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The Miner Jan 16, 1892

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 [li!1     *  Only  B*aper  B*rintecl  in tlie  -Xootenay  Lake Miii-  ing Districts.  For Kates  of Subscription. ami  Advertising?  See Fonrtn I'ajse.  NUMBEE 82.  NELSON,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA,   SATURDAY,   JANUARY   16,   1892.  $4 A YEAR.  AN    UNFAIR   fJOVEKNAIENT  I"  I  I  '  li  ��������� i---sj; -s)  ���������li:-Vcr  WITHDRAWS   PUBLIC LAND  FROM SALE AT THE  DICTATION   OF A CORPORATION.  The Land, Act was amended at the last session  of the legislative assembly.    It is now not only  explicit as to how the,applicant, shall proceed to  acquire*land, but explicit as to who shall classify  the lands so  applied for.    Section 29 reads as  follows:  '"Every person  desiring   to   purchase unsur-  " veyed,    unoccupied,   and    unreserved    crown  '���������lands shall give two months' notice of his-in-  ���������' tended application to purchase, by a noticeciri-  " serted at the expense of the applicant, in the  "British  Columbia Gazette, and in any nevvs-  " paper circulating in the district wherein such  "land   lies;   such   notice shall   not   include  a  " greater area of land than   six  hundred and  "forty acres, and shall state the name of the ap-  .." plicant, the locality* boundaries, and extent of  " ihe land  applied   for;   such  notice shall   be  " dated,  and shall be posted in a conspicuous  " place on the land sought to be acquired, and  " on the government office, if any, in the dis-  " trict.    He shall also place at one angel or cor-  " ner of the land applied for, a stake or post at  *������������������' l^ast four inches square, and standing not less  " thin four feet above the surface of the ground;  "and upon such initial post he shall inscribe his  "name and the angle represented thereby, thus:  " 'A. B's N. E. corner,' (meaning northeast cor-  " her), or as the case may be;.... Except such ih-  " it.ial post is so planted before the above notice  "is giveiKall the proceedings taken by the ap-  'Vpliqant-shall  be void.    He shall also deposit  " ten per cent of the purchase money with the  " commissioner, together with his application to  " purchase, within ninety days from the date of  "the publication  of his  notice  in the British  " Columbia Gazette, and he shall have the land  " required surveyed, at his own cost, by a duly  " authorized provincial land surveyor approved  " of and  acting under the   instructions of the  " chief commissioner of lands and works or sur-  " veyor-general;   and such  lands   shall be  sur-  " veyed   on  the  rectangular   or square  sys.lem  " now adopted by the government, and all lines  " shall be due north and south and due east and  " west, except where from the nature of surveys  " made it would be impossible to conform to the  " above system ; and wherever possible the said  " survey shall be connected with some known  " point in previous surveys, or with some other  " known point, or boundary."  Sub-section 1 of section 29 reads as follows:  "It shall be the duty of the surveyor to classify  " the lands so surveyed as first class, second  "class, or third class lands, adopting for the  purposes of such classification the distinctions  contained in the next ensuing sub-section, and  " he shall make full and accurate field-notes of  "his survey, and upon completion of the sur-  " vey shall file such notes and a report of his  " survey in the office of the chief commissioner  " of lands and works, accompanied by a statu-  " tory declaration verifying such notes, and  " showing the area of first class, second class, or  " third class lands which are embraced by such  tk survey."  Sub-section 2 of section 29 reads as follows:  "Lands which are suitable for agricultural pur-  " poses, or which are capable of being brought  " under cultivation profitably, or which contain  " timber suitable for lumbering purposes, (i. e.,  " lands which contain milling timber to the  " average extent of five thousand feet per acre  " to each one hundred and sixty acres), or which  are wild hay meadow lands, shall rank as and  " be considered to be first class lands. Lands  " which are suitable for agricultural purposes  " only when artificially irrigated, and which do  " not contain timber suitable for lumberingpur-  " poses, as defined above, shall rank as and be  " considered to be second class lands. Mountainous and rocky tracts of land which are  wholly unfit for agricultural purposes, and  which cannot,   under any   reasonable  condi-  a  i t  a  a  'tions, be brought under cultivation, and which  do not contain timber suitable for lumbering  'purposes, as defined above, or hay meadows."  Sub-section 3 specifies ,the price at which the  land will be sold, namely: $5 an acre for first  class land, $2.50 for second class, and $1 for  third class.-  Sub-section 4 specifies that the chief commissioner of lands and works, if not satisfied with  the survey or for any cause;shall desire further  information concerning the land applied for,  may cause such additional surveys to be made  and information to be procured as he may see fit.  Before the above amendments were enacted,  an order-in-council was passed withdrawing all  crown lands from purchase or pre-emption, the  notice published in the British Columbia Gazette being so worded that pending applications  to purchase would not be affected. All of Which  ���������was,-fair and above board. Had the same course  been pursued on December 31st, the date on  wrhich the following notice first appeared in the  Gazette, no resident of the province would have  suffered injustice:  RESERVE���������WEST KOOTENAY.  Notice is hereby given that all crown lands surrounding  Slocan lake, and extending back therefrom a distance of 10  miles, are reserved,from sale or pre-emption until further  notice. F. G. VERNONV  Chief commissionetof lands:and works;  Lands and Works Department,  ^Victoria, B.C., 31st December; 1891.   -  ���������' ���������'���������N6.w--f6r*facW:'-'?:'^^^  In October last prospectors discovered mineral  in the. mountains to the" east of Slocan lake about  10 miles.    The discovery created a good deal of  excitement, not. only among men who  follow  mining as a legitimate business, but among men  who   are   open    to   any   business   proposition,  whether it be one of planting potatoes, putting  up hay, cutting lumber,  or laying off land for  townsite purposes.    These men, with the enterprise characteristic of this section ofxthe province, at once began the preliminary steps to acquire land under the provisions of the Land Act;  and in doing so they underwent all  the hardships  incident  to  opening  up  a   mountainous  country,   almost" inaccessible.     The  first   land  taken up in the area now withdrawn from sale  was by W. F. McCulloch, Thomas  McGovern,  and Charles Chambers (320 acres),  their notice,  being dated   October 6th.     Other- applications  quickly followed, and in all about 40 were made,  no one of them embracing a larger area than 320  acres.    The following are the names of most of  the  applicants:    John   McGuigan,   W.   C.   McLean, John A. Watson. Harry H. Ward, R. E.  Lemon, Arthur C. Dick, T. J. Roadley,  A. M.  Wilson, G. B. Wright, James Delaney, Thomas  M. Ward, Wilson Hill, Alfred Hill, A. L.  McLean, James Dawson, Angus McGillivray, John  Sandon, Bruce White, E. C. Arthur, M. M. Fry,  A. D. Coplen, J. Fletcher,  A.  S.  Farwell, William Hunter, J. Fred Hume, E. A. Bielenberg*  and   A. Adams.    Considering  the  Land  Act a  contract between the government and the people, these men, in good faith, preformed all that  was required of them  under the provisions of  the  contract.     They  staked   the land,   caused  notices to be published, some of them even going  as far as making surveys and remitting part of  the purchase money to the land office.    No one  of them spent less than $75 in money and time  in doing what they had a right to do under the  law.    But how has the government carried out  its part of the contract?   By simply declaring  that the lands around Slocan lake are withdrawn  .from sale.  When the action of the government became  known at Nelson, the people assembled in mass  meeting and unanimously ordered the secretary  of the meeting to notify John Robson, the premier of the provincial government, that the  action of the government was flagrantly unjust.  Mr. Robson's reply was received the next day,  and it reads as follows:  Victoria, January 14th.��������� W. Gesner Allan; Nelson :  Your telegram received. Reserve put on to prevent speculation in agricultural land until legislation can be obtained to secure them for actual settlers. Reserve will be  lifted in the early spring. JOHN ROBSON.  If lands believed to be agricultural must be  kept out'Sf the hands of speculators pending  legislation, why was not all the unsurveyed  crown lands in the province withdrawn from  sale? Why should the land around Slocan lake  alone be withdrawn?  Mr. Robson's reply is just a trifle too thin. He  knows, or should know, that the land withdrawn from sale is not agricultural land, but  rocky and mountainous. He knows, or should  know, that there is but little agricultural land  in West Kootenay district outside the 2-mile-  square blocks granted the Columbia & Kootenay  Railway Company as a bonus for building a  road that ;the corrupt.. Dominion,, government  did not even dare accept as a public highway.  He knows, or should know, that the public do-  ��������� main is in no danger of being acquired by speculators as long as it  can   only  be acquired  in  H^racts of 160, 320, and 640 acres; but that it. is in  great danger of being acquired by speculators  when millions of acres are, by special enactments, granted to the promotors of railway  schemes��������� as will be every acre within 10 miles  of Sloca^h^lake at the coming session of the legislative assembly, the recipients, no doubt, being  men closely connected with or employed by the  Canadian ?acifilc railway.  _J������ ;   ^JLii" Ki'(������ni Slocan SHstriet.  James Hayes, A. R. Case, and Rasmus Malde  arrived at Nelson on Sunday night from Slocan  district.    They report  having h;td a hard trip,  the snow being deep and the weather very cold.  However, they managed to make 16 locations in  a locality near the Noble Five, but on the west  side of Carpenter creek. Mr. Hayes has had  several years experience in mines in Colorado,  and is of the opinion that Slocan district will  turn out to be one of the richest silver-lead  camps in America���������richer even than Leadville  or Aspen in Colorado. He says the formation  is of a character that surely indicates that the  mineral will be found continuous with it, whether  it goes to a depth of 10 or 10,000 feet. He says  there is no sign of crystalization. The party  were less than 4 days in coming from the locality of the claims staked to Nelson, making the  distance from the north end of the Slocan  river trail to the railway in one day. On  Thursday E. A. Bielenberg and G. D. Cleveland also came in from Slocan lake. They  made 15 locations on the mountain and as  many more on the lake shore south of t he mouth ���������  of Carpenter* creek. Mr. Bielenberg says that it  took them 6 days to go from the mouth, of Carpenter creek to the Noble Five claim, the snow  being from 8 to 10 feet deep above the forks of  the creek. They claim to have an 8-foot ledge  on one of the locations made near the lake shore,  3������ miles south of the mouth of Carpenter creek,  the ore assaying $420 in silver and $20 in gold.  Eldorado City has 4 completed cabins and  another under way. The boys are putting in  the time hunting. There was little snow at the  lake.  Ife;  .17 v������     ���������   I  rf,7t-'s  '  ���������    ������������������-*���������������- rt_.ii���������.._nl.J  ���������I*' I-  1 i" rf>  IT*. ,1-  ������'Si������u-^^ai=a-Jfii."a^������������4fflK^^i^*i'ii3^&  JE2?5KI<5I������Sk������ ESSES  '���������era'''  ���������������������������: '&!#  ;.|;|5|||:  \r;  v/  THE  MINEE:    NELSON,   E.   0.,   SATUDEAY,  JANUAKY  16,   1892.  ; \t  ���������XV  ii'VT  ������ *  fvw<  Jfti  $.���������  1*5?  if-1  s  I!  i:  4-,  t  < '  fl;  ft.  9  C  i  I  ������  pi  "if  if  i  I  Mil  I  A   CMKISTMAS   J^KE.  It was in the summer of 1877 that I arrived at  the headwaters of the Clear Fork of the Brazos,  then occupied by Gump's cowboys to the number of 6 or 8, including a Mexican and 3 negroes.  I was a mere youth at the time, but I was  anxious to learn the "ropes," and in a few days  I had the happiness to observe that I was a  favoi'ite among the bovs.       ,  For several months I followed out the lively  routine of the rancher's life on the plains' in  northwestern Texas, then full of buffalo, deer,  and other wild game now rarely seen in those  parts, owing to .the steady advance of. immigration upon the border.  We were up before the dawn and seated be-  fore a huge fire of mesquite branches and buffalo chips, and we ate with avidity hot biscuits  and bacon, washed clown with strong coffee and  pure cream. With the rising of the sun the  men were off in search of runaway cattle, which  were'frequently enticed from the range by small  bands of buffalo or wild mustangs, arid I was  left to pass the day the best I could in the tent  or on a jaunt along the creek in search of deer,  the signs of which I could daily see. I was in  possession of an excellent Winchester with a  full supply of ammunition, while in the tent  was a perfect arsenal of weapons, including a  rusty Henry, 2 Sharps, and several muzzle-loading rifles of more or less ancient make. With  all these weapons at my command, and which I  did not disdain to use, I became a marksman of  no mean ability, and my efficiency with rifle  and pistol soon won for me the respectful admiration of all in the camp.  The camp was located in the fork of the creek  and directly on the road to Font-Worth, 240  miles to the eastward, a salt lake being 60 miles  to the west. The road was a mere trail and only  occasionally used by buffalo traders who had  established posts in various parts of the country  where the buffalo were thickest. The persever-  ence with which the bison were followed by the  hunters all along their range was even then felt  and the result was a gradual thinning out of  their numbers in a locality where only a few  years previously they flocked in droves of  thousands.  One day in December I was engaged in scraping a buffalo hide on the edge of a creek when I  heard the clatter of hoofs on the roadway, and  and looking up I beheld a man on horseback approaching the camp at a gallop. I arose and instinctively glanced within the tent to see if  weapons were handy in case they were needed.  I breathed easily, for from the ridge pole hung  a heavy Colt's revolver in its holster, within  reach of my hand. The stranger meanwhile  had come to a .halt, and he sprang from his sadT  die as he greeted me in a cherry voice.  "Good  morning,"  he said.    "What  camp is  this?"  "This is Gump's cattle camp," I replied, after  our interexchange of greetings.  The stranger said something in an undertone  and colly hobbled his horse, after which he removed both saddle and bridle. He was a young  man, scarcely 23 years of age, I judged, dressed  after the frontier fashion, but there was something about him that told n\e he was a "tenderfoot." He did not carry himself with the free-  and-easy manner ���������of the frontiersman, but  seemed rather to act like a man who was  astonished at everything new and novel that  met his gaze. He was below the medium height,  but his sinewy limbs showed that, he was Tithe  and active. His face "was a good-natured one,  and when he looked full at me 1 was irresistibly  attracted toward him. He carried a Winchester  rifle, while around his waist was a belt full of  cartridges, and from it hung a Colt's revolver of  the latest pattern.  "Who are you?" I asked, after we had seated  ourselves for a chat.  "My name is Clarence Morton," he replied  laughingly. "I am from Boston and I am here  in search of sport. Yes, I am alone. I spent  the night at Sweetwater and drifted here somehow. Is there room for one more in the camp  for a few days?"  I replied that he would have to settle the matter with mr. Gump, who would arrive within an  hour.     He  answered  that  he   and   mr.   Gump  would not quarrel; that he had heard much of  frontier hospitality and did hot doubt that he  woliIc! be received with open arms; that he had  graduated from Harvard recently and had come  to northwestern Texas in search of excitement,  change of scene and health. He talked thus for  some time and we became fast friends.  "You have a fine Winchester there," I said,  picking up the weapon admiringly. "Are you  anything of a marksman?"    ��������� <  At that moment a.-chaffinch settled on the  branch of a pecan tree standing alone, fully 200  .yards" from us. He was watching the bird in  its a rial flight, and as I asked the question he  arose and took the weapon from my hands. As  quick as thought lie took aim and tired.  "Run to that tree and get the bird," he said,  coolly. "You will find it with its head shot off  clean as a whistle."  I walked over to the tree, and sure enough  there '.lay the bird with its head gone. This man  is a wonder, I said to. myself as 1 rejoined him,  carrying the decapitated bird in my haucl. ���������"���������'  Clarence had no difficulty in making friends  with the cowboys as we gathered about the  campfire that night. The young man told a  story and sung a song in the most fascinating  manner, yet everything he said or did was accompanied by an air of embarrassment which I  could not account for, but which was apparently  misconstrued by the others.  "fHe's ,a tenderfoot," said Joe Stock to Pedro,  a Mexican who had recently joined the camp.  "We must put him through.the 'Injun' trick.  Pedro nodded approvingly and then burned to  one of the negroes, with whom he held a whispered consultation. The two shook their heads  laughingly, and then separated with knowing  winks at each other.  "What are these fellows up to, I wonder?" I  inquired mentally. "What do they mean by  the'Injun'trick?"  I was soon to learn what it meant in all its  sad reality.  Several days had elapsed since Morton's arrival  in the camp and nothing of unusual interest had  occurred. One night Joe Stock arrived in camp  evidently much fatigued and laboring under  some excitement, with the announcement that  he had come across Indian signs near the  Double mountains. This exciting news set us  ���������������������������e all talking and we began to discuss the probability of an attack, and not without reason, as  we had received reports from time to time that  the Comanches had dug up the hatchet and  were on the warpath. Joe's discovery was the  first intimation of the nearness of the hostiles in  our vicinity, and we decided to be on the alert.  The only apparently cool man in the camp was  Morton. He did not join in conversation with  the others, but silently took up his Winchester  and carefully examined it. He cleaned the  weapon and then restored it to its place over his  bunk in the tent,  giving  it. as 1  thought,  a sort  of caress as he deposited it.  "Indians don't scare him worth a cent," 1  thought as I surveyed his actions.  Several days passed, but we saw nothing of  the hostiles for whose attack we had made every  precaution.  It was Christmas morning and I was milking  some cows in the corral, when I saw Joe Stock  and four others engaged in an animated discussion near the branding* pen, and their actions  somehow7 aroused my suspicions that they were  planning something. I crawled toward them  uuobserved. and was soon near enough to hear  their whole conversation.  "It's all right," Joe was saying. "He said he  was going to the wild plum patch after a deer,  and we can let loose on him there."  "Hev ye got the blankets and things?" asked  a  young fellow  named  Jack.    "We  along without 'em, you know."  "Here they be," answered Joe, as he dragged  a large bundle from a pile of shin-oaks near by.  "Good; let's skip."  The party, laughing and chattering loudly,  sprang into their saddles and were away before  I could find my tongue, so astonished was I at  their mysterious actions. I returned to my  milking job, wondering what it all meant, and  had finished with my last heifer when Morton  rode up to the corral.  "I'm going on a little hunt," he said quietly.  "I will return before noon very likely."  "Good luck to you," was my parting wish. He  nodded pleasantly, and, putting the spurs to his  animal,  was  soon out of sight over the  beyond.  can't  git  riclge  Morton had no sooner disappeared than I began, unaccountably, to feel ill- at ease. I had a  premonition that something was going to happen, but what I could hot, of course, determine.  I racked ihy brain to get at what the boys were  meditating upon, and suddenly it dawned upon  me that they had determined to play on Morton  some practical joke. Yjes, I had it! They were  to disguise themselves as Indians and swoop  down upon poor, unsuspecting Morton, in the  hope of frightening him out of his wits. What  a splendid thing it would be to give the "tenderfoot" a great scare arid iinitiate him into the  rougher experiences of frontier life!  The more 1 thought of the matter the more I  was convinced that Morton would not turn out  Co.  DEALERS IN  cn^invnio^^i-iS.  PATENT MEDICINES  TOBLET ARTICLES,  ETO.  WlflO'LESAJLE     IIEAE.E1ES     IN.. < CIttAUS.       KAYitlONI*  SI!WlXtt . MACHINES   IN "'STOCK.  Gor. East Baker and Ward Streets,  Telephone 32.  DEALERS IN  Groceries, Provisions, and  General Merchandise.  A STOCK OF  English Clothing, Men's  Furnishings, Dry Goods,  BOOTS,   ETC.  imported direct from the manufacturers, always on hand.  Postoflicc ami Telephone in Store.  B*osloilice  Store,  Nelson,  IS. C.  AND GENTS' FUENISHING GOODS.  ALSO,  FULL LINES OF  CiNES  Toilet Articles and Stationery.  CIGARS   AT   WHOLESALE  CHAIT TAILORS,  NELSON, B. C.  are now settled in their new store, No. 2 Houston & Ink  building, and have on display a full range of  Plain and Fancy Worsted Suitings and Scotch and  Irish Tweeds and Serges.  DPIR-IOIES TO  SUIT THE TIMES  d  m  t-j.{���������-^?:e  ivrr  ���������-.. m ������������������   ff.*mg*  v?7  if^KC  ���������5fn  ���������A  r;T"������",Tr::~'izix&kz:���������c* \.,i!-;��������� .-i.������j.*wa"-' ���������������������������-��������� ���������������������������- s.."aj.n-T-������������������������������������,��������� &���������rw~.-iin. ���������������.���������.������..��������� m-������.--.���������������.. .....���������....���������������������������..���������..  1-.   ������������������-:.������������������-v'CttWtiaB/j^tflM.n'.aK.j.a^im r<jv "*"* *_v?'yjv--r!������������������ ^*r*-7^r* 'i���������?���������*-~'***" ^s  ���������'%-���������  1  v'3  l    ^  ���������������������������������-  i  rt-  I  I  I  fi  ll  THE  MINEE:    NELSON,   B.  0.,   SATUDEAY,  JANUAEY 16,   1892.  to be the victim Joe Stock and his 4 companions  imagined he would be. He proved on several  occasions that he was perfectly fearless and cool  in times of danger, and when I thought of his  marvelous marksmanship, of which" the boys in  the camp knew nothing, I shuddered, despite  myself. Come what will, I decided this .game  must be blocked before it is allowed to proceed  further.  Filled with this thought, I caught up a bridle  and hurried across the creek to where, my mustang was nibbling the tall bunch-grass. I  bridled the animal and sprang upon his back  with a shout that made him lead off in a swift  lope in the direction���������Morton had taken. The  country for a mile or more was a succession of  valleys and ridges, and 1 had ascended to the  third of these before I caught a'glimpse of Morton riding rapidly toward the wild plum patch,  a quarter of a mile beyond him. 1 shouted to  him to stop, but he did not hear me, the distance  being too great. I whistled and yelled myself  hoarse in vain, and in a few moments more he  had skirted the path and I lost sight of him.  I was within half a mile of the plum patch  when Morton reappeared, and close behind him  came 5 horsemen garbed and yelling like Indians. Suddenly Morton turned in his saddle,  and a puff of smoke flying from his rifle told  ���������me'that'he had begun the imagined battle for  life. Like a man in a dream I turned my eyes  to his pursuers just in time to see one of them  fall from the saddle headlong to the ground. In  the twinkle of an eye came another flash and  report, and another saddle was empty. The  yells ceased and the 3 remaining pursuers came  to a halt, then turned and scampered off, not,  however, without losing one of their number  before the cover of the plum patch was reached.  "My God!" I cried, as I come up to Morton,  who coolly sprang from his horse at my approach.    "Why did you shoot?"  He gazed at me with surprise. "Why did I  shoot?" he answered with a laugh. "Do you  suppose I would allow myself to be captured or  butchered by Indians?"  I wrung nay hands in anguish, and then told  him of the jol^pjthat was to have been perpetrated upon him. He gazed at me in astonishment and almost terror.  "Is this true?" he asked, bitterly.  I did not answer him, but takingj.iis arm I led  him to the silent form of one man lying on the  grass a few feet away. I turned the body on its  back, and under a mask of red paint we recognized the bony features of the Mexican. A  bloody stain over the heart told the story; he  was already dead before his body touched the  ground.  "This is terrible," said Morton, sadly. "Oh,  had I only known!    Had I only knownf"  The next body was poor, jolly Jack's. Morton's  deadly missile had reached his heart, leaving a  a great wound, from which we turned away  sick at heart and dispirited. The third man  who had suffered the penalty of his prank was  Joe Slock himself. He was still alive, but it  was plain ,;to be seen that his end was fast approaching) The fatal bullet had passed clear  ihrough him and he lay on his side, one hand  nervously grasping his wound, the other shielding his pain-stricken features from the sharp  stubble. As we approached him his face lighted  up with a smile, faint and ghastly.  "The trick didn't work, tenderfoot," he gasped  faintly.    "It's all my fault and I don't blame ye;  you're a brave man, that's what ye are "  "Will you forgive me, Joe," interrupted Morton, falling on his knees  beside the dying man.  " T thought you were real Indians and "  "That's all right," whispered Joe. "I've  nothin' to forgive. I'm only sorry I got poor  Jack and the Mexican in this fix. But���������but it  can't be helped; I'm sorry you shot me in the  back, though. We tried to fool ye but we got  fooled instead, and that's the end of it. Good-by,  I'm going now; is that music there?"  He relinquished the grasp upon his wound and  lifted his blood-stained hand on high. Suddenly  it fell by his side with a dull sound and his jaw7  dropped'. There was a broken sigh, a quiver of  the limbs and poor Joe Stock had gone to his  last account.  got  *  Morton disappeared from the camp that night  and I never heard of him again. We buried the  3 victims of his unerring aim in a single grave  and covered the spot with a pile of stones to  prevent the coyotes from digging up and devouring the remains.  JOHN DOTY ENGINE  OF  TORO^TTO,   OITTAKIO.  MANUFAOTUEEES OP ALL DESCEIPTIONS OF MAEINE AND STATIONAEY  British -Columbia Branch':   520-.Cordova Street, Vancouver.  0. P. ST. JOHN, Manager.  Keep in stock a full supply of engineer and. mill supplies, such as pipe and fittings, brass gbods^ sheet and other  packing, rubber valves, rubber and leather belting,, Dodge wood split-pulleys, oils and lubricants, etc.  Estimates for boilers and'engines made on application.   Mail orders receive prompt attention.  HOISTING  ENGINES AND  SINKING  PUMPS FOR  MINES.  Ho ������������������! For the Slocan Mines!  The undersigned is prepared to pack supplies for mine  owners, miners, and prospectors  FROM   KASLO   CITY  /  TO THE SLOGAN MINES,  //  And to the mines on the headwaters and tributaries of  ���������<#Kaslo and Schroder creeks. Saddle horses will.at all times  be in readiness for travelers bound for the eldorados tributary to Kaslo City. All orders left at Green Brothers'  stores at Kaslo City and, Ainsworth will receive prompt  attention. HUGH McLEOD.  Kaslo City, B. C., December 10th, 1891.  On Slocan Lake at mouth of Carpenter  Creek.  UNTER & McKINNON  DEALERS   TN  ENERAL   MERCHANDISE  AND   MINERS'   SUPPLIES.  There is no need of prospectors or others bound for the  Slocan district bringing in supplies. Our stock is complete and will be sold at reasonable prices. Eldorado City  is not a boom townsite, but is situate within 5 to 9 miles of  all the mines so far discovered in Slocan district, and is  easily accessible from Nelson either summer or winter,  being distant but 60 miles.  The EASIEST and QUICKEST ROUTE in to  the SLOCAN MINES is by way of KASLO  CITY. Pack and saddle horses for the conveyance of parties and supplies will be always on  hand, as soon as it is possible to reach that district in the spring.  tovesi  The Cheapest Place to Buy Stoves, Tinware, etc.,  and to go for any kind of copper, tin,  and sheet-iron work is  W. KIRKUFS, Houston-Ink Block,  NELSON,  IB_ o_  Plasterers and Bricklayers  Will Contract for all Kinds of Work.  Materials furnished  and estimates given on   application  Agents for the sale of LIME.  Address all commnnications to Nelson, B. C.  BABl'S   CRIB*.  