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The Ledge Oct 3, 1918

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 6 ������   ���'.'?"
I Pro
yinci
al iiftra.
*y
THE
THE  OLDEST  MINING  CAMP  NEWSPAPER   IN   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Vol.   XXV.
GREENWOOD, B. C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1918.
No. 12
.**?!
MANY   NEW   LINES
Come In And See Our
Large And Well Assorted Stock Of
Carpets,    Furniture,   Pictures,
Crockery,   Etc.   Etc.
Many   kinds of Oil,  Tinware
and  Hardware
T. M. GULLEY & CO.
PHONE 28 X        GREENWOOD, B. C.
I
^mmmwmfmmmmmiwmm?mmmmmmmmmm||
1    GREENWOOD  GROCERY    |
B Canada Food Board License No. 8-6251 ^3
��= The   Food   Board   Asks   You   to   Save ~s
H THE RLOUR |
B yVe carry a most complete stock of other Cereals ~3
��= We specialize in TEA and COFFEE inpkge or bulk ||
B AT REASONABLE PRICES H
I    LEE & BRYAN     i
^liiiiiiiUiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiaiaaiiiiuiiaiiiiiiauiiiiiiiiaiiii^
"EXCUSE ME A  MOMENT,   PLEASE,   WHILE I
ANSWER  THE TELEPHONE"
Promptness in answering your telephone helps to improve
the quality of 5'our telephone service.
It is a courtesy your telephone caller appreciates. It keeps
him from waiting and possibly abandoning a call that may be
important to'you. Just make a habit to answer your telephone promptly, and you aud others will benefit from an even
higher quality of telephone service.   . .       .. .
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY,  Ltd.
Mazda Tungsten Lamps
15 to 40 Watt Lamps���50c each,
60 Watt Lamps���75c each.
100 Watt Lamps���$1.25 each,
NITROGEN
LAMPS
60 Watts   -  ���/ �� ��� $1.25 each
100    �����     ���"/.  -    -   2.00 ������
200   "'.    *' >   *    3.50 �����.���
Greenwood City Waterworks Co.
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
Tlie Consolidated Hi��i���� 4 Snellins Cd.
of Canada, Limited
Offices, Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
TADANAC BRAND PIG LEAD, BLUESTONE, COPPER AND SPELTER
it.   xB
W X '
ft X.
Insurance
Life, F'-e, Health and
Accident
Real Estate, Ranches and
Mining Broker
AUCTIONEER
Charles King
GREENWOOD, B. C.
"STORE OF QUALITY"
HUNTING SEASON
NOW OPEN
Ammunition, Guns,
Shooting  Coats,
Leggings,  Etc.
J.G. McMYNN
MIDWAY      -      -     B.O.
FIT-REFORM
Suits
Made from
"BEFORE THE WAR" Cloth
DURABLE LININGS
Permanent fronts in the coats
made with uon-hreak canvas
ancfhair cloth
Styles up to date
PRICES REASONABLE
W. Elson 0 Co
Greenwood
Morrison bas   revisit with relatives
Smoke a 'NOBLEMEN"
THE C1GAR0F QUALITY
20 cts each 3 for 50 cents
Box of 25 for $3.75
An Excellent Birthday Gift
AT
MUIR'S CIGAR STORE
Phone 45 P. O. Box S74
Christian Science service will be held
in the MELLOR BLOCK on Sunday at 11
a. m. All -welcome. Every Wednesday
at 8 p. m., testimonial meetings will be
held 111 the same block. Sunday School
every Sunday morning.
MATTHEWS  BROS.
GRAND  FORKS
Agents for Chevrolet, Dodge, Hudson,
Chalmers.. Cadillac cars, and Republic
truck motors.        . Garage in connection.
WANTS, ETC.
For Salb.���A Webster's Dictionary for three dollars, at The
Ledge office.
The Ledge is $2 a year in
advance. When not paid for
three months it is $2 50, and
when paid ai end of year it is $3.
For Sai.15,���A portable sawmill with, a capacity of 10,000
feet daily. Also a gasoline
latin cb, 20 feet in length, Roberts
marine engine. Apply to Charles
Oliver, Greenwood.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF CO]
SR EDMUND WALKER,
;CV.O_. LLD.rD;CL. Prisidem
SIR JOHN AIRD, General Manage*
H V. F. JONES, Asst Gen'L Maiwjer
CAWTALPAID Ufc$!5,O6^0OQT^ESEKVE fUND, - $13,500,000
Every effort is madeiitp: proyide the banfc
.ii, ��� in& service r^ujr^
"^V;;;;I-;^f;;:;--:handI^
���Xxxx. t;^!lpts^^^^^.^-i ��� -.'
'XXxXXx;.XXXiX..xXli. r;G,:".rLUCi^,rManagcr.
Of course they all go to Dad
O'Dell at the Proriuce Hotel,
Grand Forks.
In 1914 there were 300 cases of
typhoid in B, C. So far this
year only 20 cases have been reported. .At this time of the year
care should be exercised in regard
to water, as October is usually
the worst month for this terrible
disease.
Charley Dempsey says that the
ranchers at English Bay are: only
going to plant spuds in the future that are adapted to :a wet
climate. Tbis season their spuds
did not do:we:ll,:asrthey were of a
dry belt variety, and were always
coming out of the ground, and
peel ing theireyesy tp ;; see it clear
up...       -. \;:; XlX iriiXXxXxXXi , XXy X;X
A. Sr-Embree,;'who: succeeded
Haywood as leader of the I. W.W;
has been arrested; 'iinXChicago
under";the^espionage act/ ;: He is
held; under:,;$10,000^bonds.^aiid
.will be tried this;week.'";Hqir:was.
a;president df- GreenwoodXyears
ago. and has a college education:
At one time he edited a paper in
Alaska. He has a brptl'.er at
Creston.
, Around Home %
You can always hire an auto at
the Palace Livery.
Chas. King has sold the Moffatt
house to Del Parker.
The clocks will be turned back
an hour on October 27.
Seed wheat and seed rye tor
sale at Brown's, Midway.
Mrs. Wisted of Rock Creek is
in the Greenwood Hospital.
Mrs. James Sutherland spent a
few days in town this week.
Plenty of railway ties will be
made this year in tbe  Boundary.
There are 65,000 pupils at the
schools in B. C, and 2200 teachers.
A Soldiers friend is Dad O'Dell
at the Province Hotel, Grand
Forks.
Luke Gibson of Princeton, lost
$15,000 by the fire in Hope last
month.
G. A. RendelTsells many kind
of pickles, mcludiug sweet pickles in bulk.
Real good cigars at Dad
O'Dell's at the Province Hotel,
Grand Forks.
This year a rancher at the
Forks picked 16 boxes of pears
from one tree.
Mrs. A. J.
turned from a
at Vale, Oregon.
Bantings store at Edgewood
was burned last month, causing
a loss of $16,000."
Rev. H. W. Simpson is a sapper with the Canadian Engineers
at North Vancouver.
Early apples, fine tomatoes,
fresh cantaloupes, and grape
fruit atG.A. Rendell's.
D. R. McElmon, Greenwood.
Watchmaker and Jeweler, Goggles and auto glasses on hand.
Tom Gunderson is visiting his
mother in Seattle He will railroad on the prairip this winter.
Just in. Bulk vinegar $1,50 a
gallon. Sour mixed pickles $1.75
gallon glass jar.    G. A. Reudell.
Some farmers near Princeton
this season, grew 35 bushels of
wheat to the acre, and 75 of oats
To avoid Spanish Irfluenza,
keep away from crowded theatres,
churches, and other public gatherings.
Miss Eleanor Mills died in Midway last BVidav. Internment is
awaiting instructions from relatives.
Translucent crabapples, Flemish Beauty and Bartlett pears
will arrive in Rendell's store this
week.
Bill Donnelly is again at the
Mother Lode, having returned
from the harvest fields of Saskatchewan.
George Boag aud Charles
Hamarstadt, have returned to
Lightning Peak where they will
mine all winter.
The Myncaster Mercantile Co.,
at Myncaster, is selling a fine
line of clothing, boots, shoes, and
gents furnishings.
The Sunday Schools were
closed recently in Trail upon account of diptheria among the
children of that town.
Lieut. Charles McArthur, ot
the Royal Air Force, was on a
few days visit to his mother,
prior to going overseas,
At the Mother Lode on Saturday, Ben Savstrom cut his left
arm against a stoper leg. Oo
the same day John Hasty had his
right foot bruised by a falling
rock.
At Kelowna, L. Holman expects this year to make $10,000
from tobacco grown on 35 acres.
He sold it to a cigar company in
Quebec.
If the citizens of Greenwood
bestir themselves it will not take
long to get wagon road connection to Lightning Peak. Get
busy at once.
G. A. Rendell is in the Nelson
hospital with pneumonia that he
contracted at; Lightning Peak.
He is recovering and will return
to Greenwood on Friday.
: Rev. W. F. Campbell, M. A.,
P. H. D., of Toronto, will speak
on behalf of the Lord's Day
Alliance in the Presbyterian
church, Wed.; Oct. 9, at 8 p. m.
; :Harry'Bidder has succeeded F.
J. Longworth, as superintendent
of the Greenwood smelter. Mr.
Longworth has been appointed
superintendent of a big copper
smelter in Tennessee.
xiiWriting from an Australian
Red Cross hospital in France on
September 6, Sergt. A. N. Mowat
says .that he was wounded on
September 3, in the left leg and
thigh.;: He;says that he is doing
well,'.:-and was to be sent to
Blighty on the following day.
The auction sale of T. O.
Gunderson's effects last Saturday,
by Charles King turned out successfully. There were a large
number of buyers, and prices
were fair.
Arrangements have been made
to have Mr. Leslie Grossmith,
the English society entertainer
and musician give one of his
unique musical recitals, under
tbe auspices of the Boundary
Women's Institute in the Masonic
Hall, on October 14. Mr. Gros-
smiths programme sparkles with
wit and humor; is varied and
thoroughly en-joyable throughout. The concert will be followed by a dance, and refreshments
will be served.
Patrick Barrett, better known
as "Paddy the Priest" has just
been discharged from the army
after serving 18 months in three
different regiments. During that
time he made ten trips acro9s the
continent, but not on brakebeams.
He has been at Morrissey since
last April, and tells many strange
thiugs about that camp. Paddy
took in the Fair at Nelson last
week, and his old friends were
delighted to meet this noted Irish
wit of early days. After spending some time in Vancouver he
will gently drift towards the
sunny south by steamer from
Seattle. Paddy is well-known in
Arizona and California. He
helped to pack the lumber foi: the
first hotel at Coranado, and
guarded inyalids in Phoenix who
could not walk. He also picked
oranges in Redlands, lemons at
Chula Vista, and taught many a
little Mexican girl the shortest
way to count her beads. Inter
pocula it is hard to beat Paddy.
The church lost a great light,
when he traded his cowl for freedom of spirit and action.
Rock Creek
At the monthly meeting of the
Rock Creek Women's Institute the
secretary was asked to correct an
misunderstanding in regards to the
socks knitted for Red Cross a report having been circulated that
the committee were selling those
socks.
