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The Miner Nov 14, 1891

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Array &g ���������&  ���������&-.  '%  Only Paper  Printed  in the  Kootenay I^alte Mim  ing IMstricts.  For Kates  of Suhscription and  Advertising:  See  FoEirfh  Page,  NUMBEE 73.  STELSOtf,   BEITISH   COLUMBIA,   SATUEDAY,   K0VEMBEE   14,   1891.  $4 A YEAE.  TUG  SLOCA.\ A GOOD COUNTRY  TO   PROSPECT  IS.  While it is yet too early to make any statements  as to the extent or permanency of the  ledges in the Slocan country,  enough is known  to warrant The Miner in stating that the country is one worthy the attention of both the prospector and the investor.    The country is large,  unprospected, and has every appearance of being a mineral one; it will be easily accessible in  the spring, both from  Kootenay lake and from  Nelson; the ore is of a character easily treated,  and of a grade that will stand shipment to the  United States if there should be no home market; it "is not a 1-claim country, as enough locations have already been made to give investor's  a   chance to select a "winner."   Although discovered after the first fall of snow, fully a hundred prospectors and miners have paid it a visit,  and they all return with similarreports, that is,  that the country is a good one and has a future.  As to the best route in and out, opinions differ.  Prospectors who sojourn in Hot Springs district  to a man claim that the Kaslo creekroute is the  best, not only on account of its being the shorter,  but because of the easiness of its grades.    They  claim, and their claim is based on measurements  taken by disinterested parties, that the distance,  from Kaslo City to the junction of Seaton and  Carpenter creeks is not more than 25 miles, and  that a good grade for a wagon road can easily  be had from the mines to Fish and Bear lakes,  thence down the north fork to Kaslo City.    On  the other   hand, prospectors who   make their  headquarters at Nelson assert that ore cannot.be  economically hauled up hill, and if there is ore  'in the country that it must be brought to Slocan  lake, thence down Slocan river to the Columbia  &  Kootenay  branch  of  the Canadian  Pacific.  They admit that the distance from the claims to  the railroad is longer than from the claims to  the steamboat landing at Kaslo Cityy hut that  the down grade more than offsets the climb that  must of necessity be made on the Kaslo creek  route.    However, the  more  practicable   routes  into the new camp  the better, and the towns  whose business men show the most  enterprise  will probably get away with the larger share of  the trade.  The formation is limestone and schistose shale;  the gangue dolomite and quartz. The vein  matter carries a good percentage of iron. The  ore is galena and carbonates, and assays from  a few dollars to hundreds of dollars per ton in  silver; it is free from refractory elements. From  the lay of the ground many of the claims can be  easily developed by tunnels, and little machinery will be needed for the first year or two.  There is an abundance of timber, much of it  white pine. Eligible sites for reduction works  are not lacking. Jn fact, the country has nearly  all the natural advantages that are looked for  by mining speculators, without whom no new  country can be speedily developed however rich.  The latest discovery reported is one made by  E. A. Bielenberg and William Lynch on the  lake shore near the in out h of Seaton creek. The  ore is of a different character from that found in  the claims on the headwaters of Carpenter creek,  having copper for a base instead of lead. Assays  made at Nelson gave a return of over 2000 ounces  silver per ton. Mr. Bielenberg and his partner  have returned to the ground, > taking in 750  pounds of supplies, so as to be ready for operations early in the spring. Hunter & Co. have  started a store at the mouth of Seaton creek,  and expect to have a ton or two .of staples in  this fall, so that prospectors need not bring in  large packs in the spring. Mr. Hunter will also  make a trail from his place up Seaton creek to  Carpenter creek, thence to the claims on the  headwaters of the latter stream.  There will be a stampede to the Slocan country in the spring, and the stampeders will not  return as they went, is the prediction of The  Miner.   ________  A Prosperous Year on the Ynkon.  A large number of miners from 40-Mile creek  on  the  Yukon  river,   Alaska,  arrived at San  Francisco   last  week   by  the steamer City  of  Topeka.     Nearly every man had  more or less  gold, and but few only came out even.    It costs  #400,   provisions   and   everything included,   to  stay a year in the 40-Mile country.    Twentj^-five  miners in all came out this trip, and about 125  men were left in at the mines.    Of the returned  F.  W.   Harte,   Napoleon  Hust,   Napoleon   St.  Germain, Henry Matson,. and Frederick Klotke  are at the American Exchange, and, their bags of  nuggets and dust have been interesting themes  of conversation about the hotel.    Some of them  had been there as long as 5 years without once  being out.    F. W. Harte was one of these.    He  said that in some places in the diggings it was  30 feet to bed-rock, while in others it was only  4.    The season lasts but 6 months, and all the  miners worked steadily in order to   make the  most of it.     As a rule they did very well.    The  0. party here will-'go back in the spring.    Meantime,  they say,  they are going to get thawed  out at some of the California hot springs. There  is a band of about 200 Indians of the Stick tribe  in the 40-Mile district, and nearly all the miners  have taken   wives from the band.    They are  snowed up a good deal of the time, but those  that are am bit ious pile wood oh the snow, melt  it and the frozen.ground down, and then sink  holes and prospect.    In the time they have at  their disposal in winter they can sink enough  holes to find  good grourid   somewhere.     The  largest nugget taken out this year was one of 14  ounces.    The largest single cleanup from sluice  boxes made by  10  men  was  $1460.    The dust  averages about $17 to the ounce.  ������nr Telephone System*.  Last winter residents of Ainsworth, Balfour,  and Nelson obtained a charter for a telephone  company, and today the company thus organized  has 50 miles of line in operation, and the following subscribers: c  Nelson���������J". Fred Hume & Co., G. A. Bigelow  & Co., R. E. Lemon, W. F. Teetzel & Co., Wilson  & Perdue, Carney & Barrett, International hotel,  , Silver King hotel, Hotel Phair, Houston & Ink,  Canadian Pacific, Nelson Sawmill Company  (both yard and mill), Silver King mine, Dandy  mine, Grizzly Bear mine, Buchanan's sawmill.  Balfour���������C. W. Busk, Balfour hotel.  Ainsworth���������H. \ Giegerieh, Green Brothers,  McKay & Devlin, Ainsworth house, mining  recorder's office, Halfway house, Number One  mine, Skyline mine.  No one of the above subscribers would now be  without the service, as it affords them ready  communication at a comparatively trifling cost,  considering the newness of the country. Messages for transmission by the Canadian Pacific  telegraph line are received at the telephone  company's offices at Ainsworth and Nelson.  Another Mining: Snh-B>ivision Should he  Created.  Although  no  more  claims are  likely to   be  staked in the Slocan country until next spring,  a mining recorder should be appointed for the  new camp. The Slocan country is not only  quite extensive but a long distance from Nelson,  where claims must now be recorded. The new  sub-division should be designated as one embracing all that portion of West Kootenay district lying on creeks flowing into Slocan lake.  Still  the  King-Pin.  Excitements may come and go, but one fact  remains indisputable, that is, that the Silver  King on Toad mountain, is the king-pin mine of  the Kootenay Lake country. Three shifts are  again at work in the main tunnel, which is in  about 700 feet. Every crosscut run'encountered  ore, the one known as No. 6 cutting a body 47  feet wide. '     _.   A 11-Ton  Working; Test.  The owners of the Le Boi claim in Trail Creek  district have sacked 11 tons of ore for a working  test. It will be shipped to either Butte, Montana, or Argo, Colorado, for treatment.  PYKITIC   SMEI/riXti   NOT   AN   IKIDESCE.W  I������1������EAJH.  Everything pertaining to the smelting of ores  is of interest to the people* of the lake country,  because of the fact that in no other section of  America is there a greater variety. We have  ores of all grades from free gold to the most refractory pyritic. Pyritic smelting has been  tried at Dead wood, South Dakota, and although  the New7 York Engineering arid Mining .'.Journal  says   the  result   is   uncertain,   the   Dead wood  Times says it has been a complete success, as is  evidenced by the fact that the smelting company  is continually adding to the capacity of its plant.  During the fall and winter or 1889-90, the company erected an experimental nlant at a cost of  about $8000  which was kept in operation for  some 6 months, the result was so satisfactory  that steps were at once taken for the erection of  the present plant, which on its completion represented $90,000.   After being in operation about  2 mon ths it was shut dbwn for the purpose of  putting in 3 more stacks, one of which is about,  completed and the material for the other two  now en route from Chicago to Dead wood.    All  will be in place on or about the middle of this  month, when it is the intention of the company  to start up for continuous operation.   A refinery  for the treatment of the output of matte is also  in course of construction.    This additional machinery  will   bring the total  cost  of the new  works to a sum somewhat in excess of $100,000.  Other disbursements connected therewith make  a grand total invested in the enterprise of bver  $^50,000.    The ores treated at the works so far  have been concentrated 10 to 1, the  resulting,  matte being of an average value of $350 per ton.  Assay value of the ores treated show that they  carry from $35 to $37 in gold and silver to the  ton, so that it is,difficult to see how any -great  loss is sustained by volatilization  or in a "high  running  slag.     