Only a baby's tiny crib,  In a darkened, lonely room,   ,  Only the sound of a mother's moan,  Heard in the deepening gloom. o  A baby's footsteps forever still,  The blue eyes closed in sleep���������  The mother's heart o'er flows with tears  As she kneels by the crib to weep.  How the little arms had clasped her  In the happy days gone by,  And the little voice had held her  With a baby's cooing cry;  Now the tiny form is laid at rest,  And the crib is put away;  The mother cannot bear to look  Where once her darling lay.  "He giveth His beloved sleep,"     v  She says to her lonely heart,  And, though she feels that the Lord knows best,  Tears to her eyelids start;  And she bows her head upon the crib,  Her lips form a silent prayer,  Darkness spreads���������the shadows fall,  Not alone���������for God is there.  A Bald Dea<l Betrays  the Presence'of a Diamond.  A Chicago clothing merchant who is wont to  adorn his advertisements with pictures of  himself, in which a big diamond on his  shirt bosom and a big bald head are both conspicuous, recently made a business trip to Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. While at Kootenay station,  some of the toughs who make that tough town  their headquarters recognized the bald head,  and knew that the big diamond was sparkling  somewhere near. They at once put up a job to  get possession of the .sparkle, and the following  from the Spokane Chronicle of the 5th tells how  the job was done:  "The stage that runs between Bonner's  Ferry and Kootenay station, Idaho, was held  up last Saturday and Ed L. Huntley, a clothing  man of Chicago, was robbed of a watch and  diamonds, together valued at about $9000. It-  appears that the highwaymen, whoever they  were, had been keeping an eye on Huntley and  knew that he was on the stage. When it had  reached a certain point between Kootenay and  the Halfway house a man suddenly appeared in  front with a Winchester rifle and commanded  the driver to stop. The order was promptly  obeyed and at the same time another man,  armed with a revolver, leaped into the stage.  All this had been done before nir. Huntley, who,  being much fatigued was asleep, learned anything about it. "The first thing he knew some  one shook him violently and said "Wake up and  dig up and do it cl���������n quick," at the same time  covering him with a huge revolver. There was  nothing to be done but to obey, so he promptly  surrendered his watch and diamonds. The only  article of jewelry left him was a very fine diamond ring which escaped the notice of the robber. Mr. Huntley has ottered $500 reward for  the capture and conviction of the men and $1000  for the return of his diamonds and watch to  John Brueger of Kootenay station.  A   ���������iOiij?reIIoM'i.siii.  In character, in manner, in style, in all things,  the supreme excellence is simplicity.  ?V' ������w m  i^ja������������faEUiAW������Wart5r^K--ASSAj->:*atta������  asaasaBaesafesssSiKSK",  ^*<j^Si'S^r-T������t^������<:w.ite-^ttsj^  ���������i ������  8  1   tr  f    ������*  i r  ' f  f"  II  5  ������M   J  is:  ?\  ! i;  THE  MDTEB:    KELSON,  B.   0.,   SATUDEAY,  JANUAEY  16,   1892.  The Miner is printed on Saturdays, and will be  mailed to subscribers at the following cash-in-advance  .   rates: Three months $1.50, six months $2.50, one'year $L  Contract Advertisements will be inserted at the  rate of $3 an inch (down the column) per month. A  special rate for advertisements of over 2 inches.  Transient Advertisements will be inserted for  15 cents a line for the first insertion and 7 cents a line  for each additional insertion. Twelve lines of 9 words  each make an inch. All advertisements printed for  a.less period than 3 months considered transient and  " must be paid for in advance. Advertisements of less  than 12 lines will be counted, as 12 lines. -  Job Printing in good style at fair rates.   Cards,  D       envelopes, and letter, note, and account papers kept  ' in stock.. ,       ���������'."���������'?.'  Letters to the Editor avill only appear over the  writer's name. Communications with such signatures  as "Old Subscriber," "Veritas," "Citizen," etc., etc.,  will not be printed on any consideration.  Address all Letters : The Miner, Nelson, B. C.  ' EDITORIAL   KEMAKKS.  Nelson is not the only town in Canada whose  people cliffer on the Sunday observance question.  The people of Toronto are discussing the proposal to have the street cars in that city run on  Sunday.    The proposal is, of course, favored by  tlie people who wish to enjoy Sunday as they  please, and, of course, is opposed by those who  believe it to be the duty of every person to remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy.  The  The   one   class   favor the   business-doing   and  pleasure-seeking Sunday which prevails in the  greater part of the United States and .of .Europe;  the other, the quiet, restful Sun day which prevails in Canada.    The Toronto "Week, in com-  menting on the question, states the case fairly.  It says:    "Few thoughtful persons will, we sup^  "pose, doubt that the proposed change, though  .." at the  outset  so  simple  and   comparatively  '���������slight,   involves   a   principle   and    tendency  "which will more or less gradually, but surely,  " carry us to the end indicated.    Indeed, unless  " we seriously misjudge the sentiments of most  "of those who are striving to bring about the  " change, they would frankly admit that their  " opinions and wishes would carry them at once  " to the European  Sunday.      The  end   to   be  " gained by running the cars on the seventh day  "is  to   increase   the  facilities for traveling on  "that  day.    These  increased  facilities are de-  " sired for purposes of pleasure, or of business,  " or of   both combined.    But it goes  without  " saying that the logical complement of the in-  " creased facilities for traveling  for  such pur-  " poses   would   be  increased   facilities   for the  " things    themselves.      The    pleasure-seekers  " would soon demand and have a right to expect  " enlarged opportunities for pleasure, such  as  " theaters, steamboat excursions, and entertain-  " ments of various kinds.    Those intent on business would be equally inclined to keep open  their own offices and places of business and to  expect others to do the same.    We  are  not  " saying all this by way of reproach to those  " who advocate a relaxation of our Sunday re-  " straints,  but in  order that we  may face the  " question fairly, with all that it involves, and  "ask,   before   committing  ourselves:     'Will it  "pay?'    We hope, also, that no one will deem  " us  irreverent, or unmindful of  the claims of  "religion, when  we refuse to regard the ques-  " tion  as  one of religious obligation.    We  are  " not aware of any divine law which binds us to  " observe   the  first   day   of   the   week,   above  " all  other days, as a day either of rest or of  " worship.     Nor do we recognize any power, or  " authority,   or   wisdom   in   our   municipal  or*  " provincial authorities, entitling  them  to en-  " force with the pains and penalties of statute  " law. Sabbath-keeping,  or any other religious  " obligation.    Every question of religious duty  " we regard as pertaining solely to the individ-  " ual conscience.    But nonetheless do we believe  ���������' firmly that the original institution of the Sab-  t i  a  a  11  "bath was based upon a profound  knowledge  "of the needs, bodily and spiritual, of the hu-  " man race, and that in the perpetuation of that  "institution, in its spirit and essence, the high-  " est well-being of the race is deeply involved.  " This View is, we hold, confirm eel by the investigations of scienice, and by the experience of  workers of all classes, whether with brain or  "hand.    We are glad, therefore, to see in Grr eat  " Britain and Europe strongly marked tenden-  " cies in the direction of better Sunday observ-  " ance,on purely utilitarian grounds. This being  " so, is it a time for us, who are, may we not  "say,   exceptionally peaceful   and   prosperous  "under our present system,   to  begin  to   cut  .," loose from the moorings which have hitherto  " secured us a day of  rest and recuperation,  " grateful to tired muscles and brains, and have  0" saved, too, our young people and old from a  "thousand snares and temptations which would  " have much more abounded had our observance  " of Sunday rest been less complete." '.. ^  The case could not be better stated, were the  question one of keeping hotels open on Sunday,  as it is at Nelson, instead of running street cars.  No one, not even the keepers of hotels, will dispute the statement that the highest well-being  of a people requires one day of rest; but every  person, except the ultra religionist, claims the  right to enjoy this day of rest after his or her  own fashion. If the church-goer takes pleasure in  attending church, why should the pleasure-lover  be denied the right of spending an afternoon  playing whist or billiards in a hotel. The  one is no more a sinful act than the other.  If the pleasure-lover sought by legislation to interfere with the rights and privileges of the  church-goer, would the latter quietly submit?  We think not. If a day is to be observed as a  day of rest, allow every individual freedom of  action as to when and how and where it shall be  observed.   It is needless to say that the Sunday law that  went into effect on January 1st was not strictly  observed at Nelson ; neither will it be as long as  people are constituted as they are.  fliepresentjitives   at   Yanconveiy   New   Westminster,  and   Victoria.  (notary public)  Beal Estate, Mining Broker,  AND  Insurance Agent,  WEST  JSAEtEK STREET, NELSON,   B. ���������.  (Fire.)  Representing1���������  CITIZENS  QUEBEC  CITY OF LONDON   "  EQUITABLE (Life.)  REAL ESTATE and MINING INTERESTS in the  district handled to the  best advantage.  Correspondence solicited.  (A. M. Can. Soc. C. E.)  CIVIL ENGINEER AND AK0HITE0T,  TOLSOiV   BUf LDrNtt NELSON, IS. ���������.  