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The Miner Jan 2, 1892

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 ^���������aE^TKjsaatKawiJtBKrvu  Only Paper  Printed in tlie  Kootenay Xylite Mining 2>istricts,  >T--'  )  A'.',  ^  For Rates _  of Subscription and  'Advertising  See Fourth Pase...  -   , -A  n  ���������������-  W-~\  tt   ���������>    I  12 *"  *2V  -**>  !>'       .S  NUMBEE 80.  NELSON,  BEITISH   COLUMBIA,   SATUEDAY,   JANUAEY   2,  1893^  3  U A YEAE.:  A BRILLIANT MAGAZINE AWU> NEWSPAPER WRITER  In a recent number of Harper's Monthly..-was  a sketch, entitled "Dan Dunn's Outfit," by Julian  Ralph. The "f olio wing is a readable sketch of  mr. Ralph, from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer  of December 22nd:  "Julian Ralph of New York, the well-known  magazine and newspaper writer, arrived at the  Rainier hotel last night, and he will remain in  or near Seattle for a day or two. His trip to  the Pacific northwest will doubtless result in an  article or series of articles on this country. One  of his latest pieces of "-'.writing is a descriptive  sketch of railway building near Nelson, British  Columbia.  "Though mr. Ralph is not yet 40 years old, for  15 years he has been acknowledged by all his  colleagues and contemporaries as the most -accomplished- newspaper reporter in..New York.  This is certainly a ^reat distinction. To gain it  required an immense amount of hard work, and  to maintain it' mr. Ralph is obliged to keep  doing work of a higher order all the time, for it  is unquestionably true that the young-men who  nowadays go into newspaper offices to embrace  journalism as a recognized profession are, as a  rule, better equipped by education for such a  career- than formerly, when it was quite the  usual thing for them 'to gravitate from the  printer's case to the editorial desk. It was in  this old-fashioned way that mr. Ralph was fitted  for the brillian t career he has made, v He washed  rollers in a printing office and set type, and he  has risen through all the ranks to that of editor-  in-chief and proprietor. He is certainly none  the worse for any of these experiences, as each  one has helped ���������tp'-form'''tlie-';m'an--''and;-:-uia)3kft.''h'im.  capable of doing the work which delights the  readers of his articles and excites the admiration of contemporary writers.  "Chester. S. Lord, the shrewd and capable  managing editor of the Sun, has said of Ralph  that he can write on a greater variety of topics  than any other man he has known, and do more  good work at a sitting than 6 average reporters  can write in a dav of 24 hefurs. On at least a  dozen occasions he has written a page or more  of the Sun at one sitting, and in no instance  was the quality of the work sacrificed for quantity. "He only stops writing," said mr. Lord,  "when I tell him we are going to"put the paper  to press and no more matter can be taken. It  takes physique, to do that, and Ralph has both  fat and muscle."  Mr. Ralph has been city editor of the Sun and  also of the World, in the old days when mr.  Hurlbert made that journal a classic among  daily newspapers, but desk work is irksome to  mr. Ralph and he prefers a freer field of labor  than is possible in an executive position. He  has done Albany and Washington correspondence and has edited a paper of his own, Chatter.  This indisposition to be tied down has kept him  from accepting any of various tempting offers  which promised a sure and handsome salary for  his services. As a reporter his success is due to  a great extent to the fact that he gives to whatever he is doing the best that is in him and never  stops his investigations of a subject until he has  an intelligent grasp upon it.  "Then, again, nothing ever bores him. He is  always himself interested, and therefore, when  he writes, he is always interesting. He looks  with his own eyes, and he is such an experienced observer that at a glance he sees all that  is before him, and that, of course, includes a  great deal which the casual or careless spectator  misses entirely. His experiences of life and of  the world have in no particular rubbed off his  freshness, and there is never any indication in  any of his articles that he .was tired of his  subject before he had finished with it. This  characteristic is strengthened by a rule which  always guided him in his literary work. The  rule he applies was taken from mr. Da7ia's advice  to a man who wanted to become, an orator:  'Never talk unless you have something to say,  and never say anything unless you believe what  you are saying.'  CAPITAL (all paid up), $13,000,000  .REST,; :.:.   '' ���������...-'. .'.-.���������   . :���������''���������    ���������:���������''', " ' 6,000,000,'  Sir DONALD A. SMITH,.: ...  Hon.  GEO. A. DRUMMOND,  E. S. CLOUSTON,. v..........'.'.  '.-.;.-'. ... ..President  .......Vice-President  .'.... General Manager  Branches in London (England), New York and Chicago,  and in tlie principal cities in Canada;  ;    Buy and sell sterling exchange and: cable tranfers;   o  Grant commercial and travelersvpredits, available in any  v .':.; part-of tlie-^orld''; ���������������������������;''���������"  Drafts issued; Collections made; Etc.  NELSON BEAMJH, 13 EAST BAKEE STSEET.  %a  Rate of interest at present four per cent.  ��������� (Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862.)  CAPITAL (paid lip), ������000,000    .    $3,000,000  (With power to increase.)  BSESESiYE FIJSiUi,  ������230,000     .    . ,    -1,100,000-  :B~E������^:rsrc:E3::ES =  Victoria, B. C, San Francisco, California,  Vancouver, B. C, Portland, Oregon,  NewWc.stminster,B.C.,   Seattle, Washington,  Nanaimo, B. C, Tacoma, Washington.  , ~, Kamloops, B. C.  HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard street, LONDON, England.  AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS:  CANADA���������Bank of Montreal and branches;  Canadian Bank of Commerce and branches;  Imperial Bank of Canada and branches;  Commercial Bank of Manitoba ; and  Bank of Nova Scotia.  UNITED STATES���������Agents Bank of Montreal, New York;  Bank of Montreal, Chicago.    .  A BSraneli of this BSanlc will he established in tlie  Kootenay -Lake I&istriet (at NELSON, M. ���������.) as soon as  the season opens in the spring of 1S92, and will undertake  collections, remittances (to and from all points), and a general banking business. WM. C. WARD,  Victoria, B. C, December 10th, 1891. Manager.  No. 6 Houston & Ink Building, Nelson, B. C.  (JENEBfcAL  AUENCY  London & Lancashire Life Insurance Company,  A������;E$*!EES Sir Donald A. Smith, chairman.  Accident Insurance Company of North America,  The celebrated Taylor safes (3 on hand for sale).  DKiVLEKS IN  Groceries, Provisions, and  General Merchandise.  A STOCK OF  English Clothing, Men's  Pnrnishings, Dry Goods,  BOOTS.   ETC.  imported direct from the manufacturers, always on hand.  Postoffiec and Telephone in Store.  n  :Mr. Ralph has been a frequent contributor  to all the great magazines, and to this work he  bringsi  those  qualities which  have  made him  pre-eminent as  a  reporter.    His vacations he  spends  in  travel at home or abroad5^.and he,  never - fails  on   these  trips   to  gather   material  of  which  he  makes  delightful  use.    He   is   a-  hunter and a fisherman, and his summer home  at Ashbury park, lS>w  Jersey,   is   hung  with  trophies and mementos of wild game and savage  tribes.    When he began writing on the Graphic  some 17 years ago;he received a salary of $12 a  week; now,; taking oTie year with another, he"  makes $8Q00 a year.    This seems  a large and  gratifying increase,* but had he achieved in any  other profession  a like   degree  of   success   he i  would have an income 3 or 4 times as great."  Intermeddling; Canadian Authorities.  It was impossible not to feel a certain amount  of sympathy -with'.'the Newfoundland government in its indignation in view of the interference" of the Canadian authorities to prevent the  ratification of the treaty which its representative had negotiated at Washington.    It is not in  colonial human nature not to have resented such -  interference.    However necessary it may be, it  is certainly a hardship that, in addition to all  other disabilities incident to the colonial status,  one colony may not enter into a trade arrangement with another country, without becoming  liable to the interference of another colony to  which it is in no way related, save through the  common relation to the mother land.    The fact,  for such it^seems to be, that the treaty in question was, an unfair and undesirable one for Newfoundland to make does not affect this natural  feeling in the. case.    One may claim that he has  a right to make.a bad bargain with a third party  if he pleases, without asking leave of his neighbor, even   though  that  bargain may prove to  that neighbor's disadvantages.    But  there can  be no doubt that in carrying her resentment to  a vindictive and absurd extreme, Newfoundland  has put herself distinctly in the wrong, especially  if in so doing she has, as is alleged, disregarded,  the express condition on which British consent  to the legislation in question was given.    In*enforcing her stringent Bait Act against Canadian  vessels    the    Newfoundland    government   has  played a  part unworthy  of a British  colony.  We are glad to learn from a late telegram that  the British government has taken action in the  matter  and   has  notified   the.   govermnent   of  Newfoundland  that its action   in   seeking   to  enforce against Canadian vessels the provisions  of   the   Bait   Act   is   ultra   vires   of   the   act.  The  cable 'message  from   London   which  conveyed this intimation expressed also the desire. .  