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The Miner Sep 2, 1893

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Array to  if,  V  The Mines in  Kootenay sire Among  the Itichest in.  America.  ThcOres   arc  iligh-Oradc in  Kold,  Silver,  Copper,  ami  Lead.  nr^j;^2L?vzT'zzTnTr:*szri!:*TrirTorrm-.~.-r.  Whole Number 165.  Nelson,  British Columbia,  Saturday,  September 2,   1893.  Subscription  Price $2  per Year.  Ready Cash is the   Best Introduction . . .  To Present to . . . .  Should you wish lo Secure  any of lhe Bargins-which  c-  his Big Stock of Groceries,  r  Liquors,   Hardware,   and  Miners' supplies afford  NOTICE  to our (Justomers.  "WVliave adopted the Cash Basis, and have adjusted  our Prices to this Rule.  No G-oods, "whether Groceries, GrockeryWare, (Mass-  ware, Clothing, Bry   Goods,  or   Liquors  and Cigars at wholesale will leave Our  Store or Warehouse except for CaShi  . A. BIGELOW  j D. V--*.  AVE   YOU   SEEN   THE M  TEMPTING  6f  j^akhes^   C^������c^s3   fejel8r&i&������fe**J  Great Bargain can be hdd Jw Cask,  ?  NELSONITES MAT YET RIVAL MAKE  TWAIN'S ACQUAINTANCE.  The Water-Works System ������cis out of Whack  ���������last when (lie Alan who Knows the  Combination Goes out of Town.���������What  Will it foe like in Winter.  BAKER   STREET,  NELSOiX,   B. C.  .Mark Twain has given a rather good  story of an extra patient man. This  man lived in a small camp with some  others, and no matter how things went  the was never known to complain. No  matter w exasperating the matter  might be he said nothing. Bat even  this patient man fell from grace.  They were all living in little dug-outs.  These were made by digging into the  side-hill, the earth making three sides of  the shanty. A canvas strip stretched  over the top, formed the roof. Fairly  rain-proof,' this did very-well, but occasionally a wandering mule would, in  searching for grass, step on the canvas  and go through, filling the cabin with  surplus dirt and mule.       j   '  This patient man gotup several times  and drove the mules dut,%but said nothing. ���������}  On the other side of the canyon no  mule had ever been known to go. Here  one day the patient man was found digging out a new home.. A grim determined look on his face spoke volumes.  That night the patient man was awakened from the sound slumber caused by  his hard labor, by the sound of rattling  dirt. Looking up he saw two dangling  legs making frantic endeavor to regain  thir footing. The next moment down  came a cow into the dug-out.  The patient man got up, drove out the  cow and for the first time kicked. And  the words, " This is getting d ��������� d monotonous," came floating ^across' thei canyons.  The public like the patient man is just  now getting up to exclaim "This is getting monotonous." The wherefore being  the water-works system.  Nelson has a waterworks system which  is fearfully and wonderfully made.  Sometimes it runs, but not with one-  half the regularity with which the rates  are collected; Once in a while, sometimes twice in a while something goes  wrong. Then it is usually discovered  that the ..man who knows the combination is out of town. The citizen who  happens to need a little mater turns on  the tap in vain, says a few words usually  represented by dashes in print, and  starts out to borrow some tools, he then  Ideates the trouble, doctors it up, and  white winged peace reigns once more.  This is becoming so frequent that  something should be done to not only  call the attention of the corhpany to the  present state of affairs, but to force the  fact upon them that it is time a change  was, wrought in the existing state of  affairs.  A PATENT GRANTED  On a  new Process for Reducing the metal  Aluminum.  As a result of an investigation by an  officer of the United States patent office  a hew process oflfreesng aluminum from  its compounds has been declared feasible  and a patent granted. Aluminum is  one of the prihcipal.iugredientsof ordinary clay, but the great cost of'freeing  the metal has heretofore prevented the  amplication of it in tlie arts and sciences  ^notwithstanding that its lightness, arid  the fact that it does not rust like iron,  makes it superior to the latter and many  of the other metals for a number of purposes.  PLACER AT YALE  ches in diameter down to 9 inches, and  the nozzle is two inches in diameter.  They have about. 150 miners inches of  water. Although this is piping on a  small scale, it may prove to be very satisfactory, and lead to a more extensive  plant being put in. Encouraging reports arc being received from Siwash  Creek. The hydraulic company at Pra-  ory ,four miles below Yale, are making  good progress with their development  work.  UNCONDITIONAL REPEAL!  HAS AN OVERWHELMING MAJORITY  IN THE HOUSE.  Tlie Sllverltes Can Expect But Little From  the Senate in the Face of the Vote in  the House.���������Cleveland Secures a Sweeping Victory.  "Washington, Aug. 28���������The galleries  of the house were crowded long before  the time of assembling, by persons interested in the result of the ballotin g on  the silver question. When the speaker  rapped for order nearly every seat in the  hall was filled.  The clerk then reported the resolution  containing the order of proceedure on  the silver question, providing for a vote  first on the coinage of free silver at a  ratio of 16 to 1.  Mr. Bailey of Texas asked if, in case  all the amendments as to the ratio were  defeated, it would be in order to propose  an additional amendment.  The speaker thought not, but would  hear the gentleman on the subject when  the time came to formally present it.  Mr. McMillin of Tennessee wished to  offer an amendment for free coinage of  silver, the product of the mines of the  United States, but Mr, Bland objected  to the reading saving it was not free  coinage at all.  Then the Wilson bill, repealing the  silver purchase clause of the Sherman  act was read and Mr. Bland offered his  first amendment for free coinage at the  ratio of 16 to 1. Defeated. Ayes, 123 ;  noes, 226.  Applause came from the anti-silver  men, who did not expect so large a  majority.  Mr. Bland asked an aye and no vote  on the ratio of 17 to 1, but the vote resulted 100 for ; 240 against.  Man after man, who had voted aye on  the first roll call voted no on the second  and many others left the chamber.  The 18 to 1 amendment was rejected  by a vote of 102 to 239.  The 19 to 1 was lost by 105 to 237.  The 20 to 1 amendment went the same  route to the tune of 119 to 222;  On each amendment the ayes and noes  were demanded.  The amendment to re-enact the Bland-  Allison measure met with the same fate  as it's precedessors, 136 to 213; and the  crushing blow to free silver had received  its finishing touches in the house.  The vote was then taken on the final  passage of the Wilson bill. The division  was recorded : ayes, 240 ; noes, 110.  T. H. Giffin is  taking a holiday run  down to the coast.  H. E. Newton is spending a few days  in Nelson looking after business interests.  Mr. and Mrs. W. J.  Wilson  left Nel  son this week on a visit to their home in  Bohd Head,    Ont.    Mrs.    Wilson    will  probably remain several months.  J. Hughes, for some time proprietor  of the Teciimseh House, left Nelson for  Vernon. He has been engaged by the  Vernon Brewing Co.  Points on what the Hydraulic Companies  Are Doing.  The Yale Hydraulic Company, E. A.  Watson manager} have commenced piping on their property just below the old  Steamboat Exchange. The water has  beeii turned on two da> z. From where  the canvas hose connects ;vith the flume  they have 25 feet fall.   The hose is 18 in-  The many friends of Miss Kelly tendered her a farewell ball at the Stanley  House last Friday evening, the occasion  being to bid her good-by before her trip  east. All present spent a very pleasant  evening.  Work on the new fire hall is being  pushed, tt is expected that the place  will be-ready for use bjr the end of the  month. New hose, a hose reel, and some  small tools have been ordered, and when  they arrive Nelson will be in fair shape  for fighting fire.  ILLICIT WfflSIT SELLING  THERE ARE MORE FAYS THAN ONE  OF GETTING RI0E.  Cashing Time Checks along the Mac of the  .Velson A Fort Shcppard is Said to be  Very Good Speculation when Whisky Is  Retailed on the Side..  Those whose business takes them out  on the line of the construction work in  the direction of the Salmon River country would do well, if they wish to avoid  unpleasant misunderstandings, to tack  a placard on their backs setting out the  business which takes them in those  parts. >  Along the line of the railway work:  there are innumerable little shacks from  which signs reading: "Restaurant,"  "Reading Room," or "Time Checks  Cashed are suspended.  Now strange as it may seem, the men  who are engaged in these innocent pastimes, in a great many cases, are constantly on the lookout for whisky informers.  Strange is it not that these men should  take such a lively interest in the movements of an informer.  There is another report which reached  town this week, and this concerns aii  alleged whisky still. This it is said is  being operated to supply the spirituous  requirements of-the navies along the  railway line.   '���������  There is.i Dominion enactment against  the selling of liquor along the line or  any public work in Canada. At present  there are those who believe that the  only effect of the act has been to deprive  the province of the usual revenue' collected from liquor dealers.0  The railway is approaching completion in many sections, at least as far as  grading is concei sied. Would it not be-  a good plan on the part of the federal  authorities to send men along the line  and round up those engaged in illicit  whisky selling or manufacture.  THEY STOLE A MARCH  The Silver men Play a Nice Quiet JLittle Game  ia lhe House.  Washington, Aug. 31.���������The silvet  men stole a inarch on their opponents  in the house to-day, and gained a victory  which makes it impossible for the gold  men to impede consideration ofjbihifetal-  lic or financial legislation that may be  reported by the committee on coinage,  weights and measures, and banking aiicL  currency during the present session;  The time honored custom in the house  has been to make the reports of the  committees on appropriations and ways  and means privileged matters at all  times. When the new rules were being  considered to-day Mr. Springer, chairman of the committee on banking arid  currency, suddenly sprung an amendment extending the same favoritisni to  the committee on banking and currency.  Mr. Kilgore immediately followed with  an amendment yielding the same privilege the committee on coinage, and although these amendments were sharply-  opposed, the last was adopted by a vote  of 133 ayes to 95 noes, and the original  rule as amended, was adopted by a vote  of nearly two to one. Not until it wis  all over did the house generally realize  the immense victory gained by the bi-  metallists. Under this rule the committee on coinage can report the silver bill  at any time and force its consideration  by the house and the committee on  banking and currency will enjoy trie  same facilities for forcing its measures.,  to a vote in the house.  