Afe a meeting of the Patriotic
committee on Jane 29th, it was
decided feo order six spindles of
wool, part to be used for Red Cross
and part for the bazaar Bales. As
there was then a demand for several pair a few of the members volunteered feo knit and fill these
orders. In May 25 pairs of hand
knitted socks were donated to the
Grand Forks Red Cross, in Jane
17 pair, Jnly 17 pair, August 7
pair, which Bhows thafe the members are doing their bit besides
keeping the home fires burning.
Mbb. A. D. McLennan,
Bec-Treas., R. C W. I.
A. few days ago Mrs. G. A.
Rendell located and staked a
claim herself near Lightning
Peak. She called it Lanark,
after her native town in Ontario.
There is much excitement
among prospectors, over the recent strikes at Lightning Peak,
and a second Slocan is in sight.
The shortest and best route to
the new camp is by auto from
Greenwood to Dutch Pete's near
Copper creek, then along the east
fork of the main Kettle river to
Goat creek, thence due north
along the high lands to the Peak,
Several from Greenwood have
gone in that way this week.
AekwwUdtemtnts to Luke Filies
*TK) every home there comes a time when
*��� every thought, every hope, every prayer
for the future centres on the recovery of one
loved one. In that hour of anguish, every
means to recovery is sought���the highest medical
skill, trained nurses, costly treatment. Does
the price matter ?
��� ���       ���       *
It may be so great as to stagger the imagination���a sum beyond the possible.
But does anyone ask, " Can we do it ?"
Money or no money, they do it. Ahd somehow they pay.
It   may mean doing without things they
think they need.     It may   mean privations,
sacrifices, hardships.   They make unbelievable   .
savings, they achieve the impossible, but they
get the money to pay.
* *       *       *
To-day in this critical period of our nationhood, there is imperative need for MONEY���
vast sums of money.
Only one way now remains to obtain it.
The nation must save, .every community,
every family, every individual Canadian must
save.
If anyone says "I cannot save" let him consider to    .
what extent he would pinch himself to relievethe sufferings of a loved one at home; and surely he would not
pinch less for our fighting brothers in France.
Without suffering actual privations, nearly every
family in Canada can reduce its standard of living, can
practice reasonable thrift, can make cheerful sacrifice to
enrich the life-blood of the nation.
You who read this, get out pencil and paper NOW.
Set down the items of your living expense.   Surely you .
will find some items there you can do without.
Determine to do without them.
.   Start TO-DAY; Save your money so that you maybe
in a position to lend it to your country in its time of need.
PnbJitbttl nnder the Authority of
Tbe Minister of Finance
of Canada. yCt
\
Western Float
is   importing  potatoes
RS
More houses ave being built afe
Trail.
Alberta
from B. C
Batter is 82 a pound in Constantinople.
Dr. Gray is moving from Banff
to Keremeos.
Advertising will help business if
it is properly done.
The Kootenay flats yielded 2500
tons of hay tbis year.
Patches in war-time are often an
evidence of patriotism.
Grant Thorburn is now a resident of South Vancouver.
Tbe scarlet woman still lives in
Rossland and Revelstoke.
R. C. Armstrong of Keremeos
died last month aged 73 years.
This year the potato crop in
Manitoba is worth 88,000,000.
At Penticton women are doing
the section work on the railway.
' The civil population of England
only gets one^ounce of jam each
week.
In England they say: "A shilling wasted stabs a soldier in the
back."
Captain Norman Wood, a nafeive
son of Kamloops waB killed in
Prance.
All the lumber mills at Ports
Alberni are running at their full
capacity.
Who is that lady in Nelson who
chews tobacco, because it is cheaper than gum?
At a tax sale in Rupe this week,
more than 500 lots were put up for
public auction.
Jabez King died in Victoria lasfe
month aged 75 years. He had
lived 55 years in that city.
Last month at Ocean Falls two
men were fined $100 each, for
shooting deer out of season.
For lack of steel rails work on
the Hudson Bay Ry, haB been
practically stopped for this year.
Kamloops now has a business
manager, and its aldermen no
longer receive any remuneration.
The pack of sockeye salmon, on
the Fraser river this year will
amount to 25000 cases, the lowest
on record.
Several Lulu Island farmers are
selling their wheat straw for 80
cents a bale. It will be used to
make paper.
The boom started in Kaslo 26
years ago fehis month. It was
cansed by building a wagon road
to Three Forks.
George M. Yuill has been in the
Peace River country all summer.
He will probably return to Trout
Lake before ife freezes over.
Little Gus Anderson, formerly
of New Denver, is running a poolroom in Alaska, His sister died
in Prince Ruperfe some time ago.
At-the coasfe the Steamer Tees
has been made a salvage vessel, in
place of the Salvor. The latter
vessel will carry freight to Australia.
Billy Walmsley has been running the Cecil hofeel in Vancouver
for a year. His brother Charley
is running the Wayne hotel in
Seattle.
According to evidence taken in
a British Military coart, the-Germs
burned many British prisoners
alive, by sprinkling them wifeh
liquid fire.
In fehe early days of Kaelo,
Sandon and Three Forks no poker
game was held up by a bandit. Ife
was nofe necessary unless the dummy had a fore hand.
In B. C. Doukhobors have four
schools, attended by 84 pupils, all
boys. The Douks evidently do
not fehink thafe girls need any
education. All Douks should be
taught English.
According to an Order-ln-Coun-
cil, passed in Ottawa 20 years ago
the Doukhobors iu Canada are
exempt from military duty, but
cofehiug else. In all other respects
they musfe conform to fehe laws
like all other residents  in Canada.
Keep on writing letters to the
boys in France. Ife cheers them
greatly to gefe letters from home.
All of them no doubfe would like to
read a copy of Float. You can
get a copy of Float at The Ledge
office if you do not delay too long.
Threshing is over iu the Delta
and Surrey districts. About 14
machines were used, and sack
sewers were paid 73 cents an hour.
The crops were good, ae high as
180 bushels of oats feo the acre were
grown. Oat straw sells for from
S4 feo ?6 a load, four times the
price of last year. Oats has been
selling for $60 a ton. and the
Chinese are charging IS cents a
|6ack for digging potatoes. The
��� we=t is a glorious country, mn ledum. flBEEiCEooa, a_a
Soft White Hands
Follow use of Outlcura Soap and Ointment. At nlghi bathe tbcin with the
Soap and hot water. Dry ancl rub In tbe
Ointment. Wear old gloves Uuringnlght.
Sample Each Freo by Mai). Address postcard: "Cuticura. Dept. N. Bolton, U. S. A."
Sold by dealers throughout the world.
U-Boat Drowns I
"Rescued" Crew
Learning About Our Allies:
Leaves Fishermen on Deck and Submerges When Patrol Boat
Appears
'J he  survivors  <j\   two  sailing  trawlers,   Britisii   and     Belgian,     recently
brought   into   a   British   port,   tell     a
terrible,   tale  oi   German   cruelly,   Thc
Uritish   trawler  was  sunk  by a  bomb
and  thc  crew  was   taken  aboard  the
submarine.    Three   hours  later      the
Belgian   trawler     was     sighted     and
sunk and  the crew,  consisting- of    a
father  and  son,    also      was      taken
aboard.       All  were  kept  on  the  sub-
| marine's  deck near  the  conning-  Low-
j er.      When   a  patrol    boat  appeared,
ilhe  submarine    submerged       without
I warning,  leaving  the     fishermen      to
; drow n.
I son   and
land   onlv
Far  Different From  the   Traditional
American View of Them
-1 he    war  is  a  liberal   education   to
Americans   who  go  to     France.      It
yes straightway to many
ORINOCO
Shock Troops Aid Farmers
i 	
| Are Busy in American Wheat Fields
as Well as on Battle Front
"pens tlicir
things heretofore hidden. The Sammies pick up quickly an insight into
the real characteristics of Furopean
nations- nu'Uer in which our stay-
at-home peopie are pretty ignorant.
Thcy lean', iirst of all, that the
French aie not the light, lax, degenerate folk many of us have thought '.V.r.. "gf.
them, and that the English arc far
different from the traditional American view  of them.
It   is  this  latter    discovcrcy      that
seems  lo occasion most  surprise. An1
American   Lieutenant, in a  letter    to
his   father,  published  in   The   Beaver
this
Profit ?n Hogs
I     "Shock  Iroops" are busy in American  wheat fields,   as  well  as   on  the
��� western  battle    front.       When      thc
German   war   lords   command   an   ad-
  I vancc at any  cost,  shock  troops  are
' sent forward  to  buy yards of ground
Farmers ot Western Canada Receive ; with   thousands    of    lives,     but    the
More for Their Hogs j American agricultural ���'shock troops"
i- ,i       i - _���      ! advance  in  a  different  manner   Thev
1-or many months the prices ruling  .,,,, ,.���,,   ,,,,.���  ,,.,,,,     J"'""1L'-   -lllL>
i .- i .ii     . .     b i-are town  men  who have volunteered
lo help  farmers  cut and shock  their
BOVRIL
Take it as Soup before Meals"\
"he Belgian skipper and his i Valley   (Fa.)   Iv'ews, breaks  into
three   J-.n^hshnien   perished   delightful  eulogy:
"Do you know, dad, the Briiish are
a wonderful people? Their education, courtesy, dignity, reserve, are a
revelation. Their       open-hearted
triendliness,  their      admiration      for
America,   and   their   sense   of   humor
have   captured   the  hearts   of      every
if starv-jone of us who were sent to them for
ing.   All oi  the Germans appeared  to i instruction  ....
',\yo   of   the     English   crew
j were  saved.
j The survivors state that the Ger-
; mans ransacked the trawlers before
i sinking them and carried oil' everything of value. The German sailors,
| according to the survivors, ale bis-
! etuis  and  lis.h ravenously as
"Prisoner of i
The Mahdi" Dead !
be youths,    their commander being
only 20.     The   survivors  were in   the
water  lor  three  or four  hours before
they   were  picked up.
it   Calgary,  Alberta,     have
almost  invariably  been  higher     than
those ruling at the leading markets of
the  United States.    This means  that
the  farmer in  Alberta has  a  grcatct
margin of profit in  hog  raising than
his neighbor to the south.    Not only
is he obtaining  more  for  his    hogs, j
but his cost of production is consid- I
erably less.       He is  raising    equally !
large  crops  of  the  most  satisfactory {
wheat, aud thus are doing their part
in  making  the  battle  line   firm.
Here are two instances, reported
to the United States department of
agriculture, of how towns and cities
are helping to meet the need for
harvest workers  on American  farms:
A South Dakota county has organized all its towns. When labor is
needed all business places close early
Was  Used  to  Distribute  Propaganda
Among thc Arabs
According   to     advices   rcccivt d     in !
