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The Miner Sep 19, 1891

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 Only  Paper  Printed  in the  Kootenay  l<ake.'9Iin-.'  ing Districts.  ."For''.-Kates  of Subscription and  -..Advertising  See Fourth I*ngc.  tfUMBEK 65.  NELSO^   BEITISH   COLUMBIA,   SATUEDAY,   SEPTEMBEE   19,   1891.  $4 A TEAE.  A   SIX-IIUi\i>KK������-FO������T   lAHHiE.  A piece of ore from a recent location on the  north side of the outlet-,' and about 14 miles distant from Nelson, is now on exhibition at the  office of The Miner. While it is not as rich as  a piece alongside it fro m the Silver King, yet it  attracts considerable attention from the fact  that the ledge from wheiijcre it came isjr^ported  to be 600 feet wide and traceable'fdr 2rTniIes. Hts  general character is iron pyrites intermixed with  peacock copper. Samples have been sent to Salt  bake for assay, and if; the returns are,satisfactory the owners Of the location have a, bonanza,  even if the ledge is but half as wide as reported.  One of the owners, John Andrews, better known  as "Scotty," says he will stake his reputation as  an old-time prospector that the find surpasses  any ever made before in North America. Growing enthusiastically eloquent, he said : "I prospected for years for Bill Hals ton when he was the  mining king of California, and afterwards for  Walker Brothers of Salt Lake. When in their  employ 1 searched the mountains of Mexico,  Bolivia, Peru, and Chili for the precious metals,  and afterwards on my "own hook prospected  every .range in Arizona, Utah, and Montana, but  never have I seen anything equal to the claim  which I have named William Wallace in honor of  the Scottish hero and patriot Who battled with  the hated English 6 centuries aKr()." Continuing  "Scotty" said: "I have made 2 fortunes in .my  time, but they did the no good. If I made a  third, it will probably do me no good; but I will  die knowing that in British Columbia. I have  lived while prospecting on the poorest-.-flour, and  worst bacon ever sold to an honest man, by  -������������������-!" A^ter promising to give The Miner  the result of the assays .made at Salt Lake,  "Scotty" proceeded on down the street blanking  the man that sold him the flour and bacon.  ISooBssinir a W������icu-3SooB*ae3l Town.'-'  The  following   interesting   item   is 'from   the  Kettle  Falls Pioneer of   the 17th. . The prominent mining man is mr. Harris,.the' well-known  Baker street shoemaker:  "B. W. Harris, a prominent mining man of  Nelson, British Columbia, and who is interested  in mines on the Columbia river, north and south  of Kettle Falls, paid the Pioneer office a visit a  few days ago, and said: 'The Montana mining  men who have already become interested in the  mines in this vicinity .were also securing all the  mines they could get hold of on Toad mountain,  with the intention of erecting a smelter and concentrator on the Colville river at this point. In  the Kootenay Lake country we have no material for fluxing, while here you have all of it, and  it is their intention, as soon as they get. .control  of sufficient mines, to ship .the dry ores of the  north to work in with the wet ores of this country.' Mr. Harris returns to Nelson to straighten  up some business matters, when he intends making Kettle Falls his headquarters, and thinks a.  number of miners from that district will accompany him.'1   A Thug-lticldcii  Idaho Town.  The once lonely, desolate town  of  Kootenay  station  is overrun  by  thieves, rounders,   bunco  men and almost every other class of depraved  humanity. The better element of the town has  struggled hard to keep this vicious element from  gaining a foothold, but for the past few weeks  toughs have carried on their work in such a  high-handed manner that the citizens have sent  a notice to the sheriff notifying him that his  presence was needed to straighten matters out.  Men who never carried a gun -before, says a correspondent of the Spokane Spokesman, are now  noticed to have a six-shooter in their pockets,  and it is not uncommon to seethe cold glitter  of steel in a man's hand as he -walks through  some dark locality. The most serious crimes  that have taken place lately have been robberies  and bunco working. But the same old gang  that held people up and knocked down and rob-  bedrnen here last spring are here now, and no one  can tell when a hold up or murder is to take place..  The way the bunco game is worked is something  like this: One of the gang spots a man with  money���������proba bly some rail reader who has j ust  been j)aid off. The whole gang is put on to hitn,  and in a short time probably a dozen rounders  are watching their victim. .^Soirie of them succeed in enttcing%im into ;]^ for  the drinks. 'Phis drifts into"a money-game, in  which all the players are^members of thel^ang  except the victim. He is then '-cold-decked and  clone for his pile." A case or two of 0is kind  takes place nearly every day., There hffve been  nils lately. One was; a Swede from  country.    He  was  done  for $252.  engineer  m  several big h  the Palouse  The other wasc a Great Northern  charge of a party near here. He was bled to the  tune"of $395; "Dutch Henry," "Jumbo the  Swede," and "Lame Fitz" made this haul, and are  now supposed to be in Spokane enjoying their  ill-gotten gains and looking for another victim.  The gang watch every train and passenger coming and going, and especially the night train. A  person knowtFfo have money taking the train  is sure, to be followed. The shell game, the,-soap  game, and almost every other device for'cheat-,  mg-aiid swindling run day and night. There are  only 2 or 3 houses where these games .a re allowed,  but ibis is sufficient for the purpose. It is probable that the licenses-of'these, parties could be  revoked under the new law. With all this work''  going on there has hardly been a single arrest.  A fVw coroner's inquests have been held, but  this is the nearest approach to a criminal investigation that has yet been made. The public  will soon hear' of some important .arrests, or the  work of the Kootenay vigilantes will be heralded  through the land. With all its trouble with the  toughs, the town '/presents van animated appearance, -From 2 .to., 4 heavily loaded stage coaches  roll out every morning and in every evening.  Big freight teams are loaded with supplies every  day.... Men are coming and going, and at night  the alluring -strains- of music from the hurdy  .houses tend to keep things rolling high. It is  estimated that 4000-or 5000-working men are  back"of the town, it being the gateway to the  work on the Great Northern railway in Idaho.  Sill A LI/  iWiUliETS'    ������F    X.KWS,  The steamer Midge brought in this week 3 tons of potatoes, 1 ton of cabbage, and 500 pounds of carrots from captain Davics* ranch on Kootenay river. The potatoes sold  at 2h cents and the cabbage and carrots at 4 cents a pound.  Kootenay (Idaho) Herald, 12th: "A party of Northern  Pacific engineers arrived in Kootenay this week. It is a  different party from the one that has been at work here.  Just what they are doing no one knows, but some think it  is to look up the Kootenay and Bonner's Ferry branch."  Personals: Harry Young, who rain Jake Cobaugh out of  the country by the underground railway, is again at Nelson, Colville being too dull a place for him to live in. J. C.  Eaton, who represents San Francisco .mining capital, is  taking a look at our wonderful -undeveloped resources.  Provincial assayer McCullough of Victoria is making  Nelson his headquarters while examining properties in  Toad Mountain district.  The dance at the Silver King hotel on Friday night was  well attended, the music by messrs. Trencry, Harpciyand  Dutty being the best ever rendered,at a dance in Nelson.  Some of the boys who attended are still dancing, notably  one that is as graceful and silent when on the lioor as he is  awkward and talkative at other times.  Over Sixty Locations Marie.  0. 0. Sproule returned to Nelson on Thursday  from Goat river, where he has been for a month  past. He says that 00 locations at least have  been made in the Goat river and Duck creek  camps, and that a number of claim owners will  remain and work all winter. Work is now being done on a. trail to connect the camps with  the custom-house.  Shareholders   to   Take   a 'Look    fit   Their   Property.  A number of the shareholders of the company  that owns the Grizzly Bear are expected to  arrive at Nelson on Tuesday next to take a look  at that property. The tunnel is in between 70  and 80 feet. The old shaft is also being bailed  out���������about 30 feet of seepage water standing in  it when the work was commenced.  BtE&INNIiVC;   TO    LOOK    LIKK    A    MIXE.  While there has not been work enough done  on the Whitewater claim on Rover creek to  make it amine, the work done has proved the  claim to be a pretty good prospect. Two tunnels ha ve been run on the property; the upper  one being in 130 feet on the vein and the lower  one in 110 feet. A crosscut Will soon be started  from the lower tunnel to tap the main vein. The  free gold is in iron-stained quartz, which runs  about $30 to the ton. The vein varies in width  from 2 to 8 feet. According to an estimate  recently made there are 15,000 tons, of ore in  sight. Bet ween 150 and 200 tons .have bem run  through a. small Huntington mill since the middle of July. Although not over 50 per cent of  the gold was saved, yet between $3000 and $4000  in bullion has been shipped to Victoria.. The  mill will lie run about a month longer, when it  will probably be closed down and preparations  made for putting in a 10 or a 2Q-stamp mill.  Keacheri the Summit of the  Rockies.  Kootenav  (Idaho) Herald,' 12th:    "Tin  Kfr-.  