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The Miner Nov 21, 1891

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 3/  Si  ��������� ���������'   t ''  " ������������������ //!'���������������������������.  . '   / ���������  *        /���������>'  ^���������-������IV  '     #���������  sir  3>-.  3  ."'������������������������������������Only* Pape^r ,'���������  Printed in tlie '-.���������;  Kootenay Laltc -Mill'  ''.Iii.g. IMstricts.--'  For ICnfes  of .Siinscrij'iiiioii and  Advertising:  Sco . Foil vi\\  B'a&e.  NUMBEE'74.  E"ELS0E:,   BEITISH   COLUMBIA;   SATUEDAY,   NOVEMBEE   21,   1891.  $4 A YEAE.  A  .S'JICX'ESSFiri.   S0���������frAL  'E.VEX,*1V  The first animal ball and supper of the Deluge  , Hook & Ladder Company on 'Thursday night.  was an event that tlie members of that organization can look back to with pride as well as  pleasure, for it was, a great success in every way.  Not only those wlio take "pleasure in dancing  were in attendance, but many were there who  seldom allow their presence to grace such events.  The dancing was by --program,- and began at 9  and Was kept up until 3: The music was a  feature in itself, 'messrs; Trenery, Duffy, and  Harper rendering strains that made those who  didn't know how to dance wish they did, and  those who did know how excel themselves. The  supper served at 12, was a joint effort of all our  hotels, and could not have been excelled in any  mining town on the Pacific coast situated as  Nelson is, 200 miles from markets. Those in attendance were: Mr. and mrs. Bnchanali," mr,  and mrs. EJlis, mr. rand mrs. Arthur, mr. and  mrs. Phillips, mr, and ''mrs. Scoley, mr. and mrs.  -..'���������May, mi', and mrs. Taylor, ���������mr.. and mrs. Du-  hamel, mr, and mrs. Jiszkowicz, mr. and mrs.  ; Hod son, mr. and mrs. Mclntyre, mr. and mrs.  G-oodenough, mr. and mrs. Corning, mr. and  mrs. Stuckey, mr. and mrs. Rodiar, mrs. Wilson, mrs. Taylor, mrs. Muir, mrs. Smith, miss  Hume,'-"miss Rath, miss Duhamel, miss Chevinie,  miss Madden, miss McCarthy, miss Julia Coming, miss LidaCorning, and messrs. J. K. Buchanan, McDonald, Hamilton, Lemon, Stevens,0  Mahoney, Irving, Nolan, Brown, Malone, John  Buchanan, Landriggan, Arehart, Gibson, Dake,  Walker, Matheson,"McLean, Craddock, Smith,  Crane, Pichardson, Blun dell, Duhamel, Jeff ers,  Ponevan, Wardlaw, .Wai;d, Elson, Sweet, Gilker,  Tregillus' Madden, Hanson, Johnson, Devim,  Alton, and Bigelow. ' By the good will and generosity of the musicians, hotel 'proprietors,-.hall ������������������  owners, and others, the expenses were nominal,  which allows almost the entire amount received  from the sale of tickets to be turned into the  treasury of the company. The amount realized,  together with the sum appropriated by the provincial government, places the organization in a  good   way   financially.      It   now   has   12   fire  "hydrants connected with the mains of the water  company, 300 feet of hose, 60 buckets, 200 feet of  ladders, 12 axes, and a bell���������to say nothing of a  foreman and 3 assistants.  TJie 'Lytton Stunning* on the .'Lowes* BSiiver.  The general agent at Revelstoke of the Columbia & Kootenay Steam Navigation Company  writes The Miner, under date of the 13th, as  follows:������������������ .."The water' here has fell over 2 feet in  the last 3 nights, so it is considered too risky to  have fhe Lytton make another trip up to Pevelstoke. Hereafter she will be run between the  mouth of Kootenay river and Little Dalles,  leaving for the latter -place'.-on Wednesdays."  Passengers who came in on .Thursday report the'  steamboat company grading a wagon road from  the mouth of the river to the railway track, a  distance of less than a mile. The engineer- of  the boat states that one difficulty likely to be  encountered during the winter is ice on the  boat's wheel.  WJiy. tfiie-Kates were Raised.  One of the stockholders' in  the Columbia &  Kootenay Steam Navigation Company, Limited,  writes the editor of   The Miner as follows:  "You will remember my writing to you in  August last, asking you to notify shippers that  when water fell in the Columbia river rates  would be advanced, and, to advise them to get  in winter supplies while high water lasted. You  know that we are at the same expense when  making one trip a week ������ts when making 2 trips.  We went behind trip after trip in'August and  September when running to Little Dalles. Last  fall, not counting the great wear and tear on  boats and machinery, we ran at a loss after  October.     We have  invested  over $120,000 in  steamboats, and as yet see no dividends sufficient to cover bank rate of interest." No one  doubts the above statements, not even the merchants who were "chinched" by the raise in  rates; but, in all fairness, the steamboat company should haye notified the merchants that  rates would be raised on and after a certain  date, and not raised as they were, the veryweek  the bulk of the winter goods for the whole lake  country began to arrive at Revelstoke. The  railroad company was not even notified, for the  advance rate was collected on goods shipped  from Winnipeg at a. guaranteed rate, prepaid by  the shipper. The steamboat company expects  to do business in the lake country, or it would  not have expended $120,000 in boats; but if its  stockholders expect good-sized dividends, their  expectations will surely not be realized by a  repetition of the "cinch'' game played so adroitly  this fall. '"..-.-' ���������/���������/.���������',"���������'��������� :"���������'.,      ��������� ! ,.'..;'..,c ' v    .'  SMAJML .'WJIG-GETS"  OF'.-NEWS.  It will be seen frpm the private bill notices  printed in this issue of The Miner, that Nelsou  is to be well .watered 'and lighted. Two water  companies are applying for charters and the  same number of electric light companies. If the  charters are granted for water works, the owners of the present .works will be ground exceedingly fine between the upper and nether millstones of corporate capital.  "Tom" Madden, who slipped away from Nel-,  son last August, returned on Thursda/y. When0  he left he was a bachelor; on his return he was  a full-fledged benedict. Mr. Madden ^vas married at Riviere aux Pins, Quebec, on September  28th, to niiss Margaret PitzxDatrick. They were  accompanied to Nelson by m iss Martha Madden,  the party making the trip from Quebec by way  of the "Soo" route to Minneapolis, thence to  Spokane over the Northern Pacific. They report a foot of snow in Dakota and Montana, but  fine weather in Quebec.  The manager of the Victoria branch of the  Bank of British North America took a look at  Nelson one day this week. When asked if he  was afraid the Bank of British Columbia or  Bank of Montreal would be in this field ahead of  him he laughingly replied, "No; I do not think  either bank will be here until there is business  to justify their coming." All of which means  that this is not the commercial center we think  it is.  While Nelson may not have as large and expensive hotel buildings as some of its neighbors,  it boasts of several hotels that are not to be  sneezed at. The Nelson is now second to hone  in the province in the attractiveness of its barroom furniture. The office and reading-room,  when completed, will be the cosiest in the lake  country, and be a marvel of artistic work in  their appointments and decorations.  .     IKcports From Toad Mountain.  Superintendent Robertson reports the  main  tunnel on the Grizzly Bear in about ISO feet,  -with 2 shifts at work. One shift is also at work  in the shaft, crosscutting for the ledge. The  crosscut is in 12 feet, and it is expected that 20  feet more will have to be run. Superintendent  Ray expects that the crosscut tunnel on the  Dandy will reach the main, or south, ledge by  the end of the coming week. if that ledge is  as good as is expected, the Dandy Mining Company will have 500 men on its pay-roll "before  another year i'olIs around.  More Development WorSi Seeded.  The claims in the Kootenay Jake country need  no one thing more than development work. If  a smelter was ready today to treat ore, how  many mines are there in "the several districts  in shape to make a continuous ore output?  There are prospects by the hundreds, from  which to make selections on -which to expend  money, but the number on which actual development work has been, or is being, done is comparatively small.  i;.\w<>fifiKAKiJ<;   a'ls^vs.^B^.ws.  The whole of Part III of Ihe Mineral Act  should, be repealed, and 2 sections, one provid-,  ing* for the advertising out of delinquent co-  owners, and the other requiring all prospecting  syndicates to have their agreements in writing  and placed on record, enacted instead. , Part HI  relates to   mining partnerships,  and   while its  provisions are no doubt applicable to placer  mining, in which the free miner is required to  work his claim,, continuously during the open  season, they are unworkable and uneless in  quartz mining. Even if they were workable,  why should the mining business require special  enactments relating to partnerships? Is not  the Partnership Act intended to govern all  partnerships? Of the 23 sections in Part III,  not one of them relates to jDrospecting agreements, notwithstanding prospecting is the primary act in mining. There is an unwritten law  in the United States that makes the grub-staker  a partner of the prospector, but it is doubtful if  the courts':..of''this- province would so decide.  That unwritten' law has been the source of'much  litigation in the United States, and, in time,  may result likewise in this province, for judges  even have been known to make rulings not  based on written law. To prevent this litigation, no interest in a mineral claim should be  recognized unless the party claiming 1 he interest had a written agreement with the prospector and that agreement oh record. Then less  would be heard of swindling grub-stakers out of  .interests'' and beating honestprospectors out of  their claims by the verbal-agreement dodge;.  .-���������'���������ISnt Two Slave   Expended   Money in 'Actual" Work.  