H. M. Martin, late bookkeeper for J.  Wilson of Kaslo, was in town yesterday,  having paddled down in his canoe. He  left for Nakusp, where he will take up a  set of books for McGillivray the N. & S.  R. R. contractor.  Washington, Aug. 31.���������Mr. Bland,  chairman of. the coinage committee,  said to-day; "We shall at some time in  the future present a bill for the free  coinage of silver, but it will not be until  the excitement now prevailing subsides  as any action at the present time would  be useless.  ./-  iimmmmmmmmwmwmmmmMmhMMmmm&ts  :samEgB������bm^^^ THE  MINER,  NELSON,  B.  C,  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2r 1893.  SILVER UNCERTAIWILI  SEVERAL MINING PROPERTIES ARE  RESUMING WORK  LOCATED  ON   THE   COLUMBiA   RIVER    AT   BEAVER   CREEK,   ABOUT  OF    THE    PEND   O'ORESLLE   RIVER,   THE   PROPERTY  WEST   K  ILES    NORTH  LAND   COIVIPANY,  THE-"/  TTD  mm  IS   THE   TOWNSITE   OF  The Miner's Consent to Reductions and to  Conditional Waives Stimulated by the  Price of Silver.���������Tlie Smelters.'are Confident of Sullieient Ore.  The spirit of the American press, especially so'far as can be gathered from  the western exchanges, -appears to be  more'ehcourageing in many ways.  There is less blue ruin talk, and more  ���������of a-disposition fb turn the .attention of  the people toward what can be done,  instead of what must and should be  done. u  In   mining  circles   the'.effect of the  slump  in  silver  has  hardly assumed  a  permanent aspect.    Many of the  mines  had  large quantities of ore in their bins  before the drop, and  most of the large  smelters were  heavily stocked, so that  there'has been less of a falling off in the |  amount of bullion produced and  hancl-  ' led, than might have been expected.  Many of the  properties that at first  shut down tight, have re-opened in part  at   least.    This   has. been  affected in. a.  number   of   ways, one   of   ther chief of  which has  been  the   establishment   in  several  instances  of a sliding scale of  wages.    This is worked out on a basis of  the  market price  of .silver,   and,-gives  those in the mines certain wages according to the quoted price of silver  on  the  day when they worked.  In other cases an absolute reduction in  wages all round has been effected, and  the miners given a chance to take it if  they preferred that to remaining idle.  In many cases the men have accepted  the reduced scale. Others have been  offered a certain amount of cash per day  and given orders'for the remainder payable at such a time as silver should  reach a certain price.  It is probable that when the action of  congress shall become definitely known  and silver has again taken on something  like a stable value, that many of the  mines now closed will be opened again.  From the known cost of production however, it is not reasonable to expect that  for some years, if ever, the west will  produce the same amount of silver that  has been put out in the past.  The high grade, easily worked mine  will continue to produce, and the leading  smelters seem to ������������������ think that there will  always be enough ore shipped to keep  .them running.  The result will probably be that in  ms,ny sections, heretofore devoted almost exclusively.to mining, other industries will spring up, and the growth of  .. the country though temporarily checked may ultimately be quite as great.  As an example of this may be cited the  fact that in most, if not all of the. western states can be found the raw material  for many manufacturing industries.  In Utah can be found beds of fine kaolin  or porcelain clay. Vast deposits of soda  and other alkalis. These have never as  yet been worked to any extent as capital has been occupied in the'more remunerative operation of..mining precious metals.  This holds good in a measure all  throught the west, and perhaps a set of  circumstances tending to direct the attention of those seeking investments  into such channels, may result in greater good to the country in the end.  In the meantime there is less to fear  in this section than on the other side of  the line. Here mines can be found  that can be run at a profit when  90 per cent of the properties on the  other side are shut down. The smelters  require this pre for fluxing and it will  have a market when other ores are  refused. So desirable is the local ore  that premium prices are being paid for  it even in these uncertain times.  PRICES  TEEMS  A Typical Site ibr a large City, being level bench land, perfectly adapted for Building"Purposes,  and is the SELECTED junction of the Eiver and Railway Transportation.  is "the only natural location for a Centre of Supply for the great Placer and  Hydraulic Mines of the Pend d'Oreille and Salmon Rivers, and the &old and  Silver Mines, of Trail Creek.  is the Construction Headquarters of the Nelson & Fort Sheppard Railway,  and r will always be a splendid location: for supply warehouses.  .   ���������   ' ...    .,.'-.... *^s?-~���������~���������������������������������������������%^s". ,        ���������'. ;������������������'������������������  $150 for Corners ; $100 for. Inside Lots : purchasers can apply  One-third Cash, one-third in 2 months,  one-third in 4 months, with interest at  8 per cent, on deferred payments.  At NELSON, to HAROLD SELOUS  At SAYWARD, to W. M. NEWTON  At NANAIMO, to MAROUS WOLFE  At KASLO, to J.L. RETAI.LACK  At VICTORIA, Kooni No. 7, Board of Trade building  JOSHUA   DAVIES,  TITLE  Manager.  Al*I*JI.I���������ATBON EOlt VVA.T7rJ������t~I<EASE.  N  NOTICE.  f-OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SIXTY  days after elate I intend to apply to the  Honorable Commissioner of Lands and Works for  West Kootenay District for a lease of 2,000 inches  of water, to be taken from the Throe Forks of  Carpenter Creek at a point about five miles from  the mouth of Carpenter Creek, the water to be  used for milling, mining, water works, domestic  and other purposes.  CHARLES HUGONIN.  Nelson, June 19, 1893. ������ 155-8  NOTICE.  -SUI*ltE.HE ���������������IIHT NOTICE,  -j^TOTICE is hereby given that Frank Fitch, as  -J-^ agent for Maxwell Stevenson, has filed the  necessary papers, land- made application for a  Crown Gx'ant in favor of the *' Highlander " mineral claim. ,,  The "Highlander" is situated about half a  mile south of Ainsworth, and one-quarter of a  mile from Kootenay Lake.  Adverse claimants will forward their objec  tions within sixty days from the date of this  publication.  N. FITZSTUBBS,  Gold Commissioner.  Nelson, B. C; Aug. 23,1893. Aug 26  NOTICE.  THE  SUPREME COURT  COLUMBIA.  OF  BRITISH  IN  PROBATE.  In the goods of John Sandon, deceased.  TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN :  "Whereas John Sandon, late of the District of  West Kootenay, and Province of British Columbia, formerly of the Province of Quebec, died on  or about the 9th day of February, A. D., 1893, in  the district of West Kootenay, aforesaid, and by  his last will and testament appointed one Joseph  Hetherington of the District of West Kootenay  aforesaid his solo Executor and Legatee.  Take notice that an application will be made on  Friday, the fifteenth day of September, A. D. 1893  on behalf of the Joseph Hetherington, to the  Supreme Court of British Columbia, at Victoria,  British Columbia, for probate of the will of the  said John Sandon, deceased.  J. H. Bowes,  ' Baker Street, Nelson,  British Columbia.,  Solicitor for Joseph  Hetherington.  C, this 1st day of August,  NOTICE.  MINERAL ACT,   1893.  Notice of Application for Certificate of  improvements.  "Jay Gould " Mineral Claim.  rpAKE notice that I, as agent for the Shafer  -"- Gold and Silver Mining Company, free-  miner's certificate No. 43,(M0, intend, sixty days  from date hereof, to'apply to the Gold Commissioner for a certificate of improvements, for the  purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above  claim.  And further take notice that adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  .   ���������    . THOMAS JOHNSON.  Dated this ISth day of August, 1893,  Ainsworth, B. C. Aug 26  -VT OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SIXTY  -^ days from date hereof I intend to apply for  a Crown grant to thosjj' Etna " mineral claim  situated on Toad Mountain, West Kootenay District. This application will be made under clause  35, " Mineral Act, 1S91."  Copies of the field notes and plat can be seen at  the office of the Government agent, Nelson.  CHARLES VAN NESS.  Nelson, B.C., July 10th, 1S93. 158-8  NOTICE.  "VrOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A. S.  -^ FARWELL, as agent for the Josephine  Mining Company, has filed the necessary papers  and made application for a Crown grant in favor  of the " Josephine " mineral claim. The " Josephine" is a northerly extension of the "Highland,"  Lot 258, Group 1, and is situate about 2h miles  north-west from Ainsworth. Adverse claimants  will forward their objections within 60 days from  the date of thispublication.  N.  FITZSTUBBS,  Gold Commissioner.  Nelson, B.C., July 20th, 1893.  Through Tickets Issued,  Baggage Checked to Destev-smtonv  No Customs 'Difficulties.  Sleeping Cars.  Colonist  For information as to rates, time, etc., apply-  to nearest agent.  .1. HAMILTON', Agent, Nelson,  Or to <;EO. McL. BUOWN,  District Passenger, Agent, Vancouver.  NOTICE.  Dated at Nelson  A. I)., 1893.  13.  BANK NOTICE.  T  AKE NOTICE  On and after this date the undersigned;-j-  banks will receive American notes at a discount  of one per cent. .  BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.  BANK  OF   MONTREAL. ���������  Nelson, Aug. 15, '93 '' '  MtOWS ������RANT APPLICATION.  The Railway Aid Act, 1893, as it applies to the Nakusp & Slocan Railway  Co. came into'effect Aug. 18th. by proclamation of the Lieut-Goveanor.  Harry E. Bradley, representing several eastern houses, was laid up at Donald  for some days owing to an accident. H?  was opening a bottle of ammonia, when  the liquid exploded and burned his face  severely. He had a narrow escape from  loosing the sight of one eye, but is  around again, and left for home Friday.  iSK  SSMBW&.  ���������aSBKSfflS  NOTICE   OF   APPLICATION.  Blue Jay Mineral Claim t ,  New Denver Minining District.  rip AKE NOTICE THAT WE, R. E." LEMON,  i- free miner's certificate No. 49,342, and,Scott  McDonald, free miner's certificate No^ 46,42?, intend sixty days from date hereof, to apply to the  Gold Commissioner, for a .certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown  Grant of the above claim.,, .������������������  And further take notice ,that adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before the issuanceof such certifics.te  of improvements.  Dated this first day of August, 1893.  7335?  MINERAL ACT,  1893.  Notice of application for Certificate of  Improvements.  " Shafer " Mineral Claim.  TAKE notice that I, as agent for the Shafer  Gold and   Silver   Mining  Company,   free  miner's certificate No. 43,640, intend sixty days  from the date hereof, to apply to the Gold Commissioner for a certificate of improvements, for  the purpose of obtaining a Crown grant of'the  above claim. :  And further take notice that adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before tho issuance of such certificates of improvements.  