The latter has had  numerous  tests, not one of which has yet shown but what  it was free and clear of all precious mineral.  Kails to he  Laid to Koiuier's  Ferry.  The Kootenay Lake country will have competitive transportation routes by the time navigation  opens   in   the   spring.    Chief   engineer  Beckler of the Great Northern has ordered a  spur .put'in.at Sand Point, Idaho, to connect the.  main line of the Northern Pacific with the grade  of the Great Northern, and as soon as the steel  can be forwarded track laying will'"'commence  eastward to Bonner's Ferrv, a distance of 36  miles. It is expected that construction trains  will be running to Bonner's Ferry by New  Years day. The gap between Bonner's Ferry  and the end of track in Montana is estimated at  about 250 miles, on which track laying will be  continued as long as the weather permits.  Malting; jVew and Repairing <f>ld  Trails.  On "Wednesday last 16 men left Nelson to cut  a trail from the railway at Ward's crossing to  Slocan lake, a distance of about 25 miles. It is  expected that the work will be completed in 20  days. The money to pay the men was subscribed  by the business men of Nelson. A party has  also been sent out by the government to repair  the trail from Nelson to the boundary line below Trail Creek, so that the trail will be in good  condition should the mail be carried on horseback, as it was last year.  Changing; Hands.  A number of interests in claims in the new  Slocan district have changed hands in the last  week at figures ranging up in the hundreds, W.  S. McCulloch and John B. Cook being the purchasers. The former is operating for a coast  capitalist and the latter on his own hook.  ������ropping.  Silver keeps  a  dropping in price,  the New  York quotation on Monday being 94^r cents. z  :������;��������� THE  MINEE:    NELSON,  B.  0./ SATUEDAY,  N0VEMBEE 14,   1891.  A    SHOKT.   STORY   OF   REAL .LIFE."  No one in the Journal office knew him except  by the name of ''Mike," although the managing  editor unbent himself one day, and in part pay-  men t for a generous lunch brought by the city  editor, informed that worth}7 that his other  name was Edwards. This bit of information  was afterwards verified by the cashier in the  business office; and ���������later on retailed to the reporters by the spectacled, blue-pencil fiend aforesaid, in exchange for cigars and sundry bottles  of Bass's ale, of which he, the city editor, was  very fond. . ��������� " ��������� '."���������  Someone attempted to call him "mr. Edwards" one day, but he checked what'., .might  have become a practice by simply saying: "I  wish you would call me Mike, it sounds much  better to me.  Mike was about 30,1 should imagine, although  he might have been older or younger, -i He was,  a slight built fellow with wavy brown hair and  mustache, and deep lustrous eyes, which always  wore a far-away look, as if he were ever thinking of something not here; something beyond.  His mouth had a yearning expression; like as  though the lips would say something which the  spirit that controlled them would not permit.-V  He ' He ver spoke unless first addressed, and usually his replies were in monosyllables, unless  perchance the answer was an explanation, and  then it was made in the briefest manner imaginable. >.-:;'���������: v.-  He was the most faithful worker I ever saw.  He would show up at the office at 1 o'clock every  day and from that hour until the paper went to  press he was al ways at his desk. No on e ever  knew him to go to lunch, although several of us  watched him from time to time.  In his position he was a splendid man. When  the "run"was light and there was plenty of  space, he would grab a handful of associated  press and produce some of the most vivid  specials I ever read. The managing editor noted  this faculty and encouraged him to such anaex-  tent that the Gazette, .-our morning rival, used to  turn green with envy over "Mike's grapevine."  In a rush, too, he was equally proficient.  When the night editor, who was a perfect crank,  would rattle the city editor and we of the re-  portorial staff by bursting into the room and announcing that we must "condense, pare down,  concentrate; that the paper was full; cut to the  core," he never worried Mike in the least. He  would glance over his sheets of manifold, quietly  ask how much space he could have, and he  would not have a line too much or too little.  Many a time did I wash that I had his faculty in  that. line. He would reduce a column to 2 sticks,  and tell in a paragraph what many others would  require 50 lines to relate.  We all tried to scrape an acquaintance with  "Mike" but}, while he treated us politely, there  was an  air of reserve about him that made a  conversation of any considerable duration impossible.    Once 1 tried to draw him  out as to  where he had come from, but the moment I attempted it I saw by the expression of his eyes  that this was a hopeless task.   From that look  of sadness that lurked in the dreamy orbs there  came one  of   determination,  as if they' would  say:    "You are attempting to penetrate a mystery that is forbidden, and you must not cross  the line; you shall not."    I changed the subject.  One night when the day's run was completed  the city editor called us into his room and said:  "Boys,  I will be hanged if I don't think that  we have got a first-class sensation right here in  this office."    We were all alert  in an instant.  "It's in there," he continued, nodding towards  Mikes  room.    "This man  has been here for 4  months now. and while  we do know his name  none of us can tell where he came from or what  he is.    Why, we don't even know where he lives  now.    I was talking with the managing editor  today, and he doesn't know.   Said he asked him  and xVIike said 'Oh never .mind that; I will always be here.    The day 1 fail to come down will  be announced to you a week in advance.'    Now  that's all he said, and the old man had to put up  with it, for he turned and walked out.    Now I  believe there is a great mystery connected with  him, and that we ought to find out.    He may  be some noted criminal."  "Perhaps   he  is  the  lost  Charley  Boss," remarked the reporter who "did" railroads.  THE  m COM  OF   TORONTO,   OlSTT^IRIO..  MANUPAOTUEEES OP ALL DESOEIPTIONS OF MAEINE AND STATIONAEY  BSritish ColumbiaBranch:   520 Cordova  Street,   Van con ver.  Keep in stock a full supply of engineer and mill supplies, such as pipe and fittings, brass goods, sheet and other  packing, rubber valves, rubber and leather belting, Dodge wood split-pulley;*-, oils and lubricants, etc.  Estimates for boilers  HOISTING ENGINES' AND  SINKING PUJVJPS FOR  MINES.  b>���������-a  o  o  -*-*������������������  CD  CD  r-H  eg  PL  U2  CO  >  O  -+���������**>  za  o  o  I���������I  I ' "1  O       i���������H  ?   ,     &  o    (���������J  I  ���������PI  o  &  O  o  o  o  fee  o  co-  o  i���������i  ..������    CO  O  o  CD  EH  M  h-3  CD  o  CD  5*>  \>  CD  D2  c-(-  57*  ���������������<���������  h3  >->  i���������>  PU  P3  Ui  o  o  CD  i-b  5-   ������  o  o  trt-  O  O  >-i  &���������  za  c-J-  O  <  CD  i���������������-  CD  CD  c-J-  O  CD  c-K  O  "Or Tascott," said the police reporter, "although the descriptions do not tally."  "Oh, don't get fresh," said the city editor with  some severity. "I don't know -who he is, but I  am determined to know. I am going to draw  lots, and the one who gets number three can  consider himself detailed to wait until the paper  goes to press and,follow him to his room. Then  tomorrow when he is here go there and inquire  of his landlady what she knows of him."  He shook the numbers in his hat and the  drawing began. I looked at my paper and said,  "you needn't draw any more, I am the lucky  person."  "See to it that you do not fail," said the city  editor, and he then dismissed us.  I -went' across the street to a saloon and  watched for Mike. At 4 o'clock he came down,  halted for a moment, and turning a corner began walking swiftly northward. I.followed him  at a respectful distance, but found it difficult to  keep him in sight. Once or twice he looked  back as if to see whether he was being pursued,  but luckily did not see me. On and on he went,  until I began to get weary of my journey. But  finally he halted at a 2-story frame on the outskirts of the town, and, unlocking the door,  went inside. I made a note of the number and  went home.  Next day I called and inquired for him. The  landlady, a buxom Irish woman, knew nothing  of  him* excepting   that   he  was  "Misther Ed  wards." No, he never received any letters or  papers. She thought he got his mail down  town. No, there was no one ever called to see  him. I gave the woman a dollar and after informing her that he was a friend of mine and enjoining secrecy, took my leave.  The city editor was delighted. "The devil,"  said he when I reported. "Keep it up, my boy,  don't stop. We have got a mine. I hate to  sacrifice a man on the Journal, but it will be a  great piece of work.    Stay on his track."  I mentally inquired of myself how in blazes I  could keep on the track of something I knew  nothing of, but did not despair. The general delivery clerk in the postoffice was a friend of  mine, and to him I went. By dint of some persuasion I induced him to watch the mails, but  after a month of vigilance on his part he reported  that nothing ever came of it, and no letters addressed to Mike Edwards were ever called for by  the man "upon whose trail I was camping."  Then I wrote him a letter and mailed it at  another town. It came to the office and was  laid on Mike's table, but he returned it without  op-ening, saying that it was not his. It seemed  as if the mystery never would clear up. The  city editor was wiid, but that made no difference.  He tried his hand at interviewing, but he met  with no better success.  "The man is a devil," said he.  One night in December, it was on the day that  congress opened, the night editor came bolting  in. "Cut her down," he roared, "cut her down.  