track  of the Great. Northern  is  no^Mid  to  the sum-  mit of the Rockies, about a hundred miles east  of Kalispell, a town in the Flathead Lake country. Track laying1' has been somewhat delayed  on account of' the big t uVinci at t he summit and  the big bridge .fust beyond-, hot being completed.  This \Vork is now completed .and "the track will  advance rapidly-and all other work will be finished up and kept out of its way easily. The  officials of the road claim they will lay track  this winter, but as t hey will not reach Ka,l ispell  before snow flies, and then have to go over a  inoimfain, practical trackmen say that t.racklay-  irig will have to stop.  BSavc Faith  in '-Rover  ���������reek  Oi.strict.  Some of'the-boys who at times work at the  Whitewater mine and mill on Rover creek firmly  believe that the Whit -e water is not the only good  thing in that.section, and-recent finds go to prove  that i heir suppositions are. based on pretty gQOfl  foundations. William Hunter a nd Jack Sweeney  have discovered a ledge on the western'slope of  the mountain and about 2 miles from the Whitewater. They have uncovered-it 50 feet, and find  the ledge to average. 3 feet in' width, the ore being  of the same character as that of the Whitewater'.  Charles Nicholson has also made a lotation, on  the west end of the Midas, that promises well.  The <;ra������le   of the  Ore  Binprovinjr.  The crosscut tunnel on the Dandy was advanced 15 feet this week, and the boys who have  the contract for running it expect to send it. in  20 feet next week..-.-Within. 6 weeks it should  reach the main ledge, at a depth of 125 feet from  the surface. The lower tunnel is now on the  main vein and good headway is being made.  The 'grade of the ore is also improving. That  the company means business is evidenced by the  fact that snppl ies for S inoiit lis have been ordered.  Prospectors Ifcrivcn   Out  hy -Forest  Fires.  James Fox  came  in   from   the lower country  this week. He said that he had been on a. prospecting trip on Deep creek, a stream that flows  into the Fend d'Orille on this side of the boundary line. A. M. Kelly and Thomas McAuley  were with him. The country is a good one to  prospect in, the indications being favorable; but  forest fires were .raging, and they were driven  out. However, the recent rains will allow them  to return. ______   .Six   ISuurircri   Dollars  in  Oust.  The placers on  Hall creek are turning  out to  be small-sized bonanzas for the few men who  had the good sense to stay with the camp. Yesterday "French Eugene" and his partner brought  in 32 ounces of dust, the result of their last  cleanup, and sold it to Hume & Go. Other claim  owner's are reported doing equally well.  Xsw  ������������������'Vs- THE  MfflEE,:    NELSON,   B.   0.,  SATUEDAY,   SEPTEMBEE  19,   1891.  NELSON SAWMILL GO,  Yard:  It end of Flume in Nelson.  Mill:   Two Miles South of Nelson.  Manufacture  OLDINGS  The mill is now in thorough order  And Will Out 20,000 Feet a Day.  Orders for special-size stuff will receive prompt  attention.  The Kootenay Lake Saw-mill is  always ready for business, Lumber��������� good, bad, and indifferent ��������� on  hand or made to order.  G,0. BUCHANAN.  Nelson, January loth.  The Davies-Sa  Sawmill Com  MANUFACTURERS OF  OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.  PBICE  LIST  (DELIVERED AT NELSON,  AINSWORTH,   OR   BALFOUR).  .'.DRESSED.  No. 1 flooring, 4 .inch, per M  $32 00  No. 2         "        C> inch,      "  27 00  No. 1 ceiling, 4 inch,       "  32 00  No. 2        "       6 inch,        "      .:  27 00  Rustic,                                 "  27 00  Select clear, DD,         ,   "  40 00  No. 1 common, I),            "       25 00  1)1),          "       27 00  Bar and counter tops, clear, per foot   10  No. 1 common, per M  $20 00  No. 2        " "     15 00  Culls, "     12 00  Shingles, "      4 50  MOLIUNfiS.  Bead, panel, crown, base, etc., etc., per foot ....'.2.$@10c  Mills sit Pilot Bay, Kootenay Luke.'-  . 0. Spalding,   .   .   .    Manager  11. F. FERRY, Agent at kelson.  K&EBfl^EK ������fc WATSON, Agents at Ainswortli.  HOW   WATERLOO   WAS   LOST.  Napoleon's version of the battle of Waterloo,  which, so the London Globe asserts, has never  been published before in English, is to appear in  the next number of the United Service Gazette.  The Globe prints the following extracts:  After detailing the preparations for the battle  Napoleon says:   "The cannonade commenced;  the   enemy  supported the   troops  he  had advanced to guard the wood by 30 pieces of cannon.    We, on our side also posted some artillery.  At one time prince Jerome became master  of  the whole wood, and the whole English army  retired behind a ridge.    The count d'Erlon their  attacked the village of Mont Saint Jean; he supported his attack with 80 pieces of cannon.    He  commenced there an overpowering cannonade,  which must have greatly harrassed the English  army.  The whole action .took place on the plain.  A brigade of count d'Erlon's First division took  possession of the village of Mont Saint Jean; a  second brigade was charged by a corps of English cavalry, Which inflicted upon it great loss.  At the same moment a division of English cavalry   charged   upon    count   d'Erlon's   cbatteiy  on its right and dismounted several guns; but  general Melhaud's cuirassiers charged this division, of which 3regiments were routed and fled."  In the afternoon the Prussian division became  engaged  with  count  Lobau'sskirmishe?*s,   and  the whole strength of the reserve was held ready  to  assist count Lobau and crush the Prussian  corpscwheii it should advance.    He continues:  "This done, the emperor intended to  make an  attack in the direction of the  village of Mount  Saint Jean, which, it was expected, would prove  a decisive  blow, but by a movement of impatience, so frequent in our military annals, and  which  has so often  been .disastrous -*to us, the  cavalry in reserve, perceiving a retrograde movement of the English to ;place themselves under  shelter from our batteries, from which th'ev had  already suffered so much, crowned the -.heights.,  of Mount Saint Jean and charged the infantry.  This movement, made at the right moment, and  backed bv the reserves, ought to  have decided  thes day;  made separately, and before the operations  on  the right   were  completed,   if   proved  fatal.    Having do means to countermand it, the  enemy showing large masses of infantry and of  cavalry, and the 2 divisions of cuirassiers being  engaged, the whole of our cavalry started at the  same moment to support their comrades.  "There..during 3 hours they made numerous  charges, by which we gained the breaking of  ..several squares and 6 flags of the British infantry, an advantage hardly commensurate with  the losses sustained by our cavalry..from' grape-  shot and musketry. It was impossible for us to  use our reserves of infantry until the attack of  the Prussian corps on our flank was repulsed.  This attack still continued and directly on our  right flank. The emperor sent there general  Duchesne with the Young Guard and several reserve batteries. The enemy was checked, was  repulsed, and retreated; he had exhausted his  forces, and there was nothing further to fear  from him. This was the moment suitable for  an attack on the center of the enemy. As the  cuirassiers were suffering from musketry fire, I  battalions of the Young Guard were sent to support the cuirassiers, to aid their position, and if  it were possible to disengage and withdraw a  part of our cavalry to the plain. Two other-  battalions were sent to hold the eminence on  the extreme left of the division which' had-maneuvered on our flanks in order that there might  be no cause for uneasiness in this direction ; the;  rest were placed in reserve, one part to occupy  the eminence in rear of Mont Saint Jean, the  other On the plain behind the field of battle,  which formed our line of retreat.  "Under these circumstances- the battle was  gained; we occupied all the positions that were  occupied by the enemy at the commencement of  the action; our cavalry having been too quick  and badly employed, we could no longer hope  for a decisive success. But marshal Grouchy,  having learned of the movement of the Prussian  corps,"inarched in the rear of that corps, which  assured us a splendid success for the next day.  After 8 hours of firing and of charges of infantry and of cavalry the whole army saw with satisfaction the battle gained and the field of battle  in our power. At half-past 8 the 4 battalions of  the Young Guard, which had been sent to the  plain beyond Mont Saint Jean to support the  cuirassiers, being inconvenienced by the enemy's  g  grapeshot,   advanced   with   bayonets   fixed to  sweep off its batteries.  "The day closed in; a charge on their flank by  several English squadrons broke their ranks;  the fugitives repassed the ravine; the neighbor  ing regiments, who saw some troops belonging  to the guard in disorder, thought it was the  Old Guard and gave way. The cry arose: 'All  is lost!' The guard is beaten back!' The soldiers  even maintain that at several points wretched  renegades cried out: 'Save qui pent!' Be that  as it may, terror and panic immediately spread  over the whole battlefield; all fled in the greatest disorder along the line of communication���������  soldiers, gunners, wagons hurried on! The Old  Guard, which was in reset*ve, was' pressed back  and carried away. In an instant the army was  only a confused mass���������all the arms were intermingled and it was impossible 16"reform a corps.  The enemy preceived this astounding confusion ;  . sent forward columns of cavalry; the disorder  augmented, the confusion of the nightprevented  the rallying of the troops and showing them  their mistake."  Another'.Smelter Standing Idle.  Golden Era, 12th:   The smelter was finished  this week and is now in first-class working shape  ih-!