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The Ledge May 7, 1914

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THE  OLDEST  MINING  CAMP  NEWSPAPER   IN  BRITISH   COLUMBIA>M0 ^
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Vol.   XX.
GREENWOOD, B. C, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1914
No. 43
w
Wallpapers For Spring
New  Stock Now  In
INSPECTION INVITED
JOHN  L.
Books, Stationery, Kodaks, Wallpaper, Etc,
G. A. RENDELL
DRY GOODS, BOOT�� A >SHOES.
PHONE   17
Boys
Received this week
Boys Tweed Suits
Boys Kaliki Suits
Pants & Bloomers
Childrens' Buttoned
Shoes in Tan and Black
GREENWOOD.  B.C.
I
Greenwood's   Big faniiture
We Have Received This Week a Shipment of
Baby Carriages, Gocarts,  Carriers
and Sidewalk Sulkies
A Nice Selection to Choose From
Opposite Postoffice. GREEHWOOD, B. C. , Phone 27
0<K>000000��<K>��0<>0000<>^^
JUST ARRIVED AT
The Greenwood Grocery
A SHIPMENT OF
Chiver's Jams, Jellies, Bottled Fruits
Marmalade and Lemon Curd
ALSO
SNIDER S HEINZE AND BLUE LABEL CATSUPS
Lee & Bryan
Phone 46,
O-fedar   flop
Ut POLISH1Tir
Makes it easy to clean those hard-to-get
at places. Gathers all the dust from
everywhere and holds it. No side straining sweeping motion required.
O-CEDAR MOP <   -   $1.50
0-CedarOil 25&50cBottles
&S&&S&5S&&5&5&2&
Around Home
A. L. WHITE
PHONE 1G
New an! Second Hand
r
Layer Cate
35, 40, 50 and 60cts.
William C. Arthurs
THE BREAD 4 CAKE BAKER
Vienna Bakery. Greenwood
DRESSMAKING
Rooms in
Btore.
MISS DREVER
Miller Blk.  over Drag
JEWELRY HEEDS FIXING?
You have come to headquarters for
having it put in order again. Whatever
may be required we assure you
OUR JEWELRY REPAIRING
will give entire satisfaction. We put
in repair a watch of any make or re.
pair and make good as new your pins,
chains, bracelets or any other article of
jewelry.
A. LOGAN & Co.
GREENWOOD.     -     B. C.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
For Seed Oats, Wheat
���AND���
Dr. Rusk's Famous
Chick Food
���TALK TO���
ADAMS
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
^oooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
WALTER   G   KENNEDY
GREENWOOD,  B. C
WHOLESALE  AND   RETAIL
A Full Stock of First Class Pipes.       Pipe Repairs
a Specialty.
WANTS. Etc
Eggs For Hatching
ANCONAS, WHITE. WYANDOTTES
From prize winning birds at
Provincial and all local shows.
$2.00 per 15.   $5 per 50.
RICHARD V. RAMSDEN,
Box 995. Nelson, B. C.
Sinele Comb White Leghorns E��rs
For Hatching:
Prize winners Greenwood Fall  Fair
1912-13.   These settings are from birds of
a good laying strain, and any infertile
eggs will be replaced.   All orders promp-
ly  filled until the end of May.   Two
dollars per setting of thirteen.
F. H. HUTT,
Mother Lode Mine.
Greenwood, B.C
For Sale
Fare Bred Belgian Pigeons.   Apply to
C.MEGG-TT,
Grand Forks.
Keep that fly out. Wire
screens and screen doors in. all
sizes at Smith's,
For Sale
Eggs For Hatching From My Great
Laying Pen of S. C White Leghorns $2.00
per setting. Barred Rock Eggs from my
big winners and heavy winter layers,
$3.00 per sitting.
F. J. HARBINSON,
Phoenix, B.C
For Sale
3 roomed house and lot, good basement, chicken coop, in Anaconda.   For
I particulars apply,
F.W.McLATNB.
See the bungalow plans at
Kinney's,
Robert Wood has returned from
the coast.
For non-rustable bronze wire
see Kinney.
Joe Borque is yisiting relatives
in Montreal.
Curlew Creamery butter. G.
A. Rendell,
Charles Russell takes orders
for Goodyear tires.
Pure maple syrup absolutely
guaranteed.   At Rendell's.
The motor��cycle raffle will take
place at Kennedy's on May 12.
"Twenty-two" calibre rifles and
ammunition in stock at Kennedy's.
One Dollar shirt sale is in full
swing.   Don't miss this. Smith's.
Sunday chicken dinners are a
specialty at Hanson's Hotel in
Rock Creek,
Captain Harry Johns was in
town last weeki having recently
returned from California.
See those Hornurig spoons at
Kennedy's; they're? still the most
fashionable thing in Trout circles.
Miss Maggie McDonald, formerly of Phoenis, has opened a
dressmaking shop in Revelstoke.
The Greenwood Fall Fair will
be held upon September 24 and
25. It is time the prize lists were
issued. 0
On Monday a marriage license
was issued to Herbert Holmes of
Beaverdell, and Pauline Hiel-
scher of Midway.
A company of B, C. Copper
Co. officials, autoed on Monday,
from; Princeton _ to. Greenwood, in
seven hours andtWlmimiiles.'::
About 75 per cent of the stock
of the B.C, Copper Co., has been
deposited for exchange into
shares of the Canada Copper Co.
Dan McDonald, of the Mother
Lode mine, left on Monday for his
home in Bridgeport, Cape Breton.
He will be ten days travelling to
to reach that point.
The Greenwood Rebekah Lodge
will give a Kewpie card party on
Monday, May 18, at 8.30 p.m.
Kewpie prizes will be awarded
the winners. Admission 25 cents,
refreshments included.
A dance will be given in the
Old Masonic Hall this (Wednesday) night by the ladies of the
Sacred Heart Church. The music
will be supplied from Phoenix
and supper served upstairs.
Last Friday morning at the
Rawhide mine, James McCormick
and Thomas Pritchard were
killed by powder gas. The use
of the Pulmoter might have saved
these men, and there should be
one in every mining camp.
Two of the worlds most famous
dancers, Mr.   Bert French   and
Miss Alice Eis, will be seen in
the wonderful three-part Kalem
production, "The Vampire." at
the Star Theatre on Thursday
and Friday.    These   renowned
artists  appear  in   the   theatre
scene of the picture and present
their ''Vampire Dance," one of
the most extraordinary  dances
ever shown.   The story' tells of
a country boy who falls into the
clutches of an adventuress.   She
drags him down.   When at the
lowest depths of degradation, he
wanders into  a music hall and
sees Bert French and Alice Eis in
their "Vampire Dance."   It tells
of an ambitious young artist ensnared by the terrible wiles of a
human vampire.   The artist is
overcome and lured to death.   To
the   country boy,   the   playlet
seems to picture his own life with
the adventuress.   Rushing from
the theatre he turns over a new
leaf and marries his little country
sweetheart.   Also on the same
nights  "Ann of the Trails^will
be shown.   Through her fathers
sordiness, she is subjected to unfavorable criticism.     Her life is
proven spotless   and above reproach.
Grand Forks football team defeated Mother Lode on Friday
last by a score - of 3-0. Grand
Forks proved superior in combination, thus showing that they
have been training hard for this
game, Tjfeile the Mother Lode
boys have had very little practice
this year.
Don't throw away that broken
pipe, send it to Kennedy's for
repairs.
I-
HALF  HOLIDAY
$
g The leading merchants j*
I of Greenwood will close ��
I on Wednesday after- |
I noons during the months $
g of May, June, July, f
I August and September, |
g When pay-day comes on jjjg
g Wednesday the 10th of $
m the month, they will i
g close on Tuesday instead |
Pannama hat line. We have the
goods in variety of styles and
sizes.   Smith & Co.
Trap Shooting
Perhaps never before has there
been such good shooting in the
Boundary country as that witnessed at Rock Creek this week
when a team from Greenwood defeated Rock Creek by 13 points.
Of the first 60 birds only. seven
were missed. Of 25 birds! J.
Richter got a possible; some got
23 and 22 and hone below ;20.
This we believes compares very
favorably with; many of
crack professipnal teams,
wood was represented by Biner.
White, Logan, Richelson, Jenks
and Wilson, while the Rock
Creek squad was O'Donnell, Sta-
met, Larsen, Penticost, Richter
and Kelsie.