The following companies were chartered at  the last session of the legislative assembly, and,  so far, but 2 of them have expended money in  actual work, namely, the British Columbia Dyking & Improvement' Company and.the Kootenay  Lake Telephone Company:  Nicola, Kamloops & Similkameen Ooal& Railway Company, British Colum bia-Dyking & Improvement  Company,   Okanagan  Land  & Improvement Company, Upper Columbia Navigation  Company,   Ashcroft   &   Cariboo  Railway  Company,   Bm-ra.rd   Inlet   Railway   Company,  Chillivvhack Railway Company, Crow's Nest &  Kootenay    Railway    Company,    Liverpool   &  Canoe Pass Railway Company, Nelson & Port  Sheppard    Railway   Company,   Nicola   Valley  ���������Railway Company, "Vancouver &  Lulu  Island  Railway. Company,  Vancouver & Lulu  Island  Electrical Railway Company, Vancouver,'Northern,-& Peace River Railway Company, Vernon  . &���������  Okanagan   Railway   Company, ���������'Victoria   <fe  North America", Railway Company,   Kootenay  Lake Telephone Company, New Westminster &  Bnrrard Inlet  Telephone Company, Vernon &  Nelson   Telephone   Company,   Hot   Springs   <fe  Goat, River'Tram way. Company, Nanaimo Electric Tramway 'Company, Toad Mountain & Nelson Tramway Company,  Westminster & Vancouver Tramway Company.  Awaken   to  Your   Hnleresls.  The Miner h a s repeated ly called the a t ten tion  of  the  capitalists of Victoria and other coast  towns to the necessity  of investing a'share of  their capital in the mining industry, an industry  that is second to no other as a dividend payer  when carefully handled. Helena, Montana, is  one of the wealthiest towns in America, if not  the wealthiest in the world, and the main source  of its wealth has been and is the business of  mining. If miners have done so much for Helena, why should they not do as much for the  towns in British Columbia? No citizen with the  good of the province at heart cares to see the  wealth 'inherent in the provence go to the people of a foreign country; but such will be the  result if our people do not a awaken to their  own interests.  &S2  %3?$&i  SSfggg^^  gSEggEmMmmmmssmsmmmBrnMammm**!  J.1  i THE  MINEE: ������������������ EEWK B.   6���������  SATUEDAY,  NOVEMBEE  21,   1891  W. J.  WILSON.  W. PERDUE.  &  PROPRIETORS OF  .AT,,  ffELSOtf AND AI^SWOETH.  Will contract to supply mining companies and steamboats  with fresh meats, and deliver, same at any mine or  landing in the Kootenay Lake country.  CORRAL AND STABLING  AT NELSON,  where saddle and pack animals can always bo hired, and  teams obtained for job teaming.  JkC^IKIIE  GOOTBAOT&  with  merchants for hauling freight to Or from railroad  depot and steam boat wharf.  NELSON  OEFICE AND  MARKET,  PROPRIETOR OF.THE  AND   STA  ���������������rncr  EJItili and  Ward Streets,  NELSON, B. C.  . Will undertake any work or contract in which pack animals or teams can be used.    Will furnish  SADDLE AND PACK ANIMALS  to parties who wish to examine mines and claims  in Toad Mountain district.  WILL   OOrTTEAOT  TO  OAEEY PASSENGEES  ���������ght  and baggage to and from hotels ; also, frei  to and from steamboat wharves and  railway depots.  CONTRACT TO GRADE LOTS IN SSIELSON,  Stove and Cord wood  Sale.  lanos!  Jas. McDonald & Co.  Nelson and Revelstoke,  carry full lines of all kinds of furniture-for residences,  hotels, and oiliccs.   Mattresses made to order, and  at prices lower than eastern and coast.  They are also agents for  Evans Pianos and Doherty Organs.  NELSON   STORE :  'iVo. 4 BSousion ������fc Ink fSniIdin^, Josephine Street.  ' ���������"..������������������������������������������������������''.'���������r..' "CilAKCJE   IN  MINING. ;  The  element of chance plays an  important  part in mining, though perhaps no more so than  in other branches of business, and many of the  greatest ore deposits that the world have known  have, owed their discovery to what may be called  pure   luck.      The   uncovering   of  the   famous  bonanza at Mount Morgan in Queensland, Australia, was ah instance of th is, as appears from  a.''recerit report of the  manager of the Mount  Morgan  Gold Mining 'Company, Limited, Who  says, in describing the work done on the property in the last half year: "We have developed  one curious fact in the history of Mount Morgan.  Hundreds of people have wondered, 'how could  Mount Morgan, only 26 miles from Rockharhp-  ton, remain undiscovei-ed so many years, especially as Linda Cully at its foot was worked for  gold many years ago?'    Our recent working on  Lady Musgrave face has taken in the original  prospecting trench sunk by the Morgan brothers, and, st range but ti-ii e���������cal 1 it j udgme 111, fate,  or luck���������had   this  trench been  put  in  10 feet  north or south, they would not have found any  gold without sinking 20.feet;    The trench is just  in  the center of the onIv  pavahle stone  that  comes to the surface in this part of the mountain.    Ten feet north or south would proved a  duffer,, and Mount   Morgan,  out of  which the  company7 has taken 844,374 ounces of gold, would  possibly still be undiscovered and still be known  as the Iron Mountain."  -.;..��������� Similar cases can be cited in this country without number,    The discovery of the Little Pittsburg mine in Leadville, Colorado, Avas made indeed under circumstances almost identical with  those at Mount Morgan.   Ore had been found on  Iron Hill, but with the knowledge of the geology  of the j^ce possessed by prospectors at that  time there was no reason to look for the vein on  Fryer Hill, more than a mile distant from the  original  discovery, where there was  no  float,  outcrop, or other surface indications.    A party  of prospectors,   however, working on  a "grub  stake," set out to sink a shaft on this hill.    Half  way up the hill they stopped, as the story goes,  to refresh themselves from the jug of whisky  which they had  with them,    Seduced by the  charm of this fluid they remained on the spot  until the supply was exhausted,   when one  of  the number suggested that they might as well  sink a shaft at. the spot where they were as anywhere  else on the hill.     This proposition  was  acted upon,-, with a result that ore was struck  after sinking va few feet.    Curiously, this was  the place where the vein underlying Fryer Hill  came nearest to the surface.  A more recent instance of luck of this kind  was reported only a few weeks ago. The famous  ore body in the Poorman mine, Owyhee county,  Idaho, from which many millions were taken,  was followed down by the discovery shaft until  it could no longer be commanded by the latter.  A new shaft was then sunk, but the workings  from this fail to cut the ore chute and it was  supposed that it did   not   extend   downward.  After many years the continuation of the chute  has been discovered, and it turns out, according  to the. report, that the second shaft was stopped  within four feet of it.    We are not, however;,  convinced of the accuracy of this statement, and  would need much more abundant and precise  details  to make it fit  our recollections of the  costly and extensive explorations made in the  Poorman mine before its abandonment.  Nelson SawmillCo.  E. J. MOWAT & CO.  Contractors and Builders,  SEASONED   LUMBER  always on hand for store fittings,-desks, tables, etc.  Wils^^n^������ e5?ct a������ ldnds ?f buildings and guarantee  satisfaction,   Shop: corner Josephine and Bluff sts.  Yard:  Mill:   Two  At end of Flume.  Miles South of Nelson.  Manufacture  The mHL has a -capacity of 20,000 feet a day.  Orders will receive prompt attention.    ���������  # ������ W.'N.HOLFE, Secretary,  Offir<������*/Tolsori block,    ���������  umccs\ End of Flume.  Telephone No. 2.      '"'  The Kootenay Lake Saw-mill is  always ready for business. Lumber-- good, bad, and indifferent -on  hand or made to order.  G*. 0. BU0HA1AN.  Nelson, January 15th.  ompany  MANUFACTURERS OF  EVERY DESCRIPTION.  PBICE LIST  (DELIVERED AT NELSON,   AINSWORTH,   OR   BALFOUR).  4 inch, per M... .'���������  ������32 oo  (.i  Cent a Month  can be obtained for small amounts, loaned on short time  and well secured. Apply to HOUSTON & INK, real  estate and mine brokers, Miner building, Nelson.  No. 1 flooring  No. 2 "        C inch,  No. 1 ceiling, 4 inch,  No. 2        "      6 inch,  Rustic,  .  Select clear, DI),  No. 1 common, I),  DD,    Bar and counter tops, clear, per foot  No. 1 common, per M   No. 2        " '*         Culls, "   Shingles, "   ItlOUHNCiS.  27 00  32 00  27 00  27 00  40 00  25 00  27 00  10  $20 00  1500  12 00  4 50  Blasterers and Bricklayers  'Will Contract for all Kinds of Work.  Materials furnished and estimates given on application.  Agents for the sale of LIME.  Address all commnnications to Nelson, B. C.  Bead, panel, crown, base, etc., etc., per foot .2������@10o  SBills at Pilot Bay, Kootenay L������kc.  S.-..0. Spalding,  Manager  ' K. F. PJERRY, Agent at Nelson.  HWEMNEK- ������& WATS^BT, Agents at Ainsworth.  mmemm^ THE  MINER: ������������������. ������������������NELSON,-' B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,  NOVEMBER 21,   1891.  Cor. Baker and Ward Sts.'  NELSON, B. C.  h, &.:';t. madden  ;:   Proprietors.  The Madden is Centrally Located,  with a frontage towards'Kootenay river, and is newly  furnished throughout.   ' "  T HE ^E      T .A. BL-E  is supplied with everything in the.market, the kitchen  being under the immediate supervision of Hugh  ' Madden, a ^c^^  THE BAR IS STOCKED WITH THE BEST  brands of beer, ale, wine, whisky, and cigars.  Vernon Street, near Josephine,  NELSON, IS. C.      ��������� ;   '   [  PROPRIETOR.  THE HOTEL OVERLOOKS THE KOOTENAY  .'.',- its guests thus obtaining splendid views  of both mountain and river.  THE   ROO  THE  TABLE  are comfortable in size and      is acknowledged   the best  newly furnished. in the mountains.  rrr  m   ZB-^IR,  is stocked with the best liquors and cigars procurable.  No whiskies sold except Hiram Walker & Sons'  celebrated brands.  East Baiter Street,  Nelson,  Is one of the best hotels in Toad Mountain district,  and is the headquarters for prospectors and  working miners.  The Table is not Surpassed by that of any Hotel  in the Kootenay Lake country.  At the Bar is Disjoensed Pine Liquors and Cigars,  and the bed-rooms are newly furnished.  MALONE   ������&   TRKGHAIJS ��������� PROPRIETORS  TRAIL,  B. ���������.  TOPPING & HANNA  Proprietors  Good Table; Good Beds ; Myas-Closc Liquors.  CHESS   COLUMN. ��������� PROBLEM   III.  BLACK,  TWO PIECES.  WHITE,  FIVE PIECES;  White to mate in two moves.  Solution of Problem No. 1:.;"  WHITE.  1. Q. to Q. 5.  2. B. takes R.  .3.   Q. toK. 6.  ���������_,,..  Solution of Problem No. 2:  ���������white.  1. B. to K. Kt.6.  2. Q. toK. R. 2.   Mate.  November 19th.  BLACK.  1. Has choice of several  moves, say R. to Q.  R. square  2. Kt. toQ. Kt. 3.  BLACK.  1.   K. R. P. takes B.  NELSON BUCHANAN.  A    GLIMPSE. OF '.GENUINE   LOVE.,  Manifestations of parental affection are not  rare; it is natural to desire the welfare of your  children; to be anxious for their entrance in the  charmed circle of society; to crave for them  fame and fortune.  