of the home government that the government  of the Dominion and of Newfoundland should  join in carrying before the imperial privy council the question of Newfoundland's claim to enforce discriminatory regulations against Canadian trade and Canadian commercial interests.  This will be  far better for all  concerned as a  means of settling the question than the retaliatory course into which the Canadian government  would soon have been forced by the rising exasperation in the maritime provinces.    Such retaliation, whether effective or otherwise, would  have left behind it seeds of mutual ill-will which  might have borne bitter fruits for years to come.  A decision by the privy council might be. and  probably   would  be,   accepted   by   both  parties  without loss of dignity by either.  IBank of Montreal Iteady for Kusiness.  Canada's greatest bank has opened a branch  at Nelson, with A. H. Buchanan as agent,    Mr.  Buchanan came in by way of Little Dalles, and  had rather a hard time making the distance between Robson and Nelson. He came down the  north bank of the river as far as the railroad  bridge, only to find that horses could not be  crossed there, and had to take the back track to  Ward's crossing. The temporary quarters of  the bank will be in the office formerly occupied  by H. Selous on East Baker street.  mmemmmsmmmmmmmMmS^^^^^Mm^^^^^^^^MiT  ^ncw-d THE   MINEE:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUEDAY,   JTAEUABY  2,   1892.  THE    OLSf   PItOSPECTOlC.  -~   The old California ^prospector, the veteran of  the prospecting race, stiTT^Hags superfluous on  _ the stage," writes Dan D'Quill of the Virginia  (Nevada)  Enterprise.    He is the hoary-headed  father of all the present  tribe of hunters after  the precious metals.    There is now little in this  line to be found, for, true to his first love, visions  of the rich gold placers still haunt his mind. He  has never recovered from the "days of '49."   He  was then thoroughly inoculated with the golden  microbe of  the placer and its virus is still in  every drop of his  blood.    In the "days of '49"  he was in his prime. Then no toil could exhaust  and no danger intimidate hi in. He rejoiced in  the very wildness of the mountains���������in the great  forest, the dark canyon and the thundering  Waterfall. The desire of his heart was to penetrate wilds virgin to civilized eyes. It was in  such places he pictured gold-paved lakes and  gold-ribbed mountains. Neither the whoop of  the savage Indian warrior nor the growl of the  fierce grizzly monarch of the mountains could  turn him from his. path; in the glitter of his  golden' visions all dangers were obscured���������became mere shadows.  The prospectors of those old days were merely  sea.rchers after the secret hoards of nature. For  untold ages before the foot of the first white  man pressed the soil of California, Dame Nature  had been playing miner in all the mountains oi'  ' that country. Countless millions of tons of,  auriferous gravel and earth had been sluiced  down through every gulch, canyon, creek, and  river that crossed either the channels of the old  dead rivers or veins ��������� of gold-bearing quartz.  Thus the golden accumulations of ages strewed  the rocky channels of the streams and filled to  overflowing all their holes and crevices. The  first comers found little to do but to help themselves to the gold vvhich the rnihing process of  ' nature had stored up.  However, in a few years these heaped hoards  of nature were exhausted,/but this fact the genuine old-time prospector cannot be brought to  believe even to this day. All cannot be gone;  he will not hear that said. He still believes that  somewhere a great hoard of golden nuggets is  reserved for his special benefit. Having feasted  from the the golden flesh pots of the old days,  he cannot content himself with the hermit fare  of these frugal times. If there is nowhere still a  golden treasure to be unearthed, then his occupation is gone���������he is ready to lie down and die.  It-is in the hope of finding this secret hoard that  he lives and wanders.  In California the ancient prospector has a  modern successor who gives more time to  searching for gold-bearing quartz than to hunting for placers. He is a cabin-dwelling animal;  has something of the instinct of the her in it crab.  He takes possession of any cabin he finds vacant  and from it as a. base of operations scouts the  country for miles in all directions, carefully  working over every rod of grouud. If he finds  nothing he looks for another vacant cabin some  miles away, moves into it and begins the exploration of a new region.  The genuine old time prospector does not settle  down. He is always moving along i n some direction���������is a veritabie Wandering Jew. He may  halt for a few days in some ancient came, and  do a little panning and ere vicing to put a few  dimes in his pocket, but dreams of gold urge  him on. Again he is seen toiling over the hot  and steep mountain trails toward some camp  known to him in the old golden days, which  seem to him as but yesterday. In mind and  heart he is still young. He has grown old and  feeble in body without realizing the fact. This  is probably because his plans for marrying and  settling down" in life were all dropped at the  time he left kith and kin to become a gold  hunter, and he has never since taken them up,  he has come to think that his growth of years  and all else pertaining to him as a social being  stopped-to await his finding the golden hoard  always seen as a sort of will-o'-the-wisp dancing  along just a little before him.  The old prospector will creep along mountain  trails for days in order to take another look at  the ground about the head of some gulch which  he knows to have been very rich when it was  worked in the olden times. He thinks that at  last he shall be able to solve the problem of  whence came the gold found in the gulch.    He  will lind at the head of the gulch the continuation of the golden gravel in the side of some  hill or mountain. But when he reaches the old  camp he will find everything torn to pieces and  turned upside down. He will not be able to distinguish his ravine. Then he will say the Chinese have been there before him and he will heartily curse them. The Chinese are the plague of  his life. Oil his death-bed he will say he failed  to find the golden hoard for which tie sought  because it was discovered and stolen by the  provvling Chinese.  In the old golden days our ancient prospector  scoured the mountains, mounted on a splendid  and powerful mule; later he was contented with  a burro, but now increase of poverty has' rendered him independent of even the slight incumbrance of a donkey. The old prospector is no  new-found friend of mine. I have known him  for years and years, and have encountered him  alinost every where; on the Pacific coast. He is  alwaysthe same where ver seen. He bears upon  his back the same roll of well-worn blue  blankets; the same old slouched hat shelters his  gray, straggling blocks: the same no-colored  woolen shirt does duty as hoth coat and vest,  and the same old greasy leathern belt still serves  to carry his venerable' Colt's six-shooter and to  prevent his baggy canvas pantaloons from subsiding wholly into the tops of his huge boots,;  Where about one-third of the length of the legs  have already taken up quarters. ^  The old prospector does not like large towns  and seldom visits them. In large places outside  of the mining regions he is looked upon as a  curiosity. He attracts a crowd and is stared at  as the representative of an almost extinct"race,  one of a type soon to be classed with the masto^-  don and the dodo. He keeps to the mountain  camps. A town, according to his ideas, is only  of use as a place in which to obtain supplies. If  the place contains one or two saloons, as many  provision stores and a blacksmith shop, it is as  large as he would have it.  After he has found a saloon that suits  him.  has  deposited  his  roll  of   blankets   and  other  "traps" in a corner, taken his "tod," as he calls  it, and seated himself for a "'whit" of his pipe,  the  old  prospector   is  in  a humor to   be   approached.    He may then be drawn out and will  even become quite garrulous.    Still you must be  quite  careful  in   your advances.    He does not  like a loud-talking man.    He has been subdued  by the silence of the mountains, and his voice  attuned to the murmur of the lone brooks along  which  he  wanders.    He never talks so loudly  himself as to be overheard in. a mixed company;  his  voice has a muffled, monotonous flow of a  gentle -mountain  stream.    No longer ago than  yesterday I  again  encountered the "old pros-'  pec tor."    He   had   found   his  saloon   and   was  snugly settled for a rest.    I took a seat beside  him and greeted him as an old friend.    He did  not seem   in   the  least surprised.     He  is .well  aware  that  he  is  known to thousands on the  Pacific coast whose names, faces, and places of  residence he cannot recall.    The old man at once  began to talk about Downieville, no doubt thinking he had seen me at that once famous California camp.  "I was back in Downieville three years ago,"  said he. "I went up there from Sonora to take  another look at the old 'BlueBanks.' I thought  there might be a back channel there. I believe  I once explained to. you my theory of aback  channel of the Blue Banks. Downieville was a  wonderful camp when I first saw the place.  