THOMAS JOHNSON.  Dated this 18th day of August, 1833,  Ainsworth, B. C. Aug 2G  NOTICE  Notice of Application for Certificate of Improvements.  Wellington Mineral Claim.  rpAKE NOTICE THAT I, AS AGENT FOR  -*- the Kootenay & Columbia Prospecting and  Mining Company limited, free miner's certificate  No. 44,298, intend sixty days from the date hereof,  to apply to the Gold Commissioner for a certificate  of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a  Crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before the issuance of such certilicate  of improvements.  EDWARD WATTS  Dated this first day of August, 1893. Aug 5  COLUMBIA   &  KOOTENAY  STEAM   NAV.   CO.  (limited)  TIME   CARD    NO.   8.  INTO EFFECT SUNDAY,  AUGUST  13,  1893.  TRANSPORTATION TIME TABLES  NOTICE.  MINERAL ACT,   "��������� -93,  Notice" ijf application for Certificate of  Improvements.  'VBobtail" Mineral Claim.  TAKE notice that X as agent for the Shafer  , V Gold and Silver .T firing Company, free-  ���������'miner's certificate No. 43,640, intend sixty days  ^irom date h'ereibf, to apply to the Gold Commis-  sionei for a certificate of improvements/for the  purpose, of obtain"^ a Crown Grant of the above  claim.       t i      ,.,.:.... :, ��������� .  And,,/urf'iertake notice that adverse claims  must be sent, to tbe Mining Recorder, and action  cominencfed befo'rl) the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  THOMAS JOHNSON  Dated this 18th day of August, 1893.  Ainsworth B. C. AuS 26  PACIFIC  The Cheapest audi Most Direct Koute,  Prom 2STEJ.SM, EASLO and all Kootenay  Points '  To the PACIFIC COAST and to the EAST.  TRAINS   T������  AJK������  FJSOM   NELSON    BAILY.  Direct Connection arRbbson every  Tuesday, Thursday  and Saturday Evening,  With Steamer for Rkvelstoke, where connection is made with Canadian Pacific Eastbound  and Westbound through trains.  REVELSTOKE ROUTE  Str. COLUMBIA connecting with Canadian.  Pacific' Railway at Revelstoke for all Eastern  and Coast points Leaves Robson���������Tuesdays, and  Fridays at 7 p.m.  Leaves Revelstoke���������Mondays and Thursdays  at 5 a.m.  Passengers from Nelson should take the C. &  K. train leaving at 3 p. m. Tuesdays and Fridays.  NORTHPORT  ROUTE  Steamer COLUMBIA, running in connection with the C. & K. Railway and tlie S. F. & N.  Railway between Nelson and Spokane, making  close connection at Spokane with Northern Pacific, Great Northern and Union Pacific for all  points cast and west.  Leaves Robson���������Tuesdays and Fridays at  5 a.m.  Leaves Northport���������Tuesdays and Fridays ab  1 p.m. Passengers for Spokane should take C. &  K. trains leaving Nelson at 3 p. m., on Mondays  and Thursdays.  Tourists from Spokane for Glacier, Banff and  other C.P.R. resorts make close connection at  Robson with boats for Revelstoke.  KASLO ROUTE  Steamer NELSON  Sunday���������Nelson to Kaslo.  Monday���������Kaslo to Nelson and return.  Tuesday���������Kaslo to Nelson.  Wednesday���������Nelson   to   Kaslo,    thence   to  Lardo and return to Kaslo.  Thursday���������Kaslo to Nelson and return.  Friday���������Kaslo to Nelson.  Saturday���������Nelson to Kaslo and return.  Steamer leaves Nelson for Kaslo on Wednesdays  and Saturdays at 8 a. m., and on Sundays,  Mondays and Thursdays at 3 p. m.  Steamer leaves Kaslo for Nelson on Mondays,  Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 8 a .m.,  and on Saturdays at 3 p.m.. connecting with  all trains on tne C. & K. railway to Robson.  The Company reserves the right to change this  schedule at any time without notice.  For full information as to tickets, rates, etc.,  apply at the  Company's offices, Nelson, B.C.  J. W. Troup, Manager.  ssffisa  m  \ \  ?:--v*.  TSfflSWffiW^vSES.  ismf&msMMs:  3M.1 i,-c-n*,iM/|,J5"r  ^'"rtKur^nif������fc.rf/v_i.������0!  KwJC*ii4a>.1 LX.a������*l������f;'.ra;iU������fchA<*HAi������v*  b>  7  _ THE  MINER, NELSONf B. C,  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2,   1893  DIVIDING OF ISKAEL.  1 And it came to pass ,in those days  that the elders of Israel gathered together,  even in the head city called Victoria :  2 That they might give heed and consider  those things which might work for the  good of the tribes that dwelt within the  borders of the land.  3 And behold these elders were chosen  after the manner which had .been commanded in Israel from the days when Israel had been sold into bondage, and Mac-  Donald ruled in the land, and his governors sat in the judgement seat.  4: And thus were they chosen :  5 One elder for each of the tribes, or  portion of tribes, dwelling in districts set  apart.  6 And it came to pass that the eiders  sat in the synagogue, and held council how  they might build Israel up, and how the  shekles and talents ."gathered in the treasury might be spent.  7 And the ruler of the synagogue arose  when the elders had made an end of speaking, and said :  8 Behold, oh ye elders in Israel how the  synagogue in which we wont to sit is getting old.  i-.j~vm.i-~-m ,  ���������^C-  umuaMm>~me%.������m.--tttt;{ ,-y,irr  ~rTOiia-wiarr7,Tr������f 1 amiifim  ./  *P2\  i^-  if  >  >  >  >  A  new Railway  under Construction.  V.  Buy before the Market rises in the Railway-  Centre   and  Seat  of Government of"\-\  PVest Kootenay.  Choice Building and Residence Property. .,  REBATE ALLOWED FOR THE ERECTION OF GOOD BUILDINGS "        ,  Also Lots for Sale  in      NAKUSP JDA WSON and ROBSON.  Apply for Prices, Maps, etc., to ���������    '  FRANK FLETCHER, Land CommissionerC. &K.'Ry. Co., Nelson, B.C.  28 Behold I will journey among them  and reason with them, and perchance they  will hearken unto my voice.  29 And when he had departed there arose  and followed after him an husbandman,  surnamed Thomas, of the tribe of Kitchen.  30 Thomas was  of  those  who dwelt in  A BELLAfflY-LIKE BSEAI  tents by the great river, and his voice wax-  9'Strangers from the borders of Caanan,   ed strong with calling to his  oxen, as'he  the Tacomaites  and the   Seattleites point  the finger  of scorn at us and pass over on  the other side.  10 Go to, let us take shekels of gold and  silver, and buy cunningly Avroughfc stone,  and cedar from Mount Lehman, and shakes  from Chilliwack, and build us a synagogue  like unto the temple of Solomon.-  11 And some said "yea," and some "nay,"  but when the tale was read by the scribe,  behold those who cast their voice for the  new synagogue were more than those who  where against it.  12 And an elder of the tribe of Beaven,  governor of the chief city, knew not what  to sav, for his voice was against the ruler  of the synagogue in all things, but he  feared the people that they might not again  make him governor, and he voted,'yea, but  it pained him exceedingly.  13 And when they had finished the ruler  of the synagogue read from the book of the  law :  14 Now therefore hearken O Israel, unto  the statues, and unto the judgments wnich  I teach you, for to do them.  15 And when he had made an end of  speaking behold they each departed unto  his own kindred and tribe.  16 And it came to pass that scarcely had  the words of the ruler reached the people  when certain men arose in the midst of the  congregation and made a loud noise ;  17 Saying "Why should we do this thing?  Why should our shekels go to buy cun  ningly wrought stone and cedar to build a  synagogue to adorn the city of the ruler of  synagogue, when behold our feet stumble  by reason of the roughness of the way, and  we wade because of the lack of bridges."  18 And there arose in the city called Vancouver, one Abou Ben. Twigge, aforetime  a centurian in the army of CaBsar, and desiring his old power, and he said :  19 Come unto me ye people of Israel, who  dwell in the borders of the land. Let us,  make a league and covenant, and draw  after us the hosts of Israel, and depart  from the teaching of the ruler of the synagogue, and build for ourselves a nation,  and in the midst erect our own synagogue  and make such iawa as may seem best to  us. \  20 And there went with him a scribe of  the tribe of Cotton.  21 And he gathered up the words of the  Centurian and wrote them on many scrolls  and cast them abroad that the people  might read them and perchance follow  after them.  22 And those who barkened unto the  sayings of the Centurian Twigge gathered  in the gates of the city called Vancouver,  and they formed a new congregation", and  appainted new rulers.  23 And those who had lifted up their  voices the loudest were found in the high  places.  24 And Centurian Twigge was named  ruler, and him v/hom men call Keith was  named to care for such sheklus as might be  given by the faithful.  25 And a mighty man of the tribe of  Brown, surnamed Winchester, arose and  was put in command of such as draw the  sword, and drove the chariots of brass and  of iron.  26 And some marvelled and others laughed and said " behold they have devils,"  and a few said '"It is well."  27 Now when the high priest Davie, ruler  of the synagogue, heard these things he  said:  BANKING HOUSES.  BANK  OF  00L. BAKER TALES ABOUT THE GOVERNMENT OP B. 0.  COLUMBIA  (Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862.)  delved in his vineyard.  31 And he of the tribe of Kitchen said "I  also will speak after him and perchance  my voice will drown that of the ruler, if  but by strength alone.  32 Meanwhile the synagogue ceased not  being buililed in the city of'the ruler.  33 And when those who would divide  Israel saw this they gathered their scribes,  and men skilled in the law, and inscribed  on a lengthy roll a petition to him who sat  in the highest pi ace,, and ruled over all the  land, and many tribes, other than those of  Israel.  34. And among the many words on the  scroll were those saying that those who  dwelt in the borders of the land were crying out for a greater number  of shekels  for carrying out most needful works.  35 That the rulers in the chief city were  wasting the substance of the people.  36 That, the tithes collected for the >ear  had been -1,060,000 shekels, notwithstanding which 216.000 shekels above the tithes  had been spent iu vain doings. These  latter shekels being lent by the Amorities  at great usury.  37 That the new synagogue being builded  was to cost 600,000 shekels, whereas the  old synogogue was sufficient.  38 That aid was about to be given to  those possessed of evil spirits, who wrought  strange devices with chariots of iron, running on roads of steel.  39 That those ��������� chosen to be elders in  Israel are not so selected as to voice the  will of the people.  40 That the island upon which stands  the city of the ruler of the synagogue has  only 6,535 dwellers whom the law gives a  voice and a lot in the selection of the  elders. And by the voices of these 6,535  sixteen elders were chosen ;  41 Whereas they that dwell in the other  parts of Israel number .in their midst 9,025  of those whose voice may be raised and lots  cast for elders, and these had only been  given 17 elders to go up to the synagogue.  