-every respect. The work throughout has  been done in t he most thorough manner, and is  a credit to the management of the company.  The smelter, however, will hot commence to  treat ore until next spring.  Will contract; for the erection of stores, hotels, dwellings,  bridges, etc., tuuT guarantee work finished on time.  SEASONED   LXJ3VEBEI?,  always on hand for store fittings, desks, tables, etc.  Undertaking attended to.  Shop: Oor. Baker and Josephine Sts,  R. J. M0WAT & Ca "  (Successors to R. J. Hilts & Co.)  Contractors and Builders,  SEASONED   LUMBEP  always on hand for store fittings, desks, tables, etc.  Will contract to erect all kinds of buildings and guarantee  satisfaction.    Shop: corner Josephine and Bluff sts.  G"E0.E.E/. ELLIS, F. 0. S.  SyilNJNG   ENGINEER   A8SSD   CHEMIST,  Author of "Practical Organic Analysis," the "Iron Ores of  the World," etc.; expert in the "Bluebird  Mining Suit" (Butte City);  XKHSOff,  11. -C. .  Will examine and report on, or superintend the development of, mining properties in West Kootenay; advises on the treatment of ores, and furnishes specifications of mining, milling, and smelting plants.  ASSAY ���������HAlt<;ES : Gold, silver, or lead, $1.50 each.  Gold and silver, or lead and silver, $2. Copper, $2.50.  Silver and copper, $3. Gold, silver, and lead, $3. Gold,  silver, and copper, ������>4 ; and so on.  Physician, Surgeon, and Accoucheur,  Office:   Stanley Street.  Barrister at  Law,   Solicitor,   Notary  Public, Etc.  Office, Victoria street, Kamloops, B. C.  (A. M. Can. Soc. C. E.)  CIVIL ENGINEER AND AE0HITE0T,  (mi* j*.  TOISON   BHfiLI*Oi������.  .NELSON, B. C. THE  MIKEE:    KELSON,  B.  0.;  SATUEDAY,  SEPTEMBEE  19,   1891.  SAMPOffG   ORES   WITHOUT   MA���������HINEKY.  The taking of proper samples of crude ores  seems to be less thoroughly understood, or less  carefully practiced, than its importance requires.  There is no metallurgical or chemical establishment which does hot frequently receive samples  truly representing nothing. They consist usually of bits of ore, or what not, selected because  they are worse or better than the average of  what they are meant to represent. And they  are worthless, no matter who made the selection. Where conscious choice is permitted to  enter into the operation, a fair sample will not  result, unless by a miracle.    Exact sampling is  the indespensible first step towards learning the  value of any boxful, carload, or shipment of ore.  There are two principal processes to be considered: First, how to take the gross sample of  the lot of ore; second, how to proceed with that  sample. Really, there is no iron bound rule  governing the first step; each may have a way  of his own; yet most samplers proceed in much  the same way. But once having the rough  sample, there is no question as to what shall be  done with it. It must be broken and mixed and  quartered until only a few ounces remain.  To take, for illustration, a definite case, let us  assume that we have to sample a 10-ton pile of  10 per cent copper ore, prepared for market.    It  willconsist of masses generally the size of one's  fist, but of all smaller masses and even of dust.  We shall require for  the work a clean, tight  floor or platform, an iron mortar and pestle, a  ������ shovel, a small hammer, a piece of iron for an  anvil, and, lastly, a broom.    Besides these we  shall find convenient a wheelbarrow or a barrel  or box of some kind.    Begin by shoveling the  pile roughly into the form of a flattened,cone or  a flattened pyramid; say we choose t he pyramid.  Now make a trench straight through the pile,  cutting it into 2 nearly equal parts.    And again  by a trench (at right angles to the first) divide  these halves into 4 nearly  equal  quarters.    A  part of the ore taken  from these trenches will  form the sample required.    Proceed as follows:  Having the wheelbarrow ready, begin at the  middle of any side of the made-up pile and cut  the first trench.    Cast the first shovelful to the  right, the second to the left, the third into the  wheelbarrow.    Repeat this  order of shoveling  until the barrow is full, then empty it upon the  well-swept floor intended to receive the sample.  Continue in the same way until the trench has  passed through the pile, when there will result  two. rather long and narrow piles.    Begin the  second trench, extending it across the'middle of  the two piles, casting the first shovelful right,  the second left, the third into the barrow.    Proceed in the same way as with the first trench.  When done, you will have shoveled about 6000  pounds  of ore.    As  every third shovelful  was  thrown into the barrow, there will result about  2000 pounds of sample upon the floor.    This is a  fair sample of the original pile, based upon the  assumption  that each  third  shovelful thrown  into the  barrow was like the first and second  ones  cast  into the piles.    Having the sample,  proceed with it after the regulation method, as  follows:  Spread it thinly upon the floor; now examine  it. If there be any lumps which look larger  than the general run, place the anvil upon the  pile, and between that and the hammer break  those lumps. The next step is to thoroughly  well mix the sample. Begin at one edge of it  and shovel the ore over upon itself. Move around  to the opposite side of the pile, and from that  side shovel the ore again upon itself, and back  again to its original place upon the floor. Having it well mixed, form it. into a flattened cone  and sweep all the dust upon and around the pile.  You have now to halve and quarter the sample  as follows :  Commence at any point and shovel a road  through the center of the pile, casting the  shovelfuls alternately right and left as you proceed. This movement will result in cutting the  pile into 2 elongated nearly equal ones. Beginning at the middle of one of them, shovel a  road through it in the same way as was done  before. And in precisely the same way cut the  other pile in two; sweep upon each pile the dust  belonging to it. These movements will result  in 4 piles as in figure 1.  If the sample were well mixed, when and as  directed in these notes, then   will each of the  quarters A BCD have the same composition as  have all the others. But if, upon inspecting  them, you judge one or another to be poorer or  richer than the others, you will have then sufficient evidence that the work has been badly  performed. In that condition of affairs, mix  well together all the piles, and once more halve  and quarter them. Having made all the quarters of the same com position-,- it follows that any  two of them may safely be accepted as representing the original 2000 pounds of rough sample. This opens a road leading in the right direction, since it enables us finally to get rid of  half the sample. We may cast out two of the  quarters and retain the other two for the sample.  It is a matter of indifference which two are retained, say A and B. Remove from the floor C  and Dj together with the dust belonging to  them..   ���������������  We have again to break the larger stones,  until there remain none larger than walnuts.  Place the anvils between the, piles, within easy  reach of them. Take a stone from A, break  it;   take   one   from   B, break   that.    Continue  '������������������' Figure !.'"���������.,  in this way, taking stones alternately from  each pile, until all are reduced to the size  stated. By proceeding in this way the sample  is more or less mixed while being broken. Complete the mixing as before, by shoveling all of  the sample forth and back over the floor. 'Form'  it once more into a flattened cone, and sweep  the dust upon and around it. Divide the cone  into 2 halves, and those into 4quarters, precisely  as you before did, and as illustrated in figure 1.  tou have now to reject 2 of these quarters. The  unwritten law of the sampler says that it must  be those positions A and B, because those .were  retained in the last quartering. Remove A and  B from the floor, retaining C and D for the  sample. These would now weigh about 5000  pounds.  Proceeding as before, break down the lumps  of ore until none are left larger than say 1-inch  cubes. Again mix well the sample, make it  into a pile, sweep up the dust, halve and quarter  the pile. Reject 2 quarters (C and D, of course),  retain 2, precisely as in former quarterings.  Once more break the lumps, this time down to  half-inch cubes. Mix well the sample, make it  into a pile, sweep up the dust, halve and quarter,  reject 2 quarters. The two retained would  weigh about 125 pounds. Break it down until  comparable to fine gravel and coarse sand. Mix  and quarter once more.  The 2 quarters this time retained wouldweigh  about 60 pounds. With the mortar and pestle  break this to something approaching coarse  sand. Again mix and quarter. The ��������� quarters  this time retained are to be ground finer, mixed  and quartered.  If you have no mortar and pestle, the hammer  and anvil may be substituted throughout.  After getting the material into the form of  coarse sand, it is best to mix and quarter it upon  a sheet of paper, even an old newspaper.  At this point the sample would weigh about  15 pounds; its larger grains would be in size  like coarse, sand. It would be safe now, without further breaking, to mix and quarter it  twice, or until its weight did not exceed 4  pounds. Run this through the mortar and  then mix and quarter it twice, or down to 1  pound weight. Bring this to something approaching powder, and, for the last time, mix  and quarter it. Have ready 6 wide-mouth one-  ounce bottles. Place them in a line, side by  side, upon a sheet of paper. From the other  paper pour the ground sample in a small stream,  forth and back across the mouths of the bottles,  until they are all full up to their shoulders. Cork,  seal, and label them and the sampling is done,  and properly done.  