Lord,-the gold they used to take out thereon  Zumalt Flat, Jersey Flat and all about there on  the Yuba. Why, right in town was what they  called the 'Tin-cup Diggins,' because every night  they used a tin cup to measure and divide the  gold taken out during the day. I only stopped  three or four days at Downieville. No chance  at the Blue Banks; blamed Chinamen there. I  w^ent up the North fork to the mouth of Sailor  ravine and looked at the place where they got  the forty-pound nugget in the early days; looked  about Slug canyon a bit, then shouldered my  blankets and struck out up the South fork of  the Yuba toward Charcoal Flat and Sierra City.  Blamed Chinamen all the way along up the  river! Then I crossed over by Milton to the  Middle Yuba and on down that way; blamed  Chinamen everywhere!  "Beer! Thank you, a drop wouldn't go bad  just now," said the old man, knocking the ashes  out of his pipe and refilling it.  "Well, do you know," resumed the old prospector, after a whiff or two at his pipe, "about  two mouths ago I was again back on the South  Yuba at the old town of Washington. Yes, and  being there I thought I'd go up to Phelps' Hill,  where I mined 30 years ago, and where I took  out ther only pile of money I ever made in the  country.  "Well, I climbed the mountain straight up  from the river���������awful big and steep '/to, what it  used to be!���������and at last reached the site of the  old mines. All was silent and deserted; not  even the crum bling ruins of a building remained;  not a living soul was in sight:. 1 hardly knew  where the town had stood. Hills and. trees had  been swept away, and great stone piles, overgrown with brush and brambles, .filled their  places. I could no longer locate the spot where  were once my old diggings. I stood on the brink  of a circular pit half a, mile in diameter and  nearly 200 feet in depth, resembling the (.-rater  of an extinct volcano. In that vast stony pit  lay all that remained, of Phelps' Hill. A buzzard that soared above the tops of&the tall pines  encircling that great pit was theonly living  thing in sight. <  "I threw my bundle of blankets oh the ground  at t he foot of an old live oak tree and seated  myself in the shade. Looking clown upon the  chaos of briar-grown stone piles, I sat thinking  of���������of what might have been. Again I counted  oyer all the gold I had dug in the place before  me. If was thousands, but I then thought it  was not enough. Now I am sure that a certain  young girl who was then waiting for me in the  old Buckeye state would have said it was a great  fortune. As I sat and sadly reflected upon the  past, I felt that the loss of the gold was not so  much as the loss of what'might have been.'  "I had just lifted a tear-on3 my cheek, and was  gazing at the drop glistening on the tip of my  forefinger when a slight crackling of brush attracted my attention. Raising my head I saw a  strange apparation peering curiously out at me  through the parted undergrowth. Holding  apart the bushes with both hands stood ah old  man, with straggling iron-gray locks and a long'  flowing beard that was almost snow-white. On  his back he had a roll of blankets and some prospecting tools. His patched canvas pantaloons  were of the color of clay, and the broad brim of  an^old wool hat flapped about his eyes. He  seemed posed as the 'owl in the ivy hush.'  "For some moments the old man stood and  gazed at me, evidently surprised at seeing a  human being in such a lonely spot,.-then timorously advanced toward the tree at the root of  which .I was seated.  " WThen within three paces the old man halted  and solemnly said, 'Stranger, this is a deserted  and desolate looking place.'  '"It is, indeed,'said I.  "'Thirty-three years ago this spot was all,life  and activity.'  ���������"Yes, stranger, it was,' said I 'and I was  here.'  "M also,'said the old man,  'and for years I  have been thinking I would like to seethe old'  camp once more.     Now I wish I had not come;  it makes me sick at heart.'  "'Friend,'said I, 'by what name may I call  you r  "'Edward Hamilton; but in the old days,'  said the old fellow, with a faint smile, 'the boys  always called me Dandy Hamilton.'  '"Why, Dandy!' cried I, jumping up and  grasping the old man's hand, 'Dandy, old pard,  is it possible?'  "Dandy stared at me as though I had been a  ghost come up out of one of the old stone piles.  'And what was you called in those days?'he  presently asked.  "'Slim Jim,' I answered.  '"My God!' cried he, looking at me from head  to foot. 'My God! is it possible? And now so  old and gray!'  '"Ah, Dandy,' returned I, you, too, are old  and gray���������are no longer''the dandy I once knew.'  "'And here,' huskily said my old partner,  'here, impelled by the same curiosity���������perhaps  by the same impecuniosity���������we meet after a  separation of 30 years!'  " 'Yes,' said I, 'hither our old legs have brought  us���������in this desolate spot we meet.'"  "My old partner was gazing down into the  pit where once had stood a town���������vacantly staring down upon the huge stone heaps, upon the  scattered patches of chaparral and upon the  crumbling banks of red clay surrounding the  whole place, forming the rim of the unsightly  sink. He was thinking of what might have  been.    His chin was quivering, and, brushing a  m  m  ML  vummia m miuiniMCuiUHHia'MfcaHJH  JRUtWLUII muwnmwn  vmimmmmmammaia t' msaiwiiMi THE  MINEE:    NELSON,   E.   C,   SATUEDAY,  JANUAEY 2,   1892.  mi  i   j  Nelson Sawmill Co. Ltd.  Yard:   At end of* Flume.  Mill:  Two Miles South ol* Nelson.  Manufacture  The mill litis a capacity of 20,000 feet a day.  Orders will receive prompt attention.  W. N. EOLFE, Secretary.  Offippcs-f Tolson block,  umces\End of Flume.  Telephone 2.  The Kootenay Lake Saw-mill is  always ready for business. Lumber���������good, bad, and indifferent ��������� on  hand or made to order. Telephone  connection with Nelson, Balfour,  and Ainsworth.  G. 0. BUCHANAN.  Nelson, January loth.  awmi  MANUFACTURERS OF  OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.  DPIRIOIE  LIST  (DELIVERED AT NELSON,  AINSWORTH,  OR   BALFOUR).  DRESSED.  No. 1 flooring, 4 inch, per M ;. $32 00  No. 2        "        6 inch,     "      27 00  No. 1 ceiling, 4 inch,       "       32 CO  No. 2        "       6 inch,       "        27 00  Rustic,                                 i:      . .*.  r  27 00  Select clear, DD,             "  40 00  No. 1 common, D,            "       25 00  DD,          "  27 00  Bar and counter tops, clear, per foot  10  KOIMiH.  No. 1 common, per M $20 00  No. 2        " "          15 00  Culls, "     12 00  Shingles, "      4 50  MOLDINGS.  Bead, panel, crown, base, etc., etc., per foot 2������@10c  Mills at Pilot Bay, Kootenay ILaJkc.  S. 0. Spalding,   .   .   .    Manager  JR. F. PERRY, Agent at Nelson.  KBEHNfiR ������& WATSON, Agents at Ainsworth.  tear from his cheek, he said in a low and choking voice:   'Let us go���������let us leave this place.'  "'Yes,'said I, drawing my sleeve across my  eyes���������'yes, let us go.'  "We camped together that night by the river  at the foot of the mountain. In the morning  we shook hands and parted, as 30 years before  we had shaken hands and parted near the same  Spot.'.:.  ���������' '������������������.������������������ .-.        ���������_',  '���������*���������:.'  "When my old 'paid' and I meet again it will  probably be in a better place���������a place floored  with gold and where there will be no more  parting."  " WeJI.1 friend," said I, lifting; my glass, "many  happy days!"  "Yes," said the old prospector, pointing upward, ''many, many happy days���������up there. The  gold of that land is good���������there is bdellium and  the onyx: stone!" ;  A   VANCOUVER.   JLIAR   ABROAD.  Under the heading, "Heard at Hotels," the  Chicago Herald of December 13th prints the  following:  "I have heard of towns springing up in a day, but I be^  lieve British Columbia can show the only instance on record  of a town completely shrinking away in.that spa6e of  time," said B. T. Rogers of Vancouver, British Columbia,  at the Auditorium yesterday. Mr. Rogers is a young man  who left New York 2 years ago, and is now managing the  British Columbia Sugar Refining Company at Vancouver.  "One morning about a month ago a man came into my  office and gave me an order for a carload of sugar to be  shipped to Nelson, a town which had 5000 people when he  left the day before. The sugar was started on the road at  once, and when it arrived at Nelson there was no town  there. All the houses were standing; but the people had  deserted the place and there were not 10 persons left.  Mining excitement had caused the hegira. Nelson was  situated on Arrow lake, which is a broadening of the Kootenay river and is in the the region where the recent great  discovery of silver was made. Nelson was at the south  end of the lake, and on a certain morningthe strike was  made at the north end. Before nightfall the entire population of 5000 had picked up bag and baggage and moved to  the north end of the lake and started a new town under a  new name, which I cannot recall."  The party named in the abo ve article, as giv-  ing such remarkable information j has certainly  demonstrated his ignorance of this country as  well as an unwillingness to tell the truth.    Perhaps these requirements are necessary in order  that he may be competent to fill the position of  manager of a sugar refinery at Vancouver.    In  the first place, Nelson has never had, nor has it  pretended to have, 5000 inhabitants.    Since assuming the name of town���������as far as buildings  are  concerned,  less  than 2 years  ago���������it  has  steadily progressed, and modestly expects to see  the day when it will have 5000 people.    It is not  now, nor has it ever been, situated on Arrow  lake, but is located on the west arm of Kootenay  lake.   Its entire population never picked up bag  and baggage and moved to the north end of the  lake.    