sundays in thc month after
Matins; on 2nd and -ith Sundays, at 8 a.m.
Sunday School at 2.30 p.m. Rev. H. S. Ako-
hurst. Rector., Cor Ward and Silica streets.
Presbyterian Church���Services at lla.ni. -
and 7.30 p.m. Sunday School at 2.30 p.m..
Prayer meeting Thursday evening at 8 p.m.;.
Christian Endeavor Society meets every Monday evening at 8 o'clock. Eev. R. Frew,i;
Pastor. ��� *;-
Methodist Church���Corner Silica and''
Josephine Streets. Services at Ham. and 7.30"
p. m. ; Sabbath School, 2.30p.m.: Praver meeting on Friday evening at 8 o'clock; EpworfclV
League C. E., Tuesday at 8 a.m. Rev. Geo* If,.
Morden; Pastor.
Roman Catholic Church���Mass at. Nelson'���
every Sunday at 8 and 10.30 a.m.; BenctHetioe 1
at 7.30 to 8 p.m.   Rev. Father Ferland, Priest*,.
Baptist Church ��� Services morning an<|
eveningaMl aim. and-7730-p.nu;-Prayer meet"
ing Wednesday evening at 8 p.m.;   Meetings
are held in the school house.   Strangers cordially welcomed.   Rev. G. R. Welch, Pastor.
Salvation Army���Services every" evening
at 8 o'clock in barracks on Victoria street.
Adiutant Millner in charge.
LODGE MEETINGS;
A    NELSON LODGE, No. 23. A. F.ScA.
^C]ff'M" mect8 8econd,Wednesday in each
^^\ month.   Visiting brethren invited.
G. L. Lennox, Secretary.
S*%_    I. O. O. F.     Kootenay Lodge
^ No. IG, moete every Monday night,
���S5S-S**?**-*".  at   their Hall, Kootenay street.
Sojourning Odd Fellows cordially invited.
WM. HODSON, Secretary.
-^-NELSON   LODGE No. 25. K. of P...
/iyWwneets in Castle hall, McDonald block
li'.S-Ei-Jsverjr Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock,.
All visiting knights cordially invited,
J. J. Malone, C.C.
(820) Geo. Partridge, K. of R. and S.
NELSON LODGE. I. O. G. T. Meets in
Castle Hall, McDonald Block, every Monday
evening at 8 o'clock. Visiting Templars cordially invited, John Telford.
Chief Templar.
George Nunn   Secy
NELSONS QUEEN NO. 241
SONS OF ENGLAND, meets
second and fourth Wedneslay of
each month at K. of P. Hall, MacDonald Block, cor. Vernon and-
Josephine streets. Visiting breth -
rn cordially invited. Ernest King,
Chas. H. Farrow, Worthy President
., Secretary.
(|jS.O*E.(
COURT KOOTENAY, I.O.F., NO. 3138 meets'
1st and 3rd Wednesday in each month in the
K of P Hall. F W* Swanell. C. D. S. C, R.; J R
Green, C.R.: J. Purkiss, Secy.
NELSON LODGE, NO. 10 A.O.U.W., meete <
every  Thursday in the I.6.O.F. hall.    F W
Swanell, M.W.:  W Hodson, Rec.-Sec; J. J.
Driscoll, Financier F. J Squire.'Receiver and/
P.M.W.
UL'"'' .yffi'��tf^*^**nf?#y^^
r^-.-nt^.rI. ���**w.--*b***5^^-.J*-*��M*M*v**--^ J?-.]^fcM^i?.':'&.T-S*lZ��Zl9liil^9xm..*rt.-i,���7ni999..-r-n .���������-���ira.'ih*
jjggjgjglgggjjgl
^HOMia
THE MINER, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1898
GENERAL LOCAL NEWS.
EVMTS   OF   INTEREST   IN   AND
AROUND KELSON.
Brier   IKcntlnn    or   Happenings  In  tbe
IMslrict During the Fast
Vexy Days.
H. MacDonnell gave
house last night to a
friends.
a dance at hig
large- party of
�� A. S. .belcher returned to tho city
yesterday from a visit to the Halcyon
Hot Springs.
Among those registered at the Hume
are  J. H.  Heatherstone,   Spokane; J.
"A. Danbey, Rossland, and J. H. Freeman, Victoria.
Mr. Croasdaiie, general manager of
thc Hall Mines Co., Limited, is expected homo tonight.
Archbishop Pentreath, the newly
appointed Anglican Archbishop of
British Columbia, is to visit Rossland
next Sunday.
Mrs. Horace Hume and Miss Clauson
left Nelson yesterday for New Brunswick, where they intend to pass part
ofthe summer.
Among those registered at the Phair
are F. L. Mercer, Rossland; George
Bayman, Boston; Mass., and Fred
Patterson, of New York.
There will be a strawberry social at
the school house next Friday, tho 17th
inst., under the auspices of the
Ladies' Aid of the Baptist church. A
good musical and literary programme
is provided. Admission, 25 cents. -
Proceeds go towards the building
fund.
Mrs.' Staff Captain Turner of Spokane is expected to arrive tonight, and
on Thursday evening will conduct a
service iu the S. A. barracks After
the meeting ice cream and cake will
be served. Staff .Captain Turner arrives on Saturday, and with Mrs. Turner will have special meetings all day
on Sunday.