Amsterdam,   Karl   Xeufeld.  known   as   Gaze
Minard's   Liniment
where.
for   Sale   Every-
Tasks at Home
on
the    Profiteers    in
Walk  of Life
Every
"the prisoner of llie .Mahdi," is ilcail
hi Berlin. Xeufeld studied medicine j
nt l.rip.Mg and, after graduation, set-I Much more than defeating thc
tied in Assouan, Upper Egypt, where ' Germans will have to be done be-
bc practiced from 1879 to 1X.S1. When | fore democracy is made safe for thc
she rising of Mohammed Achmed j world. Our tasks will not need to
look place in the latter year he was be performed in foreign lands, but
obliged to give up his residence at I at home: not in the capital of the
Assouan, and he joined the English \ nation, not in Olympia, but in our-
troops in the Soudan as an inirrpre- j selves. And as we look out and
ter of the Arabic language and was jgaze on the profiteers in every -walk
highly appreciated. In April, 1887, j of life, from the packing-house niul-
he set. out on a scouting expedition, : timillionaire who fattens off the lood
ostensibly as a trader, and he and | of the people, to the worker who
his whole caravan was taken prison-j labors for double time Saturday after   by   the   Mahdists     aud     narrowl'v   ernoon  and   Sundav and      lays      off
��� scaped hanging as a spy, but was
loaded with chains and cast into a
dungeon by orders of thc Mahdi, but
Monday; when we see the food
hoarder, the slacker, the slicker;
when we see every man justifying his
la.tcr   was   released    and     aided     thc j profits   and  denouncing  those  of  his
Mahdi   and   later,   after   the.     hitter's   fellow-man;   when  we      note      class
death,  the  Kalifa, although  his irons i struggling   against  class,   even   at
were not removed.    In  1898 he    was j time   when   destiny   is   poised   on
rescued   by   English     soldiers,     and, j hair  balance,  we  can  get  some
��fter that, made pilgrimages to Mcc-'of what  we  have  to   do  besides  dc-
ca   and  passed  a  searching  cxamina-i fealing  the   Germans.      We  have  to
tion on the Koran when liis claim to   establish  a  democracy here at home
being a   Mohammedan   was   disputed, i according  to  the. concept of  thc  dc-
After  the   Fnropcar,   war   began,    he I mocracy  with  which   we   propose  to
"They light and fight with fury,
yet 1 never saw thc slightest evidence of 'hate.' After over three
years of defeat, disappointment and
terrible losses their spirit and morale are unbelievable.
"1 never saw such optimism as
their 'Tommies' and oflicers showed
everywhere. They were, eager to attack, and at the same time knew that
(ach attack caused them losses of
whole battalions, i cannot believe
that even 'scientific' Germany can
equal British organization and
thoroughness. Certainly no German
morale can ever equal the English.
"The English are healthy in mind
and body. 1 never saw" a belter-looking type of men. . They are generous.
They arc modest. They are absolutely fearless. They lost 7,000 killed
before Lens, but 15,000 German dead
lay opposite. This was 'out in the I
open,' hand-to-hand bayonet fighting.
"When   a   fight   is   on   they      f'g'll|bat
with but thc thought to kill and win.
When it is over, tlicy are immediately  generous  and  merciful.     They  do
hog  foods���oats,  bailev,  alfalfa,  etc. \.,���,t ,.i,^ ,���   ��� -    . , ., -
-on land which represents an invest- ^        '^n."lcn S�� '�� automobiles
ment  of a compar itivelv  small  sum. j \v^lJh?    r /'m      c��un ry:
Moreover,  losses   from "disease     are ! ^ lcJ'1.^ i T?C   iotbc]*s  c"t , bu��
1 , not shocked  they get out and shock
,1..,,..ll!iinil   then   proceed     to     other     fields
"CrtaS(1   needing thcin.    They dou't talk about
pay or who is doing the work. "If
lcr  wants   to      donate       the
money   which   hc   would   spend      for
almost unknown.
Notwithstanding      the
number  of   hogs  now  available     for
marketing as a result of the campaign X'X-   ?l
lor greater production conducted last \
i year, prices  well above eighteen  dol- i t . ���     .      .,      .-,   ,   ,-. ,,   .   .     , .
lars  a   hundred  are  being    obtained. 'bbo'   t0  the   Rcd   Cross   that   ls   hls
This represents an advance of    from
four lo five  dollars a hundred     over
prices ruling at this time last year.
Clear the Skin
A beautiful complexion ia the outward mark of
good blood and a healthy body. When the stomach,
liver and blood are in good order, the skin is clear and
lovely. Unsightly blotches, pimples, eruptions and
sallowness show the need of Beecham's Pills to stimulate
and regulate the vital organs and improve the circulation.   Good health and better looks soon follow the use of
dEECHh
are worth a
s PILLS
Inea a box
Sold ererywhero in Canada and U. S. America. In boxoi, 25 conto.
Two British Flyers
Beat Forty Germans
Unequalled Record    of Victories
Short Period of Time
in
business,"   says   a   letter   from   South \
Dakota,  "and  I   think  that  is   where'
'most of  the  money  will  go."                1
i     "Shock troops"     are     cutting   and !
| shocking   wdieat   in   Warrick   county,
j Indiana,     also.     Volunteer     business i ��� ���. ��� ���    .��� ��� ���  tag
j IS ^ir't^work"   aJd I Prosperity Reigns | Some Resources
i then arc taken in   automobiles . to. In the North! Of Northern Alberta
help the  farmers.     In     one.    evening
A correspondent on the Britisii
front in France cables that two
British air force pilots have jus
been awarded the Distinguished Fly
ing Cross, after a month of service
in a scout squadron. As thc air service regulations as to anonymity
prohibit the mentioning of their
names, they may be called "X" and
"V." Between June 1 and July 7, X
brought down twenty-seven Germans
and V won six of his decisive comin one day, and three of his total victories were the destruction of
balloons.
These   two   pilots   a   few-
forty men shocked more than  eighty .T,    ,-,,,,        _,      ,. .       ��� ,    i r��        ts ���    ,. ���
acres of wheal. j'Ideal  vVeather Condition Favors the \ Few  People  Realize   the Extent
These   forces   have   been   arranged j Farmer and He Is Happy ;        That Great Northern Region
of
. j through co-operation of farm help
specialists of the United Stales department of agriculture, county
agents, county councils of defense,
and other bodies.
The northern parts of Alberta,! In an address before thc Rotary
Saskatchewan and Manitoba are en-1 club al Calgary, Rathbone Smith,
joying  considerable  prosperity.     The | general    manager    of  the  McArthur
���was   used   lo   distribute     propaganda
tmong  the Arabs.
Animals in Gas Attacks
Horses Suffer Much From the Noxi- I
ous   Fumes
Poisonous gas  having been  consti-j
micd   by   our   enemies   a   weapon     of
war,  various       scientific       authorities;
have made a thorough study of it on
���behalf pf the; allii -.
'-���: features, the /effect of
on: animals has' been
ihe   Ccrinans   also   h;
investigated The :>.une   subject.     J\e
!rsuits- show.That  horses  sutler     much
from the ihbxiOusr funics, and are sub-
: eeciiierVtlyrthrown Tnto a state of ncr-
fvc.us terrorXdii; again scenting them.
���.;'Mtnes:,a:re'^-:m6rC;;.incliiicd to stand
7 their'grountl, atid appear as if trying
7 'not to breathe-.-.'.'; Gas helmets . of a
; kind, have been successfully tried for
' jjoth These animals. In the trenches
X-are 'inany animals kept by the sol-
^ diers as pets:: ^0f these, cats quickly
/���sccjit^tfifc^ run  about  howl-
���,���'in��_���'������: Ciiiinea '.pig.?7 are the first to suc-
.'���������'��� :toin't).-.:7-'R;ivtS arid mice emerge from
.;j(icir;^iipl;c^,r:.*n'i:>i'e found dead in
���i:<l'ila^t.i.l:Ve:^r^'>v1]i:fc)i,;': as the soldiers say,
���;'.'��� Is rtbe.^oivlyrad-^antage of a gas at-
;'--^tatjilc:���'iyy;'''^-iiiie-:--=..C'i'*iii*>"- Poultry of _ all
^kindsr'areruiseftil Tor .giving warning,
/���'������;.diic,ks.- andr/fOwlr; becoming agitated
v-^t?n;:fliintitfe|tprvS<) bcfore_ the oncom-
���jngrgasr clouds, i}Alany kinds of wild
Sbirfe^re^grfiatlyicxritcd, and thc us-
?ii_iali^7jiuir'uffl^(i:.~Q\vl becomes, as it
S':^'fft;;;l)^l^d��ni��itvtecl. Only the spar-
::rrro\yr7scem^ the poisonous
;;':^ji^ij;':SriHy:Sparrpws chirp on where
i':h:ttrses;;-;arerr;a5phyxiated, and bees.
r'-^ttcit-fli^^^ auts      and
������^b^yji's'^iid'ipit'r'iri':great number*. The
���Cgas^at:;pncp;rkills  snakes,  and   carthr
i.'���'vv'priyis'JarfrTpundi dead in  their
::rni;urv:;iWch;C__''below  the  ground.
endow the earth, and -we will have
to do it without any of the shortlived stimulus that accompanies war.
���From thc Seattle Post Intelligencer.
not murder    prisoners      nor      insult  jL.]| ;,lto u Teuton trap.    They    were
l'lf,(nK ,1-u i   wc" over enemy territory when  they
Anyone   who  has   closely   lollowecl  encountered      fortv   enemy    fighting
the course ot the war must recognize !aerop]lln(.Si     They'fought    their way
a | that  this _ is an accurate charactenxa- j tilf0ugll> wjnnjng th.-ey decisive com-
���1 aiUon-,  It is only just lo our allies, that, bals  on   Ul(,  w        and  sen(1;ng  jo^
idea, we should learn  to regard them in sojt,|ree ot|)cr Chines  apparently  out
jlavorable. a light,    And it is a pleas-jof  control      x  and   y  had scp;iriUe<l
;urc to any fair-minded American .tO:from  their   Qwn       (rol   lQ   chasc      a
thispicturc  for  the  prcju-  lonc Gcnnan Uvo scatei..    This ;s u].
impressions    we    liavc|ways  a  hazai.dous  undertaking,     because  it  is  almost   certain   that     the
This is to certifv lhat I have used
MINARD'S    LINIMENT,   in      my
days  ago   family for ycars, and consider it  thc
best liniment on the market.    I have
found it excellent for horse flesh.
(Signed)
W.   S.  P1NEO.
"Woodlands," Middlcton, N.S.
fair-minded American
substitute
diced  set   of
trained    from
onc-sulei
we    have
instruction
As a vermifuge there is nothing
so potent as Mother Graves' Worm
Exterminator, and it can be given to
the most delicate child without fear
of  iniurv   to  the  constitution.
and  absurd
Chester, N.
stage    caricatures.
V., Times-Union.
Ro-
Ability Rewarded
lone plane is a bait to draw the pursuing pilot beneath a strong enemy
'patrol waitin" at a high altitude to
pounce on him. So X pursued, Y
followed on  a  little  higher  level   for
on   the
The Mighty Arm of Britain
Undertaking    Greater    and    Greater
Activities Every Day Toward
Defeat  of  Germany
Consider for a moment Great Britain's contribution  to  the  war  in act-
-the
Among    other j CoilSCription
gas attacks up- I l
carefully noted. I
\ing   studiously
In Newfoundland
Women Have Replaced Men on the
Farms
.    . : sionarv into an   JrUh  stew.    The re
conscription   law ; Jjast ,.'videnth' did not agree with l'
which went into  effect  recently,  has
New foundland's
operated so effectively that today the
Newfoundland regiment is recruited
to full war strength. It is not expected that a second draft call will
be made until autumn, at the close
of thc season for fishing. Newfoundland's vital industry. Women
have replaced men on thc farms, but
as this is not possible on the fishing
boats, thc man-power for military
service  is  limited.
Some- resistance to the law was
experienced, but the evaders were
rounded up by military patrols.