We have the president's message and more local  than we can handle. The old man has drowned1  me with editorial, and Parker never turned in  so much advertising in his life." Then he rushed  into Mike's room. "Cut her down, Mike," he  said, "cut.her to the core. If you don't I'll have  type hanging over the chases."  Mike said nothing, but we all knew that  "News in Brief" would be one of the headlines  on the first page.  I was on the "dog watch" that night, and it  was'my duty to stay until everything was closed  up. I had just finished writing a paragraph  about a street fight which the desk-sergeant at  police headquarters telephoned me, when the  galley-boy, who had been in Mike's room, came  in, his face white as chalk. He tried to speak,  but failed. "What's the matter, kid?" I inquired. For an answer the boy pointed toward  the next room. I went in. There sat Mike,  with his head resting on the high back of the  chair in which he sat. His eyes were closed.,  and the soft, wavy hair which clustered around  ** *  '���������f?,r"-"v"B j~Vr-,*:"."r"'1 'V  '-������������������'''  ;^"j.:^;-ty;;^;^^^^  .���������fltji  %Z&<  ������-.J'  ������������������ :A  ������������������ n-'pfM1 "���������!������������������" i   ��������� ^i ii-i ������������������������,������������������������������������  II .  ..Lll.   .III. I. ���������   IIMII.i.l     ...    ,  rrjr,-y..---j:r.^;jg:i.  ' .'   ������ -���������   t- -*,-.   ���������- ii   V ���������  . ./.'���������.��������� "Hr-  -T-.i-v.- '���������'THE-. MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,   NOYEMBEE  14,   1891.  his forehead was damp with the dew of death.  His pencil had fall en from his right hand, which  rested upon the tab of paper upon ������������������which he was  writing "News in Brief." I picked up the tab.  It read: . .���������>'.. '...; . >:������������������.'  Awoman and her paramour were drowned yesterday at  Wilkesbarrc while trying to cross the Susquehanna"in a  boat.   They��������� ,  That was all. I glanced at the article he had  been condensing. It was five pages in length  and ^vas a detailed statement of the cm sua It ty;  t ogether w ith the history of t he pair. She was  the wife of a. promising young attorney of an  eastern city, who had strangely disa ppeared  after his wife had left him.  I crumpled bothand put them in my pocket  as the night editor and the foreman came in.  One of them telephoned foi* a physician. He  came. "Heart disease," he said, and I agreed  with him. The night editor gathered up the remaining* copy. I wrote a brief accbnnt of his  death, and the paper went to press.  "I wonder why we didn't have that Wilkes-  barre drowning!-'" said the n]������Vn������Mging-editor the  next day. "1 guess,it was One of the Gazette  fakes, but they might have called it 'special.'  Poor Mike; I wonder where I'll get another  man?"  i ���������[.: : . . ���������',' ���������'���������';��������� "���������'.'������������������  They searched Mike's room, but not a scrap of  paper was found to indicate his identity. We all  attended the funeral, and all carried flowers. I  had a bunch of roses, and -when .1 -dropped.- them  in the grave a.piece of manifold fell from the  cluster and hid itself at the head of the coffin.  The city editor noted it, and asked me about it  afterward.    I told him he was mistaken.  There is a grave in one corner of the cemetery  near tlie fence beneath the trees. It is seldom  noted by the visitors to the place, but to me it  seeins as if the flowers bloom more fragrant and  the songs of the .birds are more sweet there than  at any other place. The lit tie brook that laughs  as it ripples over its silvery bed On its course to  the sea, hushes its voice to a low murmur as it  passes the place where the;-simple.'white stone  marks the spot which indicates to the visitor  who chances there to go, that beneath the violet  covered mound rests the form of hinr we knew as  ':���������"'���������-'������������������������������������    ���������;-/���������;���������;��������������������������� hke. ''���������': ���������   "���������;  Jeanette Mining Company (Foreign).  Registered the 28th day of September, 1891.  CERTIFICATE OF  REGISTRATION.  This is to certify that T have this day registered the Jeanette Mining^Company (Foreign) under the Companies Act,  Part IV, Registration of Foreign companies, and the Companies Ace Amendment Act. 1889.  rl he objects for which the company is established are:  To explore, mine, mill, buy, sell, lease, bond, and to do any  other necessary work for the development of mines which  the company now owns or may hereafter acquire.  The amount: of the capital stock of the said company is  five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) divided into Jive  hundred thousand shares (500,000) at the par value of .-$1 per  share, fully paid up and non-assessable.  The term of existence of the said company is 50 years.  The place of business of the said company is located at  Ainsworth, province of British Columbia.  In testimony whereof I have hereto sctmy  hand and affixed my seal of oflice, this  2Sth day of September, 1891, at the city of  Victoria, in the province of British Columbia. ' C. J. LEGGATT,  Registrar of joint stock companies.  (  j  L. S.  V  v.  ;  NcmoE.  A lis pendens has been recorded against the mineral  claims '-Chambers," "Monarch," and "Mattie B," in the  Slocar. country, upon a suit in the county court, by the undersigned, to have it declared that Charlie Chambers has  only one-fourth undivided interest in these claims.  THOMAS SHEARER,  '  .    ' EDWARD BECKER.  Nelson, November 5th, 1891.        CHARLES F. KENT.  LAND   NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that 00 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  pcrmission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Situate at the junction of Sandon and .Carpenter  creeks (the latter a tributary of Seaton creek..-which flows  into the east side of Slocan lake). Commencing at- a. post  near the right bank of Sandon creek, thence west 40 chains-,  thence north 40 chains, (crossing Carpenter creek) thence  cast 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to point of commencement; containing 1G0 acres more or less.  BRUCE WHITE,  Nelson, November 9th, 1891. JOHN SANDON.  "warnTng notice.  Notice is hereby given that I am the owner of an undi  vided one-sixth interest in the mineral claims Washington  and I C, situate in the Slocan district and recorded at Neb  son in the names of William Lynch and M. Kinney. All  persons are hereby warned against purchasing the interest  in said claims recorded in the name of M. Kinney, pending  litigation. W.E.MURRAY.  Ainsworth, B. C, October 17th, 1891.  W. J.  WILSON.  WILSON  W.  PERDUE.  PERDUE,  PROPRIETORS OF  ..AT..  NELSOtf AKD ABTSW0ETH.  Will contract, to supply mining companies and steamboats  with fresh meats, and deliver same at any mine or  > landing in the Kootenay Lake country.  CORRAL AND STABLJNG  AT NELSON,  where saddle and pack animals can always be hired, and  teams obtained for job teaming.  DMCA-ZKZIE   COISTTEAGTS  with merchants for hauling freight to or from railroad  depot and steamboat wharf.  NELSON  OEFICE AND MARKET,  NO. II EAST BAKER STREET  ANCKJS McINTTRE,  PROPRIETOR OF THE  rPIOnSTIEIEIR.  CORRAL aud STABL  Corner  Bluff and   Ward Streets,  NELSON, B. C.  Will undertake any work or contract in which pack animals or teams can be used.   Will furnish  SADDLE AND PACK ANIMALS  to parties who wish to examine mines and claims  in Toad Mountain district.  WILL   CONTEAOT  TO   CAEEY PASSEMEES  and baggage to and from hotels ;��������� also, freight  to and from steamboat wharves and  railway depots.  CONTRACT TO GRADE LOTS IN  NELSON,  Stove and 'Con!wood  for Sale.  Pianos!  Jas. McDonald & Co.  -'Nelson., and   Hevelstoke,  carry full, lines of all kinds  of furniture  for residences,  hotels, and offices.   Mattresses made to order, and  at prices lower than eastern and coast.  They are also agents for  Evans Pianos and Doherty Organs.  NELSON   STORE:  No. 4 Houston ������& Ink Building, .loscnhinc Street.  Cent a  can be obtained for small ainounts, loaned on short time  and well secured. Apply to HOUSTON & INK, real  estate and mine brokers, Miner building, Nelson.  lelson Sawmill Co. Ltd.  Yard:   At end of Flume.  Mill:  Two Uliles So'illi of -Nelson.  Manufacture  Tlie mill lias a capacity of 20,000, feet a day.  Orders will receive prompt attention.  W. 1ST. E0LFE, Secretary.  unices| End of Flum0-  Telephone No. 2.  The Kootenay Lake Saw-mill is  always ready for business. Lumber���������good, bad, and indifferent ��������� on  hand or made to order.  G. 0. BUCHANAN.  Nelson, January loth.  S-ioct  MANUFACTURERS OF  OF EVERY  DESCRIPTION.  ZE'IRarCTJE JUST  (DELIVERED AT NELSON,   AINSWORTH,  OR   BALFOUR).  No. 1 flooring, 4 inch, per M.   ������32 00  No. 2 "        G inch,     "     27 00  No. 1 ceiling, 4 inch,       "     32 00  No. 2        "       0 inch,        "      ..     27 00  Rustic, "       27 00  Select clear, DD, "        ...   ....      40 00  No. 1 common, D, "     25 00  DD, *'     27 00  Bar and counter tops, clear, per foot 10  KOII^II.  No. 1 common, per M ������20 00  No. 2        " " ..15 00  Culls, "          12 00  Shingles, t4             4 50  M<ou������ift<.;$.  Bead, panel, crown, base, etc., etc., per foot 2J@10c  mills at Pilot Bay, Kootenay I-ake.  S. 0. Spalding,   .   .   .    Manager  IE. IF. fl������ERB������Y, Agent at Nelson.  BBS EM NEK *fc WATSON, Agents at Ainsworth.  I^g^^  ���������j""*"*";  SPS^Jwp^^^ 4  THE  MUEE:    KELSON,   B. C,   SATUEDAY,  ffOVEMBEK  M,   1891.  The Miner is -printed on Saturdays, and will be  mailed to subscribers at the following cash-in-advance  rates: Three months'$1.50, six months $2.50, one year $4.  Contract Advertisements will be inserted at the  rate of $3 an inch (down the. column) per month. A  special rate for advertisements of over 2 inches.  Transient Advertisements will be inserted for  15 cents a line for the first insertion and 7 cents a line  for each additional insertion. Twelve lines of 9 words  each make an inch. All advertisements printed for  a less period than 3 months considered transient and  must be paid for in advance. Advertisements of less  than 12 lines will be counted as 12 lines.  