If there is a shooting competition in Nelson at the Chako
Mika this summerwe would like
to see the Boundary represented
for with such splendid shooting
as these clubs are making we
have no doubt that the honors
would come this way*
the
GreetM.
AT THE CHURCHES
-Christian Science service-will
be held in the Oddfellows Hall on
Sunday at 11 a.m. All welcome.
On the 3rd Friday of each month
at 8 p.m. testimonial meetings
will be held in the same hall.
Sunday school every Sunday
morning.
Rev. A. T. Bell will preach in
the Methodist church next Sunday at 11 a.m. Sunday School
2.30 p.m.
Service in the Presbyterian
church next Sunday, May 10th,
will be held in the morning at
11 o'clock. Sunday School and
Bible Class 2:30 p. m. Rev. J.
R, Munro Pastor.
Services in St. Jude's church
Sunday next. Matins and celebration of Holy Communion,. 11
a.m. Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong and Sermon, 7:30 p.m.
Rev. R. D. Porter, Vicar,
Famous Prince collars. Have
you seen them? Put up three in
a box for 5oc   Smiths,
A simple-hearted and truly devout conntry preacher, who had
tasted bnt few drinka in the world,
took dinner with a high toned
family, where a glass of milk
punch was quietly set down by
each plate. In silence and happiness the new Vicar of Wakefield
quaffed his goblet, and then added:
"Madame, yon should daily thank
God for Buch a good cow.'\
ii Western Float
If you cannot play ball swat the
Ay-
There   are  225   telephones  in
Roseland.
Five new houses are being built
in Coleman.
There are eight polo clubs in
southern Alberta.
E. B. Dill is chief of the fire
brigade in Enderby.
Frank Pymari is moving from
Enderby to Clinton.
The Davenport is the name of a
new cafe in Vernon.
A 820,000 opera house is being
bnilt in Cumberland.
There are 30,000 fruit trees on
the ranches at Hatzic.
Maple trees from Manitoba have
been planted in Kaslo.
You can buy nine quarts of
milk in Athabasca for $1.
The cannery at Snmmerland will
treble its output .hie year.
The Merchants Bank will build
a brick block in Chilliwack.
A company for raising foxes has
been organized at Whitehorse.
In future the C.P.R. boats on
the Pacific will call at Manilla.   ,
The Union hotel at Frank is being moved to the new townsite.
The Chilcoten races will be held
on June 8 and 9, at Rieke Creek.
Mel Taylor has moved from
Natal to the Peace River conntry.
A lot on Third Avenue in Prince
Rupert was recently sold for $15,-
000.
Lately the streets of Whitehorse
have been filled with Indians and
dogei
Archie Boyd is running an auto
stage between Quesnel and Barker-
villie.
Alex Linna was fined $10 for
allowing his cows to roam through
Rossland.
A Chinese company is being
formed to operate a steam laundry
in Blairmore.
The license for a shooting gal-
lery in. Athabasca-is -$75.-^I_t-Ed--
montpn it is $5.
Naramata is to have telephone
connection with Snmmerland by a
sub-marine wire.
W. Aitken, the foot runner; and
Miss Katie Dunnegan, were married in Merritt last month.
Hope's newspaper the Review is
three years old, and has never
been raided by the sheriff.
Harry Hoyke was fined $15, for
keeping his pool room open on
Sunday at Colinton, Alberta.
Owing to an excess of water in
the Whitewater mine in the Slocan
it has closed down for a month.
Mike Desir fell out of a rig while
going from Rossland to Trail, and
died from his injuries in four days.
J. V. Anderson of Sicamous has
been appointed managar of the
Russell hotel in New Westminster.
___AllJAsiatica..are_now-,_-prohibiteid.
from entering Canada unless they
are tourists, students or merchants.
Harry Sykes, without a gun or
a pack, recently walked from Fort
McMurray to Athabasca in six
days.
Recently a carload of dairy cattle from Ontario, were sold at
Chilliwack in one day for $140
each.
James Abrams, police magistrate of Cumberland for 16 years
died a few days ago from heart
failure.
The Prince Rupert News thinks
that the government paid $35,000
too much for the postoffice site in
that city.
It is reported that six feet of
zinc ore has been struck in the
U.S. mine in the Jackson basin of
the Slocan.
A weird monster of the deep,
half fish and half animal was recently caught in the sea near
Prince Rupert,
The miners in Nanaimo are
starting a labor daily paper. It
will be managed by J. K. Johnson,
formerly of Revelstoke.
It is estimated that this year,
3,000 carloads of fruit, vegetables
and farm produce, will be shipped
from the Okanagan district.
The labor market is overcrowded
in Dawson. No one in search of
work should go to that gold camp,
unless he has plenty of money.
A tennis dub may be formed in
the old camp of Ainsworth. That
town is beginning to look quite
bright on the map of Kootenay.
By July Ireland will have Home
Rule without civil war. The civil
war talk emanates from yellow
newspapers, and peanut politicians.
The piers of the new bridge
across the Colnmbia river at Marcus, have been filled in with waste
rock from the Le Roi mine at
Rossland.
The dignity of the western press
has been lowered. -The Vancouver
World, including the red headlines,
is how sold for two cents a copy
in that city.
Palma Angrigon has brought to
New Denver eleven horses that he
bought in Pincher Creek. It is
pleasing to know that the Lucerne
is no longer a one-horse town.
It is 23 years ago since the
Strathcona liotel was built in Nelson. Its first manager, Pop Phair,
is now a resident of Prince George,
where he will manage a new hotel.
Reginald Horton, Herbert Burn-
iBton, and E. T. Shaw, C.N.R.
engineers, were drowned a few
days ago while attempting to cross
the Thompson river in a leaky
boat.
It will be 21 years ago next
Tnesday since the writer started
his firBt paper in Kaslo. It was a
hummer, and copies of its last
edition since then have frequently
been Bold for $25 each.
Recently 85 head of cattle were
shipped from High River, Alberta,
to Chicago and Vancouver. The
average weight of the animals was
1490 pounds, and the price received
for the lot was $9,180.
The Kelowna Courier has. installed a linotype. The people of
that district are loyal to the local
press, and do not send to Spokane
for their printing when they have
a Victoria Day celebration.
Charles Lnal, better known as
Dutch Charley, and a Chinaman,
were drowned a few days ago while
crossing the Fraser river hear
Lytton. Charley had been running the government ferry for 18
years. He was 78 years old, and
had lived in Lytton 25 years.
This summer an addition will be
built to the hotel at Halcyon. An
up to date electric plant will also
be installed to light the hotel and
cottages. The hotel is full all; the
bi me and Mr. Boyd expects a
record summer. The waters have
a continental reputation, and as
time goes on the popularity of this
resort must constantly increase.
Ladies  and   childrens   shoes.
"Up to the minute" at Smith's.
CITY COUNCIL
The council met on Monday.
The Mayor being absent, Aid.
McCreath took the chair,
E. Collier's offer of $25 for lot
2, block 59, map 70 was accepted.
J. D. McCreath's offer of: $25
for lot 17, biock A, map 119 was
accepted provided that he .places
the building in good repair and
pleasing to the eye.
R. Eustis was allowed the use
of lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, block 47,
map 70, provided that he fences
and clears the ground.
The clerk was  instructed  to
corfesp6nd~~with~the owners of
lots 20 to 36, inclusive, block 7,
map 21, asking if they would be
willing to contribute $25 per lot,
being half the cost of cement
sidewalks.
It was decided to call a public
meeting to discuss the advisability of supplementing the
present water supply.
It was decided to repair the
fence around the pound, and enforce the Pound By-law,
Aid. McKee was granted leave
of absence for three months.
The following accounts were
ordered to be paid. J. M. Crop-
ley, $8.50; R. W. Halcrow, $8.32;
C. Kinney. $5.95; R. N. Adams,
$24.10.
The Council adjourned until
May 18.
Little beds of flowers, little
cans of paint, make attractive
neighborhoods, out of those that
ain't   Smith & Co.
Take a joy ride to Rock Creek
on Sunday, and try one of Hanson's famous chicken dinnerf.
Nothing beats it this far west
W. G. Kennedy will give a fine
case pipe or a first-class fishing
rod to the angler taking the
heaviest trout from Boundary
Creek from 1st May to 1st July.