Nearly all those forcibly taken accepted the alternative of enlisting
rather than go to jail for two to five
years, the penalty for failure to register.
Ability   Bound    to    Be     Recognized .Protection.     Rapidly   gaininc
wVtll��� ���    -!?;���,,, nr Fartorv        j^lowei   two sealer, \  drove towards ��� Ual military  forces.
Whether in Field or Factory u;  came up  under its  tail  and    shot      Thcreis     ,hc    British     invv
.   Lord   Leverhulme   is  an   entertain-; it. down with a short burst from  Ins , cst  naval   anu   tlm        '   >    {
ing speaker.    Lately at a  meeting he -, \ lckcr s gun. As he followed the fall-   - -- -J
was   i xpatiatiug  on   the   necessity   of,ing machine, Y saw an enemy patrol
each   man   doing   his   very   best,   and  of twenty descending in good fornia-
said it was his belief thaL-ability was, tion.    After  X's prey  had  burst into
bound   lo  be  recognized   and   get  its  lhunes   he  climbed   to   rejoin  Y    and
due  reward,  whether  in   ihe  field   or.got his first view of the enemy force,
lactoiy. i \\ hile   the   latter   dived   the     Briiish
He then told a story oi a cannibal'.pilots  climbed but  in  a  few minutes,    ... . .  ..
-hi.'  ,x,.o  i,ad "converted"    a     mis-:thcy were surrounded above aud    be- . ^ding  to  world  his lory  every  ,���,���-
low bv fighting Germans. There was ulc- ll ]i'f jiad but one great op-
no question of choosing an opponent. Portumty during the four years of
The enemy saw to that. While one ��;"��� Hjc bkagcrack batttle. Never
Teuton attacked, the others look po-, S1��ce that day.has the German high
'is   sitions above and below  to     prevent'-^as fleet left its protecting Harbors,
in the world possesses. Patrollling
\ thc North Sea, protecting allied
: commerce on the Atlantic, the Paci-
1 fie, thc Indian Ocean, thc Mcditer-
| raneaii, the White Sea, the 'Tigris,
; the  Suez,   thc Adriatic���thc      Britisii
navy  is  all   over   the  world,  and    is
crop   outlook    is  exceedingly     favorable.    The  following   report,  clipped
from lhe Prince Albert Herald a few
! days  ago,  referring to  a  small  town
I in Northern  Saskatchewan, also  describes conditions  prcvaling    in  numerous  other  districts  in   thc     central
I and northern parts of the three provinces:
"Crops are fifty per cent, ahead
of last year at this date. Wheat is
well along in the shot blade stage
and growing very fast. Rye is in
head early sown barley in shot blade.
Grazing for all stock excellent. All
grasses, tame and wild abundant, cattle look fine. The abundance of
green feed and thc absence of flics
and gnats makes the flow of milk
away ahead of pasl seasons.
"The number of hogs in this district is more thru treble of last year
and thcy arc in a healthy, thriving
condition.
"Breaking is in full swing and the
amount of new land for cultivation
next year will bc ten to one of previous years. Thc recent rains havc
put lite land in first class condition
for breaking. Two horse, three
horse, four horse, six horse outfits
and tractors can bc seen turning over thc wild lands in all directions.
::\\
HOW'S THIS FOR CORNS?
LIFTS 'EM OUT QUICK
agree
clnei,    who     had  to  leave   th
table   rather  hurriedly.
"That,"'  said Lord   Leverhulme
ro>al
exactly  my   theory.     Vou  can
a good  man  down."
'i   keep I British    acrobatics,    but the iirsl en-
I Skagcrack, or Jutland, was hailed as
| emy"pkine~"that"amie~undcr~a British  a victory by  Germany, not so  much
Minard's   Liniment  Cures   Dandruff.
The Course of a Lie
tail  and  opened fire  was  deluged by
���an    Jmnu-lnian    turn    which brought
(the British pilot on  top and sent the
i German to destruction. Two individual onslaughts against tlie other British pilot were repulsed,    both enemy
: planes   rolling  over  before  thcy  sue-       J here is  the  army in  France,  two
jceeded in aoproaching close and both   million  men,   kept  at    strength     re-
were followed by bullets. gardless  of casualties, which  in    the
Finally, gelling clear of lhc melee , past two years have been about four
the  British  headed  homeward    w lienor five  times  as  heavy  as   the   casu-
on account of what was accomplished as on account of what it was
hoped would immediately follow���
and what'has followed has been
ample to demonstrate the falsity of
lhe enemy's claims.
There is thc armv in  France,
A  Standard   Medicine.���Parmelee's
Vegetable  Pills, compounded of    en-j     ^hon
tircly vegetable substances, known to | o1-*" tJl|,.
Typical Case of a Report Favorable
to Germany Started in
Sweden
During  Ins  recent  \i.-il   to  Loudon,
Hjahnar     Draining
Swedish   "Majority
reported   to   have-said   that   the   pco-P,                       .       ,r    ..    ,     ,     .    ���   ,i,,,���,-   i ,���        ���      i- r
,,,..:                  ,           ���         '        'they    seemed     effectively to bar  thc i lighting   m   France   for   two
pie   ul   .Sweden   were  becoming   more    _-_    !-,..:.._   _    i:..i.  i.;_i   ,i Lr!9...   i   ���     .i._
pro-Ally   in   their   >ympa- i
I .., i .. .'I,,!; 111oy- were confronted by another pat-, alties   suffered   by   thc   French  army.
'���'V'-'-Vi     ��l     i-!10' ��'  lu('Ill-v machines in such open ' The British  army      in  France      has
..>( i ia  s s,      y^ ! formation at different altitudes,    that] borne almost lite whole brunt of t
land   more
| tliies.
I way.
thc
years,
Flying one a little higher  than | though in the pasl month the French
eu-
,y  aiurwani  the
press  published
holes
tjle|tain   to   havc  a  healthful  and   agree
able  effect
organs.
the   sluggish   digestive |
XxXXix^X-TaXeXFrom Dakota
iXy Spea^iitg:r;'C��f r;-|a rmi n g,"     said
'.������i:i:s|fo;r:'^ "wc have some
:vfafinsiriput?:inC;?l5:akota that arc quite
"sjfzieabip^rri'ilry.ciSecn a man on one of
rpur7=1jig'Tarii:tSr\stitrt out in the spring
';'^n;d''^pijpWr;'^s.tr^Bht furrow till fall.
%Tjicnllie7rh7a:rv:e'stcd back."
S'Vs'WbnderfuV^'rrsaid thc listener.
^���������A^^'vrfiii^r?i^^^t;l  farms,"  he    went j Various   Methods   of  Cultivation
oiY;_:!7';it Ts 'the: rusua!   thing   to      send
ypting. ni;;irrie7<l"Couples   out  to    milk
''\iy<' ('V^ws.    Tlifrir children return with
t'fi(���   ifiilk���''���-\Vindsor   Rfcoul.
;havc a  revivifying  and" salutary    et-ld;im L.:ilj|    llK.., tllloliny lhc  Kol-
. feet upon  the digestive organs,  havc ��� a     x
'through years of usc attained so eminent a position that they rank as a
'standard medicine. The ailing should
j remember   this. Simple    in     their j
-composition, they can be assimilated j
! by the weakest stomach and are cer
ithc other,  the two airmen drove  for: have again   been   more  actively
, , ..   the highest enemy ilight, but as they .gaged
greatei   pai   , tli<I     so    the.  whole,   eneinv  formation
in     Am s ter
You can peel your corns off, lift
them out by the roots, do it without
pain and quickly, too, if you first apply a few drops of Putnam's Corn
Extractor. Putnam's shrivels up the.
corn, makes it look like dead skin,
uproots it completely. The beauty
about Putnam's Extractor is this���it
acts without pain���docs it's work
quickly and costs but a quarter in
auy drug store in thc land. Get it
today.
Advantages of Irrigation
Given    Sufficient     Moisture,     Large
Crops are Grown Everywhere
lit some parts of Western Cauada
crops will bc poor this year on account of a long period of drought. It
was because these sections of the
country are subject lo dry ycars that
thc  Canadian  Pacific Railway  unde
railways in northern Alberta, stated
that the Grande Prairie and Peace
River agricultural settlements would
likely have an output of 4,000,000
bushels of grain this season, an increase of 3,000,000 over last year's
crop. Hc said that few people could
realize the- extent of that great
northern region or had but little
conception of the illimitable resources that are lying dormant there
awaiting thc awakening touch of thc
human hand. Speaking of thc climate Mr. Smith said:
"The topographical conditions create a focus for chinook winds, and
for 80 per cent, "of thc winter thc
cattle feed in thc open and find their
own food among the 37 varieties of
nutritious grasses of which the country boasts. Then there are 21 hours
of shunshine in thc summer season
and that helps the crops to ripen
early. Almost every kind of grain
and vegetable can be grown there
that can be grown in southern Alberta. In fact thc climate, due to
thc aforesaid topographical conditions, parallels that of southern Alberta. ;'
"Of arable soil there "Ttrc immense
areas. There are 2,500. to 2,800
square miles in Grande Prairie, about
1,500 miles north of Peace River; 3,-
000,000 acres near 1'ort Vermilion,
aud several hundred square miles in
each of several other  sections.
"As for limber, Folcv Bros, have
limits of 1,250,000,000. feet, while ou
Spirit river arc 500,000,000 feet in
which Col. MacLeod is interested,
and on the Athabasca river are 300,-
000,000 feel.
"Thc coal supplies are inexhaustible and the quality ranges from
the finest bituminous down to high
class lignite, " which is found near
Edmonton.
"As for fish, I am informed by an
expert lhat 10,000,000 pounds can bc
taken annually, from Lake Athabasca, alone."
Mr. Smith stated that 1,200 miles
of railways had been built in northern Alberta in thc last seven ycars.
KEEP CHILDREN WELL
DURING HOT WEATHER
How to Control
Wild Mustard
mschc  Zeilung to the  effect that llie
Swedish   gow rnmenl   had     expressed
ri grits   to   the   Berlin   foreign     oflice
on   account   of    Br.uiling';,      London
utterances,
i     This   report   struck   me   as   prepos-
i terous,  as  the  present   status  oilicial-
' ly  of  Branliug  w    that   of  a  private
citizen,  for
government
responsible. An expression or regret offered by the Swedish labimt
under such circumstances would be
a most  unneutral   slap  in  the  face  of
unosc       statements    no
could   possibly   he     held
expression
reclion-of the British.
In  less  than  a  minute   the.  Britisii
were  again  iu   the   thick   ol   the   fray.
First     repelling   an     attack   together
they were  forced  to   separate.    While
manoeuvring  they  had  the    satisfaction of seeing one enemy machine go
down spinning," but each was pursued
with Germans, as the pilots expressed
it, "sitting ou  their  tales,"  and    raining  inaccurate   tire   upon  them     until
lliey    reach', d   Uritish territory where
llie     enemy     abandoned     the.   chase. .