Yet the world knows but little of the deep,  '  "   ��������� ~   ���������  ���������   a       ��������� '..���������-. .... ��������� '..'-���������������������������'������������������'.  self sacrificing love of the poor, whose efforts to  achieve those  things for their children mean  self denial of the sternest kind. -  The sublime patience  and   endurance of the  poor have ever aroused my admiration.  A case came under my notice recently that  intensified my wonder and esteem.  I called at a business college, and as several  persons were in advance of me, I sat down to  await my turn.  I observed that they were well dressed, intelligent people, in search of a higher education.  One pretty young girl (a picture in gold and  blue) was making arrangements to commence  next day,  She chatted merrily, and looked very confident of success.  As she passed out, & man entered.  He was a working man, clean and respectable;  his clothes were well brushed, but were neither  new nor fashionable.  He seemed about 50 years old; a serious expression on his face; his beard and hair were  faintly streaked with gray.  He took off his hat confusedly, fumbled in  several pockets in a worried manner; found a  card which he handed to the professor without  speaking, and anxiously watched his face as he  read it.  At length the professor said:    "I suppose this  is your boy's report from grammar school?"  "Yes, sir," he answered.  "Well, this is a splendid report for the young  man.    How old is he?"  "Only 15," he proudly replied.  "You see, sir," (he said with nervous haste)  "he is not so big and strong as I was, so me and  his mother want him to have a bit more learning so he won't have to work hard like me."  "That  is  wise and kind," said   the   teacher  pleasantly.    "What do you wish him to study?"  "Bookkeeping, shorthand and typewriting, if  it don't cost too much."  He nervously twirled his soft hat, and looked  at the teacher so grave and respectfully that he  was at once struck by the man's earnestness.  "Bring your son," he said, "and we will give  you the lowest terms possible."  "1 can't spare another half day," he said  timidly; "it's going to be a pretty hard job for  us to keep him here a year. I shall have to  work late nights, and his mother will have to  manage very close."  "Send him," said the teacher, "we'll do our  best for you all."  The man's face beamed with gratitude, yet  still he lingered and hesitated.  "Is there anything more?" asked the professor.  "Yes, sir;" said the father eagerly. "I want  to tell you, my boy is rather .'���������.slow..-.: May be you  clever folks might want to rush him, but sir,  he's a good boy; aiid very willing. I don't care  how hai'd I work, but he's our only child, and I  don't want him push ed past his-': strength."  There was a world of tender love expressed in  his homely face, as he uttered these words.  The professor smiled, promised every care,  and the -mail departed, his eyes shin ing with  happiness, and a rapt expression that suggested  innumerable Spanish castles.  I called again and saw the boy; he was a deli-  cat e, fair, serious lad. I could scarcely refrain  going to his desk and saying, "My boy, if you  don't work faithfully every moment, and strain  every nerve to excel, you are not worthy of that  dear, plain, heroic father, or your self-sacrificing  mother."  Not desiring to startle the studentSj or coveting a residence at Blqomingdale, I did not voice  my thoughts.  But I 'breathed a prayer that the lad may succeed and gladden the hearts of his obscure but  noble parents.  Of 'Interest to Eat People.  A French journal announces a cure for obesity.  This is to never eat more than one dish at each  meal, no matter vvhat that dish may be, and a  person may consume a sufficient quantity to  fully satisfy the appetite. No condiments, soups,  or desserts are to be allowed.  Corner West Vernon and Stanley Streets, NELSON, B. C.  TIKST-CLASS   IF  EVEEY   KESPECT.  The International has a comfortably furnished parlor for  ladies, and the rooms are large and furnished  newly throughout.  THE  TABLE   IS  NOT  SURPASSED  by any hotel in the Kootenay Lake country.  A share of transient trade solicited.  THE SAMPLE-ROOM IS STOCKED WITH CHOICE CIGARS  AND THE FINEST BRANDS OF LIQUORS.  PROPRIETORS  a  The  Pinest Hotel in  Toad   Mountain  District."  Corner West Baker and Ward Streets,  SON   &   SVIAHONEY,  PROPRIETORS,  The Silver King is a new building and furnished with new  furniture from kitchen to attic.   The table will not  be equalled by any hotel in Nelson. 4  THE MINER:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,   NOVEMBEE  21,  1891.  The Mixer, is . printed ox Saturdays, and will be  mailed to subscribers at the following cash-in-advance  rates: Three months ������1.50, six months ������2.50, one year ������4.  Contract Advertisements -will be inserted at the  rate of $3 an inch (down the column) per month. A  special rate for advertisements of over 2 inches.  Transient Advertisements will be inserted for  15 cents a line for. the first insertion arid 7 cents a line  for each additional insertion. Twelve lines of 9 words  each make an inch. All advertisements printed for  a less period than 3 months considered transient and  must be paid for in advance. Advertisements of less  than 12 lines will be counted as 12 lines.'  Birth Notices free if weight of child is given; if  weight is not given $1 will be charged. Marriage  announcements will be charged from $1 to $10���������according to the social standing of the bridegroom.  Job Printing in good style at fair rates. Cards,  envelopes, and letter, note, and account papers kept  in stock.., .������������������,.      .-'.-:.  Letters to the Editor will only appear over the  writer's name. Communications..with such signatures  as "Old Subscriber," '.'Veritas," "Citizen," etc.,0 etc.,  will not be printed on any consideration.  Address all Letters :  The Miner, Nelson, B. C.  EDITORIAJL   REMARKS.  If the Mineral Act must be amended this  winter, the sections amended should onlv be  those that have proved unworkable or useless.  Amendments to test the practicality or this  or that man's ideas merely should not be jmade.  a  a  a  a  A mining man who is doing much to develop  ths mines on Toad mountain once remarked to  the writer,   that the requirement of a miner's  license  kept practical  miners from  coming to  this province to seek for work; and, no doubt,  he was right.    Yet, there seems to be trouble in  securing good miners in   camps in  the United  States,  where a license is not required.   The  Anacon da S fandard of the 9th says:   ' 'Just now  "the  demand   at  the Anaconda   mine  is for  " miners, there is room for hundreds of them.  " Butte is fairly overrun with men out of a job  *-*- and looking for   work;   the trouble is that  " comparatively few of these men are miners.  Their presence in the drifts and levels and  scopes on the hill back of Butte is perilous to  " themselves and profitless to those who employ  " them.    Of course, in their  eagerness  to get  "wages,  some of these  men  represent them-  " selves as skilled in work with which in fact  they are not at all familiar; they must yield  their places  as  soon  as   better men  can   be  '���������'secured.     Within a fortnight  thousands of  .." uien  have  made  Butte  their Mecca.     They  "have  come in  crowds   from  recent   railroad  " work in various parts of the state.    There is  " small chance for these men in Butte���������the city  " is filled with them, but good miners can get  " employment,   and   the  demand  for them in  " Butte  is  large."     But, notwithstanding this  apparent   scarcity of   good  miners  in  mining  camps" like Butte, a scarcity in no way caused  by the exaction  of unfair   taxes,   it would be  well for the legislative assembly of this province  at its next session to examine into the wisdom  of taxing men for the privilege of working in  our mines.    The people who are locating at Bonner's  Ferry, Idaho, in the expectation of seeing that  town develop into a great commercial center,  will ���������surely-be disappointed if all their castles  have no solidier foundation than that which  they are building to corral the trade of the upper  Columbia and Kootenay rivers. They imagine  the canal that W. A. Baillie-Groham built 2  years ago, which connects the waters of Kootenay river with the upper Columbia lake and  which, is about 1������ miles long, will be a factor to  aid them.    All of which is an iridescent dream.  A missionary of the Presbyterian church who  is wasting his time on the main line of the Canadian Pacific in the Rockies writes to the place  in Ontario trom  whence he came, saying that1"  bis spiritual life was nearly chilled to death. He  then adds in another sentence that while his  flock is indifferent to religious matters, he is  glad that he is not laboring at Nelson, British  Columbia, a town in which there is not a single  Christian. Better men than that missionary  have had their mortal life chilled to death in  pioneering the mountains of British Columbia���������  but it is more than likely that they never posed  as Christians.  a  a  NOTARY PUBLIC.  REAL ESTATE AND   SVIINES  CONVEYANCING.  Town lots, lands, and mining claims handled on commission.   Conveyancing documents drawn up.  Correspondence solicited.  Office:   No.c13 East Baker Street, NELSON, B. G.  Eeal Estate, Mining Broker,  .AND >���������:������������������������������������..���������.'  Insurance Agent,  WEST BAKER STREET,.......'.-..':.������������������ . .NELSON,   B. C.  Representing���������  CITIZENS (Fire.)  QUEBEC  CITY OF LONDON   "���������  EQUITABLE (Life.)  REAL ESTATE and MINING INTEREST S in the  district handled to the  best advantage.  Correspondence solicited.  John Houston.  Charles H. Ink.  Houston & Ink,  BUY AND SELL  Town Lots and  Mineral  Claims,  ON COMMISSION.  Have now for sale 2 of the best hotels in Nelson ; choice  Baker street corner and Vernon street inside lots; lots in  Ainsworth; and mineral claims in Toad Mountain district.  Oflice iu Miner Building, Nelson, 15. C.  No. 6 Houston & Ink Building, Nelson, B. C.  ������ENE RAJL AGENCY  London & Lancashire Life Insurance Company,  AGENCIES Sir Donald A. Smith, chairman.  Accident Insurance Company of North America,  The celebrated Taylor safes (3 on hand for sale).  Physician, Surgeon, and Accoucheur,  Office:   Stanley Street.  Barrister at   Law,   Solicitor,   Notary  Public, Etc.  