Life is one damn thing after
another, and Love is two damn
things after each other.���B.C Fed-
erationist
���v:/A
4    ul THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
THE  LEDGE
R,   T.   LOWERY
EDITOR    AND    FINANCIER.
is located at Greenwood, B. C, and can be traced to many parts of
the earth. It comes to the front every Thursday morning, and
believes that hell would close up if love ruled the world. It believes
in justice to everyone; from the man who mucks in the mine to the
king who sits on the cushions of the throne. It believes that advertising is the life of trade; and that one of the noblest works of
creation is the man who always pays the printer.
The Ledge is $2.00 a year in advance, or $2.50 when not so paid.
It is postage free to all parts of Canada, Mexico, Great Britain and
the county of Bruce. To the United States it is $2.50 a year, always
in advance.
A blue mark here indicates that your Subscription has
oecome deceased, and that the editor would once more
like to commune with your collateral.
GREENWOOD, MAY 7, 1914.
Get a bit of land and raise l
something.
As a football the pumpkin
is a failure.
The way to hell is  paved
with cigarettes.
Ip all women were  angels
fewer men would be devils.
The wheelbarrow is slow,
but it gets   there   just the
same.
In this age a man is often
judged by the value of his
automobile.
Where there is some
smoke you will often find a
cigarette.
Be sure you are right,
subscribe for your local
paper, and then go ahead.
THE man who is not loyal
to his home town and country
is a scrub and a traitor to,
his own welfare.
In the hills around Greenwood there is gold and silver
ore worth millions, but it
cannot walk1 into town.
Some Canadians must be
tame, spineless and asleep,
when they permit a cultus
Yank or two to boss the affairs of a national holiday.
War makes men punctual,
for to be a minute late is a
serious offence in the army.
One or two of our delinquent
subscribers should be in the
army,.... _. ._,.._,       ......__...
The war in Colorado is
cansed by coal, while oil is at
the bottom of the unpleasant
conditions in Mexico. It is
a pity that the cig and booze
fiends are without the nerve
to break out in rebellion
against these evils.
Much of the trouble in this
world is caused by cranks
who wish to gag the public
with their ideas, and force
all to obey their line of
thought and action. This
is plainly seen in 'those
gloomy individuals who suffer from the Sunday observance mania. Rational beings
are in favor of stopping all
unnecessary work upon Sunday, in order that the public
may enjoy that day in a manner that is best suited to
their tastes. Sane people do
not wish their neighbors to
be fined and persecuted for
whistling, playing ball, buying ice-cream, and similar
acts upon Sunday. Sunday
is fairly well observed in the
west, but the people are
liable to make it wide open,
if they are to be pestered
with the childish and foolish
notions about that day that
emenate from the diseased
imaginations of a bunch of
howlers, who think they are
religious, when they are only
bilious from wrong methods
of living.
In the United States when
a town celebrates the Fourth
of July, or Washington's
birthday, tbey do not send
to Canada for music and
printing. Anyone, across the
line, even proposing such a
thing would be tarred [and
feathered, by an indignant
populace.
The Sunday fetich is all
powerful with some people.
We have known many a canny
Scot who would chew tobacco, drink high-balls, play
cards and swear upon the
Sabbath, who would not
work or whistle upon that
sainted day for love, money,
chalk, marbles or a barrel of
porridge, Wonderful indeed
are the ways and ideas of
man.
Thinking Themes
There is a difference between
knowing a thing and realizing it.
It is curious to note how a truth, a
fact, will wander around unnoticed
in the realm of your knowledge for
years, and then, all of a sudden,
at some moment, it will come home
to you, it will bite you, sting you
and enter into your blood and
bone.
Sometimes an experience, a happening, will drive a truth home.
For instance, you are sick at sea;
and you say, "I had heard of seasickness, but I never realized before what it means." A child has
been told of the hot stove, but he
realizes it when he burns his  fin-
8erv.
And sometimps realization seeme
to come without any particular
occasion. I hardly ever pick up
one of my favorite books, Ruskin
or VaBari or Dante orSainteBeuve
or the Bible, but some passage I
have often passed over regardless
leaps out into prominence before
my mind, as though it were suddenly printed in black face type,
and I realize it.
And occasionally in a meditative
mood, when I am just smoking my
pipe aud vegetating, some phase of
life or of nature, in a flash made
vibrant flesh, will rise before me.
Last night, for example, sitting
in a restaurant, I saw the meaning
of Democracy rise, like a flame,
sink into my being.
I think the words of Jeans have
more of this haunting, shockingly
materializing quality, than the
words of any one else, in books or
out.���Dr. Frank Crane.
The Mining Outlook
The mining outlook in British
Columbia has never been brighter.
The following information as to
the ore reserves now developed is
astonishing. The Granby company has practically demonstrated
12,000,000 tons or ore at Hidden
Creek with an average of 2.2 per
cent, copper, and suffioient to run
the new smelter for 17 years. Tlie
gross value of this ore is estimated
at $78,000,000. The reserve at
the company's Phoenix mines is
estimated at 6,000,000, carrying
0.8 per cent, copper, making an
additional copper val :e of 815,-
000,000. The gross copper value
of the company's reserves thus
amounts to the immense sum of
$93,000,000, and that without
taking into consideration the gold
and silver valueB in the ore.
The B. C. Copper Company has
5,000,000 tonB of reserves, carrying
1.8 per cent, copper, or a probable
copper value of $20,000,000, exclusive of gold and silver values.
The Rossland mines are estimated to have reserves available for
five years, equivalent on present
production to 1,335,000 tons of
shipping grade, which should on
past regards produce about $13,-
000,000 in gold, $3,000,000 in silver and $2,000,000 in copper, or a
total available value of $1S,000,000.
There is a large amount of ore
in reserve in the Nickel Plate mine
at Hedley, as provided by diamond
drilling and while it is not absolutely blocked out so that the reserves can be estimated exactly,
there appears to be about five years'
supply now assured, or say 350,-
000 tonB, or a gross value of about
$4,000,000.
While no figures are available of
actual reserves in the silver-lead
mines, it is known that there are
considerable reserves available in
the Standard, Slocan Star, Ka__-
bler-Carlboo, Whitewater Sullivan,
Molly Gibson, No. ,1, Highland,
Silver Sing and others.
The reserves in the Britannia
are placed at about 1,500,000 tons
of an average value of about $8, or
a gross value of $12,000,000.
Thus, without taking into consideration the varying reserves of
the many smaller mines, and the
undefined reserves of the silver-
lead mines referred to, there are
known reserves amounting to
about $153,000,000, or three-fourths of the total ^production of the
lode mines of the province to date.
Where iB there any other asset
whose value to the province can
already be definitely measured up
and proved to anything like the
the same extent?���Rossland Miner.
Can't Beat 'Em
"When we were married our
friends predicted a speedy divorce."
''Often the way with friends."
"Well, we've been married 20
years now without a* serious quarrel."
"And what do your friends say
to that?"
"What they have always said.
Say it can't last.
An Idea
s In developing the idea of truthfulness, the teacher asked the question: "What is the best thing in
the world to do. and at the same
time tho hardest?"
The little girl raised her hand
timidly.
"Well, Emma?"
"To get married."
I.'s awfully hard  to   forget a
friend who owes you money.
��*��*����*._.����^"_^Z����4������.*4*....��.^
ShilohM
The  family  remedy   for   Court*  and Cold*
"S-Hob.cut* so. little  and does wotaacbP
Advertising Tip
John Wanamaker, the New
York and Philadelphia retail merchant on one occasion said: If
there is ou earth anything that a
quitter should leave alone, it is
advertising. To make a success
one must be prepared to stick to it,
like a barnacle on a ship's bottom.
Advertising doesn't jerk; it pulls.
It begiuB very gently at first, but
the pull is steady. It is likened to
a team pulling a heavy load. A
thousand spasmotic, jerky pulls
will not budge that load, while one
half the power in steady effort will
start it and keep it moving.
��
^ggg=aom^gi_RE
The New Deere
Sulky and Gang
Built Dpon practically tba same lines���
with lhat undisputed sign of superiority tba
John Deere Trada Mark.
Both sulk; and gang fitted with a powerful
foot-lift.   This special foot-lift works so easy that
anyono can miss or lower the plows with cage.
The -anc lias an auxiliary liand lever. You can walk and stretch your lees, if you
like and still control the plow perfectly. The lever is within easy reach of your hand
audit lias wonderful lit tint, power���five times the lifting leverage found on any otbar gang,
A small boy easily lifts (be plows we.s_.ed down by furrows while at a standstill.