When      I   saw   these   two   conquerors , I'<""poses.
of  Gcnnan-;   \eslerday,     Y   had    just [     Britain  is
lv.-f nt v fourth   \ ir-
Evcry mother knows how fatal the
hot summer months are to small
children. Cholera infantum, diarrhoea,
dyscntry and stomach troubles arc
rife al this time and often a precious
little life is lost after only a few
hours illness. Thc mother who keeps
Baby's Own Tablets in     the     house
took the   development    of  its    large
irrigation  project in  Southern Albcr-
so    the. whole,  enemy iormation j     ]n a(it];tion  io thc ilnnv ;���   i?r:incc  ��� ui.    The  soil  is  the   most   fertile  on
climbed higherand in thc. general di-! ,hcrc arc  armies  in  llaI;%  jn   Kgypt, j tljc continent, and the climate is    all
in  Palestine, in Albania,  in   Mcsopo-1 that    can    bc    desired lo raise large
lamia,  in   Serbia,  on    the      Murnian j crops, but the supply of moisture   is
Coast, in South Africa, and German'not always dependable. Tbe volume j feels safe. The occasional use of the
Fast Africa���more than three mil- ] of lite crop is in direct ratio to thc {Tablets prevents stomach and bowel
lion men altogether, fighting in out- i supply of moisture, large crops arc j troubles, or if the trouble conies sud-
of-the-way corners of the globe. The! grown everywhere, with a moderate i dcnly���as it generally does���thc Tab-
Mesopotamia operations alone arc supply of moisture only moderate -' lets will bring the baby saffly
among the most, important of thc'"ops are obtained, and with little or! through. They arc sold by medicine
whole war and have, caused Germany! no moisture, little or no crops arc 1 dealers or by mail at 25 cents a box
as much
Check  Spread  of the  Weed
On a number of farms in Dundas
county whore the commission of conservation is conducting illustration
work on farms, various methods of
eulth ation are bring tried to check
the   spread   of   wild     mustard.       Ou
I the  western   allies. | enme   in   frni.-   hi
toj     Knowing (urmaii  methods as   I  do,'torVi  a,,,|   x   u;iS  o0j,1(, ,~,lU ;ift<.r  tea
land   knowing   aU.i   how   .ager     ^\��'-1 hopiiitr    to    set    his    iwentv-uglith.
neJnisira-se  i,  to  produce  the   g;rc-.it-L-j-j,,.v N1,01-e no inl,-s OI- nioditU on tlicir
e.-t     possible  amount   <n   friction   be- ; i(.ali'in.   l,ouml   r<);<\s,   and   their   commanding   ollicer  apologized   by     saying,   "1   havc   not   been   able   to     find
concern  as  any  others. I harvested.  Fortunately this last nam-
1 ii finance, there  are $54,000,000 000 Icd condition occurs more rarely than
working  for the allies  in  direct  war!tIla rirbt ��a����cd, so  that ycar m and
;ycar out farming in Southern Alberta
.... .       ,, '        ibrinrs  returns  as   high  as  auvwherc.
till carrjing thc greater1��� -
from   The   Dr.     Williams'     Medicine
Co., Brockviile, Ont.
'part of the burden  of sea  transporta
tion  and  munition   making.
X&riZZF
,lst.
Children
Like
*h�� attractive fla-
���vor of ihe healthful
Cereal drink
JTUM
Atidit^s fine for
tKemtoo, for it
^contains nothing
harmful- only the
goodness of wheat
rrandjnire molasses.
; Postum is now re^u-
X; larlV used in place
X, of ;xea and coffee
i Lin tnany of the best
:��^of;famJIies.
;i: Wholesome econom-
.; )Cal $hd healthful.
XyixrheiXes a Reason "
j fields   where   corn   was   grown
i_\ear and where grain  was  ��own  Ibis
, spring,  part of  the  laud   was  plowed
and   part  was  thoroughly     cultivated
, only,     before     seeding.       On      fields
iwheie   the   corn   was   kept   clean   last
summer and  no mustard  was allowed
, to  go  to  seed,  the  cultivated   portion
shows   much   less   mustard   this    year
t than   !=   to   bc   seen   in   the   grain   on
���the   land   which   w;=s     plowed,     while
ithc stand of grain is  t(|ually a= good
;ou   the     cultivated     portion     of     the
'��� field.
Tlicie are two things to be looked
for in this comparison: note which
part of the field gives thc best grain
crop and .which is freer from mustard. If this lest i= contemplated on
your, farm n<xt spring, by all mean5
sfe that the mustard in vour crop of
(���'���in i�� not allowed to go to seed.
TIk re are many MUiilar simple tr-li
���hat ,niy f,.rnier might conduct. '1 I:t
way !' find out ii a thing "is good :c
'o trv ,t out, on a small ^cd'' ,.'
iir-t,   on   ->. our   o".n   farm.
tween thi' northern muirals and tins,1
counti\i^J decided to cable an iu- ;
<|tiiry to r< liable p.utiis al Stock-;
holm. In this way an iNpkination
was obtained which i belies, to be
.lUtlion'.ative,
The   Swedish   gov i rnmenl   has     is-'
su< d     no     coiiimuiiiijue     about      Mr. *
i'raiiiii'L''s      London      interview    and
dot1-   not  intend  to  do  mi.   Xo  ollieial '
.���polony   to   Gfrinanv. . '
Iln-   story   of   stub     a-tion   on   the
pail  of  the   Swedish  government   ap- ,
piarol  in  the  \va  D.igligt  Alle!
(Xiw   Daily  .Miscellauv )   a Stork
evening   p.iptr   known     for   its     i.ui-,
atical  pro-'ierinanisni  and its  uienda-1
eious  attacks  on  this   i ountry.     The
story   was   repealed  and   strength* ued
by the Aftonblaih't  ithe  Kviniug Ga-;
zette)   "another       Stockholm       pajici |
���which "is  known   to   have  In < n   undir]
Gcrr.rni-I-'i'Uii-l;   control     sj.,, <���      >,
vim!)*,-,- l'M-4;
1      J o. my   iii::,'!.  it   -t:<
i'n    sio;';,      i iri'.'in.iti ���]
man   1, nation   m   Sioi
a!w a > s   in   i l.oM    tone
Willi  irrigation, however,  thc  leaner j
years may bc avoided altogether, and i
thc   farmer  may  assure     himself     of
And with all  this, Britain is under-Marge  crops  every vear.    This  is  no-i
taking   greater   and   greater   activities ' liccable   this   vear "when   farmers   on I
day  toward  the  defeat  of  Gcr- j irrigali d land have wheat which gives]
anv  ribbon  around  here."
But     whatever guerdon
lev
might
have worn it would not have -i i nicd
as bin to me as the men themselves
with their unequalled record of victories in so sjiort ,: period of time,
and tkiir vvinninir light with forty
German  pih��l��.
every
many
We   havc   a ��� Motlicr
w e may well  be proud
support   vv e  iiiiiv   well
Post.
and of which
and lu whose,
rally.��� Regina
probably not  reach  more
tiftiM'ii  bushels an  acre.
���nula
holm
���>-
-.iis  t , i tain   lhal
with   the     Ger-
>! ������ i > 1 u i,  which  i ���=
it!,   th'-   two
1,230,175 Pounds of Fish Caught
Statistics of the Western Canadian
fish trade for the month of June, issued by the Canada food board., show
lhat during the four weeks ending
June 29 inland shipments amounted
io 175,14^ poumL: export ihipiin nls
407,56!*, and lish on hand 569.45S
pound6, making a loi.sl marketable
catch for th< four uiihs of 1,JJ(), 175
pounds ior thc i!ir��'"��� -1'i.iiri' I'nn-
iurt s. - _
Good-bye to Asthma. Persons suf- ;
fcring from that < Ntreniely trying,
trouble, known as asthma know what!
it is to long with all their hearts for'
escape as from a tyrant. Never do,
thev know when an attack" may conic ���
and they know that to struggle un-j
aided is vain. With Dr. J. D. Kel-I
logic's Asthma Remedy at hand,-1
however, lliey ran s.iy uood-bye to1
their enemy and enjoy life again. It
help*;  at   once.
Brisk Building Activities in Cities
H'.iildiug operations  in  the  cities of j
Vv fsLcrn   Canada    havc    been    much
brisker this ycar than any  year since
the beginning of the war.    This condition promises  to  continue.
At -Moose Jaw,    Saskatchewan, the I
lion
Do
plunge hi adlong into come re
the   fir-;   time   von   I.ear-of   i;
' thine1   .-i'lc   by" ';,!c   =o'ti:a:
I,.; ;-.:���   n ,.y   Le   made.
Gocd   Fruit   Yield   Expe-;
'J V-       ,.:i-ral . ,:r:.:it    "    ������
���' io ������_ io'.L   li'C   I-:-' ������ ::n ������   or
' <e.-;< :.;,,  .-���. r-   v - r.\    ��� ;;��� '..:��� aL:
a     : ri|. : ',   ..1 to ��� >r .: !��� _"ii. i ��� ���.
"l.v -ti.ip' ;-s   pi   n';
,,:ii r illy.      vv is'ir a   io
:' ssioii   of  .Mr.. Bran
1't.ssions  of opinion.
ofl-
111!
tx
ted
i'tiiii'
l-r
i'i
>V.
Ih     V.     122Z
It:
: oi
pa;.
il-ru-.s, to
ni. nltiir
n ipi:i"
: ���: I ��� C f i i *
��� :" ".'���...���
rossii.i
'ilie whole procedure is quite typical and has numerous prect doits.������
l.dv. in   Bjorkin.iii
l"-i
China Building Ships
China   has   bet n   added   to   the   list
of   nations   building   lniivhatil      ships'
to  h'dp  defi.il   iii.rui.iny.     The   U.   S. '
'-hipping   boatd   lias   .iv.aided   to   the'
t'hiin-e    gov i rnmeui   vard-at   Shang-
I ai   contract--   ior   tour     c.n.o      \<s-
s, Is   of   Ul.'i'lO   loi's   (.I'.-h,   ,:;,d     u,oV:
options   fin    the  .b'iilding -  of     Sil.OO'l
ino.i   loi's.      | I,,,  (nine   program   will'
involve   iln    v ^peiiditure   of     perhaps
S30.0U0.000.- "    Approximately    35,000'
tons  of   steel   will   be  shipped      from j
the   1.*. "S.,   th.e    engines     and
double the value of those issued during (lie corresponding month of last
year. These figures arc generally not
available until  thr  end of the  month.
but  there  is  no  doubt   that   other ci- j
tii s  in   Wesh rn     Canada     have an
equally  good   showing   in   regard to
btiibli'ig  .u'livilv.
-k
( n-opi rativ
uoiirg  ah earl
i he S. skatciicv. an
I'.h ,,,'iur Company is
rapiiily wilh vvoik on new elevators
in the province. Seven <"h valors
hue .dii.idy b( en - erected this season and work is proceeding on four
others. One new elevator has been
purchased at Surbiton. Thc elevators
otiior j couiplf ted this year by the construe
��� (jiiipmenL v, ill be built in China. D_c- I tibn   department  '- f  lh'e_ company  are
iiv ( iii s   arc   "
��� r  the   sU <
begin  ax.
rccriv ed.
montus  ait- I located
[   '
it
-Field Crop Competitions
ir, son,
n.ite.