Here is what Peter Cooper, who died
worth millions, said of a newspaper:
'' In all the" to\vns where a newspaper
is published, every man should advertise in it, if nothing more than a card
stating his namo and the business he
is in. It does not only pay to advertise, but it lets people at a distance
know that the town in which you
reside is a prosperous community of
business men. Ab the seeds are sown
I so the seed recompenses. Never pull
down your sign while you expect to
do business."
:-.- LICENSES.
The Canadian Rand Drill company-
Capital, $18,000, in $100 shares. Head
office, Sherbrooke, P...Q. Frank R.
Mendeuhill, Rossland, attorney.   ,
Calumette Syndicate, Limited���Capital, ��3000, in ��1   shares.    Head office
in Scotland.   Arthur Perciyal Judge,
Vancouver, attorney.
Stratford Exploration and Pevelop-
^meht company���Head office, Stratford,
Capital,   $80,000, iii  $1   shares.
Johnson, B. C attorney.
i|Ont.
iB. M.
MINING NOTES.
Messrs. Jtmnball, Wallis and BuUen
lhave taken over the Juno group of
claims above the Athabasca. A force
of men will start developing of the
Iprbperty today. A portion of the purchase price has heen paid down, tut
Ithe exact terms are withheld for the
[present.
IvVE HAVE
[JUST RECEIVE
a lot of
which no well appointed
home should be without
during the warm weather.
We have also constantly
on hand a full line of . .
lumber's Supplies,
Steam fittings,
and Hardware
of every description
which we are offering at very low prices.
;ii��fir Harflware Co,
[Vancouver & Nelson* B. 0.
(d!6
HUTCHINSON'S FUNERAL.
List of  Contributors   to   tho Expenses
of Interment. |
Among (hose who contributed to the :
expenses of   Hutchinson's funeral are :'
J.    Stewart $1,   J.   Curry $J, Tackel- !
bury 50c,   A. Turner 5Cc, J.  Languor/ I
50c, W. Macdonald 50c,   Bray 50c,   R. .
J. Elliot   25c,   W.   A. Thunnan $1, C. !
Ironsides 50c,   O. Mullen 25c, W. Pult'
50c, G. Hale 50c, J. Stanyer 25c,   Miss :
Crawford  25c,   J.    Campbell   60c,   J. |
Phair 50c, T.Miner 50c, S. J. Mighton
50c.   A. McDonald 50c, W. Miller 50c*
S. Cummings $1,   Leo Teeling 50c,  R.
Hurry 50c.    J. Carr 50c, J. Lawrence
$1,   Mrs. Watson 50c, S. Neelands 50c,
Lillie Bros.; 50c, D.   Shaw 50c,  F. J.
Squires 50c,   F.  J. Paiuton 50c, W. J.
Morrison 50c, J. Byers 50c, J. Emerson
50c,   F. Walkei:50c, J. H. Jackson $1,
L. Lanen 50c, A. Tregillis 1$, A. Williams $1,   E. King 50c,   P. F. Stimler
5C0c, W. Ward 50c,   Bloomberg 50c, C.
J.   Christie   50c,   H.    Stutter 50c, W.
Traves   50c,   W.   R.   McLean  5c0, J.
Houston $1, E. E. Phair $1, W. E. Wilson 30c, Charles Gilbert $1,   A Friend
50c, G. Fronk 50c. W. Hipperson $1,
M. Bousford 50c,   G. Tunstall 50c,   E.
Roper $1, J. Adamson 50c,   Sain Mills
$1, J. H.   Gosnell 25c.
LYNCHED ON   MAIN STREET.
Great Bend, Kansas, June 14.-In the
public square fronting on the principal street of this city a murderer was
lynched last night by a mob bf about
500 people. The victim was John
Becker, a young white man, who on
April 8 killed Myrtle Huffmeister, the
6-year-old daughter of William Huffmeister, a farmer living midway between Great Bend and Ellingwood.
INTERNATIONAL CHESS.
Vienna, June 14.���The tenth round
of the international chess tournament
was played today. In the morning
games Lipske beat Baird, Tarrasch
beat Blackburn. In the afternoon and
evening Halpring lost to Burns, Maroczy was beaten by Walbrod, Steinitz
and Alapin drew, Schlechter beat
Scheffer, Janowski beat Schowalter
and Tschigerin beat Card. Trenchard
drew a bye.
RASEBALL SCORES.
June 14.���At New York���Brooklyn
3, New York 2.
At Boston���Philadelphia 9, Boston
0.-    .*
At Chicago���Chicago 3, St. Louis 2.
Sceond game at Chicago���Chicago 7,
St. Louis 1.
At Cleveland���Cleveland J, Pittsburg 3.
At Washington���First game, Washington 8, Baltimore 7. Second game,
Washington 4, Baltimore 2.
RUSSIA   IN CHINA.
Russia Now  Has Control  of  All  the
Pekin Railways.
London, June 14.���The Pekin correspondent of the Times commenting on
the increasing activity of Russia in
China, says that "when their projected new railways are completed
Russia will have control of all the railways along which it will be possible
to move troops for tlie defense of
Pekin. China was deluded into giving the contract for the Pekin-Hankau
railway in the beginning to a small
and an unaggressive power, but the
Belgian minister was merely acting
on behalf of Russia and France."