There was no strike made in the locality  named   to   justify   such   an   exodus from Nelson, or from any other established town.    The  houses which he describes as standing are still  standing,  and   others  are   being built.    Every  completed house is occupied,  and that too by  enterprising, intelligent, and law-abiding people.  Nelson is in the center of a mineral district, believed to be one of the richest on the American  continent; this, combined with the fact that it  has   unlimited water power within easy reach  and other natural advantages, its residents expect will   make  it   the  Denver of a section of  country half as large as the state of Colorado.  Mr. Rogers  is  evidently much in need  of the  practical wisdom that can best be acquired by  travel, and if he would but   make a few  trips  through the province in which his company expect to do business, he would probably not write  himself down an ass when on trips to the far  east,   where his  company   cannot hope  to  do  business.  Bneonsistent Englishmen.  Verily,   the average  Englishman  is hard  to  please.    When  sir  William  Gordon Cumming  was  charged   with  irregular card   playing   at  Tranby-croft, in the presence of the prince of  Whales, he was practically dismissed from the  army. He was not given even the privilege of  a court-martial. His friends and thousands of  others declared that this at least should have  been granted him. For weeks and weeks the  papers bombarded the war office for its alleged  unfairness. Now lieutenant. Lowry has been  charged out in Rangoon with playing poker not  according to Schenck. Somebody alleged that  Lowry dealt to himself from the middle and  bottom of a pack ol" cards. Lowry was reported  to military headquarters. The duke of Cambridge, having evident regard to the complaints  in the Cumming case, ordered a court-martial,  which is now going on in Rangoon. Presto!  Press and people change. "Ah!" they say, "you  give Lowry a court-martial, while you practically ousted Cumming without giving him a  fair chance to defend himself before his military-  peers.    Now, why is this?"  \v. J. WILSON.  W. PERDUE.  WILSON & PERDUE,  PROPRIETORS OF  .AT.  NELSON AND AINSW0ETH.  Will contract to supply mining companies and steamboats  with fresh meats,, and deliver same at any mine or  landing in the Kootenay Lake country.  CORRAL AND STABLING  t  AT NELSON,  where saddle and pack animals can always be hired, and  teams obtained for job teaming/  During the winter  EXPEESS   PAECELS  AND   LIGHT   FEEIGHT-  will be promptly forwarded to and from  Colville, Trail, Nelson, Balfour, Pilot Bay, and Ainsworth.  NELSON OEFICE AND MARKET,  NO. II EAST BAKER STREET  Telephone 32.  PROPRIETOR OP THE  IF* IO UNTIE IE IR,  RAL and g  Corner ISInil" him! Ward Streets,  NELSON, B. C.  Will undertake any work or contract in which pack-animals or teams can be used.   Will furnish   c  SADDLE AND PACK-ANIMALS  to parties who wish to examine mines and claims  in Toad Mountain district.  WILL CONTRACT TO CAEEY PASSENGEES  and baggage to and from hotels ; also, freight  to and from steamboat wharves and  railway depots.  CONTRACT TO GRADE LOTS IN NELSON.  Stove  and Cord wood for Sale.  The Cheapest Place to Buy Stoves, Tinware, etc.,  and to go for any kind of copper, tin,  and sheet-iron work is  W. KIEKUFS, Houston-Ink Block,  'Ifepss^  \TST-.  ��������� '  ��������� 1 '  r������TV��������� ���������-��������� -���������"  ���������l ,(s"W'.l ,"  .- 1 *  - -H i v  -JT-  CVy^'l-'TMTWTT"*"!.**  VfS. "Ws->  * j Jrr>'  }   't '  iff;  THE  MINEE:    NELSON,   B.  0M   SATUEDAY,  JANUAEY 2,  1892.  h  Iv'i  I  The Miner is-printed on Saturdays, and will be  mailed to subscribers at the following cash-in-advance  rates: Three months $1.50, six months $2.50, one year $1.  Contract Advertisements will be inserted at the  rate of ������3 an inch (down the column) per month. A  special rate'for advertisements of over 2 inches.  Transient Advertisements will be inserted for  15 cents a line for the first insertion and 7 cents a line  for each additional insertion. Twelve lines of 9 words  each make an inch. All advertisements printed for  a less period than 3 months considered transient" and^  must be paid for in advance. Advertisements of less  than 12 lines will be counted as 12 lines.  ,Birth Notices free if weight of child is given; if  weight is not given $1 wiir be charged. Marriage  announcements will be charged from $1 to $10���������according to the social standing of; the bridegroom.  Job Printing in good style at fair rates. Cards,  envelopes, and letter, note, and account papers kept  in stock.  Letters to the Editor will only appear over the  writer's name.   Communications with such signatures  as  "Old Subscriber," "Veritas,"  "Citizen," etc.,  etc.,  f    will not be printed on any consideration.  Address all Letters :  The Miner, Nelson, B. C.  EMTOIUAL   UEMAItKS.  In accordance with a time-honored. custom of  conntry newspapers, The Miner appears this  holiday week with nothing in it.  . P. Teetzel  DEALERS IN  oiaiDSD^diioJ^ijS;,  PATENT vMEDICINES,  TOILET ARTICLES,  ETC.  WHOLESALE    DEALEKS     IN    CIGAJRS.      RAYMOND  SEWING ..MACHINES   IN   STOCK..  Cor. East Baker and Ward Streets.  Telephone 32.  HENRY  &  ADAEVIS,  PIONEER DRUG STORE,  .AINSWORTH,   IS. C.  Drugs and Medicines, Wall Paper, Paints and Oils,  Tobacco and Cigars, Fishing Tackle,  Stationery, etc.  ODELL  &  S  MERCHANT TAILO  NELSON, B. C.  are now settled in their new store, No. 2 Houston & Ink  building, and have on display a full range of  Plain and Pancy Worsted Suitings and Scotch and  Irish Tweeds and Serges.  PEICES TO SUIT TZE3ZIEJ TIMES  Esist Baker Street,  Nelson,  Is one of the best hotels in Toad Mountain district,  and is the headquarters for prospectors and  working miners.  The Tahle is not Surpassed by that of any Hotel  in the Kootenay Lake country-  At the Bar is Dispensed Pine Liquors and Cigars,  and the bed-rooms are newly furnished.  MALONE   &   TKEGILLUS PROPRIETORS  E  DOTY ENGINE COMPANY, LTD.  :    OF 1 TORONTO,   Ol^TABIp.  MArTUPAOTURERS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF MARINE AND STATIONARY  ������  BriSisli ���������������5iiniMa Braiicli :   520 Cordova Street,  Vancouver.  0. P. ST: JOHN, Manager.  Keep in stock a full supply of-engineer and mill supplies, such as pipe and fittings, brass goods, sheet and other  packing/rubber valves, rubber and leather belting, Dodge wood split-pulleys, oils and lubricants, etc.  , Estimates for boilers and engines made on application.   Mail orders receive prompt attention.  HOISTING  ENGINES AND  SINKING  PS FOR  CLC^r  Cor. Baker and Ward Sts.  NELSON, B.C.  H.   &   T.   MADDEN  Proprietors.  The Madden is Centrally Located,  with a frontage cowards Kootenay river, and is newly  furnished throughout.  T S IE      T JL. IB Hi IK!  is supplied with everything in the market, the kitchen  being under the immediate supervision of Hugh  Madden, a caterer of large experience.  THE   BAR   iS   STOCKED  WITH  THE   BEST  brands of beer, ale, wine, whisky, and cigars.  KOOTENAY HOTEL  Vernon Street, near Josephine,  NELSON, B. C.  PROPRIETOR.  THE HOTEL OVERLOOKS THE KOOTENAY  its guests thus obtaining splendid views  of both mountain and river.  THE  ROOMS  are comfortable in size and  newly furnished.  THE  TABLE  is  acknowledged   the best  in the mountains.  m  riH  j  is stocked with the best liquors and cigars procurable.  No whiskies sold except Hiram Walker & Sons'  celebrated brands.  -H:.  Corner West Vernon and Stanley Streets, NELSON, B. C.  Telephone 43.  FIRST-CLASS   IN   EVERY   RESPECT.  The International has a comfortably furnished parlor for  ladies, and the rooms are large and furnished  newly throughout.  THE  TABLE   BS   NOT  SURPASSED  by any hotel in the Kootenay Lake country.  A share of transient trade solicited.  THE SAMPLE-ROOIC IS STOCKED WITH CHOICE CIGARS  AND THE FINEST BRANDS OF LIQUORS.  JAS. DAWSON B. ORADDOCK  PROPRIETORS  "The  Finest Hotel in Toad   Mountain  District."  E SILVER KING  Corner West Baker and Ward Streets,  NELSON, B. C.  JOHNSON   &.   MAHONEY,  PROPRIETORS.  The Silver King is a new building and furnished with new  furniture from kitchen to attic.    The table will not  be equalled by any hotel in Nelson.  Telephone 21.  TRAIL,  B. C.  TOPPING & HANNA  .Proprietors  iioool Table ; Good Beds s  Hyas-���������lose Liquors.       ��������� i i      i i ��������� in        i    r      i    i 1���������i it��������� i i     ���������i���������i~ ���������     i \\        i i i     bl   i    i i    ".l   l       -������������������m^ag  -������������������   urn..       -i i ���������   !��������� i    ���������������������������   li        ii ������������������   ill  ~     i      I   illl I        I T I . .     _' I   r    .    .      . i        ��������� ���������������������  * ���������'  , "������������������ v.i1     "ii.     *   .������-. ->V_���������      ^*    *r> %    .   ��������� .   tf t* -       ���������   ��������������������������� ��������� *"   ��������� ������  ri"       ������      ���������   ������l  ������    f" ^.   .t?r.  ���������    iiv    ?������   .   ���������     i    ���������������������������      ti i  ��������������� .    I*   ���������- ������ C1 i| /���������*���������:���������  THE  MUSTEK:    NELSON,   B.   0.,-SATUEDAY,  JANUAEY 2,   1892.  5  & 1  I  i  w  I  I  if  ���������1,  fe  li���������'"-  li.   i  li   i.  iiH.  1} -  p  ���������Mi  i  ��������� w  B������iS .  1 '  I:  '������>  i/  i  ^  i������i -  w  IJ,  mi"  r-:  r  Wright Street,  WORTH.  Wright Street,  AINSWORTH  i>ds_a.x_,^]i^s insr  Miners' Supplies, Iron and Steel, Hardware, Groceries, Provisions, Boots and Shoes,  Dry G-oods, Clothing, Men's Furnishings, Etc., Etc.  