Lightest of Draft
7515 of all the friction on n plow bottom comes In front of a line drawn up and down
across the mouldboard���a third the way back from the point. The peculiar shape
of John Deere plow bottoms enables (hem to penetrate the soil ���Mieit on that part
oi the bottom where tbe friction is beaviest.
Write or call on us.    We want to tell yon about tbe other exclusive
patented improvements on the New Deere Sulky and Gang such as Adjustable   seat���Better steel���Easy  management���Dust-proof  wheel
bo_cs-|-sood bigli wheels���easy running���axles run in oil.
Equal Distribution ol
weight on each
wheel
The
"Gold
Medal
Line"
'Highest award at every
World's Fair or Exposition
since 1840.
JAS. G. M��MYNN
MIDWAY, B.C.
Bank of Montreal
ESTABLISHED 1817
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED S2S.OOO.OOO:
Capital, paid up, $16,000,000 Rest, $16,000,000.
UNDIVIDED PROFITS, *l,04e,2>7.B0
Hon. President: Lord Strathcona and Mount Royai,, G.C.M.G. G.C.V.O.
President: II. V. MerBdiTh, Esq.
General Manager: Sir Frederick Williams-Taylor
Branches in London, En?, {^S"_?*��sSS} New York, Chicago
Buy and Sell Sterling Exchange and Cable Transfers.    Grant Commercial and
Travellers' Credits, available in any part of the world.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT %^,.VKnt
Greenwood Branch   - C. B. Winter, Mgr.
SPRING SUITS
MADE TO YOUR MEASURE
Now is the Time to Order Your
NEW SUIT
We Have Them in AH The
Latest Weaves And Colors
SATrSFACITON GUARANTEED
W.
THOROUGHLY   RENOVATED AND SPECIALLY
ADAPTED FOR COMMERCIAL TRADE
THE WINDSOR HOTEL is one of the Best famished
hotels in tbe west. It is located in the heart of Greenwood and within easy reach of all the financial and
commercial institutions of the Copper Metropolis.
Heated with Steam and Lit by Electricity
Commodious sample rooms. The bar is replete with
all modern beverages and the meals are the best. Rooms
reset ved by telegraph.
:.
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���Y
Y
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&��X'<~:~KK~H��>_><"X��:^^^
WESTERN - - HOTELS.
N..WIHAKKI.T    HOTKT,
Is the home for all tourists and
millionaires visiting New Denver, British Columbia.
A. JACOBSOK. Proprietor.
THK    -M-OVINC-I-    HOTEI-
Grand Forks, ll.C, is in the centre
of the city, aud furnishes the public
with every accommodation at
reasonable rates.
Kmll T.Hi-fKi.i, Proprietor,
THK    KASl.O    HOTKL,
Kaslo, 13. C��� is a comfortable
home for ali who travel to that
city.
J, W. COCKLE, Prou-
ARLINGTON HOTEL
Trail,. B. C���This hotel has been
thoroughly renovated. It is heated
by steam, and has hot and cold
water in all rooms. A pleasant
home for all who travel.
JAMES WILLIAMSON, Proprietor
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O��� L L. D��� D.CX., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager JOHN AIRD. Ass't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1- and
tipwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. 821
TKKMONT   HOUSE
Nelson, B. C, is run'on the American and European plan. Steam
heated rooms. All white labor.
Special attention paid to dining
. rcom.
Kaiigomo & Ci>mpl)ull, Props,
TULAMEEN HOTEL
Princeton, B. C is the headquarters for miners, investors
and railroad men. A fine location and everything- first-class
KIRKPATRICK & MALOISE, Proprietors.
I5KIDKSV]I,T.K    HOTJ-I..
Bridesville,   B. C.   This  hotel
is
within easy reach of all the leading
' Boundary towns and the centre oi
a fine farming district.
THOMAS   WALSH,   Proprietor,
THE SIMILKAMEEN HOTEL
Princeton. This hotel is new, comfortable
well-furnished, and is close to tlie railway
depot. Modern accommodation aud sample rooms.
SUMMERS & WARDLE. Proprietors
Bum*
Nelson, B.C.
First-class in everything.
Steam heat, electric : light,
private baths. Telephone
in every room. First-class
bar and barber shop.
'Bus meets all trains.'
EXCHANGE   HOTEL
KASLO
Plenty of first class rooms, and
a scenic balcony, Everything
new and cheerful about the
house, The dining room is in
charge of one of the most noted
chefs in the Kootenay. Friends
tourists and strangers always
welcome,
ALLEN & McQUISTON
Proprietors,
ROCK CREEK HOTEL
Rock Creek, B. C.   This hotel is
situated on historic ground, and
has  tasty   meals   and   excellent
,;rooins. ,;, _...:'..
T. R. HANSON, Proprietor.
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
A, H. MARCON    -   Manager of Greenwcod and RocU CrceK Branches
������ -.���    i.-i- - i  in--���.-,-y. i      i      ���      -i������i    ��� ,.���       ., ������    ��� _..     ii��� i        ���������ii        ,
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STAY AT
Cbe Strathcona fiotel
WHEN IN NELSON
Under new management, JAMES MARSHALL. Prop.
Nelson's best located and most popular hotel.   Rooms with
private baths, steam heat in every room.
Commercial Rates Given.        . Best Sample Booms in Nelson,
Best attention given to tourist and Family Trade,
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****************** *,K_c_OKt<,jc*ric��c*,��cif.jp*rj~_��
Hotel Brooklyn
The Only First Class and Up-to/Date
Hotel in Phoenix. New from cellar
to roof, Best Sample rooms in the
Boundary, Opposite Great Northern
Depot,   X   X   Modern Bathrooms
STEAM HEATED,    ELECTRIC LIGHTED
O, D, Bush, Prop,
Phoenix, R C,
HOTEL KEREMEOS
Opposite depot. Extensive alter
ations have recently been made
rendering this hotel one of the
most comfortable in the interior.
A choice selection of liquors and
cigars.  New pool room and sample
rooms in connection.      1.  ._
��rs. A. F. KIRBY
RIVERSIDE HOTEL
Rock Creek, B. C. This is one of
the oldest hotels in the Kettle Valley. Excellent accommodation for
all travellers.
S. T. LARSEN, Proprietor.
ALGOMA HOTEL
Deadwood, B. C. This hotel is
within easy distance of Greenwood
and provides a comfortable home
for travellers. The bar has the
best of wines, liquors and cigars.
JAMESJHENDERSON Pro rleto
HI IN IHE LEDGE
QUEEN'S   HOTEL,
_phco_b.ni.-_:   b. o.
The Newest and Largest Hotel in
the City.   Everything neat, clean
and comfortable.    Steam heat and
electric light.   Meals and drinks at,
all hours.
HARTMAN & WALSH    -   -   Props.
ON PARLE) PRANCAIS
NATIONAL HOTEL
GREENWOOD, B. C.
The Really Best House
in the Boundary.
Recently Remodelled and
Strictly Up-to-Date.
Restaurant in connection
OWI3N   BOyERT
PROP
The Knob Hill Hotel
PHOENIX.
One of the largest hotels in
the city.   Beautiful location,
fine rooms and tasty meals.
A. O. JOHNSON
PROP.
Subscribers are reminded that
The Ledge is a year when
paid in advance. When not so
paid it is $2.50 a year.
I Che fialcyon Sanitarium
ANALYSIS OF WATER.
Chlorine  8.14
Sulphuric Acid  3<>3-43
Silica   74-29
Lime  84.57
Alkalies as Soda  5.91
Magnesia  232.00
Lithia  .86
Sulphuretted Hydrogen 32.00
Has recently been thoroughly
renovated and re-furnished, ana
is now the greatest health resort upon the continent Natural hot water in baths, 134 degrees of heat. A course oi baths
at Halcyon will cure nervous
and muscular diseases and eliminate rheumatism and metalic
poisons from the system. The
water heals liver, kidney and
stomach complaints. The rates
are $2 a day np; or $12 weekly
np. Postoffice, express and telegraph offices in connection.
I UHlliam Boyd, Proprietor,
tiaicyoR, B. &
LEDGE ADS. BRING RESULTS
���HI ''MM'.
I,
III
THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
1
Edison's Latest Wonder
The Blue Amberol Record
is so faithful and lifelike in its tone reproduction,
so fine and broad in the scope of its selections,
so high in its plane of artists, that you can
almost see the stage setting.
> For more than fourminutes, thou- give you a concert free. Spect-
sands of timej. the Blue Amberol fy the Blue Amberol alwayi. ||��
unwinds to you the most luxurious entertainment you ever knew.