Birth Notices free if weight of child is given ; if  weight is not given $1 will be charged. Marriage  announcements will be charged from $1 to $10���������according to the social standing of the bridegroom.  Job Printing in good style at fair rates.   Cards,  envelopes, and letter, note, and account papers kept  .   in -stock;'; -.-.  Letters to the Editor will only appear over the  writer's name. Communications with such signatures  as "Old Subscriber," "Veritas," "Citizen," etc., etc.,  will not be printed on any consideration.  Address all Letters : The Miner, Nelson, B. C.  EIHTOKiAfc   R������MARKS.  According .to:ah: announcement' in the official  Gazette, the ti me has arri ved for the givi ng of  notice of the introduction of private bills for  the consideration of the legislative assembly at  its next session.-This means, of course, that  the coming session will be a repetition of previous ones; that more time will be spent in discussing private bills than in passing laws for the  general good. There is ho good reason why the  time of the legislative assembly should be taken  up in discussing the merits of an act to enable  half a dozen individuals to carry on a private  enterprise. The sooner the system is changed  the better. ���������...   An act that would do away with all special  legislation should be passed early in the session.  Until such an act is passed we will hear much  about the "vested rights" of railway corporations,   but   never  a word   about   the  "vested  rights" of the people whose property is given to  or destroyed by these corporations in aiding or  building their railways.    It is strange that railway corporations can,   through   their officials,  paralyze industries and destroy towns at will,  without a thought being given to "vested rights."  But once let the owners of industries and the  residents of towns apply for a charter to build a  railway that would parallel one already built, and  the application will be opposed by corporation attorneys���������both in and out of the legislature���������who  will talk learnedly of the great wrong done by  passing laws that interfere with "vested rights."  It is the duty of the legislative assembly to pass  a law that will place on an equal footing all men  who wish to carry on industrial or public enterprises, as it should not be within the power of  the members of the assembly to hinder this or  that man or set of men from engaging in any  business or enterprise allowed  by the laws  of  Canada.   The Times and the Colonist of Victoria can  agree on but one subject, that is, the greatness  and goodness of Grover Cleveland, at one time  president of the United States and now a leading apostle of free trade and declaimer against  the "dishonest silver dollar" of his country.  If Liverpool can be taken as a fair typo of the  rest of England church attendance is by no  means increasing in proportion to the increase  in the accommodation for worshipper's. A Liverpool paper took a census of the church and  ^chapel attendance of that city 10 years ago���������in  1881���������and found that it amounted to 63,500 persons. On Sunday, October 26th, being a fine  day, a census was again taken, and the numbers amounted to 63,429 persons���������the slightest  variation from the figures of 10 years before.  But in the interim over 40 new churches and  chapels have been built, showing clearly enough  that they can only have received a portion of  the worshippers who used to attend the previously existing buildings. The Church of England alone showed a substantial increase at the  expense of the Roman Catholics, the Dissenters  being as near as possible stationary. It ought;  however; to be remembered that the census  shows the population of Liverpool to have decreased within the last 10 years by migration  beyond the city boundaries.  In his reply to the presentment of the grand  jury, mr. justice Crease goes out of his way to  read the people of Nelson a curtain lecture. He  plainly says if our people did not tacitly stand  in -with the criminal element, the perpetrators  of the robberies and attempted robberies would  ere this be within the grasp of the :1a w> We  are afraid mr. justice Crease, during his hurried  visit to Nelson, sized up our people wrpng.  While they in ay not be as law-abiding as were  the people of Cariboo, in the early sixties, yet  they manage to present clean dockets to the  judges who occasionally drop in among them.  The telephone is a wonderful invention and it  has achieved a success in a village in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, which will no doubt delight the  heart of its inventor. A few days ago the wire  was carried through the village in question on  the usual poles. The inhabitants of this out-of-  the-way spot were, of course, curious as to what  was going forward, and learning that what was  said could be heard many miles away, a couple,  who were in the habit of having a good many  sqLiabbles, their language not being of the  choicest, resolved to keep quiet in future, to prevent their words being heard throughout the  country. _____  The gold monometallists of the United States  say that the silver dollar is a dishonest dollar  because an ounce of gold will buy about 25 per  cent more of silver bullion than it would a few  years ago. If the silver dollar is a dishonest  dollar for the reason indicated, then a bushel of  wheat must be a dishonest bushel of wheat in  these days, for the value of wheat has declined,  when expressed in gold terms, as much as silver.  In fact, all commodities except gold have declined in about the same ratio as silver, so they  , must all be set down .as dishonest things.  Funny, isn't it, that everything except gold  should be dishonest?   _____'  If the business men of Nelson are awake to  their interests they will at once take steps to,  secure the building of a steamboat on Slocan  lake. The making of a trail up Slocan river is  a good move, but it must be followed up by  action that will result in a continuous route  from Nelson to the new discoveries, or the town  may be loser. The Miner suggests that a bonus  of $1000 be subscribed, the amount to be paid  the owners of the first steamboat built and in  successful operation on the lake.  It is now a sure thing that Edgar Dewdney is  to return to the province in which he built so  many worthless trails. He will return as its  lieutenant-governor, and perhaps, in time, will  be able to save enough from his salary to pay  the debts he contracted when he was trail building. In the meantime, our own John Andrew  Mara will contiuue representing the greatest  undeveloped mining district of the province in  the house at Ottawa.      Great Britain and the United States do not act  .alike when their citizens are imposed on or mur  dered by citizens of another nation. Great  Britain usually gives the offending nation 24  hours in which to redress a wrong or make  reparation. Somehow the United States likes  to be insulted, and never thinks of doing more  than exchanging a few diplomatic letters of inquiry when her citizens are murdered. This is  why citizens of Great, Britain are respected in  foreign countries, while citizens of the United  States are often treated with contempt. A  small dose of Great Britain's medicine should  occasionally be forced down the throats of some  of the South American republics, and "Uncle  Sam should do the forcing."  & WELLS';  I*ostofIice Store,   Nelson,  K.  C.  AND OENTS' FUENISHI_TG GOODS.  ALSO,  FULL LINES OF  PATENT   MEDICIN E S  Toilet Articles and Stationery.  CIGARS   AT   WHOLESALE    ONLY.  THE    COLUMBIA    &   KOOTENAY '"STEAM-  NAVIGATION   COMPANY,   LIMITED.  THE STEAMEK LYTTON  will leave Revelstoke for Robson on Monday at daylight,  and Robson for Little Dalles on Wednesday;  returning* to Revelstoke on Thursday.  F. ii. ���������IIRISTJE, Agent,.  . BfcEVELSTOHLE, B. C.  SHERIFF'S   SALE.  By virtue of a writ of fieri facias issued out of the su~  preme court of British Columbia at Victoria on the 6th day  of October, 1891, in the suit of the Spokane Commission  Company of Spokane Falls, Washington,,against Newlin  Hoover, merchant of Nelson, B. C, for the sum of $290.10  and costs of execution, I have seized the property of the  said Newlin Hoover as follows:  Ninety (90) thousand of those bricks now being* in the  brickyards of Hoover & Walters, at Nelson, B. C.  All of which or es many as may be necessary,! shall sell  at public auction at the brickyards of the saidv Hoover &  Walters, Nelson, B.C, on Thursday, the 18th day of November, 1891, at 11 o'clock A.M., unless the amount with  all further costs, charges, interest, sheriff's fees, poundage,  etc., is sooner paid. WVGESNER AL_AN,  Nelson, B. C, November 9th, 1891.   j      Deputy sheriff.  LAND   NOTICES. "  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked A. J. WV, S. E. corner, on the north shore Kaslo bay, Kootenay lake, B. C,  thence running west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains,  thence east 60 chains more or less to lake shore, thence  following- lake shore to initial post; containing 200 acres  more or less. A. J. WHALEN.  Ainsworth, B. C., November 5th, 1891.     ,;  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake on wrest bank of Slocan  river, about 2 miles from Slocan lake and marked F. & C,  N. E. corner, thence running west 40 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence east 40 chains more or less to the river,  thence following the meanderings of the river to point of  commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891. M. M. FRY.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commisioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake on west bank of Slocan  river, about 3 miles from Slocan lake and marked F. & C.,  N. E. corner, thence running west 40 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence east 40 chains more or less to the river,  thence following the meanderings of river to the point of  commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891. A. D. COPLEN.  