K  ZEsT-   Jb"^_    Having bought the stock and book debts of the.late firm of E. S. WILSON & CO., all parties having  outstanding accounts are requested.to call and settle them as soon as possible.  Telephone 58.  Henry Anderson,   ,  Notary Public.  John L. Retallack.  Anderson & Retallack,  EeM Estate and Mining Brokers,  Conveyancers, Etc. ^  Crown Gran is obtained for Mineral Claims.  Agents for Absentee Claim Owners.  Collections Made.  Correspondence Solici ted.  Office in Townsite office, Sutton street, Ainsworth, B. C.  The Kootenay Smelting and Trading  Syndicate, Limited, of Revelstoke,. B. 0.  are preparedto sample and. purchase  all kinds of  old, Silver, and Lead  AINSWOttTII, It. C.  AND SADDLE HORSES  Contracts taken for hauling supplies, machinery, ore, etc.,  to and from mines in Hot Springs district. ^  ALL   TEAMING   WORK.. UNDERTAKEN.  Agents    for   Bavies- Say ward     Sawmill    Company's'  Ininber,  Moldings,  and   Shingles.  Telephone 90.  Prices and all information furnished on application.  J. CAMPBELL, manager.  Ho! For the Slocan Mines!  The undersigned is prepared to pack supplies for mine  owners, miners, and prospectors  Plasterers and Bricklayers  "Will Contract for all Kinds of Work.  Materials furnished  and estimates given on  application  Agents for the sale of LIME.  Address all communications to Nelson, B. C.  TO THE SLOGAN MINES,  and to the mines on the headwaters and tributaries of  Kaslo arid Schroder creeks. Saddle horses will at all times  he in readiness for travelers hound for the eldorados tributary to Kaslo City. All orders, left at Green Brothers'  stores at Kaslo City and Ainsworth will receive prompt  attention. HUGH McLEOD.  Kaslo City, B. C, December 10th, 1891.  a  B  NOTARY PUBLIC,  AL ESTATE AND  CONVEYANCING  Town lots, lands, and mining claims handled on commission.   Conveyancing documents drawn up.  Correspondence solicited.  Office:   No. 13- East Baker Street, NELSON, B. 0.  C. HAMBER,  (notary public)  Real Estate, Mining Broker,  AND  Insurance Agent,  WEST  1SAICEK  STREET, NELSOX,   IS. C.  (Fire.)  John Houston.  Charles H. Ink.  Houston & Ink,  Representing���������  CITIZENS  QUEBEC  CITY OF LONDON   "  EQUITABLE (Life.)  REAL ESTATE and MINING INTERESTS in. the  district handled to the  best advantage.  Correspondence solicited.  BUY AND SELL  Town Lots and  Mineral  Claims,  .OK COMMISSION.  Have now for sale 2 of the best hotels in Nelson ; choice  Baker street corner and Vernon street inside lots; lots in  Ainsworth; and mineral claims in Toad Mountain district.  Ofli������e in Miner Kwilding", Nelson,  IS. ���������.  Telephone 10.  J. M0WAT & GO,  Contractors and Builders,  SEASONED   LUMBER  always on hand for store fittings, desks, tables, etc.  Will contract to erect all kinds of buildings and guarantee  satisfaction.   Shop: corner Josephine and Bluff sts.  One Per Cent a Month  can be obtained for small amounts, loaned oh short time  and well secured. Apply to HOUSTON & INK, real  estate and mine brokers, Miner building, Nelson.  Having Purchased the Stocks Carried by  The Lindsay Mercantile Co.  and Fletcher & Co.  n-  is prepared to supply Prospectors, Mining Companies, and the General Trade with  everything in the line of  Groceries, Provisions, Hardware, Tinware, Clothing, Dry Goods, Boots, Shoes, etc.    The stock carried will  be sold at Low Prices and on Favorable Terms.  ^G-ZmiDTT   FOE   GKL  T   PO  IDIEIR,   OOUVHIIP^IN-y.  (The best powder made for use in, mines.)  Corner Wright and Sutton Streets,  TELEPHOITE   55.  r%  lmtMAM������mM.liipjLmiMw.i]*u������i-m'imM!mmin  iwawMi������M������llMMWW������miMM^^  jttWMMtaSMIMtt^^ IMIUUIII **TKWI-Hin������All-���������������,���������  6  THE  MINER:    NELSON,   B.   C���������  SATURDAY^ JANUARY 2,  1892.  LAND   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that 90 days after we intend to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works, British  Columbia, for permission to purchase the following described tract of land, situate in We*t Kootenay district:  Commencing at a stake marked E. V. Bodwell, H. Shear-  an, and W. Gesner Allan's southwest corner post, about ������'.  of a mile west of Grohman creek on the north bank of the  Kootenay river about 2 miles west of the town of Nelson,  thence north 40 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south  40 chains more or less to shore-line of Kootenay river,  thence west 40 chains more or less following the sinuosities  of tlie shore-line of the Kootenay river in a westerly direction to initial stake; containing 160'acres more or less.  E. V. BODWELL,  HENRY SHEAR AN!'-  W. GESNER ALLAN.  Nelson, B. C, November 28th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 80 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marded R. B's S. W. corner post, about 9 miles east  of the. town of Nelson, British Columbia, on the north bank  of the Kootenay river, above high water mark, thence  north 40 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south 40  chains more or less to bankeof Kootenay river, thencevvest  following shore line of river to place of commencement;  containing 160 acres more or.less.'  Nelson, December 5th, 1891.    RICHARD BLUNDELL.  Notice is hereby, given that 60 daj's after date I intendcto  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase a tract of land situated in West  Kootenay district and described as follows: Commencing  at a post marked A. M. Wilson's N. W. corner, placed on  the east shore of Slocan lake about 200 yards ;north of a  large creek which flows into the lake about 3 miles north  of what is known as Carpenter creek, thence east 40 chains,  thence south'.to' the lake shore, thence following the meanderings of the lake shore in a westerly and northerly direction to the point of commencement; containing 160 acres  more or less. A. M. WILSON.  Ainsworth, November 2nd, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 90 days after date T intend to  apply to'the chief commissioner of lands and works.for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a stake on the east bank of the Slocan river, about 9 miles  from Slocan lake, and marked A. A's S. E. corner post,  thence running north 40 chains, thence west 40 chains,  thence south 40 chains more or less to the river, thence following the meanderings of the river to point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.       A. ADAMS.  Nelson, December 8th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post- marked G. B. W.y S. W.ie  corner post, situate about 20 chains north of the southeast  corner of Angus McGillivray's land, about one-half mile  east of Slocan lake and about 10 chains south of Carpenter  creek, thence east 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence  west 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to the place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  Ainsworth, October 31st, 1891. G. B. WRIGHT.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of,  land: Commencing at a post placed upon the east shorce of  Slocan lake, near Carpenter creek, marked A. H., S. W.  corner, thence running north 80 chains, thence east 20  chains, thence south 80 chains more or less to lake shore,  thence west following meanderings of the shore to point of  commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 30th, 1891. WILSON HILL.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake placed near the outlet of  Slocan lake, marked Alfred Hill's S. W. corner, about three-  quarters of a mile from Slocan lake outlet and one-half  mile from Slocan river, thence running east 40 chains,  thence north 40 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence south  40 chains to point of commencement; containing 160 acres  more or less. ALFRED HILL.  Nelson, December 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land : Commencing at a stake marked A. L. McLean's N.  W. post, situate on the Slocan river about 2 miles from the  Slocan lake, thence running south SO chains, thence east 40  chains, thence north 80 chains, thence west 40 chains to  point of commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, November 1st, 1891. A. L. McLEAN.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake marked James Dawson's N.  W. post, situate on the Slocan river about one mile from  the Slocan lake, thence running south 80 chains, thence  east 40 chains, thence north 80 chains, thence west 40  chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  more or less. JAMES DAWSON.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described land in  West Kootenay district: Commencing at a post at the  southeast corner of lot 209, group 1, West Kootenay, thence  west 60 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence east 60 chains,  more or less, to shore of Kootenay lake, thence following  high-water mark in a northernly direction to initial post;  containing 480 acres, more or less.  KASLO-KOOTENAY LAND  CO.  Kaslo City, November 5th, 1891.   Per G. T. Kane.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend  to apply to the chief commissiener of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Situate at the junction of Sahdon and Carpenter  creeks (the latter a tributary of Seaton creek, which flows  into the east side of Slocan lake). Commencing at a post  near the right bank of Sandon creek, thence west 40 chains,  thence north 40 chains, (crossing Carpenter creek) thence  east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to point of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  BRUCE WHITE,  Nelson, November 9th, 1891. JOHN SANDON:  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to'  apply to, the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post placed upon the shore at the  head of Slocan lake, marked II. A., S. E. corner, thence  running north 20 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence  south 40 chains, thence east to shore of lake and following  meanderings of shore to point of commencement; contain  ing 160 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 31st, 1891.  