42 Whererefore, as tile substance of the  greater number is being ��������� w=<ted, they  would pray to go their way and separate  from the remainder of Israel, and appoint  their own rulers.  43 And the chief ruler hearkened not to  the appeal.  44 And Abou Ben Twigge said we will also  reason with the rjeople and perchance some  may barken to us and follow our teachings.  45 And he set apart a day, even the tenth  day of the tenth month when they should  gather iu the city called Kamloops, and  barken to tlie voices of who would divide  Israel.  46 And behold an elder in Israel, of the  tribe of Kellie, a man renouned for learning, pondered on these things and he lifted up his voice and spoke  these  words  of  He  Sounds tlie Death Knell of Monopolistic Concerns iu :i Manner wliicli ���������si������-  not Fail to Secure tlie Approbation of  tlie Eastern  Header.  wisdom " Let 'er flicker.  MINING NOTES  The Kootenay & Columbia Power and  Mining Co.,of Ottawa, are in   receipt  of  a contract made a few days ago .by their  superintendent in Kaslo, of silver ore at  S3A- cents per oz. for silver, and $3,50 per  100 lbs. fsr  lead.    These prices are the  same as last year.    One hundred tons of  high grade ore are being shipped to .the  Tacoma   Smelting   and    Refining    Co.  This is the highest price paid f<! ���������  silver  since last November,   and   is  a/ .minted  for by the fact that the  Koolenay produces the finest quality of fluxing ore in  the world.    It is being shipped from the !  Wellington mine, 20 miles from Kaslo.  While in Montreal a few days ago Col.  Baker was interviewed with respect to  the Provincial Government's policy by a  Star reporter.  The substance of the interview is appended:  "Col.   Baker  confirmed all  that the  Hon.  Theodore   Davie had   said   some  weeks ago   concerning   the   aggressive  land policy of the Pacific Province.   Mr.  Davie then  made  it clear, that next at  all events  to New Zealand, British Columbia had one of the most progressive  radical, administrations   in   the world.  Land monopoly was the great curse and  bane  of the west as well as of the east,  and his government was determined to  do away with the evil.    Their  weapons  of warfare against it would be the engine  of taxation.    They would tax the mere  monopolist,   the  dog-in-the-manger out  of existence?     In  the field   of   reform  their������ opportunities   and   powers   were  ample, because they had direct control  without the intervention of  municipal  authorities, of there venue of large areas  of British   Columbia,   the unorganized  districts.  In these districts they would see to it  that monopoly was taxed to death and  the product of industry taxed as little as  possible. And in the organized districts  they would urge upon the municipal  governments the adoption of a similar  policy.  They were in this  respect far in  advance of, or at least utterly opposed  to,  Mowat's administration, which not only  did not urge such a revenue policy upon  the municipalities, but by a vote  in  the  house, resolved to compel the municipalities to continue the existing system,   to  tax improvers more  than  monopolists.  In a word, on the great issue of tax  reform British Columbia has one  of the  most radical governments in the  world.  To-day Lieut-Col.    Baker   assured   a  ,Si.?r reporter that on that  issue,   as  on  every oVher, there-was perfect harmony  between Mr.   Davie and his colleagues;  and in the Legislature the  Government  has a strong  majo-ity   pledged  to  this  policy.    Personally he,(Col.   Baker)   did  not wish to   trumpet   his   views   to-the  world, but he believed that i:������ this  matter the government to which h'u belonged had undertaken one  of the  greatest  and most far-reaching  of reforms.     He  would not say  that  the people of  the  'coast' were prepared for  the policy  of  entirely  exempting  from   taxation    all  products of labor, but he would say that  they and their representatives in the executive were determined that monopoly  should be destroyed.    They would however, encourage  capitalists  to   take  up  land, and perhaps   in   this   respect fewer   restrictions  should   exist,   but   they  would see   to   it   that   such   capitalists  would be properly taxed if they attempted to hold their lands idle,   'waiting for  a raise,' and locking labor out.    Then he j  believed that the existing industrial and  financial depression would be short lived  for the resources of  the west were  almost infinite.     Hut so   complicated   was  the mechanism of commerce that   these  depressions   must   be   world-wide,    and  even the most favored  countries  could  not escape."  HOTELS.  SOI)  WATSON,   B. C.  )  CAPITA Ii (paid up), ,������������<><),000    .  (With power to increase.)  KESEKVE F1JXI*,   ������200,000       .     ,  $3,030,000  l,2ti.>,3.')������  ' Corner of Baker ancl Stanley streets.  BBA^TCHES =  Canada���������Victoria, "Vancouver, New Westminster, Nanaimo ancl Kamloops.  United States���������San Francisco, Portland, Tacoma, and Seattle.  HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard street, LONDON,  England.  AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS:  CANADA���������Canadian Bank of Commerce and  branches; Merchants' Bank of Canada ancl  branches; Imperial Bank of Canada and branches; Molson's Bank and branches; Bank of  Nova Scotia.  UNITED STATES���������Agents Canadian Bank of  ,    Commerce, NewYorK:  Bank of Nova Scotia, Chicago.  Traders' National Bank, Spokane,  avings department-  deposits received at ������1 and upwards, and  interest allowed (present rate) at 3& per cent,  per annum.  GRANGE V. HOLT,  Nelson, July 17,1S93. Agent.  The TOWN OE WATSON is  situated between  Bear and  Fish Lakes, on the Kaslo-Slocan  wagon road, 20   miles  from   Kaslo  and 10  milesfrom  New Denver, is the most central f  point in Slocan district. '  The WATSON HOTEL is one of the best kept  houses in the entire Slocan country.  The din- v  ing room and kitchen arc in charge of female  help of experience.   The bar is stocked with  the best brands of Liquors and Cigars.    -,   , '  BREMNER  & WATSON,  PROPRIETORS.  H  SPOKTINU ftOOUS.  ���������'A   3.  CAPITAL (all paid up), $12,000,000  KEST,        .       '.        .        . 0,000,000  Sir   DONALD   A.   SMITH .President  Hon.  GEO. A. 'DRUMMOND,....Vice-President  E. S. CLOUSTON General Manager  Uelson  Branch:   H". W. Corner Baker and  Stanley Streets.  Branches in London (England), New York   and  Chicago and in the principal cities in Canada.  Buy ancl sell sterling exchange and cable tranfers.  -Winchester Rifles, in- 38-66, 40-65,  40-82, 45-70, 45-90, and 50rllO calibers wifch,^  octagan barrel, price, $18.00. ...' --J-r^  Winchester   Rifles   in "4A. calibres'*  either model of'73 or '72, price $16.00 with  octagan, or $15.00 with round barrel.  Marlin Rifles, model of '89, with  octagan barrel, 44 calibre, price $18.00  Marlin Rifles, model '03, 38-55 calibre, octagan barrel, case-hardened mountings, price $20.00.  Tisdall & Greener shot guns.  Newhouse, Hawley and Norton's  bear, beaver, and other traps.  Rogers' Hunting Knives.  Grant commercial and travelers' credits, available in any part of the world ;  Drafts issued; Collections made; Etc.  SAVINGS   BANK   BRANCH.  Rate of interest at present 'SI per cent.  HOTELS.  Charles E. Tisdall  CIJXMAKEIt,  VA1TCOUVER,   IB. C_  IS  E. 0. CAKPENTEK, Manager.  All the principal mines in Slocan District can be  reached in from two to seven miles from this  hotel, which islocnted at Three Forks on Carpenter creek.  The Dining Room is under the immediate sup-  ericntendence of Mr. C. Bo wen. formerly of  Windsor hotel of Butte, Montana, and tlie  Rogers' hotel, Missoula, who will see to it  .bat the cuisine of-the Three Forks is not  excelled by that of any other hotel in West  Koote. ay.  Special States for  Private  Weekly Hoarders,  i'ooms for Transient Quests.  CUMSEH HOUSE.  i:i'lLl������l\������;   .MATEKIAI, .  f^HE. SUBSCRIBER  HAS IN  STOCK or en  route from   the  Coast : ���������  i Carload Glass, Paints and Oils.  2  Carload Sash  and Doors.  2  Carload Dry  Clear Fir  Flooring, 4-,  inch,  f  Carload Dry Clear Pir Ceiling, 4 inch  I   Carload Factory  Cedar,  An   Immense   Stock of   Com//ion  Dumber,    Shingles,    Laths,    Mouldings, ���������  Etc., as usual.  G.  O. Buchanan, \  Kootenay Lake  SazvmilL  NELSON AND KASLO.  MISOELL.l.MCOIS.  Josephine  Street.  CLAIM   NOTICES.  Hughes & Reisterer, Props.  ���������v������    KELSON, B.  " Initial  Tost "    .Voliees,  drawn  Mu>    provisions   of  (lie  .Vet. and Jiivili;; ln<i<l  f<> Slake a Claim iiih!<  be procured from  Turner Hros.  Gilker & Wells,  Nelson News Depot.  In lots of 50 and 100  Ten < ������\Yp  OatfcVJU  *���������.;.:; ���������; .:���������/���������-���������-;  "'.i.  ������'.-.  .'i sn'.iA ii t.  "*     "r .'.TV-  M.?-  n,^^s^T^JS."T,!f?r,  . - ������' .   - ���������  -.   I'l" ���������  "^-TfTXT",  ���������VV.  r*w;?  ,**1 ��������� Wr*fcT>". ��������� "Tfyt  -F���������m  *7;  TFT.  ���������!.������������������!-������������������ THE  MINER,  NELSON,  B. C.  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2r  iS93.  SILVER UNGERTMI Ml  u  SEVERAL MINING PROPERTIES AKE  RESUMING: WORK v  The Miner's Consent to Keduetions and to  Conditional Wages, Hefiiilated l\y Hie  Prlee of Silver.���������-Tlie Ssin'Iters arc Cosi-  iident of Sullicieut Ore.  The spirit of the American press, especially so far as can be gathered from  the western exchanges, appear j to.be  more encourageing in many ways.  There is less bine ruin talk, and more  of a disposition to turn the attention of  the people toward what can be done,  instead of what ������������������'���������must' and should be  done.-; -:  .<-.'".  In" mining circles lhe eifect of the  slump in silver has hardly assumed a  permanent aspect. Many of the mines  had large quantities of ore in their bins  before the drop, and "most of the large  smelters were heavily stocked, so that  there has been less of a falling off in the  amount of bullion produced and handled, than might have been expected.  Many of the properties'that" at'first  shut down tight, have re-opened in part  at least. This has been affected in. a'  number of ways, one of the. chief of  which has been the establishment in  several instances of a sliding scale of  wages. This is worked(put on a basis of  the market price of silver, and gives  those in the mines certain wages according to the quoted price of silver on the  day when they worked.  In other cases an absolute reduction in  wages all round has been effected, and  the niiners givtm a chance to take it if  they preferred that to remaining idle.  In many cases the men have accepted  ���������the reduced scale. Others have been  offered a certain amount of cash per day  ��������� and given orders for the remainder payable at such a time as silver should  reach a certain price.  It is probable that when the action of  congress shall become definitely known  and silver has again taken on something  like a stable value, that many of the  mines now closed will be opened again.  