Gliddcn,'    Scott,   .Drake,
IcntVj   Kinlcy,  ^f^lfort and
i nc.jtirage
lioldiuc '->
s.i = ka'. he,
Port Arthur and Fort William peo-
:,-!:
pic are  muc
visit-   of   r.ii";-:
=ui.ii:".cr.      1 h'    ani'r.als
^far in th.e siibnrbs and
zkd at  the irt rpif-it
to   tho-e   towns   this
A ,-
suuden
v, r.r.de;
���.rn a maximum of %2li). j
i:r.-i! disturbed by a (tog or
automobile." when   thev
and  again   disappear  in
wood:
itatioos ihis sgasca.
lake
t::c
There have i.'.'n fs-.c
:'bo;;t
.-losing
IT JST:: t
���"farl.v
r   n
oi 'lie
shown  i:t  ;
passed  by
V.rX.i. hew an.'
the-.*  p.li  bu
of -hf 'ov
^iti vre;ucr.t.
Up-tb-Date-Towns
ist;;!-,!-!'   "of   tho - up-to datrncss
towns   of   Western   Canada   is
ly-hw  which  has     been
the   town   of  Cabri,    Sas-
Tiiis    by-law stipulates"
!'*.i."cr = . en  tb*. main  street
-   must  be of brick,  stcneV
?UB ETES5:
I
��.V
f
Record Prices
For Cars of Flax
Valuable    Cars    of    Flax    Soid    by
Farmers of Western Canada
Some valuable cars of flax have
<.\-rry promise of vielding ln'ty btisji- ��� 1:,tely been disposed of by farmers
ols in the acre while that on non-ir-]0f Western Canada. The honor of
rigated land iu the same districts \vill!ilavjug shjppcd the most valuable car
than  ten or, ^;ls  ,i;iiincd  for   Champion,   Alberta,
i when  ti  car  from   there  was  sold  at
Winnipeg   for   $5,627 76.       This     car
j contained   1,466    bushels,     or    81\i'96
I pounds of flax.
It appears, however, that the price
J received  for  thc  contents  of  this ca��-
J was by no  means a  record one . for
! Western  Canada.    From   Lethbridge,
Alberta,   recently  a  car  was   shipped
. . ,, ... , ,      ,    ; on  which the  sender received $5,725,
value or the permits issue., .,��� to the . pavincnt of flight and bandl-
ninlli day oi July was more d.an ijiff J^.^ Thc colltcnt5 of another car���from Harris, Saskatchewan���have probably ' sold for lite
highest price. The amount realized
on ibis car was $6,475.
Gl.;ss   spoons   with   ttibniar   handlei
have   been  invented   for  usc   in  placa
of  -:r,i\vs   iu   cold  drinks.
M��Mi��ii��
xxmnMiX^ .
THE   JUEDG&   tWMSMQQZL   3^.JL
a
=^
Grand Complexion Improver
Better Ikn Cosmetics!
50,000 Enlist for Farm
Workers  Will    Help    Illinois   Solv*
Problem  of  Big   Production
t     Illinois lias  enlisted niors  than  50,- i
v-.=r- 'I j 000   men   from   stores,   banks,   offices j
When it's so easy to bring back';lll(1 non-essential industries lo in-
thc bloom of youth to faded checks, I s,,lrc lllc liarvcstiiig of big war crops,
when skin disfigurements can be re- ! M-esc workers are expected to do
moved, isn't it foolish to plaster on ! ^mcli '�� solving thc Illinois prob-
cosmetics? ! ,('in  of  producing  11,000,000 acres  of
Go to the'root of the trouble���' c��r�� -'"id at flic same time, harvest-
remove the cause���c-orrcf t the con- ! '"S 2,000,000 acres of wheat, 5,000,-
dition tlMt keeps you front looking;000 acres of oats, 3,000,000 acres of
as  you  ought.     Usc   Dr.   Hamilton's   lla>' a,ul J;n"Sc acreages of truck fruit
and other crops.
The  United   States   department    of
Pills   and  very   soon   you'll   havc     a
complexion   to  bc  proud    of.      Flow
much happier you'll feel ��� pimples agriculture, working with the labor
gone, cheeks ' rosv again, eyes j division of the Illinois council of de-
bright, spirits good, joyous health ' fcuse and through country agents,
again returned. .Vever a failure with I county farm bureaus and business
Dr. Hamilton's Pills, get a 25c box | "id's organizations throughout the
today. j state, has  aimed to  make  sure    that
' j there will be no less whatever in one
of   the   largest   plantings   in   Illinois'
his tor j'.
Training courses for boys conducted by the agricultural colleges in
Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, and other states, in cooperation with farm help specialists
.       . , of  the  United   States  department  of
He is a French baby. Bernard is j agriculture, state councils of defense,
his name and he is not yet four|and public safety commissions, have
years old. J-lis laughing face is j resulted in placing many hundreds of
trained by long brown curls. He 1,0VS on farms. In these courses
chatters incessantly and is much j c,jty boys have been shown how to
more of a fidget than a British baby, harness horses, adjust machinery,
He is indeed a typical "Bebc Fran- feed and milk cows, hoc and culti-
cals-." Ivatc crops, and    do      many      other
His  parents  live  on thc    Somme��� j simple  but  fundamental .farm   opera-
beliind the British  lines. At the limejtions.    The   result  has  been   the   instilling in the boys a liking for farm
"Work  and   a  confidence   on   the   part
of thc farmers in boy labor.
Digging Wealth
From tiuried Trees
French Babies
Know Only War
Has   Had   the   Noise   of  Cannon  all
the Days of His Short Life
of his binh lliey were fighting only
thirty miles away. Since then the
front had drawn farther off, but it
is near once more. Thus little Bernard has had the noise of thc cannon in his (.ns all thc days of his
short  ii tc
This French baby has many i
friends; all are more than twice his j j
height, although he i.s tall for his j j
age.     British   soldiers  all. j ?
As the village i.s on an important i {
road and the river passes by, the I j
British troops comc there for rest, j I
and as his parents' house is the big-i f
Kcst, officers stay there and have ?
made  it   tlicir  mess.
In three years 12 generals, 20 colonels, and majors, captains and lieutenants loo numerous to count havc
rested there a single day or perhaps
a whole mouth; and all have become
before leaving, friends of thc "Bcbe
Francais."
A whole album of i .ally exciting
war photographs is in his mamma's
care. Look at him at three months
in the arms of an interpreter, at six
in those of an Indian trooper, whose
turban seems to him a truly eccentric  headdress.
Here he is, grown bigger, proudly
standing beneath thc awning of a
lent; there, holding the bridle of a
general's horse, while a soldier modestly assists on the oilier side; now,
hands clasped behind his back, he
watches some Australians creeling
their kitchen in the open; a small
boy sitting astride a heavy gun-carriage, it is little Bernard, and sec
what a hearty handshake he ~\$ giving the brigadier-general!
Each one of these photographs
tells thc story of thc  war of his life.
Ignorant of badges he knows only
one rank; he lisps thc word "Captain" to all who arc khaki-clad���general and orderly alike. He knows
but two English phrases: "Good
by
PAIN?- NOT A BIT I
LIFT YOUR CORNS
OR CALLUSES OFF
No humbug!     Apply few drops   1
then  Just  lift them  away f
with fingers. f
��� i
* m
<����l-l'|.^..�� |.��H|��|-|"I   ����������������>���������>���,<���.������,.��>��������������..<��������*.�����
This ncw drug is an ether compound discovered by a Cincinnati
chemist. It is called frcezone, and can now be obtained in tiny bottles as
here shown-at very little
cost from any drug
stoix. Just ask for free-
zone. Apply a drop or
two directly upon a tender corn or callus and instantly the soreness disappears. Shortly you will
find the corn or callus so
loose that you can lift it
oft, root and all, with the
fingers.
Not a twinge of pain,
soreness or irritation; not
even the slightest smarting, cither when applying
frcezone or afterwards.
This drug doesn't eat
up thc corn or callus, but
shrivels them so they
loosen and come right
out. It is no humbugl It
works like a charti;.   For
 a  few  cents you can get
rid of every liard corn, soft corn or
,~   .-..���...,..     , ,..*. , corn   between  thc   toes,  as   well    as
'Look here," and hc makes use! painful  calluses  on bottom  of    your
of  thcin  on every occasion.
ifect.    It never disappoints and never
Soldiers lo him are beings khaki-
clad; he has only seen one French
uniform���his father's when hc conic*
on leave, and he cannot believe that   from bis wholesale house
barns, bites or inflames. If your
druggist hasn't ~ny . freezone yet,
teh him to get a little bottle for you
he also is going to the war, because
lie is dressed in blue.
He i.. only a little French baby,
but he reminds the soldiers who
play witli him .of those whom they
too havc left iii their "sweet home'.'
in the Old Country; and because of
this memory the "Bcbe Francais"
has ahvays an abundance of chocolates.
New Zealand Forests of Long    Ago
Yield Present Day Riches
Forests of New Zealand which
flourished and died so many ages ago
thai thc ground thcy covered is now
swamp and" plain, arc yielding more
than a million dollars a year to
.Maori natives and whites who dig
kauri gum, the undecaying resin of
thc prehistoric trees.
Nearly $100,000,000 worth has been
gathered in the last half century and
an equal amount remains to be dug.
From two to twelve feet under tlie
surface of the earth the resin lies, in
strata which show that three successive forests matured and died in
the creation of thc deposit, which is
used by manufacturers of linoleum
and varnish in thc United States and
Great  Britain.
The trees of thc kauri forests of
today furnish the most valuable wood
of Ncw Zealand for general building
purposes. The tree is a giant of the
bush that ranks wilh the cedars and
firs of northwestern America in girth
but not in height. The diameter runs
from four to twelve feet, with specimens that havc measured 15 and even 20 feet. The height averages 80
to 100 feet, with a maximum of 150
feet.
The great gum deposits arc not
found in thc forests of the present
day but on fcrn-covcrcd hills, plains
and swamps. In some instances thc
buried forests flourished so many
ages ago that no trace of them remains except thc hundreds of millions of pounds of resinous exudations.
The gum fields arc principally in
the provincial district of Auckland in
the northern part of the north island, covering about 1,800,000 acres.
At one time kauri gum was so abundant that it was dug out with little
trouble-near the surface, but halt a
century's industrious digging has diminished thc supply until now it is
necessary to go down several feet
for it. In sonic cases thc excavations go to a depth of a dozen feet,
and recentl3r companies have been
operating with . converted gold
dredges.
The gum, as it is found, varies
from the diameter of a marble to
lumps weighing 100 pounds or more.
In color it ranges from pale lemon
yellow and reddish brown to almost
black. Much of it is transparent or
semi-transparent. Its grades for market purposes' are as varied as its coloring. The most valuable deposits
arc found in dry soil and thc best
grades bring as much as $1,500 a
ton.
Sleep is thc great nourisher of infants, and without peaceful sleep the
child will not thrive. This cannot
be got if the infant be troubled with
worms. Miller's Worm. Powders
will destroy worms and drive them'
from the system, and afterwards the
child's rest will be undisturbed. The
powders can not injure thc most delicate baby, and there is nothing so
effective for restoring thc health of
a  worm-worn  infant.
German Vandalism
In    Vengeful    Fury      Huns      Hack
I French   Homes   to   Pieces
Evidence accumulates that during ���
���their brief success in tltc 'Manic salient the Germans have been again
indulging in wholesale acts of vandalism, lu a message sent from
French army headquarters, Renter's
correspondent gives details of their
conduct while in possession of Chateau-Thierry.
The Germans were in the town
for some time and apparently
thought thcy would remain there indefinitely. When thcy found they
would have to give it up, tlicy immediately determined to take thc
only vengeance in their power. The
injuries which havc been inflicted on
the town arc such as could not bc
the result of shelling, the correspondent points out, as those houses
which suffered most were entirely
uninjured by shell, shrapnel or bullets.