It never wears out and won't
break. Drop in on your Edison
dealer today.   He'll be glad to
Edison Phonograph, and Record* ate told by
T. M. GHULEY & C0.
GKEEIWOOD, B. C,
vTRAO-'MARKl
aSdi
m��m
_"i!iiniiiii.i.i_..iim.iiii.imiiimMM��__"_^
P. BURNS & CO. I
^��<^��^��^��4^H^^��^��^��^��^��^��^��^S^��^��4S
i
i
I
u
i
Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish
and Poultry. ' Shops in nearly all the
towns of the Boundary and Kootenay.
1 COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD, B.C. 1
f*fr**H
I
TEMPERANCE
is all right if shorn of humbuggery.
Too much water drinking is just
as injurious as too much liquor or
anything else.
OUR PURE WINES
AND LIQUORS
are medicinal if not abused. Every
household should have, a moderate
';: supply of pure wines or liquors in
the closet for emergency���either
unexpected visitors or sudden illness, when a drop of pure liquor
in time may forestall all necessity
for drugs.
_, Greenwooa Liquor conipanv, Importers, Bmnwowl, B. 0.
T.  0.  GUNDERSON
Contractor and Builder
���D_.AI.BR IN���
Doors, Windows, Sash.
All kinds of carpenter work neatly done.
Box 127
Greenwood.
Don't Be HOODWINKED
WE NEVER CHANGE BRANDS
IVI '
ARE A 1 QUALITY
B
The BR1LLI ANTES
Are the Best Clear Havanas la Canada
Made by Union Labor In the .est Hygienic Factory in the country.   Call for
them and get value for your money Instead of rope
WILBERC & WOLZ. Prop. B.C. Cl.tr
Factory. Kew Westminster. B. C
SMOKE	
Imperator and Kootenay Standard
Cigars.    Made hv
J. C. THEUN & CO., NELSON.
FRED A. STARKEY,
NELSON, B. C.
MINING
BROKER
PROSPECTS   BOUGHT   AND    SOLD
IN GRAND FORKS
I deal in Second-hand
goods and have the
largest sign in B. C.
I buy or sell anything from a needle
to a carload.
ED. PECKHAM
Greenwood & Midway
AUTO STAGE
Leaves Greenwood for Spokane
at 8:20 a.m., & for Oroville at 3:10
p. m. Leave orders at Terhune's
Cigar Store.    . Chabi.es Russeia.
THIS
,-_        is a
si mmmm mmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmm...
I Greenwood to Phoenix Stage ���
����� Leaves Greenwood Daily at 3 p. m. =��
_.g____,-      Arrives Greenwood Daily at 10 arm. g
S=    GREENWOOD OFFICE
CLUB CIGAR STORE   _5
g JOHN FULLER        ���       /       ���       PROPRIETOR  3
^iuiuiiiauiiaiiiiiiiiiauiuiiiiiiiiauiummumumuaiiu^
v
a
ARG0   TONNEL
ii ���
The tunnel of The Argo
mine is only a few minutes
walk from the centre of Green-
wood and visitors can see the
workings at anytime. Investors should examine the property. It is situated on a
highly mineralized mountain,
and the lead may be struck
at any time.
*****************
in. la *!
H CO., I/T'D. ^
V ������������ ������ '*
J Lieaves Mother Lode 2
<* 9.30 a. m. J
^ 6:30 p. m. ^
2 Leaves Greenwood JJ
fc 2:00 p. m. ;
J 8:30 p.  m. J
fc ��� ��� 1
^ Saturday .last stage leaves *_
fc Mother Lode 6 p. m. Returning, %
fc leaves Greenwood 10 p. m %
fc   1
fc _,.__,._ ^j.^u^jjj Office~ ^
fc NORDEN HOTEL 2
fc ^
*****************
J. E.  CAMERON,
Leading Tailor of the Kootenays.
KASLO      B.  O.
OLA LOFSTAD
President
JAMBS McCREATH
Secretary.
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
During tbe 87 months that Lowery's
Claim was on earth it did business all
over the world. It was the most
unique, independent and fearless journal ever produced in Canada. Political
and theological enemies pursued It with
the venom of a rattlesnake until the
government shut it out of the nails,
and its editor ceasad to publish it
partly on account of a lazy liver and
��rtly because it takes a pile of money
.o run a paper that is outlawed, .here
are still 20 different editions of this condemned journal in print. Send 10 cents
and get one or $2 and get- the bunch,
B. T. LOWBRY,
Greenwood, 3. 0-
HOME
DYE
that
ANYONE,
can use
DYOLA
kThe Guaranteed "ONE DYE for1
* All Kinds of Cloth.
, Clean, Simple. No Cb.nce of Ml.tak.8. TRY
J   IT I Send for Free Color Card ind Booklet.
| The Joh_eon.Rlchard.oa Co. Limited, Montreal
LIQUOR ACT, 1910
Sec. 35
Plumber
and Tinner
Lam prepared to ex/
ecute ��all:- orders lor
plumbing and tinsmith/
ing in city or country,
GEORGE CLERF.
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the 1st day
of June next, application will be made tc
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for the
grant of the licence for the sale of liquor bjr
retail in and upon the premises knewn as
The Bridesville Hotel situated at Bridesville,
British Columbia, upon the lands described ass
��art of Lot 491, Similkameen Division of Yale
.strict.
Dated this 20th day of April, 1914.
THOMAS DONALD
Applicant.
LIQUOR LICENSE ACT,
NOTICE is hereby (riven that on the first
day of June next application will be made
to Superintendent of Provincial Police for the
transfer of the licence for the sale of liquor by
retail in and upon the premises known as the
Vendome Hotel, situate at Anaconda British
Columbia, from the late Frank Bell to Mike
Kostlw, of Anaconda, B. C.
Dated this 20th day of April, 1914.
U A. SMITH
Executor for Frank Bell Estate,
MIKE KOSTIW
Notice of Dissolution
NOTICE is hereby given that the partnership heretofore existing between us,
the undersigned, as lumber manufacturers
and dealers, at Carmi and Rock Creek,
B.C., has this day been dissolved by
mutual consent.
All debts owing to the said partnership are to be paid to Bayard W. Bubar,
at Beaverdell, B.C., and all claims against
the said partnership are ��� to be presented
to the said Bayard W, Bubar, by whom
the same will be settled.
Dated at Midway, B.C, this 14th day of
April, 1914.
B..W. BUBAR.
WM. POWERS.
NEW ADVERTISING SCALE.
The newspapers in Greenwood, Phoenix and Grand Forks have adopted the
following scale for legal advertising: ^
Application   for   Liquor  Licence
(30 days) |5.oo.
Certificate of Improvement Notice
(60 days)..... $7.50
Application to Purchase Land Notices (60 days) $7.50
Delinquent Co-owner Notices (90
.days) $10.00
Water Notices (small). J7.50
All other legal advertising, 12 cents a
line, single column, for the first insertion; and 8 cents a line for each subse
quent insertion. Nonpariel measurement
Hotpoint Electric Appliances
-AND���
Mazda Tungsten Lamps
PRICES REASONABLE
Greenwood City Waterworks Company
Mining Resume of Kootenay and Boundary
Districts.
British Columbia
A-SftYBR
E. W. WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, Box biio8, Nelson, B. C.
Charges:���Gold, Silver, Lead or Copper,
$1 each. Gold-Silver, or Sil.er-Lead,
I.1.50. Prices for other metals: Coal,
Cement, Fireclay analyses on application. The largest custom afl_ay office in
British Columbia.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
T.   THOMAS
CLOTHES CLEANED
PRESSED AND REPAIRED
TAILOR - GREENWOOD
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
^^OAL mining rights of the Dominion.
*���* in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon Territo.-/. the Northwest Territories and in a portion of British
Columbia, may be leased for a term of
twenty-one years at an annual rental of
$1 an acre. Not more than 2,560 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by ihe applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal sub-divisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of f 5 which will be refunded if
the rights applied for are not available
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined ana pay the royalty
thereon: If the coal mining rights are
not being operated, such returns should
be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of $10.00 an acre.
For fall information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Depart
ment of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.���Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not he paid for.
Most people never forget to pose
except when they are home with
the family.
ct^ddy ttflps  i m^fi__
tbe tbrtat and tans*.
coU*. and _��__
a  ,  as ccntfc
The mineral production for the province from 1852 to 1913 inclusive
shows an aggregate value of $460,137,000. The production of metals,
coal and coke in the Kootenay and Boundary districts of British Columbia for the year 1913 amounted to the grand total of $20,629,315.