Notice is hereby given that we intend to apply to the  chief commissioner of lands and works to purchase 320  acres, more or less, of land in the district of West Kootenay,  commencing at a post placed on the east shore of Sloean  lake about 40 chains south from the mouth of Seaton creek;  thence west along the lake shore 40 chains; thence north  along- the lake shore 80 chains; thence east 40 chains, more  or.less, to a point 80 chains due north from the point of commencement. J. FLETCHER,  Nelson, October 21st, 1891. A. S. FARWELL. THE   MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,   N0VEMBEK  14,   1891.  5  Dealers in Dry G-oods, Groceries, Provisions, Canned Goods, Hardware, Etc.   Miners' Supplies a Specialty.  The stock is full and complete in every Department, and the public will find it to their advantage to call and inspect G-oods  and compare Prices. .  Main Street, REVELSTOKE.  9 and 11 East Yernon Street, NELSON.  WOKJLD'S   PRODUCTION    OF    GOLD   ANI*    SILVER.  ������* The following is Ivan C. Michels's tenth annual report of the world's production of gold  and silver for the year 1890, and should not be  dry reading for the people of the lake country,  a people who are chiefly engaged in finding out  whether they are the possessors of gold and  silver in the shape"of workable ores:  SILVER. ��������� ,   .     '        ������������������   .'"'*    ���������;���������  Ounces. Value.  U. S. of America.:... .3............... 62,930,821 .$81,180,772  Mexico................ ...  32,746,496 42,242,979  'South and Ceniral America...;.....: 12,661,152 -16,332,886  Australia.. ."'.'   10,585,200 ������������������   13,654,908  Europe..................... .........:. 7,345,472 9,475,659,  All other countries.................. 5,091,872 6,568,515  Grand Total ... ..,'....   ...'". I.: .131,361,013 $169,455,719  ���������'���������'���������..   ''������������������ GOLD.". '.- ,���������'���������' ������������������ ���������   '::��������������������������� -:3r:     '  .,':���������" Ounces. "Value.  Australia ...-....-. ...................   . 1,728,742 $35,733,128  U. S. of America...:.,.........;..... 1,595,420 32,977,332  Russia . ���������  .......... 1,126,720 23,289,303  China ...:.......  490,687 10,142,500  Africa...  439,280 9,079,917  South and Central America.  374,170 7,734,094  Dominion of Canada ."  66,130 1,366,709  Mexico....  32,045 662,370  All other countries. ;........... 103,740 2,144,294  Grand Total     5,956,934 $123,129,447  The total world\s prod uetion of gold and silver  during the nineteenth century amounted to  $9,994,057,805, or 50 per cent of gold and 44 per  cent silver.  The returns from China as to the production  of gold I have reason to believe are too low. Of  my several returns from that empire, I have accepted a medium of the highest and lowest production claimed.  As to Australia. I believe that the returns for  the production of silver are larger than stated.  The reports, from that country are somewhat  conflicting and require farther investigation.  Be it as it may the production of silver which  from 1876 to 1885 averaged only .$226,450 pet-  annum, has at once by leap and bounds marvel-  ously increased to over $10,000,000 during the  past year. In addition to my regular yearly reports on the world's production of gold and  silver, j have this year added the most complete  returns of the world's coinages for 1890. It is  this new feature which has delayed this my  tenth annual report on the precious metals this  year.  world's coinages for 1890.  Gold. Silver.  Great Britain :  $37,241,689 $ 8,302,896  Australia  25,668,269 462,940  Germany  24,141,860 77,147  United States  22,021,748 36,815,837  Russia.........  21,775,472 846,857  Spain  5,220,869 7,071,543  France  4,017,546 300,471  Austria-Hungary ....  3,182,342 3,S86,126  Japan  1,764,210 7,274,735  Denmark.  952,817   Sweden and Norway  932,829 387,586  Switzerland..   486,650 16,140  Portugal  407,157 539,999  Mexico  284,859 24,090,037  Italy        .   .          266,058 1,171,103  Turkey ���������  44,712        ���������.  India  ......... .   41,558,346  Netherlands ....���������          208,000  Ecuador.      ���������  40,530  Grand Total  $148,409,087 $133,050,293  Equal to 53 per cent of silver and 47 per cent  of gold. The recoinage of silver coins is, remark-  " ablv small; while the recoinage of gold is $19,-  887,160, that of silver is only $5,834,008. The  government of the Netherlands has smelted  quite a large amount of her silver coins, about  20,jOOO,000 ounces of pure silver, of which about  ,10,000,000 ounces have been sold already and  over 5,000,000 ounces have found their way to  this country at $1 net per ounce fine. In March,  1890, the Roumanian parliament passed a law  for the adoption of the gold standard, and for  substituting of, gold coin for 40,000,00 leis, (the  lei equal to 1������_ cents,) hence another 5,000,000  ounces of pure silver which were sold partly to  Indian and European bullion dealers.  The price for silver bullion during 1890 varied  from 96^ to $1.21f cents per ounce fine silver,  and the average for the whole year in New York  was $1.05.329 per ounce fine and $1.04.633 in  London. The yearly average bullion value of  pure silver during- the 90 years of the present  century has fluctuated from $L35������ per ounce in  1860 to 93J? cents in 1889. During 1890 a premium  of ������75 10s was paid in Europe for one million  dollars worth of gold in bars as the highest and  ������12 5s the lowest.  B  NOTARY  PUBLIC.  G  Town lots, lands, and mining claims handled  on commission.   Conveyancing documents drawn up.  Correspondence solicited.  Office:   No. 13 East Baker Street, NELSON, B. 0.  NELSON, B. C.  are now settled in their new store, No. 2 Houston & Ink  building, and have on display a full range of  Plain and Fancy Worsted Suitings and Scotch and  Irish Tweeds and Serges.  PEICESTO  SUITTHE TIIM^ES  TI  Physician, Surgeon, and Accoucheur,  . Office:   Stanley Street.  Barrister at  Law,   Solicitor,   Notary  Public, Etc.  Office, Victoria street, Kamloops, B. C.  W. F. Teetzel & Co.  DEALERS IN  OHE13yEIO-A.IL,S.  PATENT MEDICINES,  TOILET ARTICLES, ETC.  WHOLESALE     DEALERS     IN     CK12ABS.      .RAYMOND  '.     ''SEWING    MACHINES   IN   STOCK.  Cor. East Baker and Ward Streets.  BUILDERS.  Will contract for the erection of stores, hotels, dwellings,  ' bridges, etc., and guarantee "work finished on time.  always on hand for store fittings, desks, tables, etc.  Undertaking attended to.  Shop: Cor. Baker and Josephine Sts,  Contractors and Builders,  SEASONED   LUMBER  always on hand for store fittings, desks, tables, etc  Will contract to erect all kinds of buildings and guarantee  satisfaction.    Shop: corner Josephine and Bluff sts.  NELSON,   B. C.    ���������  Music furnished for dances, parties, and receptions.   Leave  orders with Giiker & Wells, Postoffice store.  (A. M. Can. Soc. C. E.)  CIVIL ENGrlEEEE AND AE0HITE0T,  TOLSON   BUILDING NELSON, B. C; 6  THE  MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0���������   SATUEDAY,  NOYEMBEE  14,  1891.  LAND   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief cnmmissioner of lands, arid works for  permission to purchase the following tract of land: Commencing at a stake marked A. McG. S. W. about half  a mile south of, Carpenter creek on Slocan lake, thence  80 chains, north following the meanderings of the lake,  thence 40 chains east, thence 80 chains south, thence  40 chains west to point of commencement; containing 320  acres inorc or less. ANGUS McGILTJWRAY.  Ainsworth, B.C., October 17th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 00 clays after date wo intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works, for  ��������� ���������permission to purchase the following described land   in  ��������� West.' Kootenay district: Commencing at a post, at the  south east,corner of lot 209, group 1, West Kootenay, thence  west 00 chains, thence south SO chains, thence east 00 chains,  more or less, to shore of Kootenay lake, thence following  high-water mark in a northern ly direction to initial post;  containing 480 acres, more or less.  KASLO-KOOTENAY LAND CO.  Kaslo City, November oth, 1S9.1.   Per G. T. Kane.  Notice is hereby given that 00 days after date 1 intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake on west, bank of Slocan  river, about'3 milesfrom Slocan lake and marked F. & C,  N. 15. corner, thence running west .40 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence east 40 chains more or less to the river,  ��������� thence.foliowing- the meanderings of the river to point of  'commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  - Nelson, October 24th, 1S91.: M. M. FRY.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to ���������  apply to the chief commisibner of lands and works Lor  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a slake on west bank of Slocan  river, marked F. & C, NJ-E. corner, thence running west  40 chains,,, thence south SO chains, thence east 40 chains  more or less to the river, thence following the meanderings of river to the point of commencement; containing  320 acres more or less. A. D. COPLEN.  Nelson, October 24th,'1891.  '" Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and Avorks for  permission to purchase tlie following described tract of  land:'Commencing at a post placed upon the shore at the  head of Slocan lake, marked H. A., S. E. corner, thence  running north 20 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence  south 40 chains, thence east to shore of lake and following  meanderings of shore'to point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less. E.C.ARTHUR.  Nelson, October 31st, 1891.              "  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post placed upon the cast shore of  Slocan lake;-"���������'���������near Carpenter creek, marked A. H., S. W.  'corner, thence running north SO chains, thence east 20  chains, thence south 80 chains more or less to lake shore,  thence west following meanderings of the shore to point of  commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 30th, 1S91. WILSON'HILL.  Notice is hereby given that 60 clays after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake placed near the outlet of  Slocan lake, marked Ii. & A., S. W. corner, thence running  east. 