Barrister at  Law,   Solicitor,   Notary  Public, Etc.  Office, Victoria street, Kamloops, B. C.  One Per Cent a  can be obtained for small amounts, loaned on short time  and well secured. Apply to HOUSTON & INK, real  estate and mine brokers, Miner building, Nelson.  Nelson Sawmill Co. Ltd,  I'arrt:  At end of FlJirne.  Mill:  Two Miles South of Nelson.  Manufacture  Tlie mill has a capacity of 20,000 feet a day.  .li  ^/  Orders will receive prompt attention.  .������. E". EOLFE, Secretary.  n*w,-.������,-,/Tolson block,  umcest End of Flume.  Telephoned.  The Kootenay Lake Saw-mill is  always ready for business. Lumber��������� good, bad, and indifferent ��������� on  hand or made to order. Telephone  connection with Nelson, Balfour,  and Ainsworth.  G. 0. BUCHANAN.  Nelson, January loth.  The Davies-Sayward  MANUFACTURERS OF  OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.  JE>TITCJ&1 LIST  (DELIVERED AT NELSON,  AINSWORTH,  OR   BALFOUR).  DJ&ESSED.  No. 1 flooring, 4 inch, per M  $32 00  No. 2         "        6 inch,      "       27 00  No. 1 ceiling, 4 inch,       "       32 00  No. 2        "       6 inch,       "       27 00  Rustic,                                "       27 00  Select clear, DD,             "       40 00  No. 1 common, D,            "  25 00  DD,         "       27 00  Bar and counter tops, clear, per foot  10  KOI7GH.  No. 1 common, per M $20 00  No. 2        " "         15 00  Culls, " ������������������.-.     12 00  Shingles, "      4 50  MOLDINGS.  Bead, panel, crown, base, etc., etc., per foot 2������@10c  Mills aft Filot Bay, Kootenay LuJke.  S. 0. Spalding,   .   .   .    Manager  It. F. FMKY, Agent at Nelson.  BSI5EMNER. <& WATSON, Agents at Ainsworth.  <������A  ^mm^w^^is^  BsssE  u^-T-'������^r^^^^  rsm  wmmmmismmmwmwimwmiiimitaiKm  /JW f  n  Ik  %������������������������������������.  i.  w  f    -.  THE   MINER:    NELSON,   B.   0.,   SATUDEAY,   JANUAEY   16,   1892.  EDWARD APPLEWHAITE.  W. GESNER ALLAN,  Coroner. Deputy Sheriff, and Notary Public.  Post office Box 69.  S..E. 00ENEE BAKEEAro JOSEPHINE STEEETS, KELSON, B. 0.  Telephone 2L  M   -  m-  it ���������-  t 3l  Us*  Loans negotiated on  Nelson property. Collections made. Conveyancing documents drawn up.  n Town lots,  lands,  and mining caims handled  on  commission.  'VKOM   SIX-MILS']   OJUSaSK'-'TO . NELSOW.  At one time it was thought by many that the  mo^t feasible route for a railway to connect the  Kootenay Lake country with the  main line of  the Canadian Pacific was from Six-mile Creek,  a siding on the main line a few miles west of  Donald, up the  valley  of  the Beaver; thence  over the su m mit and down the valiey of Duii-  can river to Upper Kootenay lake; thence down  the Dniican to its junction with the Lardo, and  down the latter stream to Kootenay lake; thence  down the west shore of that lake to Balfour;  thence to Nelson, crossing the outlet at The  Narrows, 3 miles west of Balfour. The country  was thoroughly explored by engineers, who  found the valley of the Beaver for the first 10  miles from Six-mile Creek siding to be very narrow, and from the 10th to the 20th nnle the  banks are steep and from 50 to 75 feet high. On  the east side the ground rises in benches from 50  to 100 feet, high to the hills behind, and is closely  timbered witn cedar and hemlock. On the west  side a high range continues'all the way to the  summit, sloping steeply to the bed of the river,  with snowslides,averaging about 2 to the mile.  From the 20th to the 25th mile there is  a succession of marshes and beaver clams,  lightly  timbered  with stunted  spruce.    From  the  25th  to   the   35th    mile   the   timber   has  been partly burned, and the hills come close  to the river in places. There are also stretches  of marsh, lightly timbered with stunted spruce  and hemlock, and cut by imnierous small streams.  From the 35th to the,40th mile (the summit), the  valley is narrow, showing evidences of numerous  snowslides. The summit has an elevation of  .about 5000 feet above sea level. A large part of  the Beaver river conies from a marsh half a mile  long, out of which Duncan river also flows. The  ���������remainder comes from a glacier half a mile west  of the marsh, which seems to have broken off  another further up the> mountains. Up to the  summit the rock is limestone, chiefly a coarse  quality of marble. It changes near the summit,  aud for the. first 20 miles down the slope it is  principally granite. Around the summit the  timber is small spruce and balsam.  Throughout its whole course the Duncan is  very crooked, but keeps a general direction  of  south 21 degrees east.    For the first 7 miles it  flows between steep banks, from 50 to 100 feet  high,   composed  of  solid  rock  covered  with a  few feet of soil bearing good fir and spruce timber.    Between the 47th and 4Sth i n lies it enters a  narrow and crooked canyon about 2 miles long  with  walls of rock   from  100 to 150 feet  high.  About the 50th mile a stream 75 feet wide conies  in from the southwest.    A short distance above  this the Duncan bends sharply eastward and the  valley opeus out for about 2 miles, the benches  being heavily timbered with hemlock and cedar.  From the 52nd to the 67th mile the snowslides  are  almost   continuous, some  of  them   over a  thousand feet wide.    There is one canyon half a  mile  long.      In   places  the   river is  rapid and  crooked; the banks are chiefly granite, with a  little limestone.     The elevation of the.66th mile  is about 2500 feet above the sea level.    From the  (37r 1 i to the 110th mile the valley varies in width,  at  places  being  1^   miles   wide,   with   but  one  suowslide.    At  the 85th mile the  elevation  is  about 1800 feet, and from there to the lake the  fall in the river is slight.    The river bottom is  composed of marshes-covered with poplar and  willow alternating with low cedar and hemlock  flats, and isfmuch cut up by sloughs and channels of the river. The sidehill on both sides of  the river is rough and irregulaivand the timber  nearly all destroyed. There are no large streams  on the west side, but4 large valleys come in on  the east. -.'"'"'".  , The first mile and a half of the west shore of  Upper Kootenay lake is a series of limestone  bluffs from 100 to 200 feet high. The remainder  of  the distance is sloping sidehill heavily tim  bered   to  the   water's  edge.  On the east side  the character of the shore being similar to  there are 2 bays about 1^ miles long and.3 tniles  apart  that on the west side  From the lake to the junction pf Duncan and  Lardo rivers the sidehill is easy with short  stretches of flats, the latter flooded at high-  water. From the j unction of the rivers to  Kootenay lake there is a large flat, from 1 to 3  miles wide, generally flooded at high water and  very much cut up by channels of the river.  Following the west side of Kootenay lake, the  shore line is very rough, with numerous bluffs  of limestone and slate.    These 'bluffs rise perpendicularly from 50 to 100 feet above the water  and then run back at a steep slope.    Many of  them are wearing away and falling into the lake.  About 20-miles from.-the head of the lake Kaslo  creek, a stream about 50 feet  wide, enters the  lake.    Beyond it the shore is again rough and  rocky, but a. valley runs for 3 miles a short distance back from the shore.    From the 23rd mile  to the 30th the shore is broken by small knolls  and ravines for the first 3 miles and is rough and  crooked for  the next 4.    At the 30th mile the  shore turns sharply into the bay at Ainsworth,  and from there to Ainsworth, a distance of 5  ���������miles, the sidehill is sloping.    From Ainsworth  to the 41st mile the shore is rough and irregular,  part of the way walls of crumbling limestone  rise  almost   perpendicularly   from   the  water.  The timber is nearly all destroyed.    From the  41st to the 45th mile there is a bay (Queen's) ending in a low wooded point at the outlet.  From the outlet to The Narrows, 3 miles, the  ground is level and the greater part of the timber has been burned. From The Narrows to  Nelson, 20 miles, the north shore of the outlet or  west arm of Kootenay lake is comparatively  level but indented with bays; the south shore is  more rough, with rocky bluffs coming down to  the water's edge in several places. Much of the  timber has been destroyed. The lengths of the  several parts explored are estimated as follows:  Miles  Six-mile Creek to the summit   Summit to head of Upper Kootenay lake   Head of Upper Kootenay lake to head of Kootenay lake  Head of Kootenay lake to the outlet at Balfour   Outlet to Nelson   T  10  70  25  45  23  203  NOTARY  PUBLIC.  CONVEYANCING-  Town lots, lands, and mining claims handled  on commission.   Conveyancing1 documents drawn up.  Correspondence solicited.  Office:   No. 13 East Baker Street, NELSON, B. 0.  ���������AB������JTAff, (all paid "I>>, $13,000,000  REST,        .        .        .        . 0,000,000  Sir DONALD A. SMITH   Hon.  GEO. A. DRUMMOND,  E. S. CLOUSTON,    President   Vice-President   General Manager  NELSON B.KANOH, 13 EAST BAKES STKEET.  Branches in London (England), New York and Chicago,  and i'h the principal cities in Canada;  Buy  and >&e  5<3ll sterling exchange and cable tranfers;  f .  Grant commercial and travelers' credits, available in any  part of the world ;  Drafts issued; Collections made; Etc.  S   BANK   BRANCH  Rate of interest at present four per cent.  (Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862.)  CAPITAL (pstirt up), ������000,000    .    $8,000,000  (With power to increase.)  ISBSSBtlBfcVlli; FBJXB>, -������330,000'   .    .   .'1,100,000  BRA^TCECESi  Victoria, 13. O, San Francisco, California,  Vancouver, B. C, Portland, Oregon,  NevvWi stminstcr,B.C,   Seattle, Washington,  Nanaimo, B. C, Tacoma, Washington.  Kamloops, B. C.  HEAD OFFICE: (JO Lombard street, LONDON, England.  AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS:  CANADA���������Bank of Montreal and branches;  Canadian Bank of Commerce and branches ;  Imperial Bank of Canada and branches;  Commercial Bank of Manitoba ; and  Bank of Nova Scotia.  UNITED STATES���������Agents Bank of Montreal, New York;  Bank of Montreal, Chicago.  A HSrancla of litis fl������;i0i!v will he established in the  Biuotenay B>ake fl&istrief (at NKSjSHN. li. <'.) as soon as  the season opens in the spring of 1S!)2, and will undertake  collections, remittances (to and from all points), and a general banking business. WM. C. WARD,  Victoria, B. C, December 10th, 1891. Manager.  PIONEER FINANCIAL HOUSE OF NELSON.  Transacts a general financial business.  Interest allowed on deposits at best rates.  Monej'' to loan on business paper and against securities.  GKNEKAL  AUENCY  London & Lancashire Life Assurance Co.;  Taylor's celebrated safes;  Accident Insurance Company of North America.  CIIAS. E. TAYLOR, Manager. Ill  ^Sw���������a2J3iitt*������������*-������H������taS'.Wfti-**<������W1������jj  M������23sSia&e3������BS������5a*lB������5^  sasi������������r������Bitt9isS!sasBSs^S^^?SSSS^  '4J^'HS*:^V>rtV.-j  laS5S*S535^iSSi95j,  Saras esshsk'  S3i4ff'ja5ffifeKSikSS2SS3!2f  igsasieesii-  ST  THE  MINEE:    NELSON,  B.   0.,  SATUDEAY,  JANUAEY  16,  1892.  & *  r '  *>,.  i? *  JK  ,"���������1     ������������������  V   '  t"3 "������  it \������ ~  *>   J 5-      H  jf'kk  ft ll>5  -���������i I  It*  It-  I  r>  !-<  t t  1|S  MH^'I  ���������yi-ivpf  ������t?iiiM  LAND   NOTICES.  Notice is hereby giveii that 90 days after we intend to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works, British  Columbia, for permission to purchase the following described tract of land, situate1 in Webt Kootenay district:  Commencing at a stake marked E. V. Bod well, II. Shear-  an, and W. Gesncr Allan's south west corner post, about':]-'  of a mile west of Grohman creek on the north bank of the  Kootenay river about 2 miles west-of the town of Nelson,  thence north 40 chains, thence east 10 chains, thence south  40 chains more or: less to shore-line of Kfootenay river,  thence west 10 chains more or less following the sinuosities  of the shore-line of the Kootenay river in a westerly direction to initiabstakc; containing 1(50 acres more or less.  "     E. V. BOD WELL,  ���������������������������������������������HENRY SHEAR AN,.  W. GESNER ALLAN.  Nelson, B. C, November 2Sth, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that SO days after date I intend to  apply to the chief"commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district:' Commencing at  a post rnarded R. B's S. W. corner post, about 9 miles cast,  of the town of Nelson, British Columbia, on the north bank  of the .Kootenay river, above high water'mark, thence  north 10 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south 40  chains, more or less to bank of Kootenay river, thence west  following shore line of river to place of commencement;  containing 160 acres more or less.  Nelson, December 5th, 1891.   RICHARD BLUNDELL.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked "W. G. McLean's southwest corner" (said  post being located on Slocan river about 4 miles south os  Slocan lake), running thence north (following meanderingf  of river) 80 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south SO  chains, thence west 40 chains to initial post; containing 320  acres more or less. W. C. McLEAN.  Slocan River, October 27th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land in West Kootenay district: Commencing on the west  shore of Kootenay lake, at H. Anderson's northeast corner,  thence west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence east to  the lake shore, thence following said lake shore southerly  to initial point; containing 160 acres more or less.  JOSHUA DA VIES.:.  Kootenay Lake, B. C, October oth, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land in West Kootenay district: Commencing at the  'northeast corner of Joshua Davies's purchase on the west  shore of Kootenay lake, near the mouth of Fletcher creek,  thence west 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence east  to the lake shore, thence foliowitig said shore southerly to  initial point; containing 160 acres more or less.  WILBUR A. HENDRYX.  Kootenay Lake, B. C, October 5th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked Ross Mahon's S. E. corner, situate on west  bank Slocan river, about ������ mile about forks, thenee running 40 chains north, thence 80 chains west, thence 40  chains south, thence 80 chains east to place of commencement; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, November 21st, 1891. ROSS MAHON.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked "John A. Watson's southeast corner" (said  post being near the junction of Carpenter and Seaton  creeks and about 6 miles east of Slocan lake), thence running north 40 chains, thence west 80 chains, thence south 40  chains, thence east 80 chains to initial post; containing 320  acres more or less. JOHN A. WATSON.  Dated, October 26th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked G. M. L., S. E. corner, about 2 miles from  Kootenay lake on Kaslo creek, thence running north 40  chains, thence west 40 chains, thence south"40 chains,  thence east 40 chains to place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less. G. M. LINDSAY.  Nelson, November 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works tor  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a post marked G. B. W., S. W.  corner post, situate about 20 chains north of the southeast  corner of Angus McGillivray's land, about one-half mile  cast of Slocan lake and about 10 chains south of Carpenter  creek, thence east 40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence  west 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to the place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less.  Ainsworth, October 31st, 1891. G. B. WRIGHT.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land: Commencing at a stake placed near the outlet of  Slocan lake, marked Alfred Hill's S. W. corner, about three-  quarters of a mile from Slocan lake outlet and one-half  mile from Slocan river, thence running east 40 chains,  thence north 40 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence south  40 chains to point of commencement; containing 160 acres  more or less.   . ALFRED HILL.  Nelson, December 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that, 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase a tract of land situated in West  Kootenay district and described as follows: Commencing  at a post marked A. M. Wilson's N. W. corner, placed on  the east shore of Slocan lake about 200 yards north of a  large creek which flows into the lake about 3 miles north  of what is known as Carpenter creek, thence east 40 chains,  thence south to the lake shore, thence following the meanderings of the lake shore in a westerly and northerly direction to tlie point of commencement; containing 160 acres  more or less. , A. M. WILSON.  Ainsworth, November 2nd, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60'days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Ivootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked "John G. McGuigan's south west corner"  (said post being located about 3 miles north of Carpenter  creek and 10 east of Slocan lake), running thence north 40  chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence  west 40 chains to initial post; containing 160 acres more or  less. JOHN G. McGUIGAN.  Nelson, November 23rd, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land in West Kootenay ^district: Commencing at a post  oh the west shore of Kootenay lake, about one-half mile  south of Fletcher creek, thence west 40 chains more or less,  thence south 40 chains, thence east to the lake shore, thence  following the lake shore to the initial point; containing 160  acres more or less. H. ANDERSON.  Kootenay Lake, B. C, October 5th, 1891.   P.,-  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked C.C.Sproue's N. E. corner post, placed on  the Slocan trail about 4 miles from the forks of the Slocan /  river, thence south 40 chains, thence west SO chains following the meanderings of the river, thence north 40 chains,  thence east 80 chains to the place of commencement; containing 320 acres more or less. C. C. SPROULE.  Nelson, December 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that I intend to apply, within 60  days, to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to purchase the following described tract of land,  which is situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing  at a post marked E. Corningfs northwest corner, planted  oh the shore of Slocan lake, running thence south 40 chains,  thence west 40 chains, more or less, to Slocan river, thence  north following meanderings of river to shore of lake,  to initial post; containing 160 acres more or less.  Dated, December 17th, 1891. E. CORNING.  Notice is hereby given that 90 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a stake on the cast bank of the Slocan river, about 9 miles  from Slocan lake, and marked A. A's S. E. corner post,  thence running north 40 chains, thence west 40 chains,  thence south 40 chains more or less to the river, thence following the meanderings of the river to point of commencement ^containing 160 acres more or less.        A. ADAMS.  Nelson, December 8th, 1891.,  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date we intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a" post, marked "Hunter & Hume's southeast corner,"  planted 300 yards south of a creek about 2 miles south of  the stream known as Carpenter creek, thence north 80  chains, thence west 20 chains to the shore of Slocan lake,  thence south 80 chains following the lake shore, thence  east 20 chains, following the lake shore to initial post;  containing 160 acres more or less.  