The following dividends were paid by some of the Kootenay-Boundary mines during 1913: Granby Consolidated IMining and Smelting
Company, $889,901.90; Standard mine, rSilverton, $650,000; Hedley
Gold mine, $360,000; Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company,
$232,176; B.C. Copper Company, $88,675; Le Roi No. 2 $43,000. The
Granby company alone have paid since 1903 to 1913 inclusive dividends
to the extent of $5,376,004.20. It is safe to say that a considerable
portion of the profits of the Granby smelter at Grand Forks has been
invested in the new mine and smelter at Hidden Creek. The same is
true of the B.C. Copper Co., Greenwood. While paying dividends they
have also expended a great deal of money in acquiring new properties
and developing same. The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co., of
Trail has not, until the last few years, been paying dividends to any
extent, for the simple reason they have been using th6 profits in the
development of new properties, having large holdings in the Rossland
camp. For instance, they have the War Eagle, the old Le Roi, the
Centre Star, Iron Mask, Josie as well as the adjoining claims, the Molly
Gibson, on Kootenay Lake, the old Silver King at Nelson, the Sullivan
Group at Kimherley. Likewise in the Ainsworth camp and Slocan
district.
It is pleasing to note that all these properties, such as the Le Roi,
Center Star, Silver King, Molly Gibson, the Sullivan and Ainsworth
camp properties were practically considered, from a public standpoint,
more or leB8_as played oat mines. Today these properties are estimated
to be more valuable than ever and large producers for years to come.
This has been brought about by capable and economical management.
The wonderful optimism regarding mining mining prevailing during
1912 and 1913 in the Kooteray and Boundary districts, is, I feel confident, going to be thoroughly justified. The great Standard mine in
Slocan only a few years ago was not tempting enough to keep attached
to it the men who are now foremost in the ownership. The old timer
the Silver King, is again to the fore, giving employment at the present
time to some 85 men. The Slocan Star, that haB made many of its
original owners comfortable for life, is, with development of new found
ore bodies, likely to do the same for the present owners. The Molly
Gibson, Kootenay Lake, is another instance of what proper management will do. The early owners of this property were inexperienced
men with insufficient capital to develop properly, consequently it was
sold for a small amount. Today the old Molly Gibson is considered
one of the best silver lead properties in the country.
In the Ainsworth camp such mines as the Highland and the Silver
Hoard, the Maestro, the Banker, the old Bluebell, better than ever,
the Gallagher and she Florence have all been steadily under develop*
ment during 1913 and considerable ore was shipped.
The Utica mine has passed the stage of a prospect and is now one of
the coming silver lead properties in the Slocan. The U.S. in Jackson
Basin, near Kaslo, is also becoming a shipper. The Whitewater, the
Whitewater Deep and the Washington have been highly developed and
prill renew shipments, and also many other properties in this ; district
located on the K. & S. Railway, which is expected to be ready to handle
orep from these mines in May.
Properties around Trout Lake and Ferguson, in the Lardo, have
been receiving development, bat not to the extent the properties warrant. It is a case of lack of capital. On the Slocan lake the great
producing Standard, the Hewitt, Vancouver, Rambler Cariboo, and
Ottawa are all shippers, and there are many others being developed.
Then we have the Sheep Creek and the Bayonne districts. In the
Sheep Creek district the Mother Lode and the Queen have proven very
profitable, especially the former. The owners, we understand, are trying to acquire further properties with a view to extending their holdings. In the Bayonne district, owing to lack of transportation facilities j no great extent of development, with the exception probably of
the Spokane group, has been carried on this winter.
In the Ymir district the Second Relief, Wilcox, Yankee Girl and
many other properties are producing at the present time. In the Nelson district the B. C. Copper Company are developing the Victoria
property, making large shipments to their smelter at Greenwood; likewise with the Eureka. Such properties as the Perrier mine, a gold
property, the California and Venus are beinn developed. A few cases
only are cited, but a great many more are receiving the same attention.
Some are large properties and will being turning out immense tonnage
during the year 1914. Others have been worked on a smaller scale by
the owners themselves.
Then we have the undeveloped properties awaiting capital. These
-are-here in_ abundance���Take- for^instance-the- Bayonne camp. The
large and continuous veins have been opened up to a certain stage. It
is a camp of such dimensions that it requires large capital for the initial
development, as it is necessary to have power and mills. There are the
undeveloped mineral bodies of the great Lardo district, covering from
Kootenay lake to Ferguson. Also the Duncan river section; there is
the Lardean district, reaching from the Arrow lakes, where tremendous bodies of all classes of ore awaits development, Also large, valuable bodies in East Kootenay and all through the interior,, both in the
Kootenays and Boundary,
Considering the climate; our mineral resources, which I think we
might say are among the best in the world; our transportation facilities,
considering the mountainous conntry; the abundance of timber and the
amount. of water power going to waste, it is almost an appeal I am
making to those interested in this great industry. The past record of
British Columbia should not count against her. The losses sustained
were due, in many instances, to stock jobbing, impractical management, and a good deal of misplaced faith, as many of those who came
to British Colnmbia in the early days to mine had not the practical
experience, but did have control of the expenditures, and it was not a
question of mining with them as it was pleasure. Those days are past
and gone. We are now a settled community. Our mining is conducted on a commercial basis.
I have no hesitation in saying that anyone who desires to invest in
mining, if they will have their engineers examine properties, and are
prepared to put up money for development purposes, can procure properties of great merit on a development basis, or lease and bond, at the
most reasonable terms. When we consumate the solution for our complex zinc and lead oree on a commercial basis, we venture to say that
there is no country in the world offering greater opportunities for securing the amount of returns on investments in the development of our
mineral bodies, which cover practically all well known metals, including the platinum gronp, molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium, magnesium, and various earth metals, also large bodies of hematiie, specular
and magnetite iron. The quality and immense tonnage warrants the
baiding of redaction plants. With the increased demand for various
metals the necessity will call for farther smelting facilities.
This resume of the mining industry and possibilities for investment
in same is made with a view of having it placed before those who may
be interested in the matter of investment. My position for many years
as president of the Associated Boards of Trade of Eastern British Columbia has given me thorough knowledge of the possibilities of the vast
mineral values of the country generally.
I would be glad to extend to anyone making application full particulars regarding any class of our mineral wealth.
Yours respectfully,
FRED A. STABKEY,
Nelson, R.G, Canada
Dr. A. MILLOY
EM3NTIST
All   the   latest  methods   in   high-class
Dentistry.
LOO BUILDING
Corner Abbott & Hastings Streets.
VANCOUVER,   -   -   -   BX.
COUNTY COURT OF YALE
A SITTING of the County Court of Yale will
be holden at the Court House, Greenwood,
on Tuesday the  12th  day of May, 1914, at
eleven o'clock in the forenoon.
By order,
WALTER DEWDNEY,
Registrar C. C. of V,
��������������������������������0��0������0������
your Razors Honed
and Your Baths at
FRAWLEYS
BARBERSHOP]
GREENWOOD.
About Float.
Float is not a periodical.
It is a book containing 86
illustrations all told, and
is filled with sketches and
stories of western life. It
tells how a gambler cashed
in after the flush days of
Sandon; how it rained in
New Denver long after
Noah was dead; how a
. parson took a drink at
Bear Lake in early days;
how justice was dealt in
kaslo in '93; how the
saloon man outprayed the
women in Kalamazoo, and
graphically depicts the
roamings of a western
editor among the tender-
feet in the cent belt. It
contains the early history
of Nelson and a romance
of the Silver King mine.
In it are printed three
western poems, and dozens of articles too numerous to mention. Send for
_pne_Jtrefore_itlis. too_late.__
The price is 25 cents,
postpaid to any part of the
world. AddresB all letters to
R. T. Lowery
GREENWOOD, B. 0.
He Does Not Advertise.
Breathes there a man with sonl so dead
Who never to himself has said:
'My trade of late is getting bad,
I'll try another ten-inch ad!"
If there be. go mark him well,
For him no bank account shall swell.
No angels watch the golden stair,
To welcome home the millionaire.
The man who never asks for trade,
By local-line, or add displayed,
Cares more for rest than worldly gain,
And patronage bnt gives him pain.