GtEorge'C. Hunt  J. Dover  Josephine Street^  Nelson, B.C.  Manufacturing Jewelers  for the Trade.  DIAMONDS  S1WERWAEE  DEALERS IN'.X  WATCHEl  CHRONOGRAPHS  '   ' '���������"'".' . ��������� ���������  I : .  AND  ALL FINE WATCHES  Carefully   Repaired   anil   Satisfaction   Guaranteed,  and All Orders by Mail Promptly Attended to.  "Ho..'. 1 Houston & Ink Building, Josephine Street.  Branch Store at Donald, B. 0.  GILKER & WELLS';  Postofiftce Store,  Nelson,  B. C.  AND GENTS' FUKKESHBTG GOODS.  ALSO,  FULL LINES OF  Toilet Articles and Stationery.  cigars at Wholesale  only.  S&^r Bob Shes Ian  ERCHANT TAIL0  NELSON, B. C.  are now settled in their new store, No. 2 Houston & Ink  building, and have on display a full range of  Plain and/Fancy Worsted Suitings and Scotch and  Irish Tweeds and Serges.  PRICES TOSUIT THE TIlSdlES  BALFOUR, B. C.  Wholesale,   Kef ail,  and   Commission Merchant,  Dry Goods and Groceries.  FIVE PER CENT DISCOUNT  will be allowed on all retail CASH purchases, of over $5,  on any line of goods.   Liberal discounts on CASH  wholesale orders.  w 4  THE  MIHER:    ffELSOtf,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,   SEPTEMBEE  19,  1891.  The Miner is printed on Saturdays, and will be  mailed to subscribers at the following cash-in-advance  rates: Three months $1.50,six months $2.50, one year $������.  Contract Advertisements will be inserted at the  rate of $3 an inch (down the column) per month. A  special rate for advertisements of over 2 inches.  Transient Advertisement^ will be inserted for  15 cents a line for the first insertion and 7 cents a line  for each additional insertion. Twelve lines of 9 words  each make an inch. All advertisements printed for  .-.��������� a less period than 3 months considered transient arid  must be paid for in advance. Advertisements of less  than 12 lines will be counted as 12 lines.  .Birth Notices free if weight of child is given; if  weight is not given $1 will-be charged. Marriage  announcements will be charged from"'������>! to $10���������according to the social standing of the bridegroom.  Job Printing in good style at fair rates. Cards,  envelopes, and letter, note, and account papers kept  in stock. ,  Letters to the Editor will only appear over the  writer's name.   Communications-with such signatures  ,as "Old Subscriber," "Veritas," "Citizen," etc., etc.,  n .t,$< will not be printed on any consideration.  Address all Letters :  The Mineh, Nelson, B. C.  KDlTOKIAX    lUSMASSKS.  It is strange how eager men are to cater to the  weakenesses of their fellow-men���������if money can  be made in  the catering.    Until this week no  liquor was sold on Toad mountain, and the men  employed there lost little time by indulging in  *4sprees,"and their employers got a fair return in  work for the money paid as wages.    The miners  did not petition for the privilege of having liquor  sold   within   a   stone's   throw   of   where   they  work, no more than did their   employers.    No  one,   in   fact,: wanted   liquor   on   the   mount--  ain    except    the    man    who    wanted    to   sell  it.    His   wish alone   was   considered   in  granting the license.    Now that the license has been  granted and the business of retailing liquor commenced, the peace and good  will  and industry  that reigned on the mountain are gone.    Fights  have already taken place, friendships are broken,  and industrious men are no longer industrious.  This is one of the results of having an official in  ���������charge-of- a distict  who cares nothing for its  people or their interests.    The sooner he is removed the better. _____  The following  is  an   extract from   a private  letter to the  editor  of The Miner:    "I  send  4i you a very excellent quality of specular iron  "ore, which has quite recently been located in  " the Nicola valley, near the coking coal which  ** there exists.    You will recognize the value of  "a grade of iron ore (resembling the remarkable  ** Republic mine in  Michigan) close  to a good  "coking coal.    I  hope  you   will  advocate  the  " policy of the local and Dominion governments  " both helping railways which will open up good  "coke fields, so important to the smelting  in-  " terests."   The Miner recognizes the fact that  the  early development of the mining districts  of British Columbia depends, in a great measure,  on the building of railways; railways that will not  be mere branches or feeders of a great system,  but railways that will be independent and competitive.   To that end it has advocated a change  iii both the local and the Dominion laws, so that  capitalists willing to build railways could do so  without   legislative    hindrance.     The    present  policy of first chartering and then subsidizing  railway companys should  be done away with,  and a policy substituted that would permit railways to be built anywhere'and by anyone wishing to build them.    It should be no concern of a  government whether a new railway interfers with  or competes with an old one, any more than it is  its concern whether a new manufacturing establishment interferes with or competes with an old  one.    The plant of  a manufacturing company  which cost a million  dollars and  which  gives  steady employment to a thousand men is certainly as much of a "vested right" as the plant  of a railway company costing a like sum and  employing a  less  number of   men.     Yet   the  "vested right" cry is never applicable to the  manufacturing company, but always to the railway company. \____  It is not necessary to make long arguments to  prove that a general railway law would result in  great benefit to this province. Such a law works  well in the western states of the republic, and it  would work equally well in this province were it  once tried. Then men willing to build railways  would not heed be compelled to get permission  to do so from a body of men governed too often  by self interest or narrow prejudices, and  the large sums they are now forced to spend  to secure charters would be used in actual construction work. It would also tend to do away  with appeals for subsidies, as it is a well-known  fact that more money is spent in log-rolling  charters through parliament than is regained in  subsidies. Place no restrictions on railway building, and there will be no necessity for either the  province or Dominion .granting other aid than,  perhaps, freedom from taxation for a term  of years. _____  Mr. Van Horne, accompanied by a latter-day  lord, a Scotch baron whose title is musty with  age, and a lot of plain misters who would like to  be lords and barons, is making a tour of inspection over the Canadian Pacific and its branches.  He was in extremely good humor when at Calgary, and predicted a great future for that town,  a town that his company has for years been  doing its best to "down." When at Vancouver  he will, no doubt, "stuff" the people of that place  with all manner of fair promises. When he  comes to Nelson, he will tell his admirers  that he has always had great faith in the  mineral resources of the Kootenay Lake country, and that his company is our best friend.  Mr. Van Horne, your "taffy" will not deceive  us. On a former trip here you said that the  building of the Nelson-Sproat branch was a  gamble, which meant, if it meant anything,  that you had no very strong faith in the future  of this country.  and  CHEMICALS  CHOICE TOILET AETICLES  AND  PATENT MEDICINES  AT  Dr. Arthur's Medical Hall  Corner Stanley and  Bluff Streets.  A Specially Fine Assortment of Flavoring Essences  insr   STOCK.  Meals, 25c.  Table Board, $4 per Week-  Board and Lodging, $5 per Week.  APPLICATION   FOR   LIQUOR   LSCENSE.  Notice is hereby given that thirty (30) days after date I  intend to apply to the gold commissioner of West Kootenay  district for a hotel and liquor license for Kaslo House,  Kaslo. GEORGE T. KANE.  Kaslo, B. C, September 17th, 1891.  W. J. WILSON.  &&C������&lj&[������&  W.PERDUE.  ILSON  PROPRIETORS  OF  AT.  NELSON AND ABTSWOETH.  Will contract to supply mining companies and steamboat*  with fresh meats, and deliver same at any mine or  landing in the Kootenay Lake country.  CORRAL AND STABLING  AT NELSON,  ,.        <;   r   '  where saddle and pack animals can always be hired, and  teams obtained for job teaming.  MAKE   OOITTBACTS  with  merchants for hauling freight to or from  railroad  depot and steamboat wharf.  NELSON  OEFICE AND  MARKET,  NO. H EAST BAKER STREET  Incuts mcimtre,  PROPRIETOR OF THE  PIOITEEII  CORRAL and STABLE  Near Corner East Vernon and  Hall Streets,  NELSON, B. C.  Will undertake any work or contract in which pack animals or teams can be used.    Will furnish  SADDLE AND PACK ANIMALS  to parties who wish to examine mines and claims  in Toad Mountain district;  WILL   COMPACT  TO  OAEEY FASSENGEKS  and baggage to and from hotels; also, freight  to and from steamboat wharves and  railway depots.  CONTRACT TO GRADE LOTS IN NELSON.  Stove and Cord wood for Sale.  a?Tr3:T������J  Kootenay Safe Deposit Co.  IT^IEIl.SOIEsr.,  T3. O-.  Transacts a private banking business;  Allows interest at best rates on amounts of $1 upwards ;  Receives articles for safe keeping.  ������ENEKAL AdEtfCY  London & Lancashire Life Insurance Company,  AGENCIES Sir Donald A. Smith, chairman.  Accident Insurance Company of North America,  $15 a week, $3000 on death, for 25 cents a day;  The celebrated Taylor safes.  ���������������KKESP������NI>EiWS  Vancouver���������The Bank of British North America;  Spokane Falls���������The Bank of Spokane Falls.  CSIAS. E. TAYIOK, Manager.  VIOLIIT     TEACIIEB,  NEIiSON,   B. ���������.  Music furnished for dances, parties, and receptions.   Leave  orders with Gilker & Wells, Postoffice store.                  ft&fM THE  MINER:    NELSON,  E.  0.,   SATUEDAY,  SEPTEMBER  19,  1891.