From the known cost of production however, it is not reasonable to expect that  for some years, if ever, the west will  produce the same amount of silver that  has been put,out in the past.  The high grade, easily worked mine  will continue to produce, and the leading  smelters seem to > think that there will  always be enough ore shipped to keep  them running.  The result will probably be that in  many sections, heretofore devoted almost exclusively to mining, other industries will spring up, and the growth of  the country though temporarily checked may ultimately be quite as great.  As an example of this may be cited the  fact that in most, if not all of the western states can be found the raw material  for many manufacturing industries.  In Utah can be found beds of fine kaolin  or porcelain clay. Vast deposits of soda  and other alkalis. These have never as  yet been worked to any extent as capital has been occupied in the more remunerative operation of mining precious metals.  This holds good in a measure all  throught the west, and perhaps a set of  circumstances tending to direct the attention of those seeking investments  into such channels, may result in greater good to the country in the end.  In the meantime there is less to fear  in this section than on the other side of  the line. Here mines can be found  that can be run at a profit when  90 per cent of the properties on the  other side are shut down. The smelters  require this pre for fluxing and it will  have a market when other ores are  refused. So desirable is the local ore  that premium prices are being paid for  it even in these uncertain times.  LOCATED   ON   THE   COLUMBIA   RBVER    AT   BEARER   CREEK,   ABOUT  OF    THE    PEND ' D'ORESLLE > RIVER,   THE . PROPERTY   OF   THE  IS   THE   TOWNSITE   OF  TWO   IVSILES    NORTH  PRICES  TERMS  A Typical Site tea large City, being level bench land, perfectly adapted for Building Purposes,  and is the SELECTED junction of the River and Railway Transportation.        >v  is the only natural location for a Centre of ���������Supply for the great Placer and  Hydraulic Mines of the Pend d'Oreille and Salmon Rivers, and the Gold and  Silver Mines of Trail Creek.  is the Construction Headquarters of the Nelson & Fort Sheppard Railway,  and will always be a splendid location for supply warehouses.  $150 for Corners ; $100 for Inside Lots purchasers can apply  ^ At 'NELSON,-' to HAROLD SELOUS  One-third Cash, one-third in 2 months, At SAYWARD, to w. M. NEWTON  one-third in 4 months, with interest at  8 per cent, on deferred payments, f  AtNANAIMO, to MAROUS WOLFE  At KASLO, to J. L. RETAI.LACK  At "VICTORIA, Boom rlo. 7, Board of Trade building  JOSHUA   DAVIES,  Manager.  TITLE  AB'IMUCATIOX FOBt WATER-MiASE.-  N  NOTICE.  OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SIXTY  clays after date I intend to apply to the  Honorable Commissioner of Lands and Works for  AVest Kootenay District for a lease of 2,000 inches  of water, to be taken from the Three Forks of  Carpenter Creek at a point about five miles from  the mouth of Carpenter Creek, the water to be  used for milling, mining, water works, domestic  and other purposes.  CHARLES HUGONIN.  Nelson, June 19, 1893. 155-8  sufiMtEMK ������:oiibit notice.  N THE  SUPREME COURT   OF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA.  IN PKOBATE.  In the goods of John Sandon. deceased.  TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN :  Whereas John Sandon, late of the District of  West Kootenay, and Province of British Columbia, formerly of the Province of Quebec, died on  or about the 9th day of February, A. D., 1893, in  the district of West Kootenay, aforesaid, and by  his last will and testament appointed one Joseph  Hetherington of the District of West Kootenay  aforesaid his sole.Executor and Legatee.  Take notice that an application will be made on  Friday, the fifteenth day of September, A. D. 1893  on behalf of the Joseph Hetherington, to the  Supreme Court of British Columbia, at Victoria,  British Columbia, for probate of the will of the  said John Sandon, deceased.  J. H. Bowes,  Baker Street, Nelson,  (,     British Columbia.,  Solicitor for Joseph  Hetherington.  Dated at. Nelson B. C, this 1st day of August,  A. D., 1893.  NOTICE.  "T^TOTICE is hereby given that Frank Fitch, as  -^-^ agent for Maxwell Stevenson, has filed the  necessary papers, land made application for a  Crown Grant in favor of the " Highlander " mineral claim.  The "Highlander" is situated about half a  mile south of Ainsworth, and one-quarter of a  mile from Kootenay Lake.  Adverse claimants will forward their ob.jcc  tions within sixty days from the date of this  publicixtion.  N. FITZSTUBBS,  Gold Commissioner.  Nelson, B. C, Aug. 23, 1893. Aug 26  15 INK NOTICE.  The Railway Aid Act, 1893, as it applies to the Nakusp & Slocan Railway  Co. came into eifect Aug. 18th. by proclamation of the Lieut-Goveanor.  Harry E. Bradley, representing several eastern houses, was laid up at Donald  for some days owing to an accident. H?  was opening a bottle of ammonia, when  the liquid exploded and burned his face  severely. He had a narrow escape from  loosing the sight of one eye, but is  around again, and left for home Friday.  rpAKE NOTICE  . On and after this date the undersigned-  banks will receive American notes at a discount  of one per cent.  BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.  BANK OF   MONTREAL. ���������  Nelson, Aug. 15, '93  CROWN GRANT ABDICATION.  NOTICE   OF   APPLICATION.  Blue Jay Mineral Claim , ...  New Denver Minining District.      ���������  rpAKE NOTICE THAT WE, R. E.'LEMON,  J-free miner's certificate No. 49,342, and,Scott  McDonald, free miner's certificate No^ 16,12?, in-.  tend sixty days from date hereof, to apply to the  Gold Commissioner, for a certificate of improvements for the purpose pf obtaining a Cro,wn'  Grant of the above claim.;, .- . ���������  ;  And further take notice jthat adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before the issuance of such certificate  of improvements.  Dated this first day of August, 1893.  NOTICE.  MINERAL ACT,  1893.  Notice of Application for Certificate of  Improvements.  "Jay Gould "  Mineral Claim.  rpAKE notice that I, as agent for the Shafer  ���������*-    Gold   and   Silver  Mining  Company, free-  miner's certificate No. -13,(M0, intend, sixty days  from date hereof, to apply to the Gold Commissioner for a certificate of improvements, for the  purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above  claim.  And further take notice that adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  THOMAS JOHNSON.  Dated this 18th day of August, 1893,  Ainsworth, B. C. Aug 2G  NOTICE.  ^TT OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SIXTY  -*-^l days from date hereof I intend to apply for  a Crown grant to the *' Etna " mineral claim  situated on Toad Mountain^ West Kootenay District. This application will be made under clause  35, " Mineral Act, 1891."  Copies of the field notes and plat can be seen at  the office of the Government agent, Nelson.  CHARLES VAN NESS.  Nelson, B.C., July 10th, 1S93. 158-8  NOTICE.  MINERAL ACT,  1893.  Notice of application for Certificate of  Improvements.  " Shafer " Mineral Claim.  TAKE notice that I, as agent for the Shafer  Gold and Silver Mining Company, free  miner's certificate No. <13,tM0, intend sixty days  from the date hereof, to apply to the Gold Commissioner for a certificate of improvements, for  the purpose of obtaining a Crown grant of'the  above claim. :   '  And further take notice that adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before the issuance of such certificates of improvements.  THOMAS JOHNSON.  Dated this 18th day of August, 1833,  Ainsworth, B. C. Aug 2G  NOTICE.  l^TOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A. S.  -^ HARWELL, as agent for the Josephine  Mining Company, has filed the necessary papers  and made application for a Crown grant in favor  of the "Josephine" mineral claim. The "Josephine" isanorthcrly extension of the "Highland,"  Lot 258, Group 1, and is situate about 2h miles  north-west from Ainsworth. Adverse claimants  will forward their objections within 60 days from  the date of thispublication.  N.  FITZSTUBBS,  Gold Commissioner.  Nelson, B.C., July 20th, 1893.  Through Tickicts Issued,    ���������  Baggage Checked to Destin^s'tox,  No Customs Difficulties.  Equipment Unsurpassed, combining Palatial  Dining and Sleeping Cars, Luxurious Day Coaches, Tourist Sleeping Cars and Free Colonist  Sleeping Cars.  For information as to rates, time, etc., apply  to nearest agent.  .1. HA.naiiTON, Agent, Nelson,  Or to UVAt. McL. BROWN,  District Passenger, Agent, Vancouver.  NOTICE.  MINERAL ACT,  i ;?3,  Noticdbf application for Certificate of  improvements.  ^Bobtail" Mineral Claim.  Tl AKE notice that J, as agent for the Shafer  , V.Gold and Silver robing Company, free-  ���������'miner's certifidate No. 43,640, intend sixty days  rrr'6m date h'ei-a6f,'to apply to the'Gold Commissioner for a certificate of improvements, for the  purpose, of obtain^ a. Crown Grant of the above  plain}.   ,.,, ,      ,'.,.:'....- : -.  . And. furrier take notice that adverse claims  must be seni/to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced bcfo'rk the' issuance of such certificate of improvements.  THOMAS JOHNSON  NOTICE  Notice of Application for Certificate of Improvements.  Wellington Mineral Claim.  TAKE NOTICE THAT I, AS AGENT FOR  the Kootenay & Columbia Prospecting and  Mining Company Limited, free miner's certilicate  No. 44,298, intend sixty days from the date hereof,  to apply to the Gold Commissioner for a certi licatc  of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a  Crown grant of the above claim.   ���������  And further take notice that adverse claims  must be sent to the Mining Recorder, and action  commenced before the issuance of such certificate  of improvements.  EDWARD WATTS  Dated this firstday of August, 1S93. Aug 5  TRANSPORTATION TIM 12 'TARBJ2S  COLUMBIA   &  KOOTENAY  STEAM   1STAV.   CO.  (limited)  TIME   CARD    NO.   8.  INTO EFFECT SUNDAY,  AUGUST 13,  1893.  PACIFIC  Dated this 18th day of August, 1893.  Ainswortlj. B. C.  Aug 26  The Cheapest and Most Direct Eoute,  From ;p������S.QU, KASLO and all Kootenay  Points '  To the PAGITIO COAST and to the EAST.  TRAINS    T������  AN������  FROM   NELSON    BAILY.  .    < :f/f (��������� \ru _   Direct Connection afirRobaon every  Tuesday, Thursday  and Saturday livening,  With Steamer for Revelstoke, where connection is made with Canadian Pacific Eastbound  and Westbound through trains.  REVELSTOKE ROUTE  S'rit. COLUMBIA connecting with Canadian.  Pacific i?ailway at Revelstoke for all Eastern  and Coast points Leaves Robson���������Tuesdays, and.  Fridays at 7 p.m.  Leaves Revelstoke���������Mondays and Thursdays  at 5 a.m.  Passengers from Nelson should take the C. &  K. train leaving at 3 p. m. Tuesdays and Fridays.  NORTHPORT  ROUTE  Stisamkii COLUMBIA, running in connection with the C. & K. Railway and the S. F. & N.  Railway between Nelson and Spokane, making  close connection at Spokane with Northern Pacific, Great Northern and Union Pacific for all  points east and west.  