"These houses," he said, "were
magnificently furnished, the walls
hung with costly tapestries and admirable pictures. Thc furniture is of
exceptional elegance and impressive
mirrors and charming statuettes
were  numerous.
"Today there is nothing that has
not been destroyed. Thc tapestries
have been hacked to pieces, the pictures slit from corner to corner, the
leather and other chair covers have
been ripped from their frames and
all thc delicate marqucrtric and the
irreplaceable examples of craftsmanship of past centuries have been
smashed. Thc legs have been torn
off thc tables and used in further
work of destruction. There is not a
mirror which has not been broken,
and the glass and china flung at them
lie jn  fragments  before them.
The costly carpets have been soiled and rent in every possible way
and ink pots flung at the silken papers on the walls. This vengeful
fury has been carried to the extent
of smashing nurseries and dolls'
houses. Thc fashion in which beds
and rooms havc been defiled is difficult of description. It would seem
the work of lunatics."
Minard's Liniment Cures Burns, etc.
Oranges in Palestine
CC)NTAI NS::H<3 ��LM;M    ;;
Ship Shortage Pressing
Need of the Allies
He Sees the Finish
For  Burns  and  Scalds.;���Dr.   Tho
jii'as'   Electric   Oil   will   take   the   tire j ing  plant  there
Ncw Packing Plant
Work has been commenced on the
erection of a $100,000 abattoir, and
packing plant at Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. It will be in operation
early in September and will handle
one hundred head of cattfle a day
and one hundred liogs an hour.
The progress of the cattle industry
at   Moose  Jaw,   ..Saskatchewan,    has
necessitated an extension of the pack-
Work  has    been
out of a burn or scald more rapidly j started on this addition, and it is to
than any other preparation. It should | be rushed to completion with all pos-
bc at hand in every kitchen so thatjgjblc speed. It will involve an exit   may   bc   available   at     any     time, j pendittirc of $70,000.
There  is    no    preparation    required.!  : '������-
Just apply the  oil  to  the burn     or!Minard<s Liniment.  Relieves Neural-
scald and the pain will abate and in
a short time cease altogether.
Austria's Fate
We sometimes wonder if it ever
occurs to Austria that all she has to
hope for, even in the event of glorious and complete ultimate victory,
is to bc bossed around for the rest
of her natural life by a beery megalomaniac.���Ohio State Journal.
gia.
Sensible Silo Sentences
The average annual fire loss in llic
United States is about two dollars
for each  inhabitant.
MONEY ORDERS
Pay your out ot town accounts by Domin
sen Express Money Orders. Fivo dollars
costs three cents.    .
AGENTS WANTED, $1,000���You
can make it in your county with
our fast selling Combination Cooker.
One salesman banks $388.55 thc lirst
month. Another agent sells 20 in
two hours. Others cleaning up $10
daily. No capital necessary. Goods
shipped to reliable men on time. Territory going fast. Write quick to secure your field. Combination Products Co., 100 Thomas Bldg., Foster,
Que.
Start a Club in your town, where the
young people can
gather. We build
small tables for
homes, and larger ones' for public roon:?. Equipment hce. Write
us at oii'-e ' lor
  lull   particulars.
Dept.'C"      -"fr      SAMUEL  MAY   &  CO.
102-104   Adelaide   St. ^W.,   Toronto
COOK'S   COTTON   ROOT  COMPOUND
A taft, nllcitt regulating mcit.
c'r.e- Sold in three degrees of
strength. Xo. 1. fl: No. 2. U;
No. 3, $5 pei box. Sold by all
druggists, or icnt prepaid in
plain pneltnee on receipt ot
price. Free pamphlet Addten
THE COOK MEDICINE CO
Tonnio.OnL (Famtri/tVlnJ-rX
Silage Gives the Effect of Pasturage
in Winter
lu thc silo you can store corn in a
form iu which practically every particle can be  eaten.
Silage gives the effect of pasturage in winter; it is both palatable
and  succulent.
Silage aids digestion iu the dry
feeding  season.
Animals fed nil age are not more
subject to tuberculosis, do not lose
their teeth more cjuickly, and are not
shorter-lived than animals fed other
common kinds of food.
The use- of the silo oficn makes it
possible to save corn ih.it would otherwise   bc  lost  by   frost.
A good silo should bc round, airtight, waterproof, have vails lhal aro
smooth inside, and hc .strong and
durable.
A silo should bo placed whi'ic it
will give thc grcatot convenience in
feeding and where it will bc least
exposed  to extremely cold winds.
One hundred toiw of Mlagc will
feed J5 cows 40 pounds of milage a
day for JIIO days.
A silo 14 feet in iliamltr anti 32
feel   high   will   hold   IOC  tons.
Silos of more than 100 tons capacity cost fi mn SJ to So per ton, according in the type and m.il' ii.il u1--
e<l in  construction.
IMUWrBENOHKEMBDY. N.l.tf.2 W*
Th
ERAPIONKX&S���!
reatiuccrii, cvus chpomc wkaxjcxm. toar vigo��
vrv, xiDxir. iladdhs. dissases, blocs Fc:*e*.
��tl.��S. ZITHXK -IO. DXl-GGJSTScr HML��1. rCST < CT*
fOC'CEIA CO, #0. BEXKKAK ST. Ti ElV VOK* or LYMAM Stint
��O��OM-r0.    WHITE FOK FREE BOOK TO OX. LB CE-EK0
Kid. Co. Hav=mtocjc Rd. Ham fsiead. I_o\-do.i. Ena
MtYSE*'DltjQEEtTASrCLES5lrO*MO��    EASY  TO  TAXI
THERAPION ��&.&��������
Bt THAT TKADS   MARKED  UO*D  ' TXI*APIC�� ' 11 M
Kt.mm^SUU AEflXID TO All. OMl'lKE fACWTa
England's  Bit
Tiie ciiijnny is .sonii-iiini-i tend
whotlici I ml.uiil i.-. ib'i:i'; ,i~ :; infill
tn  in   the   wai.
When wc .ue -nli'i i n; _; ii"ii! .\'\-
filK) to 4ll,0����) i.vi..d'iis .1 we-. I .-; 1
have k' pt it up mi tin. i \i .i-, <i hi ������
v> e h.iv i; stood p.i* ini.!. i ihe Mii^-
oi air iviiK and ^otu wnii.nit un..:
atid bi'tti r .ind ��� ��� i���_-.11 without coin
plaining, .mil have -i-nt s-> in.mv nun
into the army that the bnigcst machine shops in the country arc operated almost exclusively by women,
and have paid Uikos >ucli as we
haven't yot contemplated���then and
not till then will wc begin to have
llic right to enquire Vihrthcr .England is doing all it can. ��� Kar.-aq t itv
Star.
Sweden as
Germany's Lackey
A Clear Case of Violation of Swedish   Territorial  Rights
During the earlier stages of the
war a Belgian steamer, the Ambiorix
was captured by tlie Germans in thc
Sound while she was seeking a safe
passage into the North Sea, by keeping well within Swedish territorial
waters. '''..'
It was a clear case of violation of
Swedish territorial rights. After repeated demands by the Belgian minister, backed by his British, French,
Italian and Russian colleagues, the
Swedish government .finally consented to lodge a protest with thc German foreign office strong enough to
produce the desired elfects. And the
Ambiorix/was-actually  released.
���The long established rule in such
cases is that the released steamer
shall be granted safe conduct back
to lhe spot where she was captured
and it was up to the nation whose
territorial rights had been infringed
by the captain to see that such baft
conduct be granted.
Instead of doing so, the Swedish
government peremptorily refused lo
let lhe steamer in question pass
through the Kogrund Channel along
thc southwestern point of Scandia,
which had been mined in the meantime and closed to international traffic.
This happened early last year. Thc
steamer was ordered to enter the
Swedish port of Trclleborg, which is
one of the termini for thc ferry
route between Sweden and Germany,
and there slit: was still lying when 1
left Sweden in July, says Jidwin
Ujorkman,  in   one   of  lhc  magazines.
Am! now 1 shall comc to the main
point of this interesting little incident: Xo sooner had tiie Ambiorixi
tied up nt Trclleborg than the Belgian niini.sUT, again backed by his
sriiinlly colleagues, turned to thc
Swedish foreign office with a demand that it fulfill its clear international obligation to thc utmost
limit by giviinr the steamer free and
r-.iie pas-age through thc mine pro-
t-ctcd Koerund Channel to the spot
��� ���It the- little Danish i.sland of liven
v, he:-,-   -iie  was  captured  originally.
And wh.ti did thc Swedish foreign
ofiii i tin n do? It tliicctcd an inquiry
in ihe fo;i__;n "flicc at Berlin to linn
o-:t -.th.'.ho- tlie German Government
\ ' i!d ]<< m>u Sweden to do its dutv
I.v    I'   11."': I.'1
ppcni ,i tin:.'
i'. \rr;itU'C-
. ' i! S", i d( M
..<),    v -.hont
Kaiser Bill Realizes That the Worst
Is  Coming
"The hardest part of thc job is
still before us. The enemy knows
the war is about to reach the point
of decision and is summoning all his
strength for a final defense and
counter-offensive."
This was the observation of the
German emperor, recorded by Karl
Rosner in the Berlin Lokal Anzciger
and apparently made on the eve of
Gen. Foch's offensive. On thc same
occasion Field Marshal von Hindenburg gave Rosncr the following
statement:
- "It is to be hoped thc people at
home arc full of confidence. But thcy
are not learned in patience. 1 hope
nothing is so promptly punished, as
over-haste is no good.
"Preparation is half the battle,
and the people must remember we
are not vvorking with machines that
can be smashed as soon as the job
is completed. . Wc arc working with
thc most sacred thing wc possess,
namely, the blood and life of the
German people. Our last reserves
must be strong men who will return
from the trenches to take up peace
tasks. We must not be left at thc
end like smashed machines, but
must be strong and unvvcakencd.".
, No one need endure the agony of
corns.'with Hollovvay's Corn Cure at
hand  to remove  them.
Lloyd  George  Declares   Now    That
Food Question Solved, Tonnage Must Get Attention
"The problem of shipping is still
before the allies now that the food
question has been solved," said Premier Lloyd George in a speech at a
dinner given by the government in
honor of Herbert C. Floover, the
American food administrator, and
the French and Italian food ministers. America would have a gigantic army in France next year and
tonnage to bring supplies would be
greater than the tonnage needed to
bring the men across. Great Britain
and America were building ships
very fast, but the demand for tonnage was increasing. Economy in
thc use of food ;fnd other necessities
was  still  urgent.
"Notwithstanding tlie output of
shipping last month which for the
first time was greater than the losses, thc premier continued, and that
the surplus would increase yionthly,
still the demand vvas growing at an
enormous rate. Therefore every
shipload saved meant an addition to
thc arrangement and efficiency of the
American army on which the hopes
of the allies are based. The prcmier
added: "Consequently there is urgent need for stern and rigid economy.
"Wc are learning many tilings in
this war. When it began wc were
foreigners to each other. We shall
never meet as foreigners again. We
talk to each other now as though we
were old friends and we are beginning to discuss things as though we
were members of the same cabinet.
There is a common cause, common
ideal, common ardor and conimor
coal  car.