Dealers in Dry Goods, Groceries, Provisions, G^ Etc.   Miners' Supplies a Specialty.
The stock is fuU and complete in eveiy Department, and
,    and compare Prices.       ; ���...*:��� r.\"   ': ���. ;'.'������'������  ".   -.
Main Street, REYELSTOKE.
9 and 11 East Vernon Street, NELSON.
IS THE AVERAGE':"BilSINBSS: .MAN  DISHONOKABtE?"
Toroh to Week:   " Someone has well observed
that such transactions as those of which several
public servants at Ottawa have been guilty imply two parties, and that the giver of the bribe
shares the guilt  with the receiver.    This is certainly true to some extent in  evevy case, since
every man of sufficient intelligence and ability
to be at the head of a large business must know,
to  say nothing   of  the   legitimacy  of his   own
motives, that  he is sapping the foundations of
integrity in the man with whom  he is dealing-
assuming that, the latter is not already unprincipled���and so, be weakening his moral defences,
doing him  the worst  kind of injury which one
man can do to another.    It is true to th��^ fullest
extent in cases in which, the giver of the bribe
becomes the tempter and  forces his gifts upon
the recipient, while the conscience of the latter
is still more or less feebly resisting.     The mora
aspect of the affair is somewhat: changed when
the favors are asked for by the receivers, since it
is conceivable that, apart,  from  his own ���selfish"
interests or sinister ends, the dealer may, in the
kindness of his heart, find it hard to resist a pitiable appeal.    Of course it is not in the power of
the government to punish the party of the second part, save, possibly, by putting the firm on
a  black   list,   representing   those   with   whom
the departmental  officers are forbidden to deal.
But  as  a matter  of   business  ethics,  it   would
be  interesting to  know  just   how  such   methods of    securing    customs    are    regarded    by
the average business man.    Is there any written
or unwritten code governing such transactions?
It was obvious that some of the business  managers  or heads of firms who gave evidence at
Ottawa saw .nothing wrong in the bestowal of
gifts, so far as they themselves were concerned,
though vve may have ashr-ewd guess as to what
���were" their private opinions Of  those who solicited and accepted them.    We should really like
to know what view of the ethics of the matter
prevails in business circles,"
tffcwestions by an Iiitenrting Settlor Answered.
To the Editor of The Miner: I would feel much
obliged to you if you would kindly give me some information about the Kootenay district, especially about Nelson
and lake Kootenay. I am desirous of settling on lake
Kootenay somewhere near Nelson���not for the .purpose of
mining, but to start a lien ranch, and also a market garden,
to supply Nelson with eggs and green stuff, that is, if there
is any kind of a chance or. show for one. Would you
kindly answer the following questions:
1. Can I purchase within say 6 miles of Nelson 15 or 20
acres, part.bush, and say 6 or 7 acres of natural prairie or
clear land, free from spring or summer floods?
2. At what price per acre close to lake?
3. Can I procure lumber there and at what price per
thousand; also, shingles per thousand?
4. Please give me average price of provisions���flour, tea,
sugar, pork, beef, etc.
5. What is the rate per day of labor, helping to erect
house, fencing, ploughing, etc.?
6. Is not fishing allowed in lake Kootenay; if so what
license is required, by the government? Are fish so caught
(either fresh, salted or smoked) allowed to be sold to the
public?
7. What stores in Nelson, and hotel prices per day?
8. Would a hen ranch and market garden pay?
H. E. PLUNKETT.
Channel Island, Lake Winnipeg, August 29th.
The land for a mile on each side of the river
west of Nelson and on the outlet east of Nelson
is either reserved from purchase by the provincial government, or owned by the Canadian Pacific  railway.    Until   the   reserve   is  taken-'off,'
these lands cannot be obtained by intending settlers.    While  the aggregate area of cultivable
land is   not  large, yet  there are  a number  of
small tracts suitable for market gardens within
easy distance of Nelson both  by rail and water.
The Canadian Pacific lands are offered at from
$5 to $10 per acre, the acreage purchased governing the price.    Full particulars of these lands
can,   no  doubt, be obtained at  the company's
land office at Winnipeg.    These lands are generally timbered, although an occasional patch of
meadow land is found.    The lands west of Nelson are not subject to overflow, and those on the
, outlet east of Nelson not enough to impair their
value.    The price of lumber- ranges from $15 for
common   rough   to   $27   for  dressed;   shingles,
$4.50.   .Provisions retail as  follows:    Flour, $4
.per 100 pounds: tea, 50 cents a pound; sugar, 10
cents; beef, from 12_r. to 18 cents; pork, 18 cents;
mutton, 18 cents; eggs, 35 to 50 cents a dozen.
The  vvages  prevailing  in   the  Kootenay  Lake
country are:-.'$3 a day for laborer's, $3.50 a day
for miners, $4 to $5 for skilled mechanics.    As
regards fishing, the regulations in force on  lake
^Winnipeg are in  force  on   Kootenay lake and
river.    All  branches of business are well represented at Nelson, as the advertising,columns of
The Miner go to show; hotel rates run from
$1.50 to $2.50 a day for transients, and  are $7 a
week for day board.    A hen'ranch and market
garden   would   undoubtedly   pay.      While   the
above is the information asked for, The Miner
would not advise men of small means or laboring men to come to the Kootenay Lake country
this year; next year will be early enough.
Landscape Photographers,
WEST BAKES STEEET, NELSON.
Views of Nelson and  all the most interesting scenery in
British Columbia.
Dealers   in   Steel   Engravings,   Etchings,   Photo-
Gravures, Archetypes, etc.
Picture Mats and all kinds of Framing done to order.
Kootenay Lake Country, and others whom it may
Concern and Interest;
My stock of sample goods, consisting of the following;
lines, is now open for inspection, and I am prepared to ro-
ceive orders for any amount. Fine clothing of all sorts,
(under- and over-), boots, hats, (over 100 different, including men's, boys', and girls'), towels, ties, braces, blankets,
carpets, mats, needles, thread, cotton, buttons, etc.
Prices will be quoted to merchants f. o. b. at the nearest
wharf, thus saving them all trouble with custom or freight
agents, and so forth. Special inducements for cash payments on large orders. Call and see the stock before
ordering your fall supplies, and I think you will be pleased.
A small stock also on sale to retail customers.
CHARLES WESTLY BUSK, Balfour, B. C.
Canadian Pacific Railway
QUE NATIONAL HIGHWAY.
Through Passenger Service from Ocean to Ocean.
3STO   GHA^aSTGES..
LOWEST FARES TO ALL POINTS
To secure quick despatch and lowest freight rates
Kootenay XjiIcc 'SIii_��]>er.s will be con-V
suiting   their   own  interests
"'.<, by shipping by the
The Columbia & Kootenay Steam Navigation Company's
Steamer  LYTTOW .
leaves Robson for Revelstoke on Tuesdays and Saturdays
on arrival of trains from Nelson, and -makes close
connections at Revelstoke with trains for
VANCOUVER, gr
FEW WESTMINSTER, ?J
VICTORIA,
to
.<
\
TOROIsTTO.
ST.  ZP^TX!_,.,'
CHICAGO,
AND ALL POINTS EAST.
Por rates,   maps,   time-tables, >etc.,  etc.,   apply  to  any
agent of the company. -
ROBERT KERR, D. E.  BROWN,
Gen'l Fr't and Passenger Ag't, Ass't Gen'l Fr't & Pas'r Ag't.