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence cast.20 chains,  thence north 80 chains, thence west. 60 chains more or less  to shore of lake, thence south following the meanderings of  shore to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  more or less. ALFRED HILL.  Nelson, October 2Sth, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract'of  land: Commencing at a stake marked. A. L. McLean's N.  W. post, sitiia.tc.on~r.hc Slocan river about 2 miles from the  Slocan lake, thence running south 80 chains', thence east 40  ���������chains,-thence.north-SO chains, thence west 40 chains to  point of commencement: containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, November 1st, 1891. A. L. McLEAN.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land : Commencing at a stake marked James Dawson's N.  W. post, situate on the Slocan river about one mile from  the. Slocan lake, thence running south 80 chains, thence  east .40 chains, thence north B0 chains, thence west 40  chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  mure or less. JAMES DAWSON.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake marked II. H. Ward's N.  W. post, about. 3 miles from Slocan lake, on Slocan river,  running cast 10 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence west  to the river bank, thence following river bank to point of  commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.  riARItY   H. -WARD..  Nelson, October 23rd, 1.S91.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner-of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land : Commencing at a post on oast bank of Slocan ri ver,  about 3 miles from Slocan lake, marked R. E. L., S. W.  post, thence north SO chains along the shore of Slocan river,  (hence east 40 chains', thence south 80 chains,' thence west  40 chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  more or Jess. __ R. E. LEMON.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land:   Commencing at a stake marked A. C. Dick N. W.  post, on Slocan river, about one-half mile from Slocan lake,  running east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence west-  V40 chains, more Or less, to river bank, thence following  river bank to point of commencement, containing 160 acres  more or less. ARTHUR C. DICK.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891/  Notice is hereby given that 60. days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked James Delaney and"  Thomas M. Ward's <S. W. post, about one-half mile from  Slocan lake, running east 40 chains, thence north 40 chains  more or less to the shore of the lake, thence in a. westerly  direction following the lake: shore to the source of the  Sloeari river, thence -following the bank of the river in a  southerly direction to the point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.        .JAMES'' DELANEY,  Nelson, Octobcr,24th, 1891. THOMAS M. WAKD.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days, after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following tract of land: Commencing at a stake marked T. J. Roadley's S. W. post, on  Slocan .-rivi r, about three miles from its source, running  o east 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence west 40  chains, more or less to river bank, thence following river  bank to point of commencement; containing 160 acres  more or less. T. J. ROADLEY.  Nelson, October 23rd, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after elate I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following tract of land situate  in West Kootenay district: Commencing at a post marked  "J E S" and "SIC" about one mile north from the head of  Crawford Bay and one-half mile east of the large creek  that empties into said bay, thence north 80 chains, thence  west.40 chains, thence south SO chains, thence east 40 chains  to initial post; containing 320 acres more or less.  Balfour, B.C, October 13th, 1891. J. E. STARK.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to.  make application: to the chief commissioner of lands and  works for permission to purchase the following described  tract of land, situate in West ���������"Kootenay. district and described as follows: Commencing at a postmarked "J. K's  N. E. corner, 20 chains north of the center of the,forks of  Kaslo creek, thence west 40 chains, thence south 40 chains,  thence east 40 chains, thence north to the point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or,less.       ^  JOHN KEEN.  Kaslo City, Kootenay Lake, B. C, October 1st, 1891.  Notice is hereby given th-ft 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and "works for  permission to purchase'the'following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked "'W and W," on the  north shore Kaslo bay, Kootenay lake, B.C., thence running west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence east 60  chains more or less to lake shore, thence following lake  shore to initial post; containing 200 acres more or less.  ,       A.J.WHALEN.  J. A. WHITTIER.  Ainsworth, B.C., September 28th, 1891.,  Notice is hereby given that 00 days after date we intend  to apply to the cliief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked "S L S AY," being on  the eastern boundary of J. W. Cockle's preemption and  situate on the northern shore of Crawford bay, Kootenay  lake, thence east along lake shore 20 chains, thence north  80chains, thence west 20 chains, thence south SO.chains to  place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  W. P. SLOAN,  Balfour, B. C, October 13th, 1891.      GEORGE LAIRD.  Notice is hereby given that 60, days after date we intend  to apply to the chief conrmissioncr of lands and works for  permission to purchase the folio wing described land, situate  on Seaton creek, about 10 miles east from Slocan lake:  Commencing at a post on the right bank of said creek  at the mouth of Carbonate gulch, thence north 40 chains,  thence east SO chains, thence south 40 chains, thence west  following clown the bank of said, creek to place* of commencement; containing 320 acres.  W. F. MCCULLOCH,  THOMAS McGOVERN,  Slocan, October 6th, 1891.   .   CHARLES CHAMBERS.  TIMBER; LEASE.   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days afterdate we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to lease the following described tract of land  for lumboring purpose:  1. Commencing at a squared tree at the mouth of the  stream called East Fork of the Duncan river; thence east  20 chains; thence south 40 chains; thence east 10 chains;  thence south 60 chains; thence east 10chains; thence south  40 chains; thence cast 20 chains, more or less, to the mountain ; thence south along the mountain about 40 chains to  end of the timber; thence west 20'chains, more or less, to  the river; thence north along the river and timber to place  of commencement; containing 500 acres, more or less.  2. Commencing at a post on the cast side of the Duncan  river, near mountain, about 2A- miles south from the east  fork, near a small creek called Bear creek; thence south  .along the mountain 100 chains, more or less, to end of timber; thence west 20 chains;'thence north 10 chains; thence  west 20 chains; thence north 40 chains; thence west 10  chains; thence north 30 chains, more or less, to the river;  thence along the river and east to place of commencement;  containing 260 acres, more or less.  3. Commencing at the mouth of the east fork of the  Duncan river, on the west bank of said river; thence south  along the bank of the river about 2 miles to end of the timber ; ^thence north and west along the mountain about 5  miles; thence east to the river 20 chains, more or less;  thence south along the river to place of commencement;  containing 1060 acres, more or less.  4. Commencing at a squared tree at foot of mountain on  east side of Duncan river, about 3A- miles south from the  east fork; thence west 10 chains; Ihencc south 20 chains;  thence west 15 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence east  20 chains; thence south 10 chains; thence east about 20  chains to the mountain; thence north along the mountain  to the place of commencement; containing 160 acres, more  : or less. ���������'     ���������    .,-'-������������������ ��������� - 3     ;-, :: ;  , '������������������'���������  5. Commencing at a post on the east side of the Duncan  river, about half a mile above the big flood wood jamb;  tlience south about40chains; thence east 30 chains; thence  north 45 or 50 chains; thence west 30 chains; thence south  to place ofr commencement; containing 130 acres, more or  .���������less. '.'  - ,.'"';���������"' '���������";      , ' ;."������������������ ' ',"��������� ���������'��������� '   ,: ���������.    ',������������������ "\-  6. Commencing at! a point three-quarters of one mile up-  the Duncan river from the mouth of east fork on east side  of river; thence north and west along said river about 2  miles to end of the timber; thence north about 40 chains  to the mountain ;������������������ thence east and south along the mountain about 2 miles; thence west 40 chain'-;, more or less, to  the river and place'''of commencement; containing 600  acres, more or less.  JOSHUA   DA VIES   &   W.   P.   SAYWARD.  August 3rd, 1891. , .'.���������.������������������ ,,"" .;  Notice is hereby given that- 30 days after date we intend'  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  the following described tracts of land" for lumbering purposes: ���������",,'������������������'  Commencing 20 chains north of a post on the south side  of Duck creek, on the Kootenay Valley Meadow Land  Company's; survey; thence east 20 chains; thence north 50  chains; thence west 30 chains; thence south 10 chains;  thence west 30 chains; thence south 30 chains; thence east  20 chains; thence south 10 chains; thence east 20 chains to  pla.ce of commencement; containing 210acres, more or less.  