E..C. ARTHUR  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked A. J. W., S. E. corner, on the north shore Kaslo bay, Kootenay lake; B. C,  thence running west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains,  thence east 60 chains more or less to lake shore, thence  following lake shore to initial post; containing 200 acres  more or less. A. J. WHALEN.  Ainsworth, B. C, November 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake on west bank of Slocan,  river, about 2 miles from Slocan lake and marked F. & C.,  N. E. corner, thence running west 40 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence east 40 chains more or less to the river,  thence following the meanderings of the river to point of  commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 24th, 18D1. ���������*M. M. FRY.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commisioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a slake on west bank of Slocan  river, about 3 miles from Slocan lake and marked F. & C,  N. E. corner, thence running west 40 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence east 40 chains more or less to the river,  thence following the meanderings of river to the point of  commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891. A. D. COPLEN.  Notice is herebj'- given that we intend to apply to the  chief commissioner of lands and works to purchase 320  acres, more or less, of land in the district of West Kootenay,  commencing at a post placed on" the east shore of Slocan  lake about 40 chains south from the mouth of Seaton creek;  thence west along the lake shore 40 chains; thence north  along the lake shore 80 chains; thence east 40 chains, more  or less, to a point 80 chains due north from the point of commencement. J. FLETCHER,  Nelson, October 21st, 1891.  A. S. FAR WELL.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked Ross Mahon's S. E. corner, situate on west  bank Slocan river, about A- mile about forks, thenee running 40 chains north, thence 80 chains west, thence 40  chains south, thence 80 chains east to place of commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, November 21st, 1891. ROSS MAHON.  Notice is hereby given that 90 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a stake marked B. H. L's S. W. corner post, about high-  water mark on north bank of Kootenay river, about 6  miles east of the town of Nelson, British Columbia, thence  north 80 chains, thence east 80 chains, thence south to bank  of Kootenay river, thence following the sinuosities of the  Kootenay river to the point of commencement, comprising  450 acres more or less. BENJAMIN HENRY LEE.  Nelson, B. C, 30th November, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked "W. C. McLean's southwest corner" (said  post being located on Slocan river about 4 miles south of  Slocan lake), running thence north (following meanderings  of river) 80 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south 80  chains, thence west 40 chains to initial post; containing320  acres more or less. W. C. McLEAN.  Slocan River, October 27th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land in West Kootenay district: Commencing on the west  shore of Kootenay lake, at H. Anderson's northeast corner,  thence west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence east to  the lake shore, thence following said lake shore southerly  to initial point; containing 160 acres more or less.  JOSHUA DA VIES.  Kootenay Lake, B. C, October 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land in West Kootenay district: Commencing at the  northeast corner of Joshua Davies's purchase on the west  shore of Kootenay lake, near the mouth of Fletcher creek,  thence west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence east  to the lake shore, thence following said shore southerly to  initial point; containing 160 acres more or less.  WILBUR A. HENDRYX.  Kootenay Lake, B. C, October 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and. works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post on east bank of Slocan river,  about 3 miles from Slocan lake, marked R. E. L., S.'W.  post, thence north 80 chains along the shore of Slocan river,  thence east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence west  40 chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres  more or less. R. E. LEMON.  Nelson, October 24th, 1891.  ''il  1  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands a.nd works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked "John A. Watson's southeast corner" (said  post being near the junction of Carpenter and Seaton  creeks and about 0 miles east of Slocan lake), thence running north 40 chains, thence west 80 chains, thence south 40  chains, thence east 80 chains to initial post; containing 320  acres more or less. JOHN A. WATSON.  Dated, October 26th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked G. M. L., S. E. corner, about 2 miles from  Kootenay lake on Kaslo creek, thence running north 40  chains, thence west 40 chains, thence south 40 chains,  thence east 40 chains to place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less. G. M. LINDSAY.  Nelson, November,14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked "John G^-McGuigan's southwest corner*'  (said post being located about 3 miles north of Carpenter  creek and 10 east of Slocan lake), running thence north 40  chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence  west 40 chains to initial post; containing 160 acres more or  less. JOHN G. McGUIGAN.  Nelson, November 23rd, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land in West Kootenay district: Commencing at a post  on the west shore of Kootenay lake, about one-half mile  south of Fletcher creek, thence west 40 chains more or less,  thence south 40 chains, thence east to the lake shore, thence  following the lake shore to the initial point; containing 160  acres more or less. H.ANDERSON.  Kootenay Lake, B. C, October 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given thafrGO days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked C. C. Sproue's N. E. corner post, placed on  the Slocan trail about 4 miles from the forks of the Slocan  river, thence south 40 chains, thence west 80 chains following the meanderings of the river, thence north 40 chains,  thence east 80 chains to the place of commencement; containing 320 acres more or less. C. C. SPROULE.  Nelson, December 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that60days afterdate we intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post, marked "Hunter & Hume's southeast corner,"  planted 300 yards south of a creek about 2 miles south of  the stream known as Carpenter creek, thence north 80  chains, thence west 20 chains to the shore of Slocan lake,  thence south 80 chains following the lake shore, thence  east 20 chains, following the lake shore to initial post;  containing 160 acres more or less.  WILLIAM HUNTER,  Nelson, December 9th, 1891.        J. FRED HUME.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post, on the extreme north end of Slocan lake, marked E.  A. Bielenberg's S. W. corner post, thence running north 40  chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence  following the shore of the lake to initial-post.  E. A. BIELENBERG.  Ainsworth, December 10th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that we intend to apply within 60  days to the chief commissioner of la.nds and works for permission to purchase the following described tract of land,  which is situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing  at a post (marked M. Malloy and G. A. Bigelovv, northwest  corner) planted on the shore of Slocan lake at a point about  100 chains north of Carpenter creek, running thence 80  chains east, thence 40 chains south, or to the north line of  the land applied for by Angus McGillivray and by J.  Fletcher and A. S. Far well, thence 80 chains west, or to shore '  of lake, thence north, following shore of lake, to initial  post; containing 320 acres more or less.  M. MALLOY,  Dated, December 16th, 1891. G. A. BIGELOW.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked J. H. Brownlee's northwest corner, at the  center of the forks of Kaslo river, about 4 miles west of  Kaslo City, thence south 40 chains, thence east 40 chains,  thence north 40 chains, thence west 40 chains to the place  of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  J. H. BROWNLEE.  Dated this 26th day of November, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that I intend to apply, within 60  days, to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to purchase the following described tract of land,  which is situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing  at a post marked E. Coming's northwest corner, planted  on the shore of Slocan lake, running thence south 40 chains,  thence west 40 chains, more or less, to Slocan river, thence  north following meanderings of river to shore of lake,  to initial post; containing 160 acres more or less.  Dated, December 17th, 1891. E.  CORNING.  A.  ~r  m  ,(T flf. '  IWA'.  THE   MINER:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATURDAY,  JANUARY  2,   1892.  1  Ml?'      _  flSf  1  1  -  M  a -  I-  i  i  5/ -  PRIVATE   BILL   NOTICES.  ,v Notice is hereby given that application will be made to  "the legislative assembly of the province" of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act to incorporate a company for the purpose of constructing, maintaining, and  equipping a railway from some point on the Columbia  river, at or near the southern boundary of the province, to  Kootenay lake at or near the town of Nelson, via Salmon  river and Cottonwood Smith creek, with power to construct and maintain branch lines; and also to construct  and operate telegraph and telephone lines in connection  with the said railway.  WILSON, WOOTTON & BARNARD.  Solicitors for applicants.  Dated 25th day of November, 1891.   Notice is hereby given that at the next session of the legislature of British Columbia application will be made for the  passage of a private bill authorizing the applicants to construct, operate, and maintain tramways, for the purpose of  conveying passengers, freight, and ores from some convenient point near Nelson to any point or points within a radiusc  of 25 miles from Nelson, also to take and use from the  Kootenay river, in the vicinity of the falls of the said, river,  sojnuch of the waters as may be necessary to obtain therefrom 5000 horse power, for the purposes of generating electricity to be used either as a motive power for the said  tramways, or other works of the applicants, or to be supplied by the applicants to consumers as a motive power  for hauling, pumping, lighting, smelting, drilling, or for  any other purposes for which it may be applied or be required; with power, to the applicants be construct and  maintain buildings, erections, raceways, or other works, in  connection therewith for improving' and increasing the  water privilege; and also to enter upon and expropriate  lands for a site for power honses^andjlor dams, raceways,  or such other works as shall be necessary; also to erect, lay,  construct, and maintain all necessary works, buildings,  pipes, poles, wires, appliances, or conveniences necessary or  proper for the generating and transmitting of electricity or  power within the area above described.  BOD WELL & IRVING, Solicitors for applicants.  November 12th 1891. ;   Notice is hereby given that at the next session of the  legislative assembly application will be made for a, private  bill authorizing the applicants to construct; operate and  maintain a system of electric lighting in and about the  present town of Nelson and its vicinity, and for that purpose to take so much of the waters of Cottonwood Smith  creek as may be necessary for generating electricity for the  supply of the said system; with power also to erect, lay  and string such poles, pipes and wires through, along, over  and under the streets and highway s of the said town and  its vicinity as may be necessary.  BOD WELL & IRVING,  Solicitors for the applicants.  Dated 18th November. 1891.    Notice is hereby given that application will be made  to-the legislative assembly of the province of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act for the purpose of  constructing, maintaining, equipping, and operating water  works at the town of Nelson, in the Kootenay district, in  said province, and for the purposes thereof granting to the  company the privilege of taking water from the Cottonwood Smith creek, the Ward creek and other suitable  points, with power to the company to build flumes and  acqueducts, lay pipes, erect dams, acquire lands, and do  all things necessary for the purposes aforesaid.  BODWELL & IRVING,  ,  Solicitors for the applicants.  Dated 18th November, 1891.   Notice is hereby given that application-will be made to  the legislative assembly of the province of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act to incerporate the  Nelson Electric Light Company, Limited Liability, the object of said company is to construct, man tain, equip, and  operate electric light works at the town of Nelson, in West  Kootenay district, and for the purposes thereof, granting  to the company the privilege of taking' water from Cottonwood Smith creek for motive power to operate the works  of the company, with power to the company to erect poles  and string wires in the streets of Nelson, purchase works  already in operation, and do all things necessary for the-  purposes aforesaid. C. D. MASON,  November loth, 1891.    *-���������     Solicitor for applicants.  Notice is hereby given that application will be made at  the next session of the legislative assembly of the province  of British Columbia for an act to incorporate a company  to construct, equip, maintain, and operate a line of railway  from some point on Kootenay lake by way of Kaslo or other  pass up the North Fork of Kaslo .creek to some point at or  near the summit between Kootenay and Slocan lakes, or  the vicinity of the recently discovered mines in that section,  with powers of extending said railway in any direction as  may hereafter be deemed requisite for the transportation of  ores and other products, with powers of building and op-  crating branch lines from said railway I o such mines as may  now tie or hereafter be discovered in the vicinity of said  railway. WILSON, WOOTTON & BARNARD,  Victoria, October 20th, 1891. _ Solicitors for applicants^  Notice is hereby given that application will be made to  the legislative assembly of the province of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act to incorporate the  Consumer's Waterworks Company, Limited Liability. The  object of said company is to construct, maintain, equip,  and operate waterworks at the town of Nelson, in West  Kootenav district, and for the purposes thereof granting to  the company the privilege of taking water from the East,  Fork of Cottonwood Smith creek, Cottonwood Smith creek,  Ward creek, or either of their forks, with power to the  company to build flumes and acqueducts, lay pipes, erect  dams, acquire lands, purchase waterworks already in operation, and do all things necessary for the purposes aforesaid. CD MASON,  November 16th, 1891. Solicitor for applicants.  TIMBER   LEASE   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby given that I have applied to the chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special license to  cut timber on 800 acres, or thereabouts, of crown lands,  situate and bounded as follows: From my S. W. post, at  the N. W. post of Dennis Cain's timber claim, on the eastern shore of Kootenay lake, north to Campbell creek,  about 1 mile, thence east 2 miles following the meander  ings of said creek, thence south \ mile, thence west 1 mile,  thence south about ������ of a mile_ to D. Cain's N. E. corner,  thence west 1 mile to starting point.            J. F. HALEY.  Nelson, November 19th, 1891. ,   Notice is hereby given that I have applied the chief commissioner for a special license to cut timber on 640 acres of  crown lands, situate and bounded as follows: From my  N. W. post near the eastern shore of Kootenay lake, about  a mile south of Campbell creek (which creek is about 12  miles north of Hendryx camp) south SO chains; thence east  SO chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west SO chains to  starting point. . DENNIS  CAIN.  Nelson, B. 0., 12th November, 1891.   Notice is hereby given that 30 days after date we intend  to make application to the chief commissioner of lands and  works for permission to lease for lumberiug purposes for a  term of 25 years the following tract of land situated in  West Kootenay district and described as follows: Commencing at the southwest corner of M. S. Davys's limit,  thence south 100 chains, thence cast 100 chains, thence  north 100 chains, thence west 100 chains to point of commencement; containing 1000 acres more or loss.  NELSON SAWMILL COMPANY,  Per W. J. Goepel, Manager.  Nelson, B. C, November 30th, 1891.  APPLICATIONS   FOR  CROWN   GRANTS.  Notice is hereby given that J. L. Retallack, as agent for  George C. Howe, has filed the necessary papers and made  application for a crown grant in favor of the mineral claim  known as the "Fourth," situate in Hot Springs camp, West  Kootenay district. Adverse claimants, if any, will forward  their objections within 60 days from date of publication.  -(' N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.   Nelson, December 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that Scott McDonald, as agent for  A. W. McCune, has filed the necessary papers and made  application for for a,.crown grant in favor of the mineral  claim known as the "Libbjr," situate in Hot Springs camp,  West Kootenay district. Adverse claimants, if any, will  ��������� forward their objections within 60 clavs from date of publication. N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, November 23rd, 1891.  NOTICE.  A lis pendens has been recorded by the undersigned,  upon a suit in the county court, to have it declared that he  is entitled to one-third undivided interest in each of the  '-'Mountain Chief," "Maude E," "Noble 5," and "Knoxville"  mineral claims, and two-fifths undivided interest in each  of the 'Northern Belle" and "Blue Jay" mineral claims;  all situate in the Slocan country.       CHARLES OLSON.  Ainsworth, November 21st, 1891.   NOTICE.  A lis pendens has been recorded against the mineral  claims "Chambers,." "Monarch," and "Mattie B," in the  Slocan country, upon a suit in the county courts by the undersigned, to have it declared that Charlie Chambers has  only one-fourth undivided interest in these claims.  THOMAS SHEARER,  EDWARD BECKER,  Nelson, November 5th, 1891.       CHARLES F. KENT.  DISSOLUTION   OF   COPARTNERSHIP  The partnership heretofore existing between the undersigned, under the firm name of Ward & Corning, has this  day been dissolved b3r mutual consent. All accounts  against the firm will be settled by Thomas M. Ward, to  whom all debts due the firm are payable.  THOMAS M. WARD,  E. CORNING.  Nelson, B. C, December 7th, 1891.  