Office, Victoria street, Kamloops, B. C.  (A. M. Can. Soc. C. E.)  CIVIL ENGINEEE AND AECHITECT,  TOLSON   BUILDING NEJLSON, B. C.  f. Teetzel & Co.  DEALERS IN  CHEMICALS.  PATENT MEDICINES,  TOBLET ARTICLES,  ETC.  WSIOMJSAEE     DI2A&ERS     IN   . CIGARS.      RAYMOND  SEWING'' MACHINES   IN   STOCK./  Cor. East Baker and Ward Streets.  ���������..;���������;.������������������; NELSON, B. c.  are now settled in their new store, No. 2 Houston & Ink  building, and have on display a full range of  Plain and Pancy Worsted Suitings and Scotch and  Irish Tweeds and Serges.  PRICES TO  SUIT. THE TIMES  DEALERS IN  Groceries, Provisions, and  General Merchandise.  A STOCK OF  English Clothing, Men's  Fiu-nishings, Dry Goods,  EOOTS3   ETO_  imported direct from the manufacturers, always on hand.  -."/ Fostoffice and Telephone in Store.  Postoffice Store,  Nelson, IS. C.  AND GENTS' PUENISHING GOODS.  ALSO,  FULL LINES OF  Toilet Articles and Stationery.  IGAR3   AT   WHOLESALE  Will contract for the erection of stores, hotels, dwellings,  bridges, etc., and guarantee work finished on time.  SEASON"E3D   ILTJJ-jMIieEIR,  always on hand for store fittings, desks, tables, etc.  Undertaking attended to.;  Shop: Cor. Baker and Josephine Sts,  ltfri"*iB  SijMgpg^^ THE   MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,   NOVEMBEE  21,   1891.  Ho  fti  fit  'MARK. TWAIN    ON   HUMOR.  "How is it that almost invariably, in individuals, or in nations, yon  find that the greatest  capacity for humor goes hand-in-hand with the  most "Imperturbable gravity ? "  was a question  asked Mark Twain recently.    The wellrknown  author replied:    "Don't you think that,  after  all, it. is quite natural?    It  is simply reaction.  It is a law that, humor is created by contrasts.  It  is  the  legitimate child  of contrast.   .''.Therefore,- when you have found the very gravest of  people in the world, you shall also beable to say  without further inquiry,  kI have found the garden  of humor, the  very paradise of humor.'"  Then he added:    "You could not possibly have  chosen a worse man to  tellyou about humor.  Why do you come to me?    I am -.particularly  and specially   unqualified,   to   answer you.     I  might go out into the road there (pointing as  he   spoke,   to   a   pretty,   sun-flecked,   shadow-  stricken pathway, a glimpse of which I gained  through the open window), and with a brick-bat  I woulcrknock down 3 or 4 men in an hour who  Avonld know more than I about humor and its  varieties.    I have only a limited acquaintance  with, and a very small appreciation of, humor.  I haven't nearly as catholic and comprehensive  an  idea of humor as you have,   for instance."  "My dear mr. Twain," I replied, "rubbish! the  man who wrote the dialogue between Huck Finn  and the runaway negro, about kings and queens,  is the very prince of humorists!"   Mark Twain  eyed me severely, pointed a long finger at me,  and frowned .heavily and said,   "Exactly,  and  that   very book,  'Huck Finn,' reveals perhaps  the very thing of which I speak.    Within certain  rather narrow lines  I  have an   accurate,  trustworthy appreciation  of humor.    It is not  guess work, this estimate of mine as regards the  lira its of my humor, and my power of appreciating humor generally,   because with my bookshelf full of books before .me, I should certainly  read all the biography and history first, then all ���������  the diaries and personal memoirs, and then the  dictionaries and the encyclopaedias; then, if still  alive, I should read what humorous books there  might be.    This is an absolutely perfect test and  proof that I have no great taste for humor.   T  have written humorous books by pure accident  in   the beginning, and  but for that accident I  should not have written anything."  A Trunk Wjig-on Roael - Wearing. Completion.  Over in East Kootenay the people of Goldejr  have been clamoring for years for a wagon road  to connect that town with the mining, agricultural, and grazing regions on the upper Columbia and Kootenay rivers. The road is being  slowly built. Archibald Cameron, who has been  engaged all the season superintending its construction, is now at Victoria and says 13 miles  were finished this year, with between 18 and 20  men on an average working, and there remains  a further distance of 11 miles to complete the  remaining section of the road. Its usefulness  will be chiefly felt in the" winter, when "traffic  by the river is no longer possible. He reports  business as very brisk on that part of the river  now, and steadily on the increase. To meet this,  captain Armstrong intends during the present  winter to build another steamer, capable of running 15 miles an hour and to be fitted up with  every requisite and comfort. In the McMurdo  district, there is much activity, 4 camps being  backed by good capi t al is t s. A bo n t 40 men will  winter in these camps, and they expect to put  in full time. Prospects promise rich results for  'next season. The farmers have shared largely  in the general prosperity, and -report a very  good season.  A  General Who  Never Commanded  a Company.  In a, magazine article on Moltke, general  Wolseley says Moltke never put himself forward, and outwardly deferred always to the  wishes and opinions of his master. But, as a  matter of fact, his word was law in all military  matters, and no one dared dispute with him on  any point bearing upon the strategy of the campaign, or the tactics of any battle. He was a  new development in the species "general." Here  JOHN DOTY ENGINE CO  OIF*   TOIE-eOHSTTO.,   OZTSTT^IRIO..  MANUPAOTUEEES OP ALL DESOEIPTIONS OP MAEINE AND STATIONAEY  ISratisli I'olumbia   Rraneh :   580 Cordova .Street,  Vaneouver.  0. P. ST. JOHN, Manager.  Keep in stock a full supply of engineer and mill supplies, such as pipe and fittings, brass goods, sheet and other  packing, rubber valves, rubber and leather belting, Dodge wood split-pulleys, oils and lubricants, etc.  Estimates for boilers and engines made on application.   Mail orders receive prompt attention. ,  HOISTING  ENGINES AND   SINKING PUMPS FOR MINES.  S> B  o  o,  CD  dT  >  -r���������I  oz  CD  >  O  +*3  o  -*-*>  o  ���������4-3.  ������������������������  o  bo  ���������r-< .  -4-3  CO  O  CD  O        ,������,  ^ ���������������������������������  ;-*-*">        i���������'  co     --J  CD     ~!3<  o3  <D  CD  EH  >  *r  ������    1-2  CO O  e-K-  CO-  o  o  et-  O  o  CD  CD  O  was a man who had never commanded a company, battalion, or any larger body of soldiers  in action, up to the day when he was called upon  to direct all the operations of a war stupendous  in  its  magnitude.     The  movement of  masses  greater in hum bei-s than any of the armies which  Napoleon   in  his day had led to victory were  confided to this '-cabinet" soldier, who himself  had never set a squadron in the field.    He is said  never to. have made a personal enemy.    If this  be true, it is indeed most extraordinary, considering the number of fools and small-minded men  in and out of office a general in his position has  to deal with.    National necessities render it im-  perative that the Prussian king should be the  commander in the field, but royal birth does not  necessarily make  men into generals.    It may,  therefore, be assumed there will always be behind the German emperor,   during war, some  great soldier���������when he is to be found���������who will,  as Moltke did in 1866 and in 1870, plan and direct  the operations, whilst he remains studiously in  the background.    Will that general always be a  Moltke  in  knowledge and  ability?    And, still  more important, will he be as loyal and patriotic?���������as willing to accept the subordinate title  of chief of the staff when, in fact, though not in  name, he exercises all the functions of commander?   It is a position fraught with danger.    It  requires a wise king and a general, not only still  wiser,   but so  steeped   in loyalty,   and   in   its  shadow, patriotism, as to willingly sacrifice his  own individuality, and forego'the applause and  the renown  which  success   in  war  ever draws  from even the dullest and least imaginative people.    In this respect I believe Moltke's character  to  be Unique.    How  would   Wellington   have  liked the prince regent to have commanded at  Waterloo, whilst he hid   himself in  the  background, and played the role of Moltke at Sedan?  How would even our great national hero Nelson-  have   relished   the   presence   of   the   duke   of  Clarence as lord high admiral at either the Nile  or Trafalgar.  THE  'KEISE.1jI.IOiV   OF   MINERS.'-IN    TENNESSEE.  The situation of affairs in Tennessee is becoming alarming. It lias but one equal in the history of America, and that was when Carolina  attempted to secede from the United States. It  has been stated officially that the rebellion of  . miuers^so far as estimated, has damaged the  commercial standing of east Tennessee to an  amount of millions of dollars. Two iron companies, one with 50 millions and located at  Bristol, the other with 100-million's and located  at Elizabethtown, have refused to enter the  state, claiming that the state not being able to  protect its own interests, cannot protect the interests of capital. Suspicious communication is  being held between the east Tennessee miners  and the miners of Kentucky, Alabama, and Vir-  gi n ia. The h a rd y m oun tain ers who released th e  convicts have sworn that the governor shall not,  rebuild his stockades, and that if he sends the  convicts back to the Briceville and Coal Creek  mines they will be butchered in cold blood.  Sheriff Rutherford of Anderson county, who  was notified by governor Buchanan that if he  could not sustain order and protect the people  that his resignation would be requested, received  a notice with two death heads with grinning  skulls and bones marked on the paper, and under it this significant message: "Tell your governor that if he sends the convicts back again  we will kill them one by one. We mean business. Tne miners' committee." The law is now  openly defied. There can be nothing but bloodshed if the governor really intends to rebuild  the stockades. Governor Buchanan means business too. He has had 50 new gatling guns and  thousands of small arms purchased. The state  has paid out $16,800 for the capture of the convicts, but the lessees steadily refuse to keep their1  part of the contract.  ffiSSteH^gjgggg^^ ���������^'���������������������������-���������g  ,A vr^^^r-aw*! THE   MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,  NOVEMBEE 21,   1891.  