Commencing at a point on edge of the meadow near or;  at H. Anderson's S. W. corner; thence east 70 or SO chains;  thence south 60 chains; tlience east 10 chains; thence south  30 chains,more or less, to the Kootenay Valley Meadow  ' Land Company's survey; thence west aud'north"along said  boundary to place of commencement; cohtaining500 acres,  more or less. ,  Commencing at a post and tree on the trail on the south  side of "Duck creek, about 2 miles from its mouth; (hence  east 30 chains; thence north 00 chains; thence east 10  chains; thence north 60 chains; thence west 50 or 00 chains,  across the creek to foot of mountain; thence south along'  creek and mountain 120 chains; thence east 10 chains, more  or less, to place of commencement; containing about 560  acres. DAVIES-SAYWARD CO.  July 11th, 1891. Per J. C. H.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after elate we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  the following described tracts of land, for lumbering purposes, both situated on Goat river:  1. Commencing at a post near trail on Goaf river, north  side, taking in the river north and south 30 chains; thence  east along mountain and river 80 chains; thence north 30 ���������  chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south 30 chains, to  place of commencement; containing about 240 acres.;  2. Commencing at a post on north side of Goat river,  near the trail, thence east about 80 chains to'the creek;  thence south about 10 chains to side of burnt hill;, thence  east'3 miles'to the mountains; thence north about 2 miles  to the mountains;'"'thence west������������������and.p_south about 4 miles  along the .mbuhtaiiTs7"tnT'Cifb'e1';''"'s6u'ti;i"about 2 miles fo the  place of commenceihent.  Commencing at a post sections 24 and 25,-I. P., township \  7, on east.boundary of Kootenay Valley Land Company's  survey.; thence south 20 chains from said post; thence east  60 chains; thence north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains;  thence north 80 chains; thence West 20 'chains; thence  north 80'chains, more or less, to the end of the bottom  lands as per map; thence west 10 chains; thence north 40  chains; thence west 20 chains; thence south 20 chains;  thence west 50 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east  10 or 20 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence west 40  chains to a post on the south bank of Goat river, marked  Section 25; thence south 74 chains and 65 links along said  section line to place of commencement; containing 2200  acres of land more or less.  Commencing at a post on the south bank of Goat river  on the Kootenay Valley Land Company's survey marked;  Section 25; thence south 20 chains; thence west 120 chains  more or less to meadow lands; thence north 30 chains;  thence west 20 chains; thence north 30 chains; thence cast e  40 chains; thence north'20 chains more or less to the section  line of 35 and 2 of the Kootenay Valley Land Company's  survey; thence east along the foot of high banks and  boundary of said company's lands 120 chains, more or loss,  to a point due north of initial post; thence south 20 chains  to said post at place of commencement.  DAVIES-SAYWARD CO.  __Datcd July_lst>L1891. Per J. C. H.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to lease the following described tract of land for  lumbcr-ing purposes: Beginning at a stake marked GO.  B. S. W. corner,; which, stake is about A mile northwest  from the head of Slocan lake, thence north 20 chains, thence  west 20 chains, thence north 20 chains, thence west 20  chains, thence north 20 chains, thence west 20 chains,  thence north 20 chains, thence west 20 chains, thence north  20 chains, thence west 20 chains, thence north 20 chains,  thence west 20 chains, thence north 20 chains, thence west  20 chains, thence north 20 chains, thence west 20.chains,  thence north 80 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south  20 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south 20.chain's,  thence east 20 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence east  20 chains, thence south 20 chains, thence east 20 chains,  thence south 20 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south  20 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south 20 chains,  tlience east 20.chains, thence south 20 chains, thence east  20 chains, tlience south 20 chains, thence east 20 chains,  thence south 40 chains, thence west- 60 chains to the place  of commencement; containing 1760 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 31sl, 1891. G.O.BUCHANAN.  APPLICATION   FOR   WATER    RIGHT.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date avc intend  to apply to the assistant commissioner of lands and works  for West Kootenav district for permission to divert for 99  years 10,000 inches of water from Kaslo river at a point  about 2 miles from its mouth, thence following the natural  grade of north and south bank or adjoining benches or  bench easterly to Kaslo City, thence across said city in  such directions as may be required for the use of inhabitants of said city for domestic, agricultural, manufacturing, fire protection, and all other purposes for which water  is generally used by a community.  KASLO-KOOTENAY LAND CO.  Kaslo City, November 5th, 1891. THE  MINEE:    NELSON,   B.  0.,  SATTJKDAY,  NOVEMBEE 14,  1891.  Cor. Baker and Ward Sts.  NELSON, B. Q.  H.   &  T,   MADDEN  Proprietors.  The Madden is Centrally Located,  with a frontage  cowards Kootenay river, and  is newly  furnished throughout.  -X- ZE3E IE      T .__. BLE  is supplied with everything in the market, the kitchen  being under the immediate supervision of Hugh  Maddeh-ra' caterer of large experience.  THE  BAR  IS   STOCKED  WITH THE   BEST  brands of beer, ale, wine, whisky, and cigars.  Vernon Street, near Josephine,  , .... ."--'-NELSON, B. C.  PROPRIETOR.  THE HOTEL OVERLOOKS THE KOOTENAY  its guests thus obtaining splendid views  of both mountain and river. *  THE  ROOMS THE  TABLE  are comfortable in size and       is acknowledged   the best  newly-furnished. in the .mountains.  ������������������.;������������������ 'JJJEiJELi '���������" f~-> A   IN!- ���������  is stocked with the best liquors and cigars procurable.  No whiskies sold except Hiram Walker & Sons'  celebrated brands.  East SSalier Street, Nelson,;..  Is one of the best hotels in Toad Mountain district,  and is the headquarters for prospectors and  working miners.  The Table is not Surpassed by that of any Hotel  in the Kootenay Lake country.  At the Bar is Dispensed Fine Liquors and Cigars,  and the bed-rooms are newly furnished.  SI A LONE   ������&   TBfcE-KIULIJS  PRO PKIETOISS  TRAlIi,   B, ���������.  TOPPING & HANNA.  Proprietors  Good Table;  _��������������������� Beds ; Hyas-Close Liquors.  CHESS . COtUMN. ��������� PROBLEM   II.  B_ACK, SIX PIECES.  WHITE,  FIVE PIECES.  White to mate in two moves. ���������"''".'"  Pen Picture of a Well-Known Ofliciftli  The following pen picture of Stephen Redgrave  the high sheriff of all the Kootenay country, is  from the Era of Golden : "Mr. Redgrave has  occupied a forward position in the system of  police surveillance in this much respected British  Columbia of ours for some 30 years. What led  to his migration to these western wilds we will  not presume to say, but that the system of locomotion of which he availed himself in reaching  the desired haven  of rest was by-ordinary, is  more than vouched for by dame Rumor, ranging  in all degrees of possibility from the common  method of conveyance to the piloting by a flock  of aerial occupants who deposited him at some  convenient spot in the region of the Rockies.  The sheriff is well above the average height, as  some can doubtless t estify to. their cost, is built  in proportion, and carries himself with a rnein,  suggesting that Time has for the past 50 years or  more, dealt lightly with a remarkably well-  preserved constitution. He makes a point of  appearing well dressed, flanked by the regulation "christie stiff," a stick of comfortable dimensions, and above all the indispensible pipe,  which has figured so prominently in the recital  of much of the current fiction that is current  along the line of the Canadian Pacific. The  ; sheriff can tell a delightful story in a delightful  manner, which with the aid of the above-  mentioned pipe, coupled with a goodly supply of  matches, and the emphatic manipulation of Vhe  index finger, never fails to appeal to the credulity of his audience. More is unnecessary, i  other than to add that he possesses in no small  measure the respect of those who best know  him, and is generally considered the right man  in the right place." '    -  Contains Several drains of Trntb.  A Seattle paper contains the following curtain lecture:' " We had the first start in Japan,  but England has taken her trade; we once had  the start in China, but England has its trade today and America has gone to the wall. England hasrpushed her Canadian Pacific across the  continent and the Japan and Chinese trade,  both passenger and freight, feeds the Canadian  Pacific steamship line, and crosses the continent  in its cars. Are we a smart people? In our own  estimation, yes; but in sound foreign commercial policy we ai-ethe most arrogant and shallow  people on the face of the earth. We get there j  first generally, but we never stay there; we are ;  the worst-hated foreign traders in alt the ports  of the world-; in South America, China, and  Japan because we are arrogant, domineering, j  and contemptuous in our treatment of foreign  officials and their people. England, Germany,  and France all behave with tact, courtesy, and  self-restraint in dealing with foreign ports, but  your average American is a swaggering 'smart  Aleck' wherever he goes, and as a consequence  the American 'smart Aleck' has got badly 'left'  in his competition for the trade of the world,  even when the natural advantages of the situation were all in his favor. Our foreign policy  with China has been foolish, and in the meantime England has kept her temper, given no  needless, wanton offense either in China or South  America, and the result is that England has the  trade of those nations, and we have to ride behind and take England's dust. In a large, longheaded sense we are not a people or a government of profound commercial policy or sagacity,,.  