Winnipeg, Manitoba. Vancouver, B. C.
THE    COLUMBIA    &   KOOTENAY    STEAM
NAVIGATION   COMPANY,   LIMITED.
THE STEAMER NELSON
will leave NELSON-on'Tuesdays,-.Wednesdays, Fridays,
and Saturdays for AINSWORTH.
On Tuesdays and Fridays'at (> A. M., and oh Wednesdays
and Saturdays at 1:30 A.-M., on which days she
will go through to BONNER'S FERRY.
THE STEAMER LYTTON
will leave Revelstoke at daylight on Mondays and Fridays,
arriving at Robson same days.   Leaves Robson on
Tuesdays and Saturdays for Little Dalles,
returning same days and proceeding
on up river to Revelstoke,
Close connections at Robson with trains for Nelson.
F.- ii. OIKSSTHSS, Agent,	
KEVEL&TOKE,  K. V.
The Kootenay Smelting and Trading
Syndicate, Limited, of Revelstoke, B. 0.
are prepared to sample and purchase
all kinds of
Prices and all information furnished on application.
J. CAMPBELL, manager.
m
gm
m
1111111^^
^���T^TTT-TFTC'W
^ni^SS^^lB^fSSKISSIStiKSmmiamixaimiBmsmmemmimMamm 6  THE  MINER:    NELSON,':B.','O.V SATURDAY,   SEPTEMBER  19,   1891.  Corner West Vernon arid Stanley Streets, NELSON, B. C.  ONLY TWO-STORY HOTEL IN NELSON.  The International has a comfortably furnished parlor for  ladies, and the rooms are large and furnished  newly throughout.  THE   TABLE  IS  NOT  SURPASSED  by any hotel in the Kootenay Lake country.  A share of transient trade solicited.  THE SAMPLE-ROOM IS STOCKED WITH CHOICE CIGARS  AND THE FINEST BRANDS OF LIQUORS.  J AS. DAWSON  B. GRADDOGK  PROPRIETORS  HOT IE ID  EAST  TKkS'ON .STREET,- .NEAR   HAM..  THE GRAND  WILL BE  CONDUCTED  IN  GOOD  STYLE  AND AS    -  IT FRONTS ON THE OUTLET  IT IS ONE OF THE  BEST SITUATED HOTELS IN NELSON.  THE DINING-ROOM IS NOT  SURPASSED  BY THAT OF ANY HOTEL ON THE LAKE  AND THE BAR WILL  ALWAYS   BE   STOCKED   WITH   CHOICE  LIQUORS AND CIGARS.  PROPRIETORS.  (<  The  Finest Hotel in Toad  Mountain  District."  Corner West Baker and Ward Streets,  NELSON, B. ���������.  PROPRIETORS.  The Silver King is a new building and furnished with new  furniture from kitchen to attic.   The table will not  be equalled by any hotel in Nelson.  THE   BAI>   MANNERS    OF^SOME   WOMEN.  Oscar Fay Adams, in the North American Review, roundly declares that while others may  believe that woman supplies the restraining,  softening influence at work in human society,  he is convinced that woman, so far from being  the refiner of manners, is disgracefully inconsiderate, superatively selfish, and exasperating! y  insolent. The rudeness of women in their intercourse with the world at large is such that he  maintains that it would not remain in force  among men in their intercourse with each other  for one half hour. It shows itself in many ways,  some of which he ventures to describe. Women  in their relations with men presume upon the  privileges of their sex; they are spiteful exceedingly in their dealing with each other. His  summing up of the whole matter is under the  following heads:  First���������The indifference with which a woman  will contemplate the fact that the convenience  of others has been sacrificed to her caprice.  Very observable in young women.  Second���������The needless delay a women often  causes in making her appearance when visitors  have called upon her. Most, commonly noticed  among women who are no longer classed as  girls. -  Third���������The unwillingness of a woman to wait  for another to finish speaking before beginning  to speak herself. Characteristic of nearly all  women.  .���������"Fourth���������Woman's failure to recognize the importance of an engagement.r. Most noticeable  among women who have the fewest social duties.  What I do insist upon, however, is this: that  in public the average woman shows an incon-  siderateness, a disregard for the ordinary courtesies of existanee (which amounts sometimes to  positive insolence), to a degree that is not anywhere nearly approached by the average 'man..  Mr. Adams concludes his article, by a hope  that "a little healthy discussion may bring about  a reformation-in the public manners of our sister-  woman. "  NOTARY PUBLIC.  REAL-ESTATE AND ���������MINES-  CONVEYANCING..  Town lots, lands, and mining claims handled on commission.   Conveyancing documents drawn up.  Correspondence solicited.  Office:   No. 13 East Baker Street, NELSON, B. 0.  amber, Thynne, and Henshaw,  Beal Estate, Mining Brokers,  AND  Insurance Agents.  Water Street,  VANCOUVER.  West Baker Street,  NELSON.  Brokers,  Corner Baker and Stanley Streets,  NELSON,  B. ������5.  INVESTME1TTS  FOR NON-RESIDENTS A  SPECIALTY.  BENTS   COLLECTED 1&EBTS   COLLECTS������  Cor. Baker and Ward Sts.  NELSON, -B. C.  H.   &   T.   MADDEN  Proprietors.  The Madden is Centrally Located,  with  a frontage cowards Kootenay river, and  is newly  furnished throughout.  THE      T \JL. BLE  )h supplied. ..with everything in the market,  the kitchen  being under the immediate supervision of Hugh  Madden, a caterer of large experience.  THE   BAR   IS   STOCKED  WITH   THE   BEST  brands of beer, ale, wine, whisky, and cigars.  K00TE  Vernon Street, near Josephine,  NELSON,  B. C.  AXEL  JOHNSON,  PROPRIETOR.  THE  HOTEL OVERLOOKS THE KOOTENAY  its guests thus obtaining splendid views  of both mountain and river.  THE   ROOMS  are comfortable in size and  newly furnished.  THE   TABLE  is  acknowledged   the best  in the mountains.  in stocked  with  the best liquors and cigars procurable.  No whiskies sold except Hiram Walker & Sons'  celebrated brands.  East Baker Street, Nelson,  la one of the best hotels in Toad Mountain district,  and is the headquarters for prospectors and  working miners.  The Table is not Surpassed by that of any Hotel  in the Kootenay Lake country.  At the Bar is Dispensed Fine Liquors and Cigars,  and the bed-rooms are newly furnished.  mALONE   ������&   TBECJILLUS  PBOPBIETOBS  TKAIL,  B. ���������.  TOPPING & HANNA Proprietors  Coed  Table; GoodBeds;  My������s-���������l������Be Lienors.  ^3^;?^^^^^^ THE  MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,   SEPTEMBEE  19,   1891.  ,   TIMBER   LEASE   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date we intend  to make application to the chief commissioner of lands and  works for permission to lease the following described tracts  of land for lumbering purposes: Commencing at a point,  across the Lardeaux river; opposite a post on the west side  where the trail and river meet, about 18 miles from the  mouth at Kootenay lake, thence south along the river from  said point 2 miles more or less to the end of the .'.timber/  thence east 20 chains more or less to the mountain, thence  north and west in a lawful manner along the side about 4  miles, thence west 40 chains more or less to the river,  thence along the river 2 miles more or Jess to place of com-  mencemeht. Also commencing at a post on the trail  about | of a mile down the river from the first large creek,  called "Cascade creek," thence west 20 chains more or less  to the mountain, thence along the mountain north'and  west, in a lawful manner, about 2������ miles; thence east 40  chains more or less to the river, tbence, south along the  river to place of commencement. Also commencing at a  point 1'mile,'down the river from Cascade creek, thence  west 20 chains more or less to the mountain, thence south  40 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south 20 chains,  thence east 20 chains more or less to the, river, thence  northeast along the river to place of commencement.  JOSHUA DAVIES,  Pilot Bay, August 21st, 1891.  W. R SAY WAR  D.  Notice is hereby given, that 30 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to lease1 the following tract of land for lumbering purposes: Commencing at a post near the Lardeaux  trail and north line of Columbia & Kootenay railway block  on the Lardeaux river,, thence east along said north line of  rail way block (block 9) to G. O. Buchanan s limit, 80 chains  more or less, thence north 60 chains along O. O. Bach an  an's limit, thence west 80 chains more or less to trail and  mountain, thence south 60 chains more or less to place of  commencement. JOSHUA DAVIES,  Pilot Bay, August 3rd, 1891. W. P. SAY WARD.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date we intend  to make application to the chief commissioner of lands and  works for permission to lease the following tract of land  for lumbering purposes: Commencing at a. post; near; a  small creek and the Lardeau trail, about ������ or } of a mile  from the river, through the trait, thence west,40 chains,  more or less to the mountain, thence north 40 chains,  thence west 20 chains, thence north 4.0 chains more or less  to the river, thence along the river southeast to a point  due east from the starting point, thence w-jst 40 chains  more or less to place of commencement.  JOSHUA DAVIES.  Pilot Bay, August 20th, 1891. VV. P. SA Y WARD.   ,,.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after da='e I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to lease the following tract of land for lumbering purposes: Commencing at a point on the Lardeaux  trail, near mountain, 60 chains north of-the'north line of  the Columbia & Kootenay railway block,.No. 9, thence cast  120 chains more or less to G. O. 