TIMBER   LEASE   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 30, days after date A^e intend  to apply to the chief coininissioner of lands and works for  permission to lease the following described tract of land,  for lumbering purpose:  '���������,. I. Commencing at a squared tree at the mouth of the  stream called East Fork of the Duncan river; tlience east  20 chains; thence south 40 chains; thence east 10 chains;  thence south 60 chains; thence east 10chains; thence south  40 chains; thence east 20 chains, more or less, to the moun-,  tain; thence south along the mountain about 40 chains to  end of the timber; thence west 20 chains, more or less, to  the river; thence north along the river and timber to place  of commencement; containing,560 acres, more or less.  2. Commencing at a post on the east side of the Duncan  river, near mountain, about 2������- miles south from the east  fork, near a small creek called Bear creek; thence south  along the mountain 100 chains, more or less, to end of timber; thence west 20 chains; thence north 10 chains; thence  west 20 chains; thence north 40 chains; thence west 10  chains; thence north 30 chains, more or less, to tlie river;  thence along the river and cast to place of commencement;  containing 260 acres, more or less.  3. Commencing at the mouth of the east fork of the  Duncan river, on the west bank of said river; thenbe south  along the bank of the river about 2 miles to end of the timber; thence north and west along the mountain about 5  miles; thence east to the river 20 chains, more or less;  thence south along the river to place of commencement;,  " containing 1060 acres, more or less.  4. Commencing at a squared tree atfoot of mountain on  east side of Duncan river, about 3^- miles south from the  east fork; thence west 10 chains; thence south 20 chains;  thence west 15 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence cast  20 chains; thence south 10 chains; thence east about 20  chains to the mountain; thence north along the mountain  to the place of commencement; containing 160 acres, more  or less.   . . . ..'������������������ <- ;;       ������������������ "���������"������������������'  5. Commencing at a post on the east side of the Duncan  river, about half a mile above the big flood wood jamb;  thence south about40chains; thence east 30 chains; thence  north 45 or 50 chains; thence west 30 chains; thence south  to place of commencement; containing 130 acres, more or  less/- v    ''.. ' " "; ''-      /���������  6. Commencing at a point three-quarters of one mile up  the Duncan river from the mouth of east fork on east side  of river; thence north and west along said river about 2  miles to end of the timber; thence north about 40 chains  to the mountain ; thence east and south along the mountain about 2 miles; thence west 40 chains, more or less, to  the river and place of commencement; containing 600  acres, more or less.  , JOSHUA   DA VIES   &   W.   P.   SAYWARD.  ,       August 3rd, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief com missioner of lands and works for  the following described tracts of land for lumbering pur-  ���������:��������� -poses: . ��������� -,, ��������� 3 ��������� '.- ��������� .���������-'*'���������  Commencing 20 chains north of a post on the south, side  of Duck creek, on the Kootenay Valley Meadow Land  Company's survey; thence east 20 chains; thence north 50  chains; thence west 30 chains; thence south 10 chains;  thence west 30 chains; thence south 30 chains; thence east  20 chains; thence south 10 chains; thence east 20 chains to  place of commencement; containing 210acres, more or less.  Commencing at a point on edge of the meadow near or  at H. Anderson's S. W. corner; thence east 70 or SO chains;  thence south 60 chains; thence east 10 chains; thence south  30 chains, more or less, to the Kootenay Valley Meadow  Land Company's survey; thence westand north along said  boundary to place of commencement; containing500 acres,  more or less.  Commencing at a post and tree on the trail on the south  side of Duck creek, about 2 miles from its mouth; thence  east 30 chains; thence north 60 chains; thence east 10  chains; thence north 60 chains; thence west 50 or 60 chains,  across the creek to foot of mountain; thence south along  creek and mountain 120 chains; thence east 10 chains, more  or less, to place of commencement; containing about 560  acres. DAVIES-SAYWARD CO.  July 11th, 1891. Per J. C. PL  Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  the following described tracts of land, for lumbering purposes, both situated on Goat river:  1. Commencing at a post near trail on Goat river, north  side, taking in the river north and south 30 chains; thence  east along mountain and river 80 chains; thence north 30  chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south 30 chains, to  place of commencement; containing about 240 acres.  2. Commencing at a post on north side of Goat river,  near the trail, thence east about 80 chains to the "creek;  thence south about 10 chains to side of burnt hill; thence  east 3 miles to the mountains; thence north about 2 miles  to the mountains; thence west and south about 4 miles  along the mountains; thence south about 2 miles to the  place of commencement.  Commencing at a post sections 24 and 25, I. P., township  7, on east boundary of Kootenay Valley Land Company's  survey; thence south 20 chains from said post; thence east  60 chains; thence north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains;  thence north 80 chains; thence west 20 chains; thence  north SO chains, more or less, to the end of the bottom  lands as per map; thence west 10 chains; thence north 40  chains; thence west 20 chains; tlience south 20 chains;  "thence west 50 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence cast  10 or 20 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence west 40  chains to a post on the south bank of Goat river, marked  Section 25; thence south 74 chains and do links along said  section line to place of commencement; containing 2200  acres of land more or less.  Commencing at a post on the south bank of Goat river  on the Kootenay Valley Land Company's survey marked  Section 25; thence south 20 chains; thence west 120 chains  more or less to'meadow lands; thence north 30 chains;  thence west 20 chains; thence north 30 chains; thence east  40 chains; thence north 20 chains more or less to the section  line of 35 and 2 of the Kootenay Valley Land Company's  survey; thence east along the foot of high banks and  boundary of said company's lands 120 chains, more or less,  to a point due north of initial post; thence south 20 chains  to said post at place of commencement.  DAVIES-SAYWARD CO.  Dated July 1st, 1891. __A_J*_t:   Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for per-  mission to lease the following described tract of land for  lumbering purposes:   Beginning at a stake marked G. O.,  B. S. W. corner, which stake is about _- mile northwest  from the head of Slocan lake, thence north 20 chains, thence  west 20 chains, thence north 20 chains,  thence west 20  chains, thence north 20  chains, thence west  20 chains,  thence north 20 chains, thence west 20 chains, thence north  20 chains, thence west 20 chains, thence north 20 chains,  thence west 20 chains, thence north 20 chains, thence west  20 chains, thence north 20 chains, thence west 20 chains,  thence north 80 chains, thence east 40 chains^ thence south  20 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south 20 chains,  thence east 20 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence east  20 chains, thence south 20 chains, thence east 20 chains,  thence south 20 chains, thence east 20 chains, thence south  20 chains, thence ea,st 20 chains, thence south 20 chains,  thence east 20 chains, thence south 20 chains, thence east  20 chains, thence south 20 chains, thence east 20 chains,  thence south 40 chains, thence west 60 chains to the place  of commencement; containing 1760 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 31st, 1891. G.'Q. BUCHANAN.  LAND   NOTICES;  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief enmmissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following tract of land: Commencing at a stake marked A. McG. S. W. about half  a mile south of Carpenter creek oh Slocan lake, thence  80 chains, north following the meanderings of the lake,  thence 40 chains east,, thence SO chains south, thence  40 chains west to point of commencement; containing 320  acres more or less. ANGUS McGILLIVRAY.  Ainsworth, B.'��������� C., October 17th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described land in  West'Kootenay district: Commencing at a post at the  southeast corner of lot 209, group 1, West Kootenay, thence  west 60 chains; thence south 80chains, thence east60 chains,  more or less, to shore of Kootenay lake, thence following  high-water mark in a northernly direction to initial post;  containing 480 acres, more or less.  KASLO-KOOTENAY LAND CO.  Kaslo City, November 5th, 1891.   Per G. T. Kane.   Notice is hereby given that 60 daj7s after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Situate at the junction of Sandon and Carpenter  creeks (the latter a tributary of Seaton creek, which flows  into the east side of Slocan lake). Commencing at a post  near the right bank of Sandon creek, thence west 40 chains,  thence north "40 chains, (crossing Carpenter creek) thence  east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  BRUCE WHITE,  Nelson, November 9th, 1891. JOHN SANDON.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post placed upon the shore at the  head of Slocan lake, marked H.A., S. E. corner, thence  running north 20 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence  south 40 chains, thence east to shore of lake and following  meanderings of shore to point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less. , E.C.ARTHUR.  Nelson, October 31st, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post placed upon the east shore of  Slocan lake, near Carpenter creek, marked A. H., S. W.  corner, thence running north 80 chains, thence east 20  chains, thence south 80 chains more or less to lake shore,  thence west following meanderings of the shore to point of  commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 30th,,1891. WILSON HILL.