England ought to insist upon the right
of first refusal to allow railways in
the Yangrtse-Kiang region..
LEITER LIQUIDATES.
The; Wheat King's Creditors Will Not
Lose After All.
Chicago, June 14.���P.D. Armour today bought all Joseph Letter's cash
wheafe in the northwest, amounting to
four' or"' five million bushels. Semi-
authoritative information^ is_ also ob-
faihed~that"^^
Letter's wheat. It is generally admitted that the sale to Armour clears
the atmosphere to a considerable extent, and if trustees are necessary cto
liquidate the rest of Lei ter's cash
wheat in this city, New York, afloat,
and in European storehouses, it will
not require much time to dispose of
the remaining three million bushels or
more. There will apparently be little
difficulty in winding up the deal, inasmuch .n as it is authoritatively stated
that oids have been received for all
the cash wheat that Letter has.
There is a fair prospect that Letter's
creditors will lose nothing and that
the wheat will hriug in sufficient, with
recovering markets, to pay all claims.
THE  METAL MARKET.
New York, June 14.���Bar silver, 58.
Copper,     dull;   brokers,    4.65;   exchange, 3.87^ to 8.92^.
CARRANZA  MUST GO.
Canadian    Authorities    Have   Intercepted an Important. Letter.
Madrid, June 14. ���It was semi-officially annunced today that Senor Du
Bosc, the former Spanish charge d'
affaires at Washington, and Lieutenant Carranas.the former naval attache,
have been invited to leave Canada,
owing to tne Canadian authorities
having intercepted a letter which
Lien tenant Carranza addressed to the
minister of marine, giving an account
of the American fortifications.
HE SAW THE   SQUADRON.
Lieutenant   Blue   Has   Identified  the
Ships of Cevera's Fleet.
On Board the Associated Press Boat
.Wanda, Off Santiago de Cuba, June
13, via Kingston,   Jamaica, June 14, 7
WHAT
DO
YOU
WANT
For One Cent a Word?
You can find a buyer for " Any
Old Thing " if you advertise.
���
t
���
Classiflrd A<lv<-i*tis*riurnta.
All advertif-emesits in this column are
1 cent a word each insertion. Ho advertisement taken for less than 25 cent?.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
and   SOO--PACIFIC I.I Mi i
International Navigation & Trading Conpasy
LIMITED
Time Card Effective May IK, 1888
Subject to Change without Notice.
������������������������^������������������������������������^
+++t
FOR SAL E
Old papers at
per hundred.
The Miner office.   25 cents
MISCELLANEOUS
FOUND.���A small key. National Cash
ter.   Apply "Miner" offlco.
Regis-
THE   NELSON   CAFE
Gives a first-class meal for
25 CENTS & TOWARDS
.' ���a/V^%*^*-*fc'
ICE  CREAM  &   CAKE   15c.
THE DIRECT and SUPERIOR SERVICE ROUTE
To all Eastern and European
Points.
To Pacific Coast and Transpacific Points.
To the Rich and active Mining
Districts of Klondike and the
Yukon.
New Tourist Car bervice
Daily to St. Paul.
Daily (except Monday) to Eastern Canadian and U.S. Points.
Tickets issued through and Baggage checked to destination.  '
dailtTtrain.
To Hossland and  Main   Line points.
G.lOp.m.-Lcaves-NEI.SON-Airives-lO.SOp.in
Koulfiiil.T Luke���KaslH Konf��.
Str. Kokanee
Except Sunday. Except Sunday.
i   p.m.���Leaves���NELSON���Arrives���11   a.na.
Calling at way ports in both direction i.
Kooienay Hlver Konte.
STR.-NELSOX.
Mon. Wed. Fii. Mon, Wed. Fri.
7 a. m.���Leaves���NELSON--Arrives���8.30 p. m.
Huns to Kuskanook (formerly Armstrong's
Landing) calling at way ports and makes close
connections at Pilot Hay wilh Steamer Kokanee. Steamer may make additional trips provided business offers,
JAPANESE  *  TEA *   PARTIES/
Every Afternoon.
EXPERIENCED WAITRESSES.
OPEN ALL NIGHT.
a. m.���Delayed arrival of the transports is ascribed here to a fear that
after all Admiral Cevera's squadron
might not bo in Santiago harbor.
Once and for all, Admiral Sampson
has decided the question officially, and
on Saturday last he scut Lieutenant
Victor Blue, of the gunboat Swanee
to investigate. Lieutenant Blue, landed
on Saturday and proceeded with guides
to the hills overlooking the harbor and
city. He distinctly saw and definitely
located four Spanish cruisers and two
torpedo boat destroyers. Ho saw also
several small cruisers and gunboats.
CASTELLANE WANTS  TO FIGHT.
London, Juno 14,���The Paris correspondent of the Daily Telegraph says:
Count Boniface de Castellaue, who
married Miss Anna Gould of New
York, has challenged to a duel M.
Henri Tnrot for an article in the Petit
Republiqu-e commenting on an act of infanticide committed by a servant in the
count's household.
FIVE MEN KILLED.