for we always hehave like those clumsy people  who never can drink without first spitting in the  cup."  A Graceful Ue.  The following graceful lie comes from an enterprising Montana newspaper: It says a farm er  in Gallatin county raised 1000 bushels of popcorn  and stored it in a barn. The barn caught fire,  the corn began to pop, and filled a 10-acre field.  An old mare in a neighboring pasture had defective eye-sight, saw7 the corn, thought it was  snow, and laid down and froze to death.  Corner West Vernon and Stanley Streets, NELSON, B. C.  FIEST-0LASS   IN   EVERY   EESPE0T.  The International lias a comfortably furnished parlor for  ladies, and the rooms are large and furnished  newly throughout.  THE  TABLE  SS   NOT  SURPASSED  by any hotel in the Kootenay Lake country.  A share of transient trade solicited.  THE SAMPLE-E00M IS STOCKED WITH CHOICE CIGARS  AND THE FINEST BRANDS OP LIQUORS.  PROPRIETORS  <t  The  Pinest Eotel in Toad   Mountain  District."  E SILVER KING  Corner West Baker and Ward Streets,  JOHNSON   &  EY,  PROPRIETORS.  The Silver King is a new building and furnished with new-  furniture from kitchen to attic.    The table will not  be equalled by any hotcLin Nelson.  I    B  PIONEKR  PAINTER  AND   DECORATOR,  Address:   Nelson Hotel.  Plasterers and Bricklayers  Will Gontract for all Kinds of Work.  Materials furnished  and estimates given on  application.  Agents for the sale of LIME.  Address all commnnications to Nelson. B. C.  W  $8ms@im$m  i't^W-'SiSS*?-! 8  THE- MINEE:    NELSON,  B.  0.,  SATIJEDAY,  NOVEMBEE 14,  1891.  Grocer and  gs  nor  Sporting  AGENT  FOR GURNEY &  CO.'S  STOVES  AND   HIRAM  WALKER & SONS' WHISKIES.  Main Street, Eevelstoke, B. 0,  SMALL   NUGGETS   OF   NEWS.  A concerted effort should be made by the people of Ainsworth and Nelson to induce the Hendryx .line, to run the  Galena all winter, if possible. It is understood that dr.  Hendryx is willing to make theatternpt, provided he is  guaranteed running expenses. He claims that he ran the  Galena for several years at a loss when there was but few  people in the country and less business, and it is too much  to expect him to continue doing so now that the towns  have grown to be places of importance and the field occupied by a rival line better equipped than his is to do business^ The doctor is right. The people of the two towns  should "chip in" so that communications will not be entirely closed during the winter.  A. S. Beebe, who is in charge of the work at the Pilot  Bay smelter site, reports everything progressing well. The  boarding-houses and offices are very nearly completed, and  25 men are on the pay-roll.  Judging from the reports received from Spokane, the  "noble 5" who made the first big discoveries in the Slocan  country had as much attention paid them as if they had  been magnates intending to build a transcontinental railway that would have its headquarters in Spokane. Boys,  sometimes there is almost as much luxury in having Wealth  in prospective as having it in reality.  < A meeting will be held in Lemon's hall on Tuesday  evening, November 17th, for the purpose of arranging for  a series of meetings to be held weekly throughout the  winter for the discussion of questions literary, political,  social, and practical.  Assessment work is being done on the White, Miami,  Hardscrable, and Hardup, all in the neighborhood of the  Poorman on Eagle creek. These claims belong to the  Davenports, and M. C. Monaghan, who is doing the assessment work, reports about 5 inches of snow in that locality, and by present indications thinks it will remain.  The people of the towns on Kootenay lake will not be  without tender turkey and juicy leg-of-mutton with which  to regale their appetites at Christmas time, as Wilson &  Perdue expect a carload of turkeys and last spring's lambs  in from Coiville valley by the next boat.  The Deluge Hook & Ladder Company, to he in keeping  with the customs of like volunteer organizations, will give  its first annual ball and supper on Thursday evening, the  19th instant. The ball will be in Lemon's and the supper  in Hume's hall. Every maid and matron in Ainsworth,  Balfour, and Nelson not opposed to dancing on religious  principles is expected to be in attendance, and the fire boys  will see to it that they will not regret their coming.  The money realized will be used in purchasing apparatus  for the company.  W. W. Sprague and Scott McDonald, 2 of Hot Springs  mining operators, passed through Nelson on Monday bound  for the outside. Mr. Sprague goes to Tacoma for the  winter; mr. McDonald goes on business that requires his  personal attention for a week or so.  No mining town in America has a better-appointed hotel  than Nelson, now that the hotel Phair is open to the public.  In the first place the site commands a fine view of the outlet and river, and in the second place every room in the  house is large and well lighted.   The oflice, dining-room,  billiard-room, and parlor are finished in British Columbia  cedar, and all the appointments and furniture are modern  and in keeping with the finishings. There are 30 bedrooms,  single and in suite. The Jhouse is supplied with electric  bells, hot and cold water, and last but not least a barroom.  E. E.Phair, who has had long experience in the eastern  provinces as manager of summer resort hotels, is the lessee,  and he says he will make the Phair the best hotel in the  province.  A party of 4 from Bonner's Ferry intend putting in the  winter hunting in the mountains north of the outlet. They  have about a ton and a half of supplies, and are now engaged in packing them to the head of 7-Mile creek, where,  it is said, they will establish their camp.  The last load of supplies for the mines on Toad mountain  was sent up today. The road is reported to be in good condition, the foot or more of snow at the upper end not interfering with teaming. ���������  C. E. Taylor telegraphs The MiNERfrom Spokane, under  date of October 14th, that his nori-arrival at Nelson last  week was caused by his missing a train, but that he will  surely be in on Thursday next.  C. S. F. Hamber has withdrawn from the firm of Hamber, Thynne'���������& Henshaw and taken over the Nelson end of  their business. v  DISSOLUTION   OF   PARTNERSHIP.  The firm of Hamber, Thynne & Henshaw of Vancouver  and Nelson has been dissolved by mutual consent. Mr.  Hamber will continue the Nelson business and messrs.  Thynne and Henshaw the Vancouver business, each taking  over the respective assets and liabilities of the offices as  above mentioned.  Nelson, B. C., November 10th, 1891. ... .*  NOTICE   TO   CONTRACTORS.  Sealed tenders will be received by the undersigned up to  noon of Friday, 4th December, 1891, for the construction of  a wharf at Nelson. Plans and. specifications can be seen  at the engineer's office, Tolson building.  N. FITZSTUBBS,  Assistant commissioner of lands and works. :  Nelson, B. C, November 12th, 1891.  Eeal Estate, Mining Broker,  '    AND  Insurance Agent,  WEST BAKER STKEET,...  Representing���������  CITIZENS (Fire.)  QUEBEC  CITY OF LONDON  "  EQUITABLE (Life.)  ....'...'.. ..NE&SON,B. c.  REAL ESTATE and MINING INTERESTS in the  district handled to the  best advantage.  Correspondence solicited.  v.v   NOTICE; :    "  A court of revision and appeal under the Assessment Act  will be held at the government office, Nelson, on Thursday,  December 10th, "at 10 A.M. N. FITZSTUBBS,  Chairman court of revision and appeal.  Nelson, November 13th, 1891.  NOTICE.    :'.'  Notice is hereby given that I have applied the chief commissioner for a special license to cut timber on 640 acres of  crown lands, situate and bounded as follows: From my  N. W. post near the eastern shore of Kootenay lake, about  a mile south of Campbell creek (which creek is about 12  miles north of Hendryx camp) south 80 chains; thence east  80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains to  starting point. DENNIS CAIN.  Nelson, B. C, 12th November, 1891. o  APPLICATION   FOR   CROWN   GRANT.  Notice is hereby given that John Robertson, as agent for  Ephriam Dempsie, has filed the necessary papers and made  application for a crown grant in favor of the mineral claim  known as the Sunrise, situated on Toad mountain, West  Kootenay district. Adverse claimants, if any, will forward-  their objections within 60 days from date of publication.  N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, B, C., October 3rd, 1891.  NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that application will be made at  the next session of the legislative assembly of the province  of British Columbia for liberty to construct, equip, maintain, and operate a line of railway from some point on  Kootenay lake by way of Kaslo or other pass up the North  Fork of Kaslo creek to some point at or near the summit*  between Kootenay and Slocan lakes, or the vicinity of the  recently discovered mines in that section, with powers of  extending said railway in any direction as may hereafter  be deemed requisite for the transportation of ores and  other products, with powers of building and operating  branch lines from said railway to such mines as may now  be or hereafter be discovered in the vicinity of said railway.  WILSON, WOOTTON & BARNARD,  Victoria, October 20th, 1891.     Solicitors for applicants.  APPLICATION   FOR   WATER   RIGHT.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date, I intend to  apply to the assistant commissioner of lands and works for  West Kootenay district for permission to divert for a term  of 99 years 100 inches of water from a small stream known  as Bear creek, at a point 40 chains northwest of the northwest corner of my preemption (lot 208), thence following  the natural course of the creek southeasterly to the west  line of my preemption, thence across said preemption to  the site of "Kaslo City," now being platted, and to such  points as will be required for the use of the inhabitants of  said city for domestic, agricultural, manufacturing, fire  protection, and all other purposes for which water is generally used by a community. GEORGE T. KANE.  Kaslo, September 21st, 1891.  iiui win* mam iwwm-m ww i-nu,nwnnu-*w

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