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake placed near the outlet of  Slocan lake, marked H. & A., S. W. corner, thence running  east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence east 20 chains,  thence north 80 chains, thence west 60 chains more or less  to shore of lake, thence south following the meanderings of  shore to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  more or less. ALFRED HILL.  Nelson, October 28th, 1891.     '  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake marked A. L. McLean's N.  W. post, situate on the Slocan river about 2 miles from the  Slocan lake, thence running south 80 chains, thence east 40  chains, thence north 80 chains, thence west 40 chains to  point of commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, November 1st, 1891. A. L. McLEAN.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake marked James Dawson's N.  W. post, situate on the Slocan river about one mile from  the Slocan lake, thence running south 80 chains, thence  east 40 chains, thence north SO chains, thence west 40  chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  more or less. JAMES DAWSON.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891.   Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake marked H.-H. Ward's N.  ' W. post, about 3 miles from Slocan lake, on Slocan river,  running east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence west  to the river bank, thence following river bank to point of  commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.  HARRY H.  WARD.  _ii_ilsi__-j Qpto]!? _23rd, 1891.   Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post on east bank of Slocan river,  about 3 miles from Slocan lake, marked R. E. L., S. W.  post, thence north 80 chains along the shore of Slocan river,  thence east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence west  40 chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  more or less. R. E. LEMON.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891. __________  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at,..a stake marked A. C. Dick N. W.  post, on Slocan river, about one-half mile from Slocan lake,  running east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence west  40 chains, more or less, to river bank, thence following  river bank to point of commencement, containing 160 acres  more or less. ARTHUR C.  DICK.  Nelson, October 21th, 1891.       '.���������_������������������   , .: . .'.   .,-��������� . -.-.;/, ,   ��������� ���������    ��������� ���������  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked James Delariey and  Thomas MV Ward's S.-W. post, about one-half mile from  Slocan lake,running east. 40 chains, thence north 40 chains  more or less to the shore of the lake, thence in a westerly  direction following the lake shore to the source of the  Slocan river, thence following the bank of the river in a  southerly direction to the point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less. JAMES DELANEY,  Nelson, October 24th, 1891. THOMAS M. WARD.  Notice is hereby given that 00 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following tract of land: Commencing at a stake marked T. J. Roadley's S.VV. post, on  Slocan riv-r, about three miles,from its source, running  east 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, tthence West 40  chains, more or less to river bank, thence "following river  bank to point of commencement; containing 160 acres  more or less. T. J. ROADLEY.  Nelson, October 23rd, 1891. :.,'     :        ., ....     ... ''���������   ��������� ���������  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to ���������purchase} the following tract of land situate  in West Kootenay district: Commencing at a post marked .  "J E S" and "SE" about one mile north from the head of  Crawford Bay and one-half mile;east of the large creek  that empties into said bay, thence north 80 chains, thence  west 40 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence east 40 chain-  to initial post; containing 320 acres more or less.  Balfour, B. C, October 13th, 1891. J.-E. STARK.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  make application to the chief commissioner of lands and  works for permission to purchase the following described  tract of land, situate in West Kootenay district and described as follows: Commencing at a post marked J. K's  N. E. corner, 20 chains north of the center of the forks of  Kaslo creek, thence west 40 chains, thence south 40 chains,  thence east 40 chains, thence north to the point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.        <  ,  JOHN KEEN.  Kaslo City, Kootenay Lake, B. C, October 1st, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 00 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked "SL S W," being on  the eastern boundary of J. W. Cockle's preemption and  situate on the northern shore of Crawford bay, Kootenay  lake, thence east along,Jake shore 20 chains, thence north  80 chains, thence west 20 chains, thence south 80 chains to  place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  W..P. SLOAN,  Balfour, B. C, October 13th, 1891.     GEORGE LAIRD.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described land, situate  on Seaton creek, about 10 miles cast from Slocan lake:  Commencing at a post on the right bank of said creek  at the mouth of Carbonate gulch, thence north 40 chains,  thence east 80 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence west  following down the bank of said creek to place of commencement; containing 320 acresi  w. f. Mcculloch,  THOMAS McGOVERN,  Slocan, October 6th, 1891.       CHARLES CHAMBERS.  APPLICATION   FOR   WATER   RIGHT.  Notice is hereby given that 30 clays after date we intend  to apply to the assistant commissioner of lands and works  for West Kootenay district for permission to divert for 99  years 10,000 inches of water from Kaslo river at a point  about 2 miles from its mouth, thence following the natural  grade of north and south bank or adjoining benches or  bench easterly to Kaslo City, thence across said city in  such directions as may be required for the use. of inhabitants of said city for domestic, agricultural, manufacturing, fire protection, and all other purposes for which water  is generally used by a community.  KASLO-KOOTENAY LAND CO.  Kaslo City, November 5th, 1891.        .    '  ��������� _____  ~~ NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that application will be made at  the next session of the legislative assembly of the province  of British Columbia for liberty to construct, equip, maintain, and operate a line of railway from some point on  Kootenay lake by way of Kaslo or other pass up tlie North  Fork of Kaslo creek to some point at or near the summit  between Kootenay and Slocan lakes, or the vicinity of the  recently discovered mines in that section, with powers of  extending said railway in any direction as may hereafter  be deemed requisite for the transportation of ores and  other products, with powers of building and operating  branch lines from said railway lo such mines as may now  be or hereafter be discovered in the vicinity of said railway.  WILSON, WOOTTON & BARNARD,  Victoria, October20th, 1891.     Solicitors for applicants.  NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that I am the owner of an undi  vided one-sixth interest in the mineral claims Washington  and I C, situate in the Slocan district and recorded at Nelson in the names of William Lynch and M. Kinney. All  persons are hereby warned against purchasing the interest  in said claims recorded in the name of M. Kinney, pending  litigation. W.E.MURRAY.  Ainsworth, B. C, October 17th, 1891. ; Ii r  THE   MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,  NOVEMBEE  21,   1891.  A    I50TTEV   LOT    OF  --PI.'oVlN���������I.4.L '''OFFICIALS.  J''  i/j.  The unexpected frankness -..of irir. Pacaud in  the witness box gave the  investigation  before  the Quebec commission'-.'quite a dramatic turn.  In the coolness and apparent absence of regret  or shame witli which he gave his testimony, this  witness reminds us of Murphy before the committee on privileges and elections.    In  fluency  and apparent straightforwardness, however, the  Frenchman appears to have greatly the advantage of his Irish compeer.    His lucidity of style  and the documentary evidence with Which his  ���������"narrative' was accompanied,  go far to  convey  the idea  that he was  telling the truth, at least  so far as his own  share of the transactions is  Concerned.   And that share was a. truly remarkable one.    Here is a man with no official position  whatever in the.government or in connection "with' it, who sways the government at his  will.    His control of the premier seems to have  been   even  more absolute than that exercised  oyer sir Hector Larigevin by Thomas McGreevy.  And the fact is so well understood that contractors  haying  or  wishing to  have access to  mr.  Mercier on business with the government, practically recognize the fact that it is useless to attempt to approach him save through this inter-  mediary.    Think, too, of the sublime assurance  of this man  when he refuses the paltrv fee of  $75,000,  and insists on one of  $100,000" for his  services  as  a mere  go-between  in  an   alleged  business transaction which could scarcely have  consumed more than a few hours, or at most  days,   of  his  valuable  time.    But   neither   the  power nor the rascality of Pacaud are matters  of   doubt.    Nor   are   they,   in   themselves,   of  more  than  secondary   importance.    The   main  interest     in     his    remarkable    story     centers  around   its   connection   with   the    premier   of  Quebec and his cabinet,  though  it is   exceedingly-unfortunate,   to  say   the   least,   for  mr.  Laurier, the leader of the Dqminiou Opposition,  that he should have made such a selection of his  newspaper editor and confidential agent.    But  how about.mr. Mercier?    The aim of the witness was,   evidently to  save  his  leader  at  his  own expense.    Pacaud declared that neither mr.  Mercier nor the members of his cabinet knew  anything about his (Pacaud's) relations with mr.  Armstrong.    But they could  hardly have supposed the former so  disinterested  as to  have  taken so much trouble for the latter without fee  or reward.    Moreover, mr. Mercier can hardly  have been so ignorant to his friend's personal  history and the circumstances as  not to  have  had cause for wonder, in the absence of knowledge,   at   his almost   unlimited   command   of  money.    