St. Louis, June 14.���Messages from
Aurora, Minnesota, say that five men
were killed in the miue disaster at
Staata City.    . ��� ���
SPAIN SUPPLIANT.
Vienna, June 14.���The Neue Freie
Presse says that Spain has requested
the powers to urge the United States
to occupy Manila should the town surrender, and not allow the insurgents
tcr&o sor"1^^���^- ":y~' ������=���������--="*���-:�����---���
PHILIPPINES BARRED.
San Francisco, June 14. ���A general
order has beon issued to the effect that
no natives of the Philippines are to be
enlisted in the United States army.
Train*  lo nml from  Slocan Cily. Bniirton
an��l Slocau  Lake   Points.
(Sundays Excepted)
9 a. m.���Leaves���NELSON���Arrives���2.20 p.m.
ASCEP.TAIN PltESENT
Reduced Hates East
and full information by addressing nearest
local agent, or GEO. S. BERK, City Ticket
Agent, Nelson,
VV. F. ANDEIISON, K. J. COYLE.
Trav. Pass. Agent,      Dist. Pass. Agent,
Nelson Vancouver.
Write for Klondike folder and Map.
KASLO & SLOCAN RAILWAY
TIME  CARO  NO: I
Going West.
Leave 8.00 a. m.
" 8.36 a.m.
" 9.36 a.m.
" 9.51 a, m.
" 10.03 a.m.
" 10.18 a.m.
10.38 a.m.
10.50 a. m.
Are.
Daily
Kaslo
South Fork
Snroule'8
Whitewater
Bear Lake
McGuigan
Cody Junction
Sandon
CODY LINK.
Goraa East.
Arrive Sk.50 p.m.
a 15 p.m
it. 15 p.m.
2.00 p.m.
M8p.m.
1.33 pm.
1.12 p.m.
Leave. 1.00 p.m.
Leave 11:00 a. m.   Sandon
Arrive 11:20 ���'       Cody
ROBT. IRVING,       GEO. F
2611 G. F. & P. A
Arrive
Lcava
lt:45a.m.
11:25   "
COPELAND,
Superintendent.
WHEN . . .
... GOING EAST
Use a flrst class line in traveling between
Minneapolis, St. Paul and Chicago, and
the principal towns in Central Wisconsin
and Chair Can
Pullman Palace Sleeping
Service        .....
Thf Dining Cars are operated in the interest of
ii? patrons, thc most elegant service ever
ihauguiuud.   Meals are served a la Carte.
To obtain first class service
read via '      '. ���
your ticket should
THE WISCONSIN
XeNTRAI. MPS
Direct connections at Chicago and Milwaukee
for all Eastern points. . . .
For full information call on your nearest ticket
agent, or write        . . ,
Jas. A. Clock.        or       Jas. C. Pond,
General Agent, General Pass. Agent
216 Stark Street, Milwaukee. Wis.
Portland, Ore.
%"WAR" ANP "ROLLED OATS." %
O'er earth's greatest Empire the union jack floats,
And this proudly due, to the use of kolled oats,
While war news it thunders!  on the winds it flies riot,
That states' battles for freedom, are won by this diet.
With great Britain, the states and rolled oats in alliance,
To all other nations, we could bid bold defiance.
No union in EUROPE, our position could mar,
If the oats be well branded, wilh brackman & ker.
Remember "dArgai," and remember "findlater,"
Whose "pap" was rolled oats, from the hands of his MATER
And "hobson," the gallant, each patriot soul fills,
Oh ! such men are the outcome, of "NATIONAL MILLS"
Rolled Oats! islands rich, like the Phillippines gain,
And National Stuff, will free Cuba from pain.
Porto Rico is settled, as one of war's fines,
While our Cereals well rolled, secure "Carolines, '
If our brand of Rolled Oats, had diet been of Spain,
That, country with honor, had guarded the Maine,   >
Then proclaim with loud timbrels, and sound ib afar,
B. & K. National Oats, will an end put to war.
ASK FOR
a. S. lulernallounl.
Leaves Kaslo at 3.30 a. m. every day except
Sunday, calling at all way points.
Connects at Five Mile Point wiib S.F.ScS.
train at 0.45 a. in., arrives Nelson at 7.20 a. m.
Leaves Xelson at 4:30 p. m..con net-ting at Five
Mile Point with train from Spokane, arriving
at Kaslo 8.30 p.m.
Connects at Pilot Bay with S. S. Alberta for
Bonner' Ferry and Kootenay hirer point*.
8. a. Alberta.
Leaves Kaslo on arrival of K, Sc S. train on
Saturday and Tuesday at 5.30 p. m., and'Jhnra-
day at 6 a. in., touching at all way points. Con-
nects at Bonner's Ferry with G. N. truins.
���I>ftves Bonner's Ferry nt 2 p. m. on Sunday.
W cdncsdav and Friday, arriving at Kaslo 1 p.
m. next day.
Close connection with Enst Kootenay point
via Jennings and Bonncr.s Fern.
P.O.
G. ALEXANDKR. Gan.
Box 122, Kaslo, B.C.
Mgr.
Spokane Falls 6l
Northern RY
Nelson  &  Fort
Sheppard R'y.
Red Mountain R'y.
The only all rail route without change
of cars between Nelson and Bossland and
Spokane and Rossland.