WILLIAM HUNTER,  Nelson, December 9th, 1891.        J. FRED HUME.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in W'est Kootenay district: Commencing at  a stake.near the outlet of Slocan lake marked David B.  Bogle's 'northwest corner post, thence running east 40  chains, thence south 80 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence  north SO chains; containing 320 acres more or less.  Nelson, 31st December, 1891. DAVID B. BOGLE.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked C. D. Kinnee's southeast corner about 40  chains west of Kaslo bay, thence running 40 chains west,  thence 40 chains north, thence 40 chains east, thence 40  chains south ; containing 160 acres. C. D. KINNEE.  Ainsworth, December 29th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post on the extreme north end of Slocan lake, marked E.  A. Bielenberg's S. W. corner post, thence running north 40  chains, thence east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence  folloAving the shore of the lake to initial post.  E. A. BIELENBERG.  Ainsworth, December 10th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked J. H. Brownlee's northwest corner, at the  center of the forks of Kaslo river, about 4 miles west of  Kaslo City, thence south 40 chains, thence east 40 chains,  thence north 40 chains, thence west 40 chains to the place  of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less..  J. H. BROWNLEE.  Dated this 26th day of November, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that 90 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a stake marked B. H. L's S. W. corner post, about high- ;;  water mark on north^bank of Kootenay river, about 6  miles east of the town of Nelson, British Columbia, thence  north 80 chains, thence east 80 chains, thence south to bank  of Kootenay river, thence following the sinuosities of the  Kootenay river to the point of commencement, comprising ,  450 acres more or less. BENJAMIN HENRY LEE.  Nelson, B. C, 30th November, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that we intend to apply within 00  days to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to purchase the following described tract of land,  which is situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing  at a post (marked M. Malloy and G. A. Bigelow, northwest  corner) planted on the shore of Slocan lake at a point about  100 chains north of Carpenter creek, running thence 80  chains east, thence 40 chains south, or to the north line of  the land applied for by Angus McGillivray and by J.  Fletcher and A. S. Far well, thence 80 chains west, or to shore  of lake, thence north, following shore of lake, to initial  post; containing 320 acres more or less.  M. MALLOY,  Darted, December 16th, 1891. G. A. BIGELOW.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend to  apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for permission to purchase the following described tract of land,  situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing on shore  of Slocan lake at a stake marked J. R. Cook's southwest  corner, thence 80 chains north on east side of Hume &  Hunter's purchase application, thence 40 chains east, thence  80 chains south, thence 40 chains west to place of comf  mericement; containing 320 acres more or less': '..J/  Dated, December 6th, 1891. JOHN R. COOK^v  "         ; ���������..��������� : _____ ���������������_- i\'r^'fc������-y\'  PRIVATE   B8LL   NOTICES. ^    '  Notice is hereby given that application will be made to1J  the legislative assembly of the province of British Columbia, at its next session, for an act to incorporate a company for the purpose of * constructing, maintaining, and  equipping a railway from some point on the Columbia  river, at or near the southern boundary of the province, to  Kootenay lake at or near the town of Nelson, via Salmon  river and Cottonwood , Smith creek, with power to construct and maintain branch lines; and also to construct  and operate telegraph and telephone lines in connection  with the said rail vvay.  WILSON, WOOTTON & BARNARD.  Solicitors for applicants.  Dated 25th day of November, 1891.  - Notice is hereby given that.at the next session of the legislature of British Columbia application will be made for the  passage of a privatec.bill authorizing the applicants to construct, operate,.'and- maintain tramways, for tlie purpose of  conveying passengers, freight, and ores from some convenient point near Nelson to any point or points within a radius  of 25 miles from Nelson, also to take and use from the  Kootenay river, in the vicinity of the falls of the said river,  sojnuch of the waters as may be necessary to obtain therefrom 5000 horse power, for the purposes of generating electricity to be used either as a motive power for the said  tramways, or other works of the applicants, or to be supplied by the applicants to consumers as a motive power  for hauling, pumping, lighting, smelting, drilling, or for  any other purposes for which it may be applied or be required; with power to the applicants to construct and  maintain buildings, erections, raceways, or other work's, in  connection therewith for improving and increasing ther  water privilege; and also to enter upon and expropriate  lands for a site for power houses, and for dams, raceways,  or such other works as shall be necessary; also to erect, lay,  construct, and maintain all necessary works, buildings,  pipes, poles, wires, appliances, or conveniences necessary or  proper for the generating and transmitting of electricity or  power within the a,rea above described.  BOD WELL & IRVING, Solicitors for applicants.  November 12th 1891.  APPUQATION FOR GROWN GRANT.  Notice is hereby given that J. L. Retallack, as agent for  George C. Howe, has filed the necessary papers and made  application for a crown grant in favor of the mineral claim  known as the "Fourth," situate in Hot Springs camp, West  Kootenay district. Adverse claimants, if any, will forward  their objections within 60 days from date of publication.  N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, December 14th, 1891.  Notice is hereby given that Scott McDonald, as agent for  A. W. McCune, has filed the necessary papers and made  application for for a crown grant in favor of the mineral  claim known as the "Libby," situate in Hot Springs camp,  West Kootenay district. Adverse claimants, if any, will  forward their objections within 60 days from date of publication. N. FITZSTUBBS, gold commissioner.  Nelson, November 23rd, 1891.  The Kootenay Smelting and Trading  Syndicate, Limited, of Eevelstoke, B. 0.  are prepared to sample and purchase  all kinds of  Gold, Silver, and Lead  Prices and all information furnished on application.  J. CAMPBELL, manager.  i^������������iiimi^  -���������Jilt i  i. .������������������it'.  fp--.������:  ������.'>���������:���������'������������������ I  M  m  w  7  THE   MOTEK:    KELSON,   JB.   0.,   SATUDEAY,   JANUAEY   16,   1892.  **'���������*'_. .  Cor. Baker and Ward Sts.  NELSON, B. O.  H.   &   T.   MADDEN  Proprietors.  The Madden is Centrally Located,  with a frontage towards Kootenay river, and is newly  furnished throughout.  O? HC _B      TABLE  is supplied with everything in the market, the kitchen  being under the immediate supervision of Hugh  Madden, a caterer of large experience.  THE BAR IS STOCKED WITH THE BEST  brands of beer, ale, wine, whisky, and cigars.  KOOTENAY HOTEL  p   Vernon Street, near Josephine,  AXEL  JOHNSON,  PROPRIETOR.  THE HOTEL OVERLOOKS THE KOOTENAY  its guests thus obtaining splendid views  of both mountain and river.  THE   ROO  THE  TABLE  are comfortable in size and       is acknowledged   the best  newly furnished. in the mountains.  THE   ZB^IR,  is stocked  with the best liquors and cigars procurable.  No whiskies sold except Hiram Walker & Sons'  celebrated brands.  Ksist BSaker Street,   kelson,  Is one of the best hotels in Toad Mountain district,  and is the headquarters for prospectors and  working miners.  The Table is not Surpassed by that of any Hotel  in the Kootenay Lake country.  At the Bar is Dispensed Fine Liquors and Cigars,  and the bed-rooms are newly furnished.  MALOXE   ������&   TKEGILLIJS PKOI������RiETOI_8  TKA1JL,   15. ���������.  TOPPING & HANNA Proprietors  dwood Table ; iiootl I5e<ls ; HByus-Closc Liquors.  SQUELCIff   SHARP-PRACTICE. OPERATORS.  As several parties at Nelson and Ainsworth  have been victimized lately by sharpers, who  posed as rn in ing experts ill the employ of. men  of large capital, it <hs jnst as well that the  doings of these gentry be exposed. The Miner  knows little more of the parties referred, to in  the following, from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer of December 23rd, than that mr. Harrop  has for 2 years or more been a resident of Ainsworth, and is considered a trustworthy man.  Hardee has written parties in Ainsworth that  he could satisfactorily explain matters. It is,  however, the duty of our people to show by  their acts that they do hot countenance sharp  practices, no more in making deals for mining  r claims than in other business transactions:  "John P. Hardee, who for several months past  has made his headquarters in Seattle posing as  a mining expert, Was arrested last evening on a  warrant charging him with larceny by embezzlement.     The  warrant  was  issued  by justice  Von Tobel at the instance of H. K. Owens, the  civil engineer, who alleged  that Hardee made  away with $500 belonging to him and was the  means of his losing $500 more.    Mr. Owens says  that instead of a mining expert Hardee.is a bunco .  steerer and   has   merely adopted   his   present  methods in order that he might make big money  more freely.    According to mr. Owens,'the circumstances leading up to the arrest are as follows:     Some time  ago  Hardee went   to   mr.  Owens and told  him in  confidence that there  was a chance for a profitable mining investment  in the Kootenay country.    