As a matter of fact, mr. Langelier is  already so implicated by his acceptance of a part  of the booty that no way of escape is apparent,  and he will, there is little doubt, follow the example of sir. Hector Langevin and resign;    As  to mr. Mercier himself the impartial onlooker  will feel constrained to conclude, just as in the  case of sir Hector, that the theory that he was  without knowledge, or a suspicion so strong as  to be practically equivalent to a guilty knowledge of the fact, is inconceivable and so, inadmissible.    In  any case  it is  evident   that  the  Quebec   treasury,   under   his   supervision,   was  robbed of   at  least  $100,000  in   this  particular  transaction,   which should have been saved by  the vigilance of the premier and his ministers,  and no plea of myopia or imbecility can avail to  free them from responsibility for such a loss to  the   public   revenues,  especially a   loss which  accrued in equivalent gain to themselves, personally or politically.  Facts  AJMHit British  CoIiubiMji's ���������iii������ate.  British Columbia  is another country which  shows a  very remarkable  variety  of  climate,  apart,'even from its differences in altitude.    At  the experimental farm at Agassiz, which fairly  represents the coast climate of the lower Fraser,  the summer is that of the south or middle of  England���������and the summer is a good long one of  about 200 days between the last killing frost of  spring and the first frost of autumn. Ninety  miles further up the Thompson river we have a  summer a little cooler than that of Cincinnati,  and warmer than the summer of Los Angeles in  southern California. The excess over Agassiz  in July is 14 or 15 degrees. The ordinary winter  is not too severe for the peach and vine. Further  up the river, in Kamloops, the weather is a little  colder, but still the peach is grown;    The very  small rainfall is a drawback in the Thompson  valley,  still  irrigation  is  managed along that  river at a cost often riot exceeding1 $2 per acre.  Southern  California,   famous for its  great resources in fruits, entirely depends on irrigation.  Of the  Okanagon   valley   we know  too  little.  There are few records of climatic observations,  and very little is known of its capability for various .."agricultural productions, except from the  inadequate reports of" travelers and recent settlers.    We can guess somewhat of the nature of  its climate from the fact that its level above the  sea  is  not  higher than Guelph, Ontario.    The  Arrow   Lake   and   Kootenay  valleys   are   but  slightly higher.    The  Okanagon   valley has   a  breadth of arable land of 26 miles in some places.  Its  climate  varies exceedingly.    Into one part  of the valley, probably sufficient of the moisture  of the Pacific penetrates to allow farming to be  carried, on without' irrigation, while other parts  are largely excluded by intervening mountains  from its rainfall.    One part, owing to local topography,  may  escape  very severe  extremes  of  cold in winter, while other parts, owing to the  neighborhood of wide plateaus in the direction  of the cold winds, may have short periods  of  cold almost as severe as those of the Northwest  Territories.    There is some reason to hope that  some parts of that valley will'be found capable  of   growing   the   peach   arid   the   vine.     How  far   fruit   culture   can    be    carried    eastward  from   the   coast, we  do  not   know, but   there  are   the   means   of   ascertaining   in   the   consideration of  topographical  conditions as well  as  in  the   investigation   of   perhaps   30   or 40  records, taken at different times, to enable us to  arrive at valuable, andpf ten accttrate, determinations  as to   the   climatic  capacity  of   inland  British Columbia.    Were the climate of the inland part of British Columbia south of the line  of the Canadian Pacific railway studied, the evidence afforded of agricultural capacity would be  a revelation  to the people of eastern Canada.  Besides its valleys; very much of tliis region is  under an elevation, of 1600 feet���������the height of  northern Grey,: in western Ontario-���������ancl^there  are further large areas which do not reach up to  2000 feet.    In triany places, esped'alty where irrigation is practicable, we could hope for more or  less  profitable agriculture,   and  we  could certainly hope for a great deal from fruit culture.  A Father's Opinion-of his  Son.  In view of mr. Gladstone's subsequent career  as a politician and statesman���������a career which  has become not only of national, but of worldwide importance���������-the following is worth publishing. Towards the end of 1832, the year after  Gladstone had taken his degree at Oxford, and  when he was about to be brought forward as  member for Newark by the then high Tory duke  of Newcastle, his father, John Gladstone (afterwards sir John), was dining at the house of mr.  Bolton, the great Liverpool merchant, poet  ^vVadsworth being one of the company. After  dim: tt mr.A'Vads worth took occasion to congratulate nir. Gladstone on the remarkable success of his son William at Oxford, and added an  expression of hope and anticipation that he  would be equally successful in the houseof commons. To which the father replied: "Yes, sir,  I thank: you. My son has certainly distinguished  himself greatly at the university, and I trust he  will continue to do so when he enters public life,  for there is no doubt he is a man of great  ability; but," he added, "he has no stability."  Women  Hide  Secrets Better Than Men.  Ella Wheeler Wilcox savs it is the mistake of  a lifetime to give a man any liberty which you  would not want known, and expect him to keep  the matter a secret. The exceptional man will  sometimes hide the indiscretion of a young girl  whom he believes spoke or acted from ignorance; but the average man, in the highest the  same as the lowest walks of life, boasts of his  successes with foolish women, and the rendezvous, the letter, the embrace, or the souvenir  which she has given him, thinking it will never  be known to others than themselves, is shortly  the matter of gossip among a dozen people.  Women hide their secrets far better than men  do. They fear the censure of the world too  much to share their errors or indiscretions with  confidents. But men are almost invariably vain  and proud of their conquests, and relate their  achievements with the fair sex to one or two ad  miring friends. They may not use names, but  let the incidents once be told, it is an easy matter to discover the personages, if one is at all  curious to do so. The only way to keep men  from betraying our indiscretions is not to commit them. ���������'.���������-��������� .���������'������������������������������������:-'  LAND   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the folio wing described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked A; J.' W., S. E. corner, on the north shore Kaslo hay, Kootenay lake, B. C,  thence running west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains,  thence east GO chains more or less to lake shore, thence  following lake, shore to initial post; containing 200 acres  - more or-less. A. J. WHALEN.  . Ainsworth, B.C., Noyemher 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 00 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of,lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake on west bank of Slocan  river, about 2,milcs from Slocan lake and marked F. & C,  'N... E. corner, thence running west 40 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence east 40 chains more or less to the river,  thence following the meanderings,of the river to point of  commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891. M. M.* FRY.  *-��������� Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commiskmer of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land:   Commencing���������:at, a stake on west bank of Slocan  , river, about 3 miles from Slocan lake and marked F. &,C.,,..  , N.E. corner, thence running west 40 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence east 40 chains more or less to the river,  thence following the meanderings of river to the point of  commencement; containing 320 acres more or less. ^  Nelson, October 24th, 1891. A D. OOFLEN.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the. chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to lease for cutting timber the following described land : Beginning at a post marked ''southeast cor-.  her of G. B. Wright's.timber lease," near the trail recently  built up Schroder creek, said post being about Smiles from  the mouth of Schroder creek, thence running west along  said Schroder creek 160 chains, thence north 80 chains,  thence east toward Kootenay lake 160 chains, thence south .  to place of commencement; containing 1200 acres, more or  less. aB. WRIGHT,  Ainsworth, October 22nd, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that we intend to apply to the  chief commissioner of lands and works to purchase 320  acres, more or less, of land in the district of West Kootenay,  commencing at a post placed on-the east shore of Slocan  lake about 40 chains south from the.mouth of Seaton creek:  thence west along the lake shore 40 chains; thence north  along the lake shore 80 chains; thence east 40 chains, more  or less, to a point 80 chains due north from the point of commencement. J.FLETCHER,  Nelson, October 21st, 1891. ���������   A. S. FAR WELL.  NOTICE.  A court of re vision and appeal under the Assessment Act-  will be held at the government office, Nelson, on Thursday,  December 10th, at 10 A. M. N. FITZSTUBBS,  Chairman court of revision and appeal.  Nelson, November 13th, 1891.  , NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that I have applied the chief commissioner for a special license to cut timber on 640 acres of  crown'lands, situate and bounded as follows: From my  N. W. post near the eastern shore of Kootenay lake, about  a mile south of Campbell creek (which creek is about 12  miles north of Hendryx camp) south 80 chains; thence east  80 chains; thence north SO chains; thence west 80 chains to  starting point. DENNIS CAIN.  Nelson, B.C., 12th November, 1891.  APPLICATION   FOR   CROWN   GRANT.  Notice is hereby given that John Robertson, as agent for  Ephriam Dempsie, has filed the necessary papers and made  application for a crown grant in favor of the mineral claim  known as the Sunrise;situated on Toad mountain, West  Kootenav district. Adverse claiman ts, if any, will forward  their objections within GO days from date of publication.  