(Daily Except Sunday)
Leave 6*20 a.m. NELSON Arrive 5.35 p-m.
"   12:05 "   EOSSL'D    "  11:20   "
���"    8.30 am. SPOKANE   *   310 p.m.
Irari's  Xt-lsot)' nt 620 a.m.
cuiititc-iiibN at Spokane for
Tniiu'Hliat
tnakft* close
nil Pacific CoHst Ponita,
Passengers for Kettle Ittver aud Bound*
iry Creek, connect at Marcus villi HlngA'
Ifciilv.
COLUMBIA & WESTERN RT.
Schedule
EFFECTIVE   MUMMY NOV.   22,  1897
WESTBOUND
P.M.   P.M.   P.M.
No. 5 No. 3 NO. 1
EA8TBOUKD
P.M.   P.M.   P.M.
No. 2 No. 4 No.
8:15
5.00
2:00
3:15
0:00..ROBSON...&0U
10:00...TRAIL...7:00
11:15.ROSSLAND.6*0
MO
12:55 1:15
12:00 m.
No's. 1 and 2 connect witb C. P. R. main Una
steamers, and trains to and from Nelson at
Robson,
No's, 3 and
and Rossland.
I are local trains between Trail
Brackman & Ker's "NATIONAL"
Brand Rolled Oats
and take no other.
A. B. GRAY, ��� Kootenay Agent.
oil P. O. BOX 6i, NELSON, B.C.
No's, 5 and G are local trains between Trail;
and Robson.   No. G connects with train No.
(rom Rossland.
All trains daily.
F. P. GUTELIITS. Gen. Sopt.
ATLANTIC
Steamship lines
From Montreal
Lake Winnipeg���Beaver Line June 15
Lako Huron���Beaver Lino JuneSf
From New York.
Majestic���White Star Line June 15
Germanic���White Star Line JuneSf
Ktruria���Cunard Line Juno II
x_     "ania���Cunard Line.' June 18
From Montreal
vorkshiit.-   ^minion Line June 11
lioi^Uii?"���Doj..1-,ou Line  June 19
L-aurcntw.    '"in  -'-����� June 11
Parisian���Allan ._:>�� , June 19
Cabin, 915.00,950, $M>, if. v. ��>.    ,*! upward*.
Intermediate, 931.00 n.'d up..  -���
Steerage. 922.50 ancl upwards,
- Passengers -ticketed through to all point* iti
Great Britain or Ireland, and at specially lout
rates to all parts of the European conti sent.
Prepaid passages arranged from all pointt,.
Apply to GEO.  S.  BEER.   C.P.R. Tck��.
Agent. Nelson, or to,     WILLIAM STITl.
554)   General AKcnt, C.P.R. Olilces. Winnipeg.
EAST
GHtAT
I *    r\ . 11 ��� V
It'ST
TBE   SOBVEYOR'S   CHAIN   JUDB
THE SH0BTEST
TRANSCONTINENTAL
IT
It I* (ke Meat Madera l�� Koutpmeut.
II la Uie Heaviest Balled lift*
It Oan a MaeU-moUaat, UeeOOeO.
It Crauea ba ftuMl Vtennrrta.
It to tlie Oftljr Use Saanlug Uxiriwi
Clan Ink Can.
It to Noted for tko Cearf e��y or IU Kmpleyea.
It to tke Oaly Hae Servlac Heal* on tko
a la Carte Plaa.
THROUGH   THE
GRANDEST      SCENERY
IN AMERICA BY DAYUGHT.
Attractive Tonrs during Season of"
Navigation on Great Lakes via Duluth in
connection witb Magoificont Passenger
Steamers Northwest and Northlaud.
For maps, tickets and complete infoimatlon
call on or address Agents, K. Sc S. Ry.. C. ft K.
S. Nav. Co., N & F. S. Ry., or
C. G. DIXON, Central Ageat,
KpoVanc, Walk.
F. 1. WHITXPY, li. IP. AT. A.,
Si St. Paal, Mlaa,
V$t: ������ A THE -MINER,--WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 189
CABINET CRISIS   IN PARIS.
J-
Hostile
M. Meline Has  to Accept
Amendment.
Paris,   Juno   14.���The   chamber   of,
deputies today  by a vote of  295 to 272 '
passed a vote of confidence in the gov- '���
eminent.    Later, however, the Meline
ministry was defeated by a vote of 29G
to  246  amid   intense   excitement and
uproar.
The house was crowded as were tho
public galleries, and all. present-
eagerly discussed the situation. The
premier, M. Meline, opened the proceedings by vehemently reptidiating
the statement that he was engaged in
an anti-democratic policy, but he declared that the accession of socialism to
power wonld spell ruiu for France.
Ex-Minister Bourgeois followed, taunting M. Meline in being unwilling, to
cut himself loose from tho rightists,
and several leftists continued their
severe strictures of. the premier's antidemocratic policy.
M. Ribot delivered a warm eulogy
of the premier and proposed a vote of
confidence in the government, but its
tone elicited loud protests from 'tho
rightists. Amid general excitement M._
Meline, however,accepted the terms of
the motion, whereupon M. Oassagnac
charged him with throwing over the
rightists. The premier retorted that
he had never asked for the*snpport of
the rightists. The first part of. M.