Leaved Robson���������Tuesdays and Fridays at  5 a.m.  Leaves Northport���������Tuesdays and Fridays at  1 p.m. Passengers for Spokane should take C. &  K. trains leaving Nelson at 3 p. in., on Mondays  and Thursdays.  Tourists from Spokane for Glacier, Banff and  other C.P.R. resorts make close connection at  Robson with boats for Revelstoke.  KASLO ROUTE  Steamer NELSON  Sunday���������Nelson to Kaslo.  Monday���������Kaslo to Nelson and return.  Tuesday���������Kaslo to Nelson.  Wednesday���������Nelson   to   Kaslo,    thence  Lardo and return to Kaslo.  Thursday���������Kaslo to Nelson and return.  Friday���������Kaslo to Nelson.  Saturday���������Nelson to Kaslo and return.  Steamer leaves Nelson for Kaslo on Wednesdays  and Saturdays at 8 a. m., and on Sundays,  Mondays and Thursdays at 3 p. m.  Steamer leaves Kaslo for Nelson on Mondays,  Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 8 a .m.,  and on Saturdays at 3 p.m.. connecting with  all trains on tne C. & K. rail way to Robson.  to  The Company reserves the right to change this  schedule at any time without notice.  For full information as to tickets, rates, etc.,  apply at the  Company's offices, Nelson, B.C.  J. W. Troup, Manager. ���������>��������� \  =-u* wu.i Vifilfl* i^r^iff-w^r*"!! ^ ..;r:;������rs-i.������i  ���������utMi ^O^U-ri-Cii ������������._,��������� v   civf? ���������* '4*  ���������,<i -nj^r^-fct-Ti/rJcP-iitt^^jip"!  **B**wcss������.-owwst^* tents*,-1'  THE MINER,  NELSON,  B. C,  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2,   189  >?  m  If  ?  DIVIDINQ OF ISRAEL.  1 And it came to pass in those days  that the elders of Israel gathered together,  even in the head city called Victoria :  2 That they might give heed and consider  those things which might work for the  good of the tribes that dwelt within the  borders of the land.  3 And behold these elders were chosen  after the manner which had been commanded in Israel from the days when Israel had been sold into bondage, and Mac-  Donald ruled in the land, and his governors sat in the judgement seat.  4: And thus were they chosen :  5 One elder for each of the tribes, or  portion of tribes, dwelling in districts set  apart.  6 And it came to, pass that the eiders  sat in the synagogue, and held council how  they might build Israel up, and how the  shekles and talents .'gathered in the treasury might be spent.  7 And the ruler of the synagogue arose  when the elders had made an end of speaking, and said :  8 Behold, oh ye elders in Israel how the  synagogue in which we wont to sit is getting old.  9 Strangers from the borders of Caauan,  the Tacomaites and the Seattieites point  the finger of scorn at us and pass over on  the other side.  10 Go to, let us take shekels of gold and  silver, and buy cunningly wrought stone,  and cedar, from Mount Lehman, and shakes  from Chilliwack, and build us a synagogue  "like unto the temple of Solomon.  11 And some said "yea>" aud some "nay,"  but when the tale was read by the scribe,  behold those Avho cast their voice for the  new synagogue were more than those who  where against it.  12 And an elder of the tribe of Beaven,  governor of the chief city, knew not what  to sav, for his voice was against the ruler  of the synagogue in all things, but he  feared the people that they might not again  make him governor, and he votedjyea, but  it pained him exceedingly.  13 And when they had finished the ruler  of the synagogue read from the book of the  law:  14 Now therefore hearken O Israel, unto  the statues, and unto the judgments wnich  I teach you, for to do them.  15 And when he had made an end of  speaking behold they each departed unto  his own kindred and tribe.  16 And it came to pass that scarcely had  the words of the ruler reached the people  when certain men arose in the midst of the  congregation and made aloud noise ;  17 Saying "Why should we do this thing?  Why should our shekels go to buy cun  ningly wrought stone and cedar to build a  synagogue to adorn the city of the ruler of  synagogue, when behold our feet stumble  by reason, of the roughness of the way, and  we wade because of the lack of bridges."  18 And there arose in the city called Vancouver, one Abou Ben. Twigge, aforetime  a centurian in the army of Caesar, and desiring his old power, and he said :  19 Come unto me ye people of Israel, who  dwell in the borders of the land. Let us  make a league and covenant, and draw  after us the hosts of Israel, and dejjart  from the teaching of the ruler of the synagogue, and build for ourselves a nation,  and in the midst erect our own synagogue  and make such laws as may seem beat to  us.  20 And there went with him a scribe of  the tribe of Cotton.  21 And he gathered up the words of the  Centurian and wrote them on many scrolls  and cast them abroad that the people  might read thein and perchance follow  after them.  22 And those who harkened unto the  sayings of the Centuriau Twigge gathered  in the gates of the city called Vancouver,  and they formed a new congregation', and  appainted new rulers.  23 And those who had lifted up then-  voices the loudest were found in the high  places.  24 And Centurian Twigge was named  ruler, and him whom men call Keith was  named to care for such sheklus as might be  given by the faithful.  25 And a mighty ma a of the tribe of  Brown, surnamed Winchester, arose and  was put in command of such as draw the  sword, and drove the chariots of brass and  of iron.  26 And some marvelled and others laughed and said " behold they have devils,"  and a few said 'Tt is well."  27 Now when the high priest Davie, ruler  of the synagogue, heard these things he  said:  '���������>"'-'  ���������������������������������-. ~"r .i>-/..-;-?-���������r>i.-,_������ -j.i-i^-������������������������   ���������������������������.,.  ������V  /���������  ������������������O'i  \^&  A  new Railway  under Construction.     :  Buy before the Market rises in the Railway  Centre   and  Seat  of Government of ' |  IVest Kootenay.  Choice Building and Residence Property.;.  REBATE ALLOWED FOR THE ERECTION OF GOOD BUILDINGS  Also Lots for Sale  in     NAKUSP DA WSON and ROBSON  \  x  Apply for Prices, Maps, etc.. to ���������*,  FRANK FLETCHER, Land CommissionerC. & K. Ry. Co., Nelson, B.C.  28 Behold I will journey among them  aud reason with them, and perchance they  will beajken unto my voice.  29 And when he had departed there arose  -and followed after him- an husbandman,  surnamed Thomas, of the tribe of Kitchen.  30 Thomas was of those who dwelt in  tents by the great river, and his voice waxed strong with calling to his oxen, as he  delved in his vineyard.  31 And he of the tribe of Kitchen said "I  also will speak after him and perchance  my voice will drown that of the ruler, if  but by strength alone.  32 Meanwhile the synagogue ceased not  being builded in the city of'the ruler.  33 And when those who would divide  Israel saw this they gathered their scribes,  and meti skilled in the law, and inscribed  on a lengthy roll a petition to him who sat  in the highest place, and ruled over all the  land, and many tribes, other than those of  Israel.  34 And among the many words on the  scroll were those saying that those who  dwelt in the borders of the land were crying out for  a greater number of shekels  for carrying out most needful works.  35 That the rulers in the chief city were  wasting the substance of the people.  36 That, the tithes collected for the >ear  had been .1,060,000 shekels, notwithstanding which 216.000 shekels above the tithes  had been spent iu vain doings!' These  latter shekels being lent by the Amorities  at great usury. , ������  37 That the new synagogue being builded  was to cost 600,000 shekels, whereas the  old synogogue was sufficient.  38 That aid was about to be given to  those possessed of evil spirits, who wrought  strange devices with chariots of iron, running on roads of steel.  39 That those chosen to be elders in  Israel are not so selected as to voice the  will of the people.  40 That the island upon which stands  the city of the ruler of the synagogue has  only 6,535 dwellers whom the law gives a  voice and a lot in the selection of the  elders. And by the voices of these 6,535  sixteen elders were chosen ;  41 Whereas they that dwell in the other  parts of Israel number in their midst 9,025  of those whose voice may be raised and lots  cast for elders, and these had only been  given 17 elders co go up to the synagogue.  42 Whererefore, as the substance of the  greater number is being wted, they  would pray to go their way and separate  from the remainder of Israel, and appoint  their own rulers.  43 And the chief ruler hearkened not to  the appeal.  44 And Abou Ben Twigge said we will also  reason with the people and perchance some  may barken to us and follow our teachings.  45 And he set apart a day, even the tenth  day of the tenth month when they should  gather in tlie city called Kamloops, aud  harken to the voices of who would divide  Israel.  46 And behold an elder in Israel, of the  tribe of Kellie, a man renouned for learning, pondered on these things and he lifted up his voice and spoke these words of  wisdom " Let 'er flicker."  A BELLAIY-LIK  BtA.VKI.V4J HOUSES.  00L. BAEEE TALES ABOUT THE G0V-  EErTMENT OF B. 0.  BANK  OF  ft  BBc Sou nils Hie ]������cuUi Knell of Monopolistic. Concerns in a Maimer which tan-  not FsilI to Secure the Approbation of  lhe Eastern  Rentier.  (Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862.)  HOTELS.  WATSON,   B. O.  CAl'ITAI. (paid up), ������4SOO,000     .  (With power to increase.)  kbsskrvk fijxi>, ������'>������������,<>������<>    ���������   -  $V)20,000  1,365,393  Corner of Baker and Stanley streets.  While in Montreal a few days ago Col.  Baker was interviewed with respect to  the Provincial Government's policy by a  Star reporter.  The substance of the interview is appended :  " Col.  Baker  confirmed  all  that the  Hon.  Theodore   Davie had   said   some  weeks  ago   concerning   the.   aggressive  land policy of the Pacific Province.   Mr.  Davie  then  made it clear, that next at  all  events  to New Zealand, British Columbia had  one of the most progressive  radical  administrations   in   the world.  Land monopoly was the great curse and  bane  of the west as well as of the east,  and his government.was determined to  do away with the evil.    Their weapons  of warfare against it would be the engine  of taxation.    They would  tax the mere  monopolist,   the  dog-in-the-manger out  of existence.      In  the  field   of   reform  their   opportunities   and   powers   were  ample, because they had direct control  without the  intervention of municipal  authorities, of therevenueof large areas  of British   Columbia,    the unorganized  districts.  In these districts they, would see to it  that monopoly was taxed to death and  the product of industry taxed as little as  possible. And in the organized districts  they would urge upon the municipal  governments the adoption of a similar  policy.  