N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, B. C, October 3rd, 1891.  ������������������     NOTICE.    ������������������������������������  A lis pendens has been recorded against the mineral  claims "Chambers," "Monarch," and "Mattie B," in the  Slocan country, upon a suit in the county court, by the undersigned, to have it declared that Charlie Chambers has  only one-fourth undivided interest in these claims.  Y THOMAS SHKARER,  EDWARD BECKEII.  Nelson, November 5th, 1891.        CHARLES F. KENT.   DISSOLUTION   OF   PARTNERSHIP.  The firm of Hamber, Thynne & Henshaw of Vancouver  and Nelson has been dissolved by mutual consent. Mr.  Hamber will continue the Nelson business and messrs.  Thynne and Henshaw the Vancouver business, each taking  over the respective assets and liabilities of the oflices as  above mentioned.  Nelson, B. C., November 10th, 1891.    NOTICE   TO   CONTRACTORS.  Sealed tenders will be received by the undersigned up to  noon of Friday, 4th December, 1891, for the construction of  a wharf at Nelson. Plans and specifications can be seen  at the engineer's office, Tolso^bli4^rUBBS>  Assistant commissioner of lands and works.  Nelson, B. C, November 12th, 1891. 8  THE MINEE:    NELSON,  B.  0... SATUEDAY,  NOVEMBEE 21, 1891  and compare Prices.  ��������� ���������   ' ' ' '' :..''���������':'.'',,���������-;,'^i-...".   ,;;.".-':'--'-''.. ., ,    ���������..;..������������������,.,.���������..:��������� .,-"���������:-, ,-3  ���������=',���������.-,,..���������:'���������,-���������  ==_=_^__^ajid^        Yernon Street, NELSON.  Street,  ;.'   SMALI,.' NVGGET8   OF   NEWS.  As per notice in" last week's Miner, the following gentlemen met in Lemon's hall on Tuesday evening to  talk  over the project of a debating society:   Messrs. Mo watt,  Bogle,   Mills,   Ellis,   Hanson,   Johnson,   Lemon, Arthur,  Buchanan, and Turner. It was decided to name the society  the Nelson Debating Union, the gentlemen present to be  charter members, and all wishing to join later to be admitted upon proposition and ballot.   A meeting for the adoption of rules will be held on Monday evening (23rd), and  a meeting on Thursday evening (26th), at half past 7, for  the discussion of the following question:   "Shall British  Columbia have a representative exhibit at the Chicago exposition separate and distinct from that of the Dominion."  Mr. Lemon has placed the room furnished, lighted, and  heated at the disposal of the society for weekly meetings  throughout the winter free of charge.  LAND   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district:   Commencing at  a post marked G.M.L., S.E. corner, about 2 miles from  Kootenay lake on Kaslo creek, thence running north 40  chains,  thence west  40  chains,, thence south 40 chains,  thence east 40chains to place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less, u G. M. LINDSAY.  Nelson, November 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land in West Kootenay district: Commencing on the west  shore of Kootenay lake, at H. Anderson's northeast corner,  thence west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence east to  the lake shore, thence following said lake shore southerly  to initial point; containing 160 acres more or less.  JOSHUA DA VIES.  Kootenay Lake, B. C., October 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the   following described tract of  land in West  Kootenay  district:    Commencing at the  northeast corner of Joshua Davies's purchase on the west  shore of Kootenay lake, near the mouth of Fletcher creek,  thence west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence east  to the lake shore, thence following said shore southerly to  initial point; containing 160 acres more or less.  WILBUR A. HENDRYX.  Kootenay Lake, B.C, October 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked A. M. Wilson's N.  W. corner, placed on the east shore of Slocan lake about  200 yards north of a large creek which flows into the lake  about 3 miles north of what is known as Carpenter creek,  thence east 40 chains,  thence south  to the lake shore,  thence following the meanderings of (the lake shore in* a  westerly and northerly direction to the point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less. ������  Ainsworth, November 2nd, 1891.            A. M. WILSON.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  perriiission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked G.B.W.,S. W.  corner post, situate about 20 chains north of the southeast  corner of Angus McGillivray's land, about one-half mile  east of Slocan lake and about 10 chains south of Carpenter  creek, thence east 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence  west 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to the place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  Ainsworth, October 31st, 1891. G. B. WRIGHT.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I Intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  fiermission to purchase the following described tract of  and in West Kootenay district: Commencing at a post  on the west shore of Kootenay lake, about one-half mile  south of Fletcher creek, thence west 40 chains more or less,  thence south 40 chains* thence east to the lake shore, thence  following the lake shore to the initial point; containing 160  acres more or less. H. ANDERSON.  PRIVATE   BILL   NOTICES*  Notice is hereby given that application will be made at  the next session of the legislative assembly of the province  of British Columbia for an act to incorporate a company  to construct, equip, maintain, and operate a line Of railway  from some point on Kootenay lake by way of Kaslo or other  pass up the North Fork of Kaslo creek to some point at or  near the summit between Kootenay and Slocan lakes, or  the vicinity of the recently discovered mines in that section,  with powers of extending said railway in any direction as  may hereafter be deemed requisite for the transportation of  ores and other products, with powers of building and operating branch lines from said railway to such mines as may  now be or hereafter be discovered in the vicinity of said  railway. WILSON, W^OOTTON & BARNARD,  Victoria, October 20th, 1891.     Solicitors for applicants.  Notice is hereby given that application will be made to  the legislative assembly of the province of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act to incorporate the  Consumer's Waterworks Company, Limited Liability. The  object of said company is to construct, maintain, equip,  and operate waterworks at the town of Nelson, in West  Kootenay district, and for the purposes thereof granting to  the company the privilege of taking water from the East  Fork of Cottonwood Smith creek, Cottonwood Smith creek,  Ward creek, or either of their forks, with power to the  company to build flumes and acqueducts, lay pipes, erect,  dams, acquire lands, purchase waterworks already in operation, and do all things necessary for the purposes aforesaid. C.D.MASON,  November 16th, 1891.                    Solicitor for applicants.  Notice is hereby given that application will be made to  the legislative assembly of the province of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act for the purpose of con  structing, maintaining, equipping and operating waterworks at the town of Nelson, in West Kootenay district, in  said province, and for the purpose(< thereof, granting to the  company the privilege of taking water from Cottonwood  Smith creek, Wark creek, and other suitable points, with  power to the company to build flumes and acqueducts, lay  pipes, erect dams, acquire lands, and do all things necessary  for the purpose aforesaid. BOD WELL & IRVING,  November 18th, 1891. Solicitors for applicants.  Notice is hereby given that at the next session of the legislature of British Columbia application will be mad e for the  passage of a private bill authorizing the applicants to construct, operate, and maintain tramways, for the purpose of  conveying passengers, freight, and ores from some convenient point near Nelson to any point or points within a radius  of 20 miles from Nelson, also to use so much of the waters  of the Kootenay river as may be necessary for the purpose  of generating electricity to be used either as a motive  power for the said tramways, or to be supplied to consumers as a motive power for hauling, pumping,  lighting,  smelting, drilling, or for any other purposes for which it  may be applied or be required; also to erect, lay, construct,  and maintain all necessary works, buildings, pipes, poles,  wires, appliances, or conveniences necessary or proper for  the generating and transmitting of electricity or power.  BOD WELL & IRVING,  November 12th 1891. ;    Solicitors for applicants.  Notice is hereby given that application will be made to  the legislative assembly of the province of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act to incorporate the  Nelson Electric Light Company, Limited Liability, the object of said company is to construct, mantain, equip, and  operate electric light works at the town of Nelson, in West  Kootenay district, and for the purposes thereof, granting  to the company the privilege of taking water from Cottonwood Smith creek for motive power to operate the works  of the company, with power to the company to erect poles  and string wires in the streets of Nelson, purchase works  already in operation, and do all things necessary for the  purposes aforesaid. CD. MASON,  November 16th, 1891. Solicitor for applicants  NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that I have applied to the chief  commissioner of lands and works for'a special license to  cut timber on 800 acres, or thereabouts, of crown lands,  situate and bounded as follows: From my S. W. post, at  the N. W. post of Dennis Cain's timber claim, on the eastern shore of Kootenay lake, north to Campbell creek,  about 1 mile, thence east 2 milps fnii^���������"-*��������� +������ n  ���������b������"3ISlSE|li������S|  ings of  ���������_,.. ���������_ _,���������_. _-_,._-_, uiicxice suutn $ mile, thence west 1 mile,  thence south about J-of a mile to D. Cain's N. E. corner,  thence west 1 milA tn -fn/pH^o- -..~;-.j- ___-_._  thence west 1 mile to starting point.  Nelson, November 19th, 1891.  J. F. HALEY.  Notice is hereby given that I will not be responsible for  any debts contracted by one George Webber, whether the  debts be contracted in my name or that of Walter & Webber or in his own name. LEOPOLD  WALTER.  Nelson, B.C, November 20th, 1891.  m

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