Bibot's motion, "the chamber approving the,.declaration of the government, " was then adopted by a vote of
292 to 272, as already cabled, and the second part, "is determined to put ih
force the policy of democratic reforms
based on the union of republicans,''
was adopted by 525 to 5 votes. Thus
far matters were comparatively
smooth.
Then M. Henri Ricard moved to add
the words "supported by a majority
exclusively ' republican." M. Meline
refused to accept this addition. M.
Ricard insisted on a vote and the addition was .carried'by 296 to 246, whereupon there was a terrible uproar. The
members of the extreme left rose en
masse and shouted for the retirement
of M. Meline. M. Bertaux yelled,"Get
out, you are defeated.'' Others, pointing to the ministerial benches, indulged in a chorus of "Boohs.''
The] socialists vociferated ''Resign,
resign.'' When a lull occurred another
vote was taken on the entire motion.
Meline accepted, swallowing the obnoxious addition and the motion was
adopted by 284 to 272. The chamber
of deputies then adjourned until Monday. In the lobbies of the chamber
opinion was freely expressed that M.
Meline would resign after the council
tomorrow, though nothing is certain.
Canada and the United States.
Reciprocity with .the United States
will also be discussed together with
the fortification of St. John and the
creation here of a naval coaling
station. Thc French government having objetecd to the presence of a fourth
British warship on the treaty coast the
British gunboat Columbine has landed
ber guns and ammunition here and
thoy will be stored here until her
(irui.se is.completed.
GERMANY WATCHFUL.
London, June 14.���According to a
special despatch from Shanghai, the
German steamer Petrarch is about to
leave there for Manila with secret orders, it is believed, from the German
government. Prince Henry of Prussia
is now at Kiao Chou with- the German
squadron and is kept constantly informed, t-he despatch says, as to the
developments of the war.
UNFIT FOR SEA.
DEPEW MISREPORTED.
Did Not Say Anlgo-American Alliance
Would Never Be.
London, uJne. 14.���The Daily Chronicle' publishes this morning an interview with Mr. Chauncey M. Depew
with reference to his recent utterances
to French newspaper men on the subject of an Anglo-Americau alliance
and the relations between France and
the United States. In the course of
the interview Mr. Depew explains that
the French papers had not correctly
represented his views,.declaring that
he did not say there never would be an.
Anglo-American alliance, but what he
did say was that a specific alliance
"wasnot necessary or possible," because it ought to have constant and
cordial co-operation. Mr. Depew
said also: "My statements regarding
France and America were similarly
colored."
MORE TROUBLE  FROM SPAIN!
A Cabinet Crisis Today and a Revolution   Tomororw.
London, June 4.���The  Paris correspondent of the Evening Post says:
I leairn from a trustworthy source
that the days of the Sagasta cabinet
are numbered. It is believed that the
cabinet is aware that the torpedo boat
d*tMrbyer"Terrbir"M^
despite official denials it is rumored
that there is further bad news from
Cuba. Senor Sil vela, leader of the
conservatives, is regarded as the coming man. The Carlists are enrolling
adherents, startling developments are
expected.
ENGLAND GRATIFIED.
The  English  Press Gratified at Payment of  Award.
London, June 14.--The Times this
morning in an editorial, which pretty
fairly represents the feeling expressed
by tiie other morning papers, says the
"resolution to pay the Bebring sea
award is another gratifying proof of
the growth of spirit of friendship and
justice towards England in a quarter
where until recently such feelings were
rarely exhibited. It is a proof of the
good feeling which we cordially recognize and reciprocate, as well as a good
omen for the establishment of closer
and more cordial relations between the
two, countries, toward which the best
minds on both sides of the Atlantic
have been steadily moving." ' """"
: SIR  JAJVIE8 WINTER.
Has   Sailed   and   Will    Confer  With
British Government.      <
St. John, N. F., June 14.���The
premier, Sir James Winter, and the
receiver general of marine, sailed today
for England as delegates to negotiate
with the imperial government for the
despatch of a royal commission to inquire" into the affairs of the colony.
Among the subjects which they will
bring before the British cabinet i.s the
securing of representation for Newfoundland on the commission recently
arranged   to   settle disputes  between
Washington, Juno 14.-���Word has
been received at the navy department
from a high though unofficial source
that Admiral Camara's Cadiz fleet has
been found unfit for sea-.
FEAR GERMAN   DESIGNS.
London, June 14.���The Singapore
correspondent ofthe Times says:
Letters received here from Manila
dated May 26 say that the prolonged
conferences between the German consul and Captain Augusti were exciting
attention in Manila and had led to the
belief that Germany had designs ou
the Sulu archipelago.
HIS   SOLDIERING  ENDED.
1 Buffalo, N. Y., June 14.���Herbert
Hodgson, a member of the Sixty-fifth
regiment of volunteers, which left- hero
some weeks ago for the front, was
killed near Washington, D. C. today
by being run over by a railroad train.
Hodgson was a Canadian, hailing from
tlie vicinity of Hamilton, Out;
SECOND ARMY GOING.