'Buchanan's, limit, thence  north 80 chains, thence west 20 chains, thence north SO  chains, thence west 20 .chains, thence north 80 chains,  thence west 20 chains, thence north 80 chains, thence west  20 chains, thence north 80 chains, thence west 20 chains,  thence north 80 chains, thence west 20 chains, ���������thence north  80 chains, thence west 120 chains, thence south 80 chains,  thence east 20 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence east 20  chains, thence south 80 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence  south 80 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south 80  chains, thence east 20 chain:-?, thence south 80 chains, tlience  east 20 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence cast 120  chains to place of commencement containing 6000 acres  more or less.  Nelson, B.-O., July 20th, 1891.  W. J. MACAULAY.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date J intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the the following tract of land for  [umbering purposes: Commencing at a post on Lardeaux  trail near Summit creek, thence south 160 chains, thence  west 80 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence west 80  chains, thence north 40 chains, thence west 80 chains,  thence north 3 miles to Lardeaux river, thence 3 miles  along bank of the river, thence south 2k miles to place of  commencement; containing 7000 acres'more or less  Nelson, B. C., July 23rd, 1891.  W. J. MACAULAY.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works to  lease for lumbering purposes the following tract of land :  Commencing at a post on the east bank of the Duncan  river, about k of a mile above the big, Hood-wood jam,  thence south about 40 chains, thence east 30 chains, thence  north 45 or 50 chains, thence west 30 chains, thence south  to place of commencement; containing 130 acres more or  less. JOSHUA DAVIES,  , W. P. SAY.WARD.  Pilot Bay, Kootenay Lake, B. C, August 8th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works to  lease for lumbering purposes the following tract'of land:  Commencing at a post on the east side of Duncan river  near a mountain, and about 2������ miles south of the east fork  near a small creek, called Bear creek, thence south along  the mountain 100 chains more or less, to end of timber,  thence west 20 chains, thence north 10 chains, thence west  20 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence west 10 chains,  thence north 30 chains more or less to the river, thence  along the river to place of commencement; containing 260  acres more or less. JOSHUA DAVIES,  W. P. SAY WARD.  Pilot Bay. Kootenay Lake, B. C, August 10th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to lease the following described tract of land  for lumbering purposes: Commencing at a post on the  south bank of Goat river, on the Kootemxy Valley Lands  Company's survey marked section 25; thence south 20  chains; thence west 120 chains, more or less, to meadow  lands; thence north 30 chains; thence west 20 chains; thence  north 30 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence north 20  chains, more or less, te the section line of 35 and 2 of the  Kootenay Valley Land Company's survey; thence east  along the foot of high banks and boundary of said com  pany's lands 120 chains, more or less, to a point due north  of initial post; thence south 20 chains to said post at place  of commencement. DAVIES-SAYWARD CO.  Pilot Bay, July 1st, 1891. per J. C. H.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works to  lease for lumbering purposes the following tract of land:  Commencing at a squared tree at the foot of a mountain,  on the east side of Duncan river, about 3i miles south of  the east fork, thence west 10 chains, thence south 20 chains,  thence West 15 chains, thence south 20 chains, thence east  20 chains, thence south 10 chains, thence east 20 chains  more or less tothe mountain, thence north along-mountain'  to place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or  less. JOSHUA DAVIES,  W. P. SAY WARD.  Pilot Bay, Kootenay Lake; B. C, August 10th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works to  lease for lumbering purposes the following tract of land :  Commencing at a point about :f- of a mile up the Duncan  river from the mouf h of East Fork on the east side of river,  thence northwest along said river 2 miles more or less to  end of ..timber,'thence" north 40 chains more or less to the  mountain, thence east and north along the mountain 2  milps more or less, thence west 40 chains more or less to the  river and place of commencement; containing 600 acres  more or less. V JOSHUA DAVIES,  W. P. SAYWARD.  Pilot Bay, Kootenay La;ke, B. C, August 12th, 1891.  Notice is, hereby given that 60 days afterdate we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works to  lease for lumbering purposes the following tract of land,:  Commencing at. the mouth of the east fork of the Duncan,  river,'thence south along bank of river about 2 miles more  or less to end of timber, thence north and west along the  mountain about 5 miles, thence east to the river 20 chains  more or less, thence south along to place of commencement  as per map; containing 1060 acres more or less.  ���������.���������'..��������� JOSHUA DAVIES,  W. P. SAY WARD.  Pilot Bay, Kootenay Lake, B. C, August 12th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands.and works to  lease for lumbering purposes the following tract of land:  Commencing at a-squared.tree at the mouth of the stream  called "EastFork of the Duncan river, thence east 20 chains,  thei.ee south 40 chains, thence east 10 chains, thence south  60 chains, thence east 10 chains, thence south 40 chains,  thence east 20 chains more or less to the mountain, thence  south along the mountain 40 chains more or less to end of  timber, thence west 20 chains more or less to the river,  thence north along the said river and timber to place of  commencement as per map; containing 560 acres more or  less. JOSHUA DAVIES,  W. P. SAY WARD.  Pilot.Bay, Kootenay Lake, B. C, August 12th, 1891.  LAMP   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to purchase the following tract of land: Commencing at a post marked J. L. R., about 2 miles south of  Kaslo creek, Kootenay lake, and about 200 feet south of a  small creek there situate, thence west 40 chains, thence  north 40 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south following the shores of the lake to the initial post; containing 320  acres more or less. JOHN L. RETALLACK.  Ainsworth, B. C, August 16th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  ���������to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following tract of land: Commencing at a post on the lake shore on the north side of  Schroder creek, Kootenay lake, thence northwesterly along  lake shore 20 chains, thence south 20 chains, tlience wrest 20  chains, thence south 40 chains, thence east to lake shore,  thence following lake shore to point of commencement.  J. C. HOOKER,  GEORGE G. BUSHBY.  Ainsworth, B. C, August 18th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  leave to purchase a tract of land as follows: Beginning  at a post marked N. W. corner post, on the west shore of  Kootenay lake about 8 miles south of the Lardeaux river,  and about ������ a mile north of the mouth of Schroder creek,  thence running south 40 chains, thence east to lake shore,  thence following lake shore to initial post; containing 160  acres more or less. JOHN A. WATSON.  Ainsworth, August 18th, 1891.   JOHN A. WHITTIER.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase 160 acres of land, situate in West  Kootenay district, and described as follows: Commencing  at a post*marked F. F., S. E., planted on the west shore of  Kootenay lake about 2 miles south of the month of Kaslo  creek, thence west 30 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence  east to the shore of the lake, thence following the meander  ings of the shore of the lake to the point of commencement;  containing 160 acres more or less.  Nelson. B. C, July 1st. FRANK FLETCHER.  Notice is hereby given that sixty (60) days afterdate I intend to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works  for permission to purchase the following described tract of  land situated in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked N. E. corner post, placed on the west shore  of the Lardeaux river near its mouth, thence west 40  chains, thence south 40 chains, thence east to the west  shore of Kootenay lake, thence north following the shores  of Kootenay lake and Lardeaux river to point of commencement; containing 160 acres, more or less.  Ainsworth, August 3rd, 1891. S. H. GREEN.  Notice is hereby given, that sixty days after date I intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase 320 acres of land, situate in West  Kootenay district and described as follows : Commencing  at a stake marked H. S. N. W., at southwest corner Lot 207,  on the east shore of Kootenay lake, thence east 20 chains,  thence north 40 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south  30 chains, thence west 40 chains more or less to the shore of  the lake, thence following the shore of the lake in a northerly direction to the point of commencement.  Nelson; August 6th, 1891. HAROLD SELOUS.  