They were in this respect far in advance of, or at least utterly opposed to,  Mowat's administration, which not only  did not urge such a revenue policy upon  the municipalities, but by a vote  in the  house, resolved to compel the municipalities to continue the existing system,  to  tax improvers more than  monopolists.  In a word, on the great issue of tax reform British Columbia  has  one  of the  most radical governments in  the  world.  To-day Lieut-Col.    Baker   assured   a  S'u?r reporter that on that issue,   as  on  every p.: her, there was perfect harmony  between Mr.   Davie and his  colleagues;  and in the Legislature the  Government  has a strong  majority   pledged  to   this  policy.    Personally he,(Col.   Baker)   did  not wish to  trumpet  his'views' to'the  world, but he believed that ir> this  matter the government to which h'u belonged had undertaken one  of the  greatest  and most far-reaching  of reforms.    v-te  would not say  that  the people of  the  'coast'were prepared for  the  policy  of  Canada���������Victoria, Vancouver,  New Westminster, Nanaimo and Kamloops.  United States���������San Francisco, Portland, Tacoma, .and Seattle.  HEAD OFFICE: (50 Lombard street, LONDON,  England.  AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS:  CANADA���������Canadian Bank of Commerce and  branches; Merchants' Bank of Canada and  brandies: Imperial Bank of Canada and branches; Molson's Bank and branches; Bank of  Nova Scotia.  UNITED STATES���������Agents Canadian Bank of  ,    Commerce, New Yoric;  Bank of Nova Scotia. Chicago.  Traders' National Bank, Spokane,  The TOWX OF WATSON is situated between  Bear and Fish Lakes, on the Kaslo-Slocan  wagon road, 20 miles from Kaslo and 10  milcsfrom New Denver, is the most central  point in Slocan district.  Tlie WATSOX HOTEL is one of the best kept  houses in the entire Slocan country. The dining room and kitchen are in charge of female  help of experience. The bar is stocked with  the best brands of Liquors and Cigars.    -r '    ���������'  BREMNER  &  WATSON,  PROPRIETORS.  m  QAVINGS   DEPxVRTMENT���������  Deposits received at ������1 and upwards, and  interest allowed (present rate) at 3������ per cent,  per annum.  GRANGE V. HOLT,  Nelson, July 17,1S93. ' Agent.  sb/okti.w; 4;ooiss.  I  t -1  h  11'  ���������AS>STAL (all paid up), $19,000,000  REST, .       .        .        . 6,000,000  Sir   DONALD   A.   SMITH,............President  Hon.  GEO. A. DRUMMOND.... .Vice-President  E. S. CLOUSTON  .General Manager  ITelson  Branch:   IS. "W.  Comer Baker and  Stanley Streets.  Branches in London (England), New York  and  Chicago and in the principal cities in Canada.  Buy and sell sterling exchange and cable tranfers.  Grant commercial and travelers' credits, available in any part of the world ;  Winchester. Rifles in 38-56, 40-65^  40-82, 4-5-70, 45-90, and 50-110 calibers with..,  octagan barrel, price, $18.00. '-^r^  Winchester   .Rifles   in   44 calibjgir^"1.  either model of'73 or '72, price 316.00 with  octagan, or 315.00 with round barrel.  Marlin Eifles, model of '89, with  octagan barrel, 44 calibre, price 818.00  Marlin Eifles, model '03, 38-55 calibre, octagan barrel, case-hardened mountings, price $20.00.  Tisdall <fe Greener shot "uns.  Newhouse, BVawley and Norton's  bear, beaver, and other traps.  Rogers' Hunting Knives. ~~  Charles E. Tisdall  Drafts issued; Collections-made; Etc.  SAVSiMGS   BANK   BRANCH.  Rate of interest at present 3i percent.  UU.VH A KEK,  VAWCOUVEE,   IB. C.  i:ijM>B\<;   MATEKIAL  IIOTEBiS.  Three Forks Hotel  entirely   exempting  from  taxation    all  MINING NOTES  The Kootenay & Columbia Power and  Mining Co.,of Ottawa, are in   receipt  of  a contract made a few days ago by their  superintendent in Kaslo, of silver ore at  S3A cents per oz. for silver, and .$3,50 per  100 lbs. fsr lead.    These prices are  the  same as last year.    One hundred tons of  high grade ore are being shipped to .the  Tacoma   Smelting   ancl     Refining    Co.  This is the highesr. price paid  fc ��������� silver-  since last November,   and   is  a/ ,nun ted  for by the fact that the  Kootenay  produces the finest quality of fluxing ore in  ^e^c,1'Jd'    Xt.is being shipped from the   everiThe'iiiost  Wellington mine, 20 miles from Kaslo.    ��������� not escape."  products of labor, but he would say that  they and their representatives in tiie executive were determined that monopoly  should be destroyed. They would however, encourage capitalists to take up  land, and perhaps in this respect fewer restrictions should exist, but they  would see to it, that such capitalists  would be properly taxed if they attempted to hold their lands idle,   'waiting for  E. 0. 0AEPENTEE, Manager.  All the principal mines in Slocan District, can be  reached in from two to seven miles from this  hotel, which islocatcd at Three Forks on Carpenter creek.  Tlie Dining Room is under the immediate sup-  cricntendcnce of Mr. C. Bowen. formerly of  AVindsor hotel of Butte, Montana, and the  Rogers' hotel, Missoula, who will see to it  .bat the cuisine of-the Three Forks is not  excelled by that of any other hotel in West  Koote* ay.  a raise,' and locking labor out. Then he  believed that the existing industrial and  financial depression would be shortlived  for tlie resources of tlie west were almost infinite. .But so complicated was  the mechanism of commerce that these  depressions must: be world-wide, and  favored  countries could  Special. Kates for Weekly Hoarders.  E'ri.vale, k'ooiiis for Transient <;ucs(s.  TECUMSEHNHOUSE.    "\  ,       Josephine  Street.  Hughes & Eeisterer, Vhvs.  '.   ~n������)    NELSON, B>  f-VE   SUBSCRIBER  HAS IN  STOCK or  en   route from   the  Coast :  i Carload Glass, Paints and Oils.  2  Carload Sash  and Doors.  2  Carload Dry  Clear Fir  Flooring, 4-  i/ich.  1 Carload Dry Clear Fir Ceiling, 4 inch  I  Carload Factory  Cedar,  yi/i-   Immense   Stock of  Com//ion  Lumber,    Shingles,    Laths,    Mouldings, y  Etc., as usual.  G.  O. Buchanan, \  Kootenay Lake  SawmilL  NELSON AND KASLO.  .llBSCKLLAXKOr.S.  E^O>  "Initial  B'osf"    Sotiees,  <lra>vn   11-  llie    provisions   of  tli<>;  Act, an<l ;iivint; lucid /  to M:ihe a 4'I;iiin  iiimJi.-  I>e procured from  Turner Hros. <:  Gilkur & Wells, Ten ft'  Nelson Xews Depot. ':���������'.���������������������������  In lots of 50 and 100 at T:  nu  I . . /������������������    /       ,       ..   A % M  ^   ��������� ,,���������, M.          , , .-������������������_     ., _  ,-  ^������������������m,        tts  ��������� n.n*i re���������a,- -_ ^.^j,,,  _ rh r-i-.' J->^M^-���������l  "i.������������������ .^'n-     - r*   ��������� ���������_ ������ "'���������������������������'i*',"j ��������� " ' "��������������������������� ' ������������������ ������������������y"  ������������������������������������������������f ��������������� i *m 4*   hi THE MINER,  NELSON, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, ,189;  ���������~r-ar,v;j tytrzTKrr  <(Lhc ^Tincv.  upon an immense vein of high grade ore,  the extent of which is almost beyond belief to anvone who has not been   on   the  'jnku is printed on Saturdays, provided  ���������<tail* is sober, and will be mailed to any  address in Canada or the United States, for  one year on receipt of two dollars. Tlio.se1  desiring simple copies will secure same on  receipt of ten cunts.  Contract Advertisements inserted al the rate  of ?3 per inch, (down lhe column) per month  and as much more as patrons will stand.  Transient Advertisements inserted at the  rate of lo cents per line fust insertion, and 10  ccntsjier line for each subsequent insertion.  Advertisements running for shorter periods  than three months is classed transient.  Quack, Cure-All, Private Remedy, and Next-to-  Pure-Reading-Mattcr advertisements are not  '    'wanted.'   ��������� ��������� . .      <r  Job Printing of high merit turned out in short  order.   Prices to match,  Address  The Miner Printing & Publishing Co.  c NELSON,    B.C.  SEEKING 'NE W INVESTMENTS.  - As was pointed out in the Miner last  week, Canada's day is coming. For a  year or more,the world generally has  been subjected to more or less of a finan"  eial disturbance. Capital as a result has  suffered in many ways. Investments  that at one time were perfectly safe and  remunerative, have become more and  \more doubtful, until now they are gen.  'lerally dangerous and often disastrous.  British capital has, for some reason,  fought shy of Canada for years past, but  the tide is turning. Disappointed in  other fields, the mbnied men of Great  Britain are turning their attention in  this direction, and asking if in Canada  there can be found something safer  and  better.  The answer is certainly favorable, and  especially so with regard  to British Columbia'    Here can be found the raw   material which iu less abundance, but properly handled, has  made permanent and  thriving communities.    The  same   will  ,   undoubtedly be true of this province.  One thing however must not be forgotten.    This  capital which   is   just    now  .���������-', knocking at our door is a proverbially  _������i?2L-<2;e'    Conservative to  a degree,   it  f doe's not look so much for immense prof-  I it as safe investment.  In the past mistakes have been made  that should be carefully, avoided in the  future. It is the duty of every citizen  who has the future growth and welfare  of .this region at heart, to see that these  people get in every case a "square deal."  They must be shown that there is an evident intention to give them not only  the worth of their money in the first  place, but an opportunity for a reasonably assured profit.  1 i Every man who expects to remain   in  this country is interested to a considerable degree in seeing that no "wildcats"  are worked off on those who come from  across  the   water   seeking   for   investments.    One such can do an amount  of  iharm that years can hardly remedy  *"  It is reaonable to believe   that a section, like this, rich in the material  nec-  j'essary  to build a prosperous country,  Will be one of the first to  receive  atten-  _ tion of those who have  money to invest  f    Almost every day is adding to the  already long list of valuable discoveries of  rich   mineral   bearing    veins.      Within  the next twelve months investments can  be made in this portion of  the  country  that will yield returns   that   will  astonish our friends on the other side.  The money to make the trial of some  of these is already turning in this direction. When it comes, treat it in  such a manner that more and more will  i follow.          IVIIJTE GROUSE MOUNTAIN.  A new chapter is being opened in the  wonderful history of rich finds and  lucky ventures in this section. It would  appear as though chance is working almost like design in revealing the hidden  treasures of the Kootenay mountains in  such a way that the discoveries follow  each other in a geometric ratio with regard to extent and richness.  Just as the   Slocan  country and the  Toad  Mountain   district have    become  well known, and the  people are  beginning to say "That must be all there is up  .^3S!*g!������a.'."'eomi's the news of  the discovery  | ground.  