AS   A    WASS.S5IOR    BHJBS.  We were on the west bank or edge of the ravine, which was about 50 feet wide and so deep  that our eyes could not penetrate through"-the  darkness to the bottom. We had been sheltered  behind the great boulders for half an hour or so,  believing that the Indians'were following on our  trail, when a warrior suddenly stepped into, view  just opposite us. He was a trifle higher up than  we were, and but for the glare of the sun in his  eyes he must have seen us at once. We had  traveled, faster than he had anticipated, for he  was looking back over the rough road we had  traversed.  He stood beside a rock which would have hidden him from tlie sight of anyone coming from  the west, and we watched him for a couple of  minutes before the scout suddenly raised his  rifle and fired. The bullet struck him in the  chest. He was so near that I saw the dust of it  as it cut his hunting shirt. He had just straightened up as the scout fired, and the blow of the  bullet knocked him oli* his feet backward. As  he fell his rifle slipped from his grasp and went  clattering down, and it seemed as if one could  have counted up to 100 before it reached the  bottom and was discharged.  The warrior was stunned for a minute and lay  as if dead. Then he made an effort to get up,  and the struggle carried him feet first down the  steep and slippery rock, and he only caught  himself as his body went over the brink. With  a sort of a half turn he grasped the very edge of  the shelf, but only with his right hand. As he  hung there he faced us, and we looked square  into his eyes across the chasm.    He was a full  grown man, and iii war paint, and his face was  that of a demon. There was a bloody froth  oozing from his lips, and as he hung there he  spat blood. But for his lungs being filled he  would no doubt have uttered a war cry and  summoned aid. We dared not fire again for  fear of further betraying our position, and so  we watched and waited until he should'go to his  death down in the darkness 400 feet below.  Drip! drip! drip!  It was the blood from his ^vound running down  to his feet and then dropping on a rocky projection a yard below. Such was the awful silence  that we could hear the fall of each and every  drop.  With his glittering black eyes fixed upon us���������  eyes which shown with hate and fury and had  never a waver in them���������he hung as motionless  as if he was a part of the cliff. After tlie first  30 seconds he did not open his lips to eject the  blood which finally ran in tiny streams from  each nostril. ,  Hate���������fury���������revenge! Not a movement of the  lips���������not the twitching of a muscle from head to  toe as he hung there. We read it all in his eyes.  He was going to his death, but he would go  hating the white man as only an Apache can  hate���������thirsting for his blood as,only an Apache  thirsts.  I watched the arm by which he hung. It was  the arm of an athlete, with the muscles standing  out to prove its wonderful strength. I could  not detect the slightest sign of weakness after  it had held him up for 5 long minutes.  "He's going!" whispered the scout.  There   was  a   movement   of the legs���������a  wild ���������  clutch  of  the   other arm���������a twitching  of "the  corners of  the   mouth.    Then   the   eyes   blazed  forth a new fury  for a few seconds���������a look so  full of malignant hate ancl thirst for vengeance  that we instinctively drew back, and theblood-  staiued body  was  out of sight in an   instant.  We leaned over and waited.    No sound came up  to us.    He had struck the  rocks to be mashed'  and mangled to ari unrecognizable mass, but the.  ravine was too deep for the echo to find its way  to the brink.  JPuiiiiy Result oi* Enforced Silence.  There is a time to keep silence, but it evidently  was not the right time in the case of a boy who  lives in an Ontario town.    He got a sliver in his  foot, and in spite of his protestations his mother  decided to place a poultice over the wound. The  boy vigorously resisted.  "I won't have no poultice," he declared,  stoutly.  "Yes, you will, Eddie," declared both mother  and grandmother, firmly, and the nia.jority being two to one, at bedtime the poultice'was  ready. If the poultice was ready t he boy was  not, and he proved so refractory that a switch  was brought, into requisition. It was arranged  that I he grandmother should a pply the poult ice,  while the mother was to stand with the uplifted  switch at the bedside. The boy told that if he  "opened his mouth" he would receive that which  would keep him quiet. As the hot poultice  touched the boy's foot he opened his mouth.  "You   he began.  "Keep still!" said his mother, shaking her  stick, while the grandmotner busily applied the  poultice.  Once more, the little fellow opened his jnouth.  But the uplifted switch awed him into silence.  In a minute more the poultice was firmly in  place and the little boy was tucked in bed.  "There now," said his mother, "the old sliver  will be drawn out and Eddie's foot will be all  well."  As the mother and grandmother moved  triumphantly away a shrill, small voice came  from under the bedclothes:  "You've got it on the wrong foot!"  Electricity  Keller thaw  tlie Sun.  The experiments made at Cornell university  and in France to ascertain the effect of the electric light upon vegetation have demonstrated  its wonderful property of greatly stimulating  almost every variety of vegetable life. The  colors of flowers are intensified, and an increased  yield of fruit and vegetables of nearly 100 per  cent has been obtained without diminishing the  odor of the former flavor of the latter. The  parts of the soil are more actively dissolved by  the action of the light and are thus brought  within reach of the roots.  \  i V .   [  ''{If  ii������������fiIM^ 5k?  L'i  ii-  %  \n  'ft?  !-���������'!  he.  it.,-  b  k  I  I  ^^yiff.w^wwwjijii'ffff'fi"^  8  THE 4II_TEJi:    KELSOK,   &��������������������������� ."O.,   SATUEDAY,  JANIJAEY  2, 1892.  Dealers in Dry ..Go6dsf-.-Gro^ Etc.   Miners' Supplies a Specialty  The stock is full and complete in every Department, and the 'public .will find it to their advantage to calland inspect G-oods /  7    * and compare Prices.  Telephone 27.  7, 9, and 11 East Yemon Street, NELSON, B. 0.  EDWARD APPLEWHAITE.  W. GESNER ALLAN,  Coroner, Deputy.. Sheriff",1: and Notary Public.  Postoffice Box 69.  S. E. OOENEE BAKEE Al^D JOSEPHINE STEEETS, NELSON, B. 0,  Telephone 24.  Loans negoti  on  Nelson property. Collections made. Conveyancing documents ��������� drawn ��������� up.  Town lots,  lands,  and mining claims handled ��������� on commission.  1'ostollicc Store,  Nelson,  15. C.  AND GENTS' FUENISHING GOODS.  ALSO,  FULL LINES OF  ATENT  Toilet Articles and Stationery.  (A. M. Can. Soc. C. E.)  CIVIL ENGINEEE^AND AEOHITECT,  TOLSON   B8lttLBIi\������.,  KELSON, IS. V.  Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians of London ;  Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England.  p  Corner Silica and Ward Streets, Nelson.  Telephone 40.  Physician, Surgeon, and Accoucheur,  Telephone 15. Office:   Stanley and "Victoria Streets.  LAMD   NOTBGES.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days Jifter date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of \laiids and word's for  permission to purchase the folio win gs.described ^tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay districtr:~^Conixiiencing at  a stake near the outlet of Slocan lake marked David B.  Bogle's northwest corner post, thence running east 40  chains, thence south 80 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence  north 80 chains; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, 31st December, 1891. DAVID B. BOGLE.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked C. D. Kinnee's southeast corner about 40  chains west of Kaslo bay, thence running 40 chains Avest,  thence 40 chains north, thence 40 chains east, thence 40  chains south; containing 160 acres. C. D. KINNEE.  Ainsworth, December 29th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to purchase the following described tract of land,  situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing on shore  of Slocan lake at a stake marked J. R. Cook's southwest  corner, thence 80 chains north on east side of Hume &  Hunter's purchase application, thence 40 chains east, thence  SO chains south, thence 40 chains west to place of commencement: containing 320 acres more or less.  Dated, December 6th, 1891. JOHN It. COOK.  Jas.:' McDonald & Co.  Nelson  and Kevelstofiie,  carry full lines of all kinds of furniture for residences,  hotels, and offices.   Mattresses made to order, and  at prices lower than eastern and coast.  They are also agents for  Evans Pianos and Doherty Organs.  NELSON   STORE :  No. 4 Houston. _fe Sink Building, .Josephine Street.  By virtue of a warrant of execution, issued out of the  county court of West Kootenay, at the suit of R. E. Lemon  of Nelson against Nelson Riopel of Nelson for the sum of  $192.70 and costs of execution, I have seized the property  of the said Nelson Riopel as follows, viz:  That dwelling house situate on the river bank near Nelson recently occupied by the said Nelson Riopel and all  fixtures appertaining thereto.  All of which I shall sell by public auction at the house  aforesaid on Wednesday, the 0th day of January, 1892, a.t  11 A. M., unless the above sum and all other lawful charges  are sooner paid. W. GESNER ALLAN,  Nelson, December 26th, 1891. Deputv sheriff.  TIEX-IEIE'lEaiOIISriE   S_  <f>������������  ��������� .   V  4.��������� ���������"!  -l:*\  I  t  'Mi  iff 9 " '.���������' ^       ��������� r&  Hi '���������- "  "-'i'i

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