Not    From    Tan pa,   Eut   From   the
East Coast.   ���
Washington, June 1.4. ���Arrangements
for the second expedition of invasion
of the United States for the West
Indies are being hurried forward at
tho'war department. There seems, to
be no doubt that this expedition, if its
number approaches the first, will be
sent from the east coast of the United
States. The experience of embarking
from Tampa has demonstrated that
other ports "where the railroad and
other facilities aro more adequate than
at Tampa arc much more desirable
places for the concentration of troops
and their embarkation. Tho officers at
Tampa have recommended that future
expeditions bc dispatched from some
other city.
A board of army officers for the past
week has been examining various
places in the south with a view to
their occupation for camping purposes,
and it is also suggested that it may
take occasiou to point out a desirable
port for the embarkation of the Porto
Rico expedition. This board will arrive here tomorrow morning and will
hurriedly prepare its report for tlie
consideration of the president. Fernando and Savannah are looked upon
with favor as suitable ports, and
Charleston has also been suggested.
HAYTIEN RUMORS.
Haytien, June 14, 1:40 p. m.���The
United States auxiliary cruiser .St.
Louis and several despatch boat, it is
reported here, brought to Mole St.
Nicholas today a story that a landing
was effected by the Americans late on
Monday very near Santiago. According to this report the Americans took
possession of a fortified position at the
port; but the Spanish rallied and attacked the invading force, finally dislodging theni and 0retaking the position. This information does not tally
with a cablegram received Sunday
night by United States Minister Pow-
ellrwhich^stated-Hhat- lOOO^menhad
landed at Santiago bay without encountering serious opposition.
IN DEPENDENCE OR   NOTHING.
London, June 14.���A despatch from
Cay Romano, coast of Porto Principe,
reports a conversation with the representative of the insurgent government
in Cuba. The latter declared that the
insurgents will accept nothing short of
absolute independence. He represented that General Maximo Gomez
had gone personally to assist the
Americans against Santiago, and that
the' remainder were massed around
Havana, which was being stoutly defended. The rainy season, ho said,
was not regarded as very dangerous for
Americans, provided thoy fortified
themselves with quinine.
BEST HOLD-UPS FOR SKIRTS.
raising her shoulders an inch or two,
and every skirt- gees with thom. It
may not be pretty, but that motion is
one among others recommended for developing thc muscles of tho neck, giving a beautiful roundness of contour
which is necessary for beauty and a
foundation for a reasonable plumpness,
so there arc othor advantages in it.
The doctor carries ber ideas of a
hygienic dress further than this, foilier walking boots are of tho most approved pattern. They have low heels
and wide, flat toes. The necks of her,
gowns are in- keeping with the rest of
it, no stiff collar or even high collar
around her throat, but little turn-back
collars which give. perfect freedom to
every muscle. It is all very becoming
to the doctor, but it is not every woman who would have such courage.
GOLD FEVER IN   MELBOURNE.
Gold threatened to become as common as silver in the days of Solomon,
says the Pall Mall Gazette Iu one
year ��12,600,000, in eight-years ��95,-
000,000 were won. Some meu at
Golden Point made as much as ��400
each day. Another exceptionally lucky
party unearthed M pounds of gold in
one day. No wonder that such pockets
were termed " jewelers' shops. " Occasionally a nugget worth ��10,000 was
unearthed. The result of this sudden
increase of wealth almost wholly without labor, and with risks which are infinitesimal compared to the Klondike,
was the temporary demoralization of
the population. Melbourne, in the
height of the gold fcATer, has been described by one who knew it well, as a
"fevered, drunken, delirious pandemonium." Thc lucky ones���and they
were thousands of them���squandered
their riches in the most reckless manner. Some of their fantastic tricks
would scarcely be credited were they
not attested by witnesses still living.
The game of nine-pins was played
with bottles of champagne, for Avhich
he who broke the least had to pay;
dozens of the same costly wine were
emptied into tubs and drunk from tin
pannikins, spirits and beer being added
to give-"body" to the beverage; one
man, in imitation of Caligula, shoed
his horses with gold; sandwiches made
of bank notes wore devoured; silver
wrapped up in banknotes were thrown
to popular actresses instead of flowers
���in fact, money was so plentiful that
the reckless diggers could not "knock
it down" fast enough. They thought
they had only to dig a few feet in the
earth to get plentj*- more, and for a
time it almost seemed as if this were
so. Such were some of the characteristics of Victoria's hot youth.
FIGHTING   RENEWED.
Have Your Garments Hung  From the
Shoulder, Says a Doctor.
Courage to wear what is called an
absolutely hygienic dress is possessed
by but few* women. One of them, a
charming blonde, lives on the north
sido. Every garment she wears hangs
from her shoulders, and as she is a successful physician in active practice, her
opinion is worth listening to when she
says that this is the easiest way in the
world to hold up skirts. Nothing she
wears fits tightly at the waist, where
.there is a band a little pointed, to
avoid that straight line across the
waist which is so ugly, and inartistic.
The doctor wears her skirts of a
length which do not require holding
up, "but I do care to hold them up an
inch or two,'' she says with a laugh ;
"why, it is the easiest thing in the
world. See!" That -"See" is not
slang,.'for at the same moment she
illustrates her   skirt-raising  methods,
NeAV York, June 14. ���A special dated
off Caimanera June 13, via Mole St.
Nicholas, Hayti, today reports a renewal on Sunday of the Spanish attack
on the marines who landed there on
Friday last. The fighting lasted all
through Sunday night. *
MORE   SOLDIERS STARTED.