Dp to the present time such information as could be gathered from reliable  sources', is to the affect,that the country  is crossed by a ledge of vein matter nearly 40 feet in width. This ledge is clearly defined, and can be traced for miles  along the hillsides and over the ridges.  Assays on specimens submitted for  test are no less startling than the width  and extent of the vein. The mineral  appears to be, for the greater part, grey  copper, and other types of copper-silver  ore."1 In value it ranges from a few hundred,.to several,thousand ounces in silver, a sinallamount in gold, and a very  high percent of copper. This latter  reaches in some cases fully 50 per cent.,  and one sample ran as diigh��������� as 55 per  cent. ';  With silver hanging in the balance,  tremblingjliable to turn either way, the  opening up of a uew district, rich in a  metal so desirable as copper, and carrying promising traces of gold, cannot fail  to have a most deueficial effect, on this  region generally.    (".'  ,,  The whole White Grouse Mountain  district is within easy access from the  Kootenay lake, being only about 15  miles by trail from Marysville, at which  point the lake steamers' are now touching every trip. This renders the new  mining region directly tributary to Nelson, from which point will tie drawn  .the supplies for the carrying on of the  development , work, a , considerable  amount of which is already contemplated for the present season.  Another cause for congratulation, and  another reason for the "Faith which is  inus," -  ���������A FIND  OF OPAL.  It is possible that the recent finds of  opal made in Idaho, may be located in a  belt which is more extensive than was  at first thought. In a letter from the  Miner's Trout Lake correspondent this  week is noted the discovery of a deposit  of hyalite.  This mineral, sometimes called Mul-  ler's glass, is a glassy and nearly transparent variety of opal. It occurs in  small concretions, and is occasionally  stalactitid While it has no commeacial  value of itself, it is a good indication, as  it is rlmost always found in connection  with the more, precious forms of the opal,  aud espeially the gdm or lire opal.  Specimens of this latter have been  picked up in that section, and the indications would seem to point toward the  existance of a bed of this beautiful and  desirable gem in the mountains of East  Kootenay.   ���������',.  BRITISH COLUMBIA   IRON WORKS  General Founders, Engineers, Boiler Makers, and Manufacturers  of All Classes of Machinery. Sawmill and Marine  Work a, Specialty. ,  SOLE   MANUFACTURERS   OF   THE  MfSFaOi:!  EE0OEDOP THE HAPPENINGS IE AKD  ABOUND TEOTJT LAKE  Set out in Kcndablc Shape by the Miner's  Corr������si>on������lcnt.���������The.'Abbott Group Kids  Fair to Kecome one of the Best Properties in   the .District;  Kendall Band, Mill, B. C. Shingle MaGbines,  Steam Log Hauling Machines.  Wc keep in-stock .������ supply of Enetaeer and Mill Supplies.,������0h aa.Pipc and :Flttu,gS. Brr^.  Goods,   Shoot and-othor -Packing-Rubber Valves, Rubber and Leather Boltmg���������Oi!,  .'���������'���������' and Lubricants, etc.  HOISTINQ ENGINES and SINKING PUMPS FOE MINES  Corner Alexander Street and Westminster Ave., VANCOUVER, B. 0.  D.   CARTMEL,:       J. W. OAMPION, J. E  Agent West Kootenay. Secretary-Treasurer.  W. MACFARLAKE,  Manager  A BIG-MAJORITY.  The vote in the House of the U. S.  Congress on the Wilson repeal bill was  not a surprise as far as the result was  concerned, but there were some startling  figures in the totals of the votes cast.  Either someone blundered in the first  canvass of the situation, or the ranks of  the anti-silver men have been swelled, to  an extent not taken into consideration  by any of the western friends of; silver.  After listening to the debate on Saturday last it was conceeded by all that  unconditional repeal would pass the  House, but in was hoped by such a small  majority that the vote would have but  little influence on the supposed friendly  attitude of the Senate. This hope was  not realized, as the majority of 130 in  favor of the Wilson bill would show.  It is a well known fact that the two  houses are accustomed to pay attention  to a considerable extent, to the wishes  of the other when expressed in anything  like a heavy majority for or against a  measure, and it is therefore to be feared  that such an expression of the feeling of  the Senate will have great weight in  helping to decide on its final course of  action.  The most hopeful must admit that at  the present time the situation is not a  very pleasant one for the|friends of free  silver. The message of president Cleveland may, however, have had more  weight in the House than it will have  in the Senate, and that body may, in  view of the fact that this is an unusually  grave situation, decide to take a firm  stand as opposed to both the House and  the president.  This may bring the matter to a question of veto on the part of the president  and those who know his character have  but little hope that he will permit anything directly opposed to his views' to  pass him in the shape of a bill. The requisite two-thirds to pass anything of a  nature frendly to silver over him, looks  like a last year's ghost in thinness when  viewed in the light of the recent vote.  The Spokane Review says in this r-uiir  nection:  The president will hardly yi^ld. to the  Hill idea of a declaration ci bimetallic  policy. Pickwickian though it be, he  would prefer even tb:/ Sherman act.  His purpose in calling" an extra session  was avowedla to,convince the world  that the United States is going to cut  entirely loose from silver, and he will be  content with nothing less. His victory  in the house will make him more uncompromising than before, and nothing  ���������        -      t  medical.  Owing,to the depressed condition of  the silver market special attention is  being paid to gold. Several claims have  been located upon supposed auriferous  leads. Specimens ���������from some of these  show a payable percentage of gold.  J. W. Haskins passed through town  on his way to, the northeast arm. He  reports favorably of the Abbott group,  upon which a large amount of capital is  being expended. The shaft is now 20  feet deep, and the ore is improving in.a  very satisfactory manner.  The Alice also gives encouragement,  and it is the intention of the syndicate  to continue work on the most promising  of the claims until winter sets in. It is  probable that thejtrail will be kept open  till the end of the year.  Mr. Jenkins is expected to arrive next  week with his compliment of men to go  to work on the Silver Cup, and will probably make several shipments of ore  before the close of" navigation.  Later assays of orejfrom the Great  Northern show a much higher percentage of gold than has been hitherto suspected. Some fine specimens of copper-  bearing ore have been brought in lately  from the further range. Curiously  enough tlie copper-bearing ore almost  invariably contains more silver than  galena, the general <rule seeming to be  reversed, and the more heterogenious  the ore the greater the prospect of a  large percentage of precious metal.  A report comes from the east  slope of a find of hyalite, a mineral which though valueless in itself is of  consequence as a probable indication of  certain varieties of opal, which gems I  have myself found on the ranges further  south, and therefore believe their existence in this district to be quite within  the range ofpossibility.  Mr. Thomas Cadman arrived from  Revelstoke. He was in a high state of  excitement, consequent upon the escape  of his courser, by which fickle quadruped  he had it appeal's been opilt upon the  road.  Messrs. C. Anderson and Andrew Ab-  rahamson hp v'e struck a vein of rock  which assays over forty ounces of gold  to the tcii.  William Miller, who has been prospecting with W. J. Haskins, reports  good prospects for gold beyond Healey  Creek. He has recorded two claims in  the Healey creek country, both of which  give good assays.  E. LeEoy has sold the Black Prince on  very advantageous terms.  Several new silver strikes are reported  during the week, notably one by Tom  Edwards of a vein which assays 1050  ounces of silver to the ton. Others'Jvary  from 62 to 420,  J. Sutherland and his partner are  placer mining on the Lardeau, but do  not appear to have much  success.  L. Cague starts for the Porks where  he intends to put in the fall hunting for  gold. He has been ;very busy for some  days at the forge making derrick hooks,  drills and other appliences.  ,  J. ,W. Haskins has left this district .for  E.  C. ARTHUR, A.M., M.D.,  PHYSICIAN,   Etc.,  CORONER FOR WEST KOOTENAY,  Office over Nelson Drug Store,  West Baker street,  Nelson, B.C.  LaBAU,   M. D.,   ;V,.  Physician and Surgeon,  Rooms 3 and A,  Houston Block,  Nelson, B.C.  Telephone  42.  MINING.  PELLEW-HARVEY  ASSAYER and ANALYTICAL CHEMIST  ',-.'' Golden, B.C.  Appointed by the British Columbia Government;  to make all Assays and Analysis of Specimens sent to the World's Fair, Chicago,  1891-1893. "  SURVEYING.  A       S.  GOING,  CIVIL  ENGINEER AND  PROVINCIAL  LAND   SURVEYOR.        G  Houston Block,  Nelson, B. C.  13     C. CAMPBELL-JOHNSTON  , (of Swansea, India, and the United States;)  METALLURGIST, ASSAYER,  AND MINING ENGINEER  Properties reported on. All assays;undertaken.  Furnaces and concentrating plants planned  and erected. Treatment for ores given. Ores  bought and sold.   Box 731,Vancouver, B.C.  M.  S. DAVYS.  T7TRK & RITCHIE  Dominion   and   Provincial  Land Surveyors.  PHOTO-TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEYS.  Office over Bank of British Columbia,  Nelson,   B. C.  MINING  ENGINEER,  AND ASSAYER.  Offices Victoria Street.  NELSON, B. C������  AUCTIONEERS.  J. A. KIRK  J. F. RITCHIE  /^i      W.   BUSK,  Assoc. M. Inst. C. E., M. Can. Soc. C. E.  PRVINCIAL  LAND SURVEYOR.  Telephone Connection.  Balfour, b. c  A.   ROBERTS,  Provincial   and   Dominion  Land Surveyor,  TROUT LAKE CITY, B.C.  (^  P. TUCK,  CIVIL  ENGINEER  AND PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR  Nelson and New Denver, B.C  -rxr   P. ROBINSON,  GENERAL    AUCTIONEER  NELSON,   B.C.  Wanted���������Consignments of Household Goods,  Surplus Stock, Etc., for Auction.  Prompt returns.  All business transactions strictly confidential.  KROKERS.  C.  HAMBER,  CUSTOMS BROKER  Attends to all Consignments of Goods and Chat-  tics held at the outpovt of Nelson,  for payment of Customs Duties.  NELSON, B. (J.  MISjCEBiLANEOUS,  Subscribe   for  .o.  H. ELLACOTT, B.A., Sc,  CIVIL   ENGINEER  AND  PROVINCIAL   LAND   SURVEYOR.  Mineral and Mining Surveying  a Specialty.  KASLO, B. C  s  VICTORIA,  K.C.  The paily Tiipies,  Subscription, $io per annum,  In advance.  The l^/eeklij Tirji.es,  Subscription, $2 per annum,  In advance.  MIXING  J.  F.   BLEDSOE,  EXAMINER    OF   MINES,  Nelson, B.C.  twenty years' experience in the  152-52 american camps.  Independent in Politics,  Fullest Telegraphic Reports,  Correspondents in every District  Address���������  THE TIMES PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO.  VICTORIA, B.C.  WM. TEMPLEMAN, MANAGER.  Tra^Z-  ��������� 1 Tit i  ��������� "-  D*T\*������

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