Tread lightly, friends; let no rnde sound
Disturb his solitude profound,
Here let him lie in calm repose,
Unsought except by men he owes.
And when he dies, eo plant him deep
That nothing may disturb his sleep,
Where no rude clamor may dispel
That, quiet that he loved so well.
And that the world may know its loss
Place on a stone a wreath of moss.
And on a stone above "Here lies
A fossil, who did not advertise.1'
SUTTON'Q
EEDu
for garden cmdfc-rm vrelwat
for B.C.��oil.S��* Caftcriotfa* in
"' solid guarantee-��f poritr
<tncT_|grniti-fttioii>.
S��adnow for Ccpj fet��
Sutton iSon-LThtKliijpiSwdbBaa
A.J.W����dw��rd
Vtc��*r*��     a      VMMiiww THE  LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO;
��   B. C. MINING NEWS   !
6 ��
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
Last week we referred to placer
diggings in the vicinity Qof Cayoosh
creek, hut there are other creeks
not far from Lillooet where the
ground is worth investigating���
Tyauchton creek, Alexander creek,
Cadwater Creek, and the South
Fork of the Bridge river. Tyauchton creek has not been worked for
a great number of years, bnt lots
of gold has been taken off this
Btream, especially at 8 mile flat,
andsome claim that fehe ground
never has been thoroughly prospected. All the ground at the
mouth of the South Fork of
Bridge river has been recorded
by the Golden Dream Mining
Co., and others, but up-stream
there is a^high level channel that
falls into the South Fork above
the "Wby Not" mineral claim.
This channel has been ground
sluiced by a spring raising below
the road until it forms gulch digging; while the water iajhardly sufficient to sluice with, still, by building a tank with an automatic gate,
and flashing, a good deal could be
accomplished. Very course gold
has been washed out of this gnlch
within the last few years and the
bedrock was not reached. Further
up stream there must by some big
diggings, as course gold up to $32
was taken out on the Lome claim
eome years ago.
Going np Seaton and Anderson
Lakes, McGillivray creek is the
best stream for placer, and last fall
one prospector is reported to have
taken out considerable heavy gold.
Above the month of Gold creek
some maintain there is nothing,
but it seems to be doubtful whether
anyone has tried it sufficiently to
know; but fairly-course gold has
been found up above the Forbes,
and it looks as though it wonld
pay for further investigation. Besides these known creeks there are
numerous other streams that are
gold-bearing, as outside of there-
ported discovery of the late Jack
Tashpola's diggings last fall, which
were only discovered by him a few
years before he died, there is always the question of where he got
the gold dust he sold in this town
���and he sold considerable.���Lillooet Prospector.
Rich in Platinum.
Considerable attention is now
being paid to the alluvial deposits
of the Similkameen and Tulameen
riverB in southern British Columbia
owing to the fact that tbe Tulameen district has the richest platinum deposits on the North American continent, and partly in view
of the high price which platinum
has obtained and the scarcity of
the metal.
The rise of the price of fehe metal
is probably due to its extended
nsesin the setting of precious jewels
for which purpose it is better
adopted than gold. In addition to
its value for jewelry, platinum is
in such demand in the arts, as for
electric, chemical and scientific
apparatus and other uses, that
scientific men say ife must be found
as there is nothing el_e known to
take its place.
That platinum exists in economic
quantity in British Columbia
placers is evident from the returns
officially recorded. The geological
survey gives the production from
the year 1887 np to 1902 aft a total
value of $44,972. The records
available are, however, very imperfect. In those days, too, nobody paid any attention to platinum
regarding it as worthless and the
prices ranged from 60c to ��3.50 per
oz.
The SimiDuuneea country has
for years been known as a rich
mineral district and the Talameen
river is its main west fork.
While tbe Sijnilhameen river
was found rich only ia spots, the
��arly placer miners in  the sixties
got richer and larger returns from
the Tulameen. The largest gold
nugget found during the Granite
creek excitement was reported to
be worth $350 while several nuggets
ranging in value from $80 to $150
were picked up from the beds of
the Tulameen/iver and tributaries.
Several conflicting reports are made
on the estimated output of gold
from the Granite creek and Tulameen digfiings during and long
after the rush of miners from the
California gold fields to the Tulameen.
They evidentally all make good
and spent their gold dust as fast as
they made their daily clean-ups.
ThiB has been corroborated by the
few old timers who returned to this
district at the close of the Cariboo
excitement, which was the direct
cause of tho general exodus of
miners from the Tulameen and
Bock Creek into the far north.
The Similkameen and Tulameen
rivers have been for many years
famous for the remarkable quan
tity of black sands contained in the
gravels, which, all more or. less
contain gold and platinum. C. F.
Law, who knows the district,
places the production of platinum
from the Tulameen and its tributaries at 20,000 ozs. The black
platiniferous sands held in the
riffle and sluice boxes were regarded as of no value in those days and
were thrown away. For instance,
according to the Mineral Industry,
platinum was selling in Russia in
1898 at $7.75 to $8.75 per oz.
Today it is quoted in New York
at $45.50 for refined metal and $48
per oz. for hard metal. This represents an average' increase in price
of over 50 per cent, per annum, or
600 per cent, in 10 years. The
Tnlameen platinums are classed as
hard metals.
Hugh Hunter,' the gold commissioner at Princeton, has eome
very nice specimens of platinum
nuggets, also the British Columbia
Platinum company of Vancouver,
which has been operating on some
of the leases for a number of years.
C. E. Lee, of Seattle, is at present examining the placer leases
held by Messrs. Coulthard & Snow
den Bros., of Princeton. This
mining company is employing men
on these diggings and will make a
thorough test of the ground for
gold and platinum on the Boaney
leases. C. Lambert is preparing
to work his ground on Granite
creek. He has several nice specimens of gold he recently took out,
���Hedley Gazette.
Bohunk Miners
Writing   in    the   Mining  and
Scientific Press from Juneau Al
aska a man signing himself "Traveler," says previous contributors
have overlooked the moat import
ant feature of  the discussion on
''What is the matter with pros
pecting?"    He says it is the class
of labor at present employed in the
mines.   He continues:
"Fifteen years ago you could
make a shift boss out of practically
any man in the mine. Today, go
into tbe stope of any of the mines
in the larger districts and ask the
first man yoa meet a question
about the mine and two-thirds of
the time yoa will be greeted with
a blank expression and a shake of
tbe head. Go up to the shaft
when the shift is going to work or
stop into the office of a labor
agent and listen to tbe inquiries of
'Catch a job dis morn?' Then try
to imagine these men as prospectors. To these men a steady job
where they save a considerable
portion of their wages, and look
forward to a home in the old country as an ideal, is all sufficient.
They do not even know whether
they are working in a gold or a
copper mine. It is the job they
want, without any reference to
where it is so long as it pays.
There is no interest or fascination
to their work.   As this type
labor now represents about two-
thirds of the men around the
mines, it is easy to see the reason
for the decrease of the number
who were willing to 'stake a pal'
or 'take a chance' themselves ten
years ago. Whisper in any Of our
Alaskan towns that gold has been
found on some of the creeks hitherto unknown, and every English
speaking miner that can get away
is off on the stampede and the 'bohunk' grabs the job that is left.
The new camps are settled and
work by the day may be obtained.
Thus with the decrease of the
easily found placers or (lodes,) the
American turns his attention to
other lines and the foreigner settles
down to the routine work."
.n
off
Why Preachers Go Wrong.
Recently there was "printed in
The Standard, an official organ of
the Baptist denomination, an
article with the above title. The
author frankly admitted that
preachers go wrong.
It is a significant fact in the
trend of the times when preachers
themselves realize that there is
something wrong with their business.
The reason preachers go wrong
more than other men is not because preachers, as a class, are depraved. They are neither better
nor worse than any other class of
men of similar intelligence and opportunity. They go wrong because they are in a business that
places a premium on prevarication
and which penalizes truth.
Preachers today are exactly in a
class with palmists, clairvoyants
and fortune-tellers.
There is no choice between theo-
gy and astrology alchemy. As a
science, theology is just as worthless as that of augury. And the
best about theology is that it is now
unprofitable, and in degee, while
not dishonorable in a social way, it
is certainly without special honors.
A paid priesthood always stands
for moral degeneracy. Whenever
a new religious denomination is
formed and starts out with a firm
intent to be honest, simple, ^'direct
and cleave to the primal virtues, it
eliminates the paid priest.
The professional theologian is a
pander to superstition and prejudice.