The matter was investigated and mr. Owens learned to his own  satisfaction that  such-was  the case, so he entrusted to Hardee's keeping $1000 in drafts���������one  for  $500 and 2  others for $250 each.    He was  warned that Hardee was not "straight," and so,  to guard against any danger that Hardee might  appropriate the  money to his own use, he had  the drafts drawn in his own' favor and endorsed  them payable to Ernest Harrop.    Harrop is the  owner of a mine in the Kootenay country, and  had arranged through Hardee to bond it to mr.  Owens for $1000, the deal -being made through  Hardee.    When  Hardee arrived in the Kootenay country mr. Harrop had changed his mind  about bonding his mine, and so. refused to live  up to the terms of his agreement.    Then it was,  according to mr. Owens, that Hardee succeeded  in inducing Harrop to indorse the drafts.    For  his aid in the transaction Hardee turned over to  Harrop the  $500 draft and kept the two $250  drafts himself.    On December 15th Hardee returned to Seattle from the Kootenay region, but  kept clear of mr.   Owens.    The latter lea.rned  yesterday that Hardee had cashed his two drafts  at the National Bank of Commerce.    He immediately swore out the warrant that caused his  arrest.   Harrop cashed the $500 draft in. Spokane  at the First National bank, and it is claimed that  he is now in British Columbia.    Mr. Owens has  engaged   attorneys   on   the   British   side   and  through them has procured a warrant for the  arrest of Harrop upon  a charge of larceny by  embezzlement.    Shortly after   his   arrest   last  evening Hardee went before justice Von Tobel  and   furnished bonds  in the  sum of $1500,   his  bondsmen being William   Langdon  and J.   T.  Baker.    Hardee could not be found last evening,  and consequently his side of the story was not  learned."  Mil lions   of   iSritisIs   Money    In vested   in   Colorado.  There are over $100,000,000 of English capital  invested in Colorado.    In Denver there are London agents who act directly.for English investors.    In every direction you can see English investors.    While this may also be true of other  western states, it is not so marked elsewhere as  in Colorado.    They take hold of anything that  looks substantial and promises fair profit���������and  as to that they will raise money in London for  what an American  wouldn't touch,  as  to  the  margin of the profit.    They are rather conservative, and  prefer safety to large   returns, and  therefore seek substantialities.    When an Englishman goes out there to look the ground over  he rarely goes away without going into something, and  a, year or two later you'll see him  back again, most likely to remain.   Your typical  London speculator-investor knows more about  Colorado than any other state in the Union.  (Corner West Vernon and Stanley Streets, NELSON, B. C.  Telephone 43.  PLRST-CLASS "IN   EVERY   RESPECT.  The International has a comfortably furnished parlor for  ladies, and therooms���������are large and furnished  newly throughout.  THE  TABLE  IS  NOT  SURPASSED  by any hotel in the Kootenay Lake country.  A share of transient trade solicited.  THE SAMPLE-E00M"IS STOCKED WITH CHOICE CIGARS  AND THE FITTEST BRANDS OF' LIQUORS. ! ^  JAS. DAWSON  B. CRADDOCK  PROPRIETORS  "The  Finest Hotel in  Toad   Mountain  District."  THE SILVER KING  Corner West Baker and Ward Streets,  NEJLSOtf, 15. C. ���������''���������������������������:  JOHNSON   &   MAHONEY,  PROPRIETORS.  The Silver King is a new building and furnished with new  furniture from kitchen to attic.   The table will not  be equalled by any hotel in Nelson.  Telephone 21.  Furniture and Pianos!  Jas. McDonald & Go.  Kelson and Revelstoke,  carry full lines of all kinds of furniture for residences,  hotels, and offices.   Mattresses made to order, and  at prices lower than eastern and coast.  They are also agents for  Evans Pianos and Doherty Organs.  XKLSON   STORK :  No. 4 BBouston ������V Ink BSiiBhliii<>, .Josephine Street.  ~R. J. M0WAT & CO.  Contractors and Builders,  SEASONED   LUMBER  always on hand for store fittings, desks, tables, etc.  Will contract to erect all kinds of buildings and guarantee  satisfaction.   Shop: corner Josephine and Bluff sts..  m  m  m  WG  ������r_Atir  yy'z  *"   '?      ���������     "5* > "  :l- '     J."  *       *   -      _   1 ������������������  ���������f :-,J������"���������ft?'���������-*^"a11 ���������'���������ipr?~i' ������������������ TT.'y'Js"- " '-Ti'-v������������������'������������������.> 'T-"���������~  - -i *_> *$  , l"   n  .1 ������ *  ;.' -\  ft  ffi&Al  p-.ti-'fA  riS.hrj ���������  saw  ������������������..'.���������i-y  ������n������-"*"!.* -���������_���������-  *i S^iS^_^^oSaS3^i_^ESffias____Si_2a!_������  KCS3������53E32SSC&eSi  :Iir/^^sA^v.j;  feriEcvtaij'*-'**-"  i^^^^y^^i^^^^w^^M^ui^^  S2SaiaSiiisi  ������  8  THE  MIKEE:    NELSON   B.   0.,   SATUDEAY,  JANUAEY 16,   1892.  m jj  ���������is?  M   i  V'  i  li  Dealers in Dry Goods, Groceries, Provisions, Canned Goods, Hardware, Etc.   Miners' Supplies a Specialty.  The stock is Ml arid complete in every Department, and the pubHc will find it to their advanto^ ,,  and compare Prices.  Telephone 27.  7, 9, and 11 East Vernon Street, NELSON, B. 0.  'SMALL -NUGGETS 'OF   NEWS.  The rumor that Wilson & Perdue were unable  to get their band of beef cattle in from the Colville valley is contradicted by a member of the  firm, who states that the cattle will be brought  in, dead or alive, notwithstanding all rumors to  the contrary. ,  Captain Bob Gray states that he is putting" the  fine touches on the steamer Spokane,-now lying  at the Galena's old landing below Bonner's  Ferry, so as to be "in it" when navigation is resumed in the spring. The Spokane will have  20 staterooms, a spacious dining saloon, and all  other 'modern appointments.. She will be run  direct between Bonner's Ferry and Nelson.  . After an interruption of 20-odd days, telegraphic communication is again established between Nelson and Spokane. It is claimed by  the. Canadian Pacific people here that the long  delay was altogether the fault of the line repairers of the Corbin line, who reported to their  manager at Spokane that the Canadian Pacific  people did not intend to repair the line north  from the Pend d'Orille until spring.  LAMP   NOTICES-  Notice- is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend  to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land, situate in West Ivootenay district: Commencing- at  a post marked J. Hamilton's northeast corner, planted 350  feet above the bridge of the Columbia & Kootenay railway  where the same crosses the Kootenay rapids, on the north  side of the river, thence west 20 chains, thence south SO  chains, thence east 20 chains, thence following the shore of  the Kootenay river to the place of commencement; containing 160 acres more or less, excepting right of way of  railroad company in area claimed. J. HAMILTON.  Nelson, January 11th, 1S92.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date I intend  to appljr to the chief commissioner of lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described tract of  land situate in West Kootenay district: Commencing at  a post marked J. D. Townley's northeast corner, planted  on the south shore of the Kootenay river about 500 feet east  of the bridge of the Columbia & Kootenay railway where  same crosses the Kootenay rapids, thence 20 chains south,  thence SO chains west, thence 20 chains north, to the shore  of the Kootenay river, thence in an easterly direction following the shore of the Kootenay river to the place of commencement; containing 100 acres more or less, excepting  right of way of railroad company in area claimed.  Nelson, January llfch, 1S92. J. D. TOWNLEY.  PROPRIETOR OF THE  W.  J. WILSON.  W. PERDUE.  IPIOIDTJEimiR,  RAL AND  Corner Bluff .and. Ward Streets,  NELSON, B. C.  PROPRIETORS  OF  ..AT.  Will undertake a.ny work or contract in which pack animals or teams can be used.   Will furnish  SADDLE AND PACK ANIMALS  to parties who wish to examine mines and claims  in Toad Mountain district.  WILL   OONTKAOT  TO   0AEEY PASSENGEES  and baggage to and from hotels ; also, freight  to and from steamboat wharves and  railway depots.  CONTRACT TO GRADE LOTS  IN  NELSON,  Stove and Cord wood for Sale.  NELSON AND ABTSWOETE.  Will contract to supply mining companies and steamboats  with fresh meats, and deliver same at any mine or  landing in the Kootenay Lake country.  CORRAL ASMD STABLING  AT NELSON,  where saddle and pack animals can always be hired, and  teams obtained for job teaming.  During the winter  EXPEESS   PAE0ELS  AND   LIGHT   PEEIGHT  will be promptly forwarded to and from  Colville, Trail, Nelson, Balfour, Pilot Bay, and Ainsworth.  John Houston.  Charles H. Ink.  Houston & Ink,  nelson oefice and market,  Telephone 32.  '       _^^  BUY AND SELL  Town Lots and  Mineral   Claims,  ox cwsamission.  Have now for sale 2 of the best hotels in Nelson ; choice  Baker street corner and Vernon street inside lots ; lots in  Ainsworth; and mineral claims in Toad Mountain district.  Offiee  in  Miner ISiiildiag,  Nelson,   SI. C.  Telephone 10.  Physician, Surgeon, and Accoucheur,  Telephone 45. Office:   Stanley and Victoria Streets.  Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians of London ;  Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England.  Corner Silica and Ward Streets. Kelson.  Telephone 40.  Groceries, Hardware, Boots, Shoes,  Clothing, and Gents' Furnishings,  mors' Supplies a Specialty.  WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT.���������Wines, Liquors, and Cigars. AG-ENTS: Val Blatz Brewing Co., Milwaukee; Northwest iErated Water  Co.; Gooderham & Worts' Whisky.  T_e-XJ_E_E3_E_EO_ISr_E3    8.  v ���������������"_,������������������.  ttt&ttttST&S&T?^^  WMmmmmmmmsm

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