Notice is hqreby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase a tract of land described as follows:  Beginning at a post marked southwest corner post, situate at the northwest corner post of Johns and Anderson's  preemption, about 1 mile north of Goat river and about 3  mile cast of Kootenay river; thence east 60 chains; thence  north 60 chains; thence west 60 chains; thence 60 chains  south to place of beginning; containing 320 acres, more or  less. J. W. DOW,  Ainsworth, July 20th, 1891. J. H.WRIGHT.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to buy a tract of land described as follows:  Beginning at a post marked northeast corner, post placed  on the west side of the Kootenay lake at the mouth of the  Lardeaux river; thence west 20 chains; tlience south 40  chains; thence east 20 chains, to the shore of the lake;  thence following the meanderings of the lake shore to the  place of beginning; containing 80 acres, more or less.  Ainsworth, July 15th, 1891. R.F.GREEN.  APPLICATIONS   FOR   CROWN   GRANTS.  Notice is hereby given that EdwinV Jay Kelly, as,agent  for the Le Roi Mining & Smelting Company (Foreign), has  filed the necessary papers and made application for a  crown grant to the Le Roi mineral claim, situate Qn the  left slope of north fork of Trail creek, about 5 miles west  from Columbia river. Adverse claimants, if any, will forward their objections to me within 60 days from date ot  publication. N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  ;���������    Nelson, B.C., August 29th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that J. C. Rykert; for himself and  others, has filed the necessary papers and made application for a crown grant in favor of a.mineral claim situate  in Hot Springs camp on Kootenay lake, and known as the  Danira. Adverse claimants, if any, will forward their objections within 60 days froni date of iniblication.  ���������'.���������- N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, B. C., August 27th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that J. C. Rykert has filed the  necessary papers and ..made, application for a crown grant  in favor of a mineral claim, known as the Highland, situate  at Hot Springs, north of Cedar creek, Kootenay lake. Adverse claimants, if any, will forward their objections  within 60 days from date of publication.-  N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, B. C, August 27,th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that A. H. Kelly, as owner, has  filed the necessary papers and made application for a crown  grant in favor of a mineral claim known as the Royal  Charter, situate on Toad mountain, west arm of Kootenay  lake.  Adverse claimants, if any, are required to file their objections with me within sixty days from date of publica-"  lion. N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, B. C, 1st August, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that L. C. Kramer, as agent for  the Empire Consolidated Mining Company (Foreign), has  tiled the necessary papers and made application for a  crown grant in favor of the mineral claim known as the  Dictator, situate about 2 miles southwest from Ainsworth,  Kootenay lake, B. C. Adverse claimants, if any, will forward their objections within 60 days from date of publication. N. FITZSTUBBS,  Nelson, B. C, August 22nd.  Gold commissioner.  DISSOLUTION   OF   PARTNERSHIP.  The firm heretofore existing as Fletcher & Co. is hereby  dissolved. All debts due the firm must be paid, to G; B.  Wright, and all claims against said firm must be sent to  6. BT Wright for payment, JOSIAH   FLETCHER,  Ainsworth, August 20th. G. B.   WRIGHT.  APPLICATION   FOR   LIQUOR   LICENSE.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date wc intend  to apply to the gold commissioner for a hotel and liquor  license for the Half way house, Ainsworth.  MORRISON & SHANNON.  Halfway House, Ainsworth, August 27th, 1891.  NOTICE.  A session of the assize court will be held at Nelson on  Saturday, October 3rd, 1891, and a session of the county  court on Monday, October 5th, 1891.  T. 11. GIFFIN, registrar county court.  Nelson, B. C, September 10th, 1891.  John Houston.  Charles H. Ink.  Houston & Ink,  BUY  AND SET,!.  Town Lots and  Mineral  Claims,  ON ���������OMMISSE������N.  Have now for sale 2 of the best hotels in Nelson ; choice  Baker street corner and Vernon street inside lots; lots m  Ainsworth; and mineral claims in Toad Mountain district.  Office ira  Miner Bu*J<8ini������,  Nelson,  B. ���������.  mi  SSfe  r*y$3  !lSs&5i^P^  ZZFr.\  &jB^m.'gJflEfflaymi'i!i.vaii.^^uji_u������i.������iii  ra<������  >HW.w 8  THE  MINES:    NELSON,  B.  O.V SATURDAY,   SEPTEMBEE 19,   1891.  Furnishings and Sporting  AGENT  FOR  GURNEY &  CO.'S STOVES AND   HIRAM   WALKER  & SONS' WHISKIES.  .ne Streets,  Main Street, Eevelstoke, B. G.  SMALL    i\'IJ������������ETS    OF   VVEWS.  Departure of Trains: 'Trains connecting with boat for  Little Dalles and all points south leave Nelson at 2 P. M.  on Mondays and Fridays. Trains connecting with boat for  Revelstoke and all points north will Nelson at.2 P. M. on  Tuesdays and Saturdays.  Tenders are asked for grading and clearing Bluff, Josephine, Silica, Baker, and Vernon streets, the "bids to be in  by Monday next; When these streets are graded, no resident of Nelson will have just cause for complaint. The  work will be done under the superintendence of A. G.  Hodgins, the engineer.  R. Robson disposed of his household goods at auction on  Friday, and  intends removing- to Regina, a town in the  .Northwest Territories.    "Keno Jack" acted as auctioneer,  and talked over $500 out of the crowd for the goods sold.  Nelson and Ainsworth arc now connected by telephone,  and as soon as switchboards arrive from Montreal central  -r-ofhees will be established in both towns.  Wilson & Perdue brought in 96 head of beef cattle this  week. These with the cattle held on the Slocan will supply  the demand for 4 months. They also have about 40 head  of prime beef steers in the Kootenay valley.  Before leaving for Victoria this week C. W. Busk arranged for considerable street clearing on the Balfour town-  ...site.   He claims that Balfour is" bound to be in 'the center  Tot" the farming, fruitgrowing, and gardening sections of the  lake country.  After putting in a month down in Manitoba as a harvest  hand, at ������35 a month, J.'C. Steen is once more on his old  stamping ground in the Selkirks. He was in Nelson today,  and before returning north stated that the crops in the  NorthwestTerritoricsand Manitoba arc immense, the frost  having done little or no damage in the Territories.  The powrder companies are beginning to look toward the  lake country for business. Last week a representative.of.  the Giant Powder Company of Victoria was at Nelson;  this week H. J. Scott, who represents the Victoria branch  of the Hamilton Powder Company, is in the field, looking  it over with the view of establishing an agency and building a magazine.  The Deluge Hook & Ladder Company has ordered a hose  cart and 300 feet of hose. The company's foreman does not  propose to be a mere figurehead any longer, and as soon as  the cart and hose arrive will drill the company twice a day.  "Does the marriage relation tend to make a man absent-  minded?" was the soliloquy uttered by a well-known hotel  man of Nelson this afternoon as he hastily withdrew from  a millinery store that he had entered, mistaking it for  "Bill" Kirkup's stove store.  If the present demand does not in crease, cthere will be no  scarcity of well-seasoned lumber next spring'. TheDavies-  Say ward, the Nelson Sawmill Company, and the Buchanan  mills are all running.  Kootenay (Idaho) Herald, 12th: "The people of Bonner's  Ferry are arranging for an excursion/on the steamer Nelson, from their town to Nelson, British Columbia. The  affair will be arranged so as to accommodate Kootenay  people especially.   It will probably occur the latter part of  fc~��������� 8  o  ���������+=>  CD  CD  CD  o3  ^      u  o  T3  EH  t/2  CD  O  32  o  O  o  bn  C  m   g  ������-*  CD       O  O ���������   a,  .    CO rj-J���������  M.  CD  Ph  a3  CD  o  CD  <  this month, so that Kobtenay folks can attend the opening  ball at Smith's new Bonner'siFerry hotel on the same trip.  Greatly reduced rates on both stage and steamer will be  given.  The warm springs, on the Upper Arrow lake, about -15  miles below Revelstoke, are beginning to become famed  for the curative properties of their waters. During the  summer as many as 50 people at a time were camped in the  neighborhood, several of them suffering from chronic rheumatism. Next season a hotel and bath-houses will be  erected, to better accommodate both tourists and sufferers  from disease.  At New York, on the 6th, bar silver was quoted at 96  cents, copper at $12.30, and lead at $4.52������.  NOTICE.  A court of assize, nisi prius, Oyer and Terminer, and  general gaol delivery will be held in the Hotel Phair building at Nelson, in the county of Kootenay, on Saturday, the  3rd of October, 1891. S.REDGRAVE,  Sheriff Kootenay county.  Sheriff's office, 10th September, 1891.  DEALERS IN  o^azoEnvniO-A-LS.  PATENT  TOILET ARTICLES,  WHOLESALE   * DEALERS     ffN     CI&ARS.       SSAYMONS*  SEWIN������    MACHINES' IN   STOCK.  Oor. East Baker and Ward Streets,  iftyAAUMWiiMiUuiimyiM!!!!  l^W>tfyWSI������H*!UU������!  meiMnMllW^IIIMUIUEMIU^Ma������������������^^  i3Egim!mmmm!Mmmtmmmmm>^ms^mwm*  mm^/tHmimmmjmxMmmimmMtitmai/iiMmmi

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