San Francisco, June 14.���Three
thousand five hundred soldiers embarked todajr on transport steamers for
the Philippines. It is generally expected to sail tomorrow.
TO SUCCEED   GENERAL MOORE.
London, June 14.���Lord William
Frederick Ernest Seymour has been
gazetted commander of the British
troops in Canada, to succeed Lieutenant General A. C. Montgomery Moore.
WAR REVENUE BILL SIGNED.
Washington, June 14, ���The war revenue bill was signed by the president
today at 3 o'clock.
Waff Paper,      Sportina Goods,
���   Hammocks,   #
Cameras, Kodaks,
Photographic Suppfies,
Thomson Stationery Co.
  (d22)
LIMITED
ITIEXiSOIlSr
ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS
and JOINERS
When requiring thoroughly seasoned
timber should apply to
The Nelsou Planing Mill
fl W. GRAY.
In stock,l,000,000 ft-of Flooring.Liniiig
Mouldings, Doors, Sashes and
every description of Joinery.
SCUEKX   I>OOKs  AM��    WIXIMIWg   MAD
TO OUIir.K.
MINES EXAMINED
AND REPORTED OX BY
F. M. CHADBOURN
Kirkpatrick & Wilson
are receiving Seasonable Goods
for the best trade of Nelsdn in
the lines of
GROCERIES, TEAS  ��d COFFEE
The quality is the best and prices
right.      As always, our stock of
CROCKERY and GLASSWARE
is full and being added to as needed.
Kirkpatrickand Wilson,BAKERSTREET
Twenty years* experience in mining.
Thorough   knowledge  of mines  of British
Columbia.   Terms Reasonable.
713 NELSON, B.C.
W, A. JOWETT
MINING & REAu ESTATE BROKER
I>S! U.iME isikI  ���������
C��M3fISS��G.\ A���EXT.
VICTORIA ST.,     ���     NELSON, B. O.
&1+
BEAR IN MIND
That everything you BUY here
is GUARANTEED. If not as
represented return and your
money will be cheerfully refunded. .*. .*. .*.
.FISHING TACKLE AT COST..
P. O. Store   V =   =   J. A. GILKER
Lawrence H*? bw&re Ca
PaI rite ready mixed and dry.
Boiled and Raw Llli Seed   Oil,
Turpentine
Varnishes, White Lead
Paint and Varnish Brushes KajSOmine
Builders' Hardware Miners'Supplies
Telephone 21.   Prompt Delivery
<3ambfe & O'Reiffu
Civif Engineers,
Prouinciaf Land Surveyors
Real Estate and -General Agents
Financial and Insurance Agents
Notaries   Public,   Etc.
w
e have for sale the 'following1*
Valuable Property.
Yes, but we don't advertise the
prices, as we lose money by
doing so.
List and Prices on application
at our Office.
Call and see our full list of property for sale in  "Hume"
and "A" Additions
Ten Lots in "Hume".Addition at a Bargain.
QamWe & Q'ReiUy, Agents.
Baker Street, NELSON, B. C.
IQNDQN & \)WM COMJPIA PQWTOWJS.
HEAP OFFICE, fcONPOtf, ENGJ-.ANP.
All  Communications relating to British Columbia business
to be addressed to P. O. Prawer 505, Nelson, B.C.
J. Roderick Robertson,
General Manager
S. S. Fowler, E. M.,
Mining Engineer
NELSON, BC.
GHENTS 0  CLOTHING
Repaired. Altered, Cleaned, Pressed
and Dyed by the New Process at
Reasonable Prices,
STEVENS,   THE  Tattou.      _���r
Room 9. Hillyer But., NE1��80*N>
P. S.���Ladies Wool Dress Goods Sponged
before Making Up. ��
NOTICE'
IMPERIAL MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate in tiie Nelson Mining Division of
West Kootenay District. Where Located:��� About 1} Miles From where
Porcupine Creek empties into the
Salmon River, on the South side and
about J a Mile From said Porcupine
Creek. *^_	
TAKE NOTICE tbat I, Kenneth L. Burnet.
Free Miner's Certificate No, 5397a, acting
as Agent for G. F. Whiteman, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 8918a, intend, sixty days from
tbe date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the
above Claim.
And further take notice that action, under
Section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
KENNETH L. BURNET,
Dated tbis 21th day cfMay, 1898.
0. P. j; CHRISTIE,
CENERAL BROKER,
INSURANCE. REAL ESTATE.
MONEY TO LOAN.
Several Houses to  rent.    Property
for sale in all parts of the  city. ,]
Accountant    Work.       Stenography     and      Type-Writing
done on shortest notice.
ARCH BOLD & PEARSON
(HUM. MFIME.,MMin. Assoc. Cornwall)
MINING ENGINEERS AND ASSAYERS,
Opposite Phair Hotel,
NELSON. B.C. P. O. BOX 583.
Extended experience in Chile and German
South Africa. Assays and analysis of ores.
Reports and valuations on mineral properties
Underground surveying and mine plans kept J
up by contract.
Subscribe for The Miner
One Year
Half Year
One flonth
$IO.OO'i]
$5.00
$i.oo
.BY MAIL OR CARRIER.
iAS^Ay-'Ti^'A '

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