He makes his money by banking
on fear, gullibility and credulity.
He is an attorney for the defence.
His business is not to ascertain
truth, but to protect and uphold a
denomination. So many people
have withdrawn from the churches
that preachers now, for tbe most
part, are on half rations.   -
It was officially stated in a Presbyterian Synod within the past
year that sixty per cent of all
Presbyterian pastors receive less
than nine hundred dollars a year.
At the present cost of living, no
man with a family can exist on a
sum less than a thousand dollars a
year and tell the truth.
He is paralyzed by apprehension
disturbed by doubt, and the uncertainty of his position makes clear,
lucid thinking quite out of the
question. Pastor Bicheson, who
was executed in Massachusettes a
short time ago, was laying bis
plans to marry the daughter of a
rich man, and in his vaporiags he
gave as an excuse for killing his
victim the fact that she had no property, and a minister could not afford to marry a woman without a
dowry.
This was a silly excuse for murder, but the man told the truth
just the same.
The priest Schmidt, who commit*
ted a similar crime, was a counterfeiter as well, because, as he explained, "the church did not pay
sufficient upon which a gentleman
could live."
Business men are honest for the
very best possible reason, and that
is because honesty pays. The one
price system is here to stay.
The general business policy of
treating every customer exactly
alike, fairly, truthfully, courteously, and without any special personal favors, is a good one.
Clergymen, however, have to dip
to the intelligence, or lack of it,
that the worshiper possesses. A
clergyman injects into every listener all of the theological caloric that
the individual will absorb. No intelligent clergyman will uphold
theological dogmatism when face
to face alone with a man of intelligence. In the pulpit things are diluted and made plausible.
The endeavor to uphold the
supernatural in a rational age is a
hopeless task, and the fact that the
world will not pay a living wage
for any such alleged service is one
of the signs of the times.
And so when a clergyman writes
an article asking the question why
preachers go wrong, he falls Jnto
tbe mire and deals in sciolism, pi file
and polite prevarication.
It will not do to tell a clergyman
to be manly and pay his debts, and
speak the truth. He can no more
speak the truth than he can pay
his debts. You can't pay your
debts unless you have money, and
you can not speak the truth when
by so doing you are going to be
cast out of the business to which
you^were educated, and which is
the only thing that can secure you
a crust. The clergyman is not
fighting for truth���he is fighting
for bis life.
The entire thinking world has
discarded the supernatural, and
the upholding of the supernatural
as a business is no longer a paying
profession. That is why preachers
go wrong.
The Quakers, the Shakers, the
Dunkards, the Zoarites, the Men-
nonites, and all of the denominations known as primitive churches,
did away with a professional
priesthood. Any man or woman
who had a message for the people
was at liberty to present it.
Christian Science is the strongest
force today in the theological world
and Christian Science has done
away with a paid priesthood. It is
true that their readers are paid, in
some instances, but all of these
I readers are people who have a
business, a trade, an occupation,
and derive an income outside of
the church. Most of them are
wage-earners. To that degree they
are independent of the church.
The professional preacher's task
jS now to make superstition palat
able, and this is a hopeless job.
The young man who goes into
the ministry now is one lacking in
commonsense. The Church has
no future, and wise are they who
recognize the fact that God is
everywhere if anywhere; that the
round world is a temple; that there
is no gulf between the secular and
the sacred; that the useful is the
divine, and the helpful is the sacred;
that all days are holy, and that
men who know most abont this
world are those who are best fitted
to teach us the Way of Life.
When we want to hear really
good sermons nowadays we attend
a weekly lunch of the ad club, and
listen to a man who deals in ways
and means and is intent on bringing about paradise, here and now.
And the answer as to why preachers go wrong is this���they are in a
bad business.���Philistine.
Mabel���"I wonder how much
longer we must wait for that
mother of mine. She's kept us
waiting quiet a few minutes."
George���"Hours I should Bay."
Mable���"Ours! Oh, George 1 this
is so sudden!"
Appropriate
Hi, waiter, this meat is like
leather." "Yes, -Jr. Saddle of
mutton sir."
HUP OWN WOMEN
Find Health in a Simple Tonid.
How many women do you know
who are perfectly well, Btrong and
healthy as a woman should be? They
may not be sick enough to lie in bed
���but they are run-down, thin, nervous, tired and devitalized.
Women are bo active nowadays,
and so much la expected of them,
that they constantly overdo and suffer from headache, backache, nerrous-
ness and kindred Ills.
Such women need Vlnol, our delicious cod liver and Iron tonic without oil which will create an appetite,
tone up the digestive organs, make
pure blood and create strength.
Mrs. Walter Price, BlloxJ, Hiss.,
Bays: "I was In a run-down condition
for months, I had taken several medicines but they seemed to do me no
good. Finally Vlnol waB recommended, and from the first bottle I began
to Improve until I am Btrong and well
as ever."
Try a bottle of Vlnol with the understanding that your money will be
returned If It does not help you,
J. L. White, druggist, Greenwood
JLTQUOB   ACT,   1910.
Sec. 42.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, on the first day
ol June next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for
renewal of the hotel licence to sell liquor by re-
tall In the hotel known au the Westbrldge Hotel,
situate at Westbrl-tre, In the Province of British Columbia.
Datedthl8 25th day of April,1914.
I.OUIS CLERY
Applicant
E.C. HENMGERAITOCO
GRAND FORKS
Agents for theStudebaker Automobiles and Goodyear Tires
Gasoline and all kinds of Auto Supplies
VULCANIZING PROM PLY EXECUTED
All Kinds of Autos Repaired Upon Short Notice
Save Money By Trading at
Brown's Ferry Wash,
Note these prices and be convinced
Granulated Cane Sugar
lOOIbs. for $6.
201bs. for $1.25
LARD lOlbs for S1.50.   51bs. for 7Sets
Fancy Standard Hams 20c per lb.
California Fancy Tomatoes 2 cans for 2 Sets.
Del Monte Canned Fruits 25cts. a can.
Coal Oil 2 Sets a gallon
Gasoline 30cts a gallon.
CASH ONLY
If you Desire an Education in Buying and a knowledge
as to where you may&et the most value
for your money expended
write for our illustrated catalogue, through
which you will come into direct touch with the
facilities of our Big Vancouver Store.
Splendid Values in Cutlery and Table Silver
are offered'all buyers through the medium of
this catalogue, in which the illustrations and descriptions are truly representative of the real
articles/] ��0ur prices for this fine Cutlery and
Silverware are very moderate when the quality
of the'goods are considered, and this quality
backed by our house guarantee, Our��Silver-
ware comes direct to you from our own tactoiv
ies,
HENRY BIRKS & SONS, LIMITED
JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS
Geo, R Trorey, Man, Dir. VANCOUVER, B/C
'r
I NEW SPRING HATS I
Stanfield's Underwear.
Bell's Shoes
Mallory Hats
Semi-Ready Clothing
=2
25
|       P.W.GEORGE        I
f|   COPPER STREET       /        GREENWOOD, R C   |f
jF��e��pj^_?*pjs,^"*rjP3e,js,je,j��,jPiP jpjcir _cjr_c_c *���***���.<'*���*���*��� *���*���*���,
fc
fc
fc
fc
Lawn
Mower
BROWN'S
EERRY    WASH,
fc
fc
fc
fc
fc
fc
1 Grinder
%
fc
fc
fc
fc
fc
fc
****************** *****************
KINNEY'S
GRAND FORKS GARAGE CO.
Distributors of Ford, Overland and Cadillac
Automobiles.
Repairs Made to all Kinds of Cars by Firafe-Olaas Mechanics
Complete line of Auto Accessories, including Gasoline, Oils,
__._._,.._..,.  _.., _GreaBeB,.jOhaiiw}jEtc.i._-__,__------.-,-,-_.-,_=---------
We are Boundary Agents for tbe Danlop tires, and keep in
stock all standard sizes in plain and traction treads. Information regarding prices, etc., may be obtained from Charles
Russell, Greenwood, or the Grand Forks Garage Co.,
Grand Porks.
��#���
Our New
Suits
are unusual values
���in style, in quality
of cloth, and in the
superior tailoring
of every garment.
We can give you a
choice of Blue
Serges, Blue
Flannels, Gray
Worsteds, Homespuns in a big
variety of effects,
and other of die
season's novelties,
in the newetft
styles.
Ask to see our
Suits at $15. to $35.
965
W. ELSON & CO.
Greenwood
���"���.V
:"JV���

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