"Wc are making shipping common
as   far  as   possible.
"From the common struggle and
common sacrifices wc shall havc a
common triumph and a common
brotherhood which will be the surest guarantee of peace on earth and
good will among men of all races,
creeds, and nationalities to the ena
of time."
Air. Hoover said that the only
problem now was that of ships and
that problem had been helped greatly
by the solution of the food problem,
adding: "1 ani happy Ip say that
food supplies arc assured for the
period of the war and'I do not think
it necessary to estimate for more
than two years hence, lu less than
two ycars the result will be victory." Mr. Hoover endorsed the
plea of Premier Lloyd George for
economy, the necessity for which
had not relaxed because success thus
far had attended the efforts of thc
various  govern merits.
The Channel Tunnel
���.,,.... i,,f
din r '_   ;! .
' i    li"    <i'I",,
��� . ti il'v   hi . i
���li 111   t'n _\   ;i htjilj    V.
i-<<\ -huh '1
( in ��";.����� other hand, thc first ac- I
tion taken by thc Swedish foreign'
cfticc in leiMn! to propositions or,
rn.'.i-ts cohu'iil; from thc enemies of;
(i-i- ,.���-.'\ :',<;> iiivari.ibly been to turn I
to ii'. ���lenran foreign office v. itli I
t'.c i.i'^'ii-o: " WImi do vou want us '
lo  ii.'.' -:!'   .:'.  it.' ' '
Ii a man refuses to set ar. rvaiiiplr
he is foolish ii he expects the vv orld
to  have a good opinion of him. .
War's Heavy Toll
Heavy Decline in the Birth Rate in
All  Belligerent   Countries
The    war has caused the belligerent countries of  Europe the  loss  of
not    less    than  12,500,000    potential j
lives, because of the decrease in  the
number  of    births      resulting    from
the  war,  says . Sir  Bernard   Mallctt, j
registrar-general    of    Great   Britain;!
Britain, he asserts, has lost in these j
potential lives  650,000 children.    He j
believes  that, other  belligerent  coim-1
tries  have  suffered in    this    respect j
more  than has  Great Britain. j
Sir Bernard estimated that every |
day of the war means the loss of i
7,000 potential lives of children to !
the United Kingdom, France, Italy j
and the central powers. Dealing !
with thc decline in thc birth rate, he ,
said thc births registered in Fngland ���
and Wrales in 1913, numbered 881,800.1
In 1915, thcy fell to 814,614; in 1916 ;
there was a further fall to 780,520; ;
i and in 1917 to 668,346; a decline of i
125 per cent, compared witli 1913.
! MOTHERS OF CANADA I
4* PREPARE FOR TROUBLE
When a girl becomes a woman, when j
e, woman becomes a mother, and vrlieu a '
woman passes through tho changes of J
middlo life, are tho three pciicds of life j
when health and strength are most needed
to withstand tbe pain and distress often
caused by severe orgar.ic disturbances. ���
Many thousands in this section ivoaM '
testify as do the following: j
St.   Catharines,   Cut.--"Over   forty,
years  ago I  was restored  to health  bv ,
taking Dr. I'ierce'e
Favorite   I'rescrip-!
tion.    It r/as utter:
mediciiiB and   doctors ha<]  failed  to ���
help    me   or   give;
r o 1 i o f.      I   hia,
through   ororvrork,
bc-eoino     all     rundown in health..    1
vvas     vr c o 1:     and
i;i:al!y    bennie    a
iTtvotts wreoK The1
' Prescription'   vrns
ucomipmhIciI      to
he   tinio   1    started    to
take it I had  not been nhlp to do anything for over a year.   T took tho "Favorite Prescription-" and tho ��� Golden Medical Discovery' &s  well.    It took several
bottles., but I was completely restored to
good health and since that time vrhra I
have felt tho need of these medicines I!
have taken them ard always with perfect
satisfaction."���Mrs.   Wit.   Baker,   S3
Po'go St.
Stratford, Ont.���I x&�� all rcn <1otvd;
vre.ia-, cervoiis. 1 aho FtuTcred with seven*
pains   through "my   hick.     I   viae   very
United    States     Military     Engineer
Urges That It Be Built
Now
Francis ; Vinton Greene, major-
general, U.S.A., urges in '���The Yale
Keyicvv" for July tliat the niuch-
discusscd tunnel under the English
Channel, connecting England and
France,  should  bc   begun  at  once;
"Had it been begun when applied
for in 1907, it would havc ��� been .��� in
operation throughout the war. Had
il been begun when permission was
again applied for "in i91J, il would
now be in operation and would be
one of-the'greatest-single factors in
winning the w:.r. The Britisii admiralty more than a year ago stated
that 0,000,000 .soldiers had been, carried back and lorth across thc Channel, and in liis most lcccnt article
published in thc Revue des Deux
-vloudes, for September, 1917, M.
Sparliaux >ays that the toial number of passengers across the Channel Miiee tiie outbreak oi the war
exceed.-, JO.UOO.WU. 'Flic animals, vehicles, munitions, .supplies oi all
kinds are counted by the millions oi
tons. The amount is not beyond
the capacitv of the tunnel, but it
requires the use of probably 1,500,-
O0U tons of .shipping���at a time when
there is danger that civilization may
bc lo^t'fur lack ot  ships.
"\\ hci shall say how long the war
will last; l-'cw, if any, well informed men c.\pccl its end in less than
two years. Germany is financially
bankrupt, but i omoniicnliy self-supporting, espici.iliy since acquiring an
unlimited supply in" piiroh'uui at
Baku; ar.d lierii:..n\ !������ now, .is she
was over a yiar ago, 'balked but
not defeated.' Jt is quite conceivable that the war may l.irt more
than two years. Hy employing modern nu'tliutls llic tunnel mav possibly be luiilt in  less  than  three  j cars.
Cultivation  of Oranges  Has  Greatly
Increased of Late Years
We have comc very nearly to the
end of the orange season, says a
correspondent with the forces in
Palestine.
For months past we have revelled
in the juicy, luscious fruit. But they
have been a real. God-send to our
troops. Apart from the pleasant
variation they offer to thc ordinary
diet, they have a distinct medicinal
value, and our medical men have encouraged their consumption. The
soldier could get as many as ten for
a piastre (about 4 cents) so that
his consumption has been usually
only limited to the amount of change
he could dispose of.
The fruit itself was obtainable
practically all over Palestine. Although thc principal qrangc groves
arc at Jaffa and neighboring villages
in thc plain, thc natives soon realized the irresistible attraction of their
fruit for the British soldier, and
would find means of transporting
their golden ware to the most out-
of-the-way  places.
Jaffa comes after Spain and California in importance as one of the
world's orange marts. The export
before the war amounted to nearly
eight million francs. The value of the
crops, however, depended very largely on the ability of the shipper to
get liis consignment to the London
market  before   the   Spanish  crop.
The cultivation of oranges had
greatly increased of late years owing to the establishment of Jewish
colonies in Palestine, who brought
scientific methods into lhcir fruit
farming ancl sank a huge capital into
irrigation and water supply.
The outbreak of war in 1914 had
a very serious effect on thc
orange trade. It completely cut
off all means of export, and growers
were left with their entire crops on
their hands. Thc difficulty and ex-'
pense of obtaining fuel for their
pumping plants and thc absence of
any market for thc harvest compelled owners to neglect their groves
during  thc  past  three   years.
Anybody was welcome to carry
away as much as hc wished, provided he picked it off the trees, as it
ruined them lo allow the fruit to
hang, and even the expense of plucking was a consideration. So for
thrcc years thc crops have been
growing poorer and poorer.
The advent of our troops has saved thc situation. Another ycar of
neglect would have spelt the total
ruin of the groves. We have not
only supplied a market for the crop,
but the opening up of communication with Egypt, has provided facilities for the importation of fuel,
which will permit of the proper watering  and  manuring of  the  trees.
The lirst oranges ripen in November. For over six months now thcy
havc provided the troops with a delightful and refreshing dessert, but
arc now beginning to show signs of
scarcity.
Soon, however, we may look forward to apricots, which are fairly
plentiful, although not nearly so
healthy, while the vineyards promise an abundant supply of grapes
somewhat  later in  the  summer.
,   poygLAS'
INFANT!
Cures
!\Ta ft Worms,
IIABLETS Stomach &
������=*? M*" Teething
FORMERLY  TTENNEQUINS _,       , . *
FOR BABIES AND SMALL CHILDREN  IrOUDleS
Contain  no harmful drugs.    25c per box or 5
boxes   by   mail   on   receipt   of   $1.00.
Douglas & Co., Napanee, Ont.
Captured Enemy Trade
At Brighton, Eng., Bernard Oppenheimer is spending $100,000 on a
scheme tor employing disabled soldiers and sailors in the diamond cutting industry. He is working in conjunction with the ministry of pensions and is building a factory cap^
able of employing 1,500 men. A
minimum weekly wage of ��2 after
six weeks' training is agreed upon.
The project is an effort to capture
this trade from the Germans, who
almost monopolized it before the
vvar. Ninety-nine per cent, of the
diamonds the Germans wrere cutting
came from Briiish possessions.
r i
Catarrhal Deafness Cannot be Cured
Hy local applications as they cannot reach
the diseased portion ot Uio ear. There is
only one way to cure catarrhal deafness, and
that is by a constitutional remedy, uararrlial
Ueainess is caused by aa iiiilaineit condition
oi the mucous lining ot tbe Eustachian Tuoe.
When this tube is uillauied you nave * rumbling sound or miperlect hearing, and when
it is entirely closed, Deafness is tne result.
Unless the inflammation can be reduced aud
this tube restored to its normal condition,
hearing will be destroyed iorever. Many
cases oi deaincss are caused, by catarrh,
which is an inflamed condition ol tue mucous
surfaces. flail's Catarrh Cure acts through
the blood on the mucous surfaces ol tbe ��y��-
tem.
We will give One Hundred Pollais (or any
case   ot   Catarrhal   Dealness   that   cannot   be
cured   by   Hall's   Catarrh   Cure.       Ciicuia:��
lrec.     All   JJrujrcists,   7Sc.
.-    F.- J.  CHluvliY  & CO.,  Toledo.  Ok*.
Strangle-hold of Sea Power
Seapower Has Proved    to    Be    the
Greatest Force in  the War
To close the war quickly is an exigent necessity for  Germany.     .Leaving everything else out of the      ac-
couiit, she is in danger      of      being
strangled by the grip of enemy    sea-
power.     That  will   not  relax  as.   thc
months slip by.    Already, despondent
Germans  arc saying  that they  could
not win even if,thcy crushed France.
Neither   England   nor     the       United
States  would give  in,  and     together
thcy  would   still   bar   Germany   from
the sea.        If Admiral  -Mahaii    were
alive he could, tell  the Germans  that
he  had  predicted   this   result.   Prince
Buclow  is alive,  and    hc    distinctly
forewarned   his  countrymen  of   what
would  happen  it   thcy   went  to    war
with England.    Jf they are  now    dc-
Ipicssed,  we   may  bc  corrcspondingly
I cheered  by  reflecting     that,     largely
i viewed,  ^ea power has proved to  bc
Mhe greatest force in  the war,  and is
.working  ever  more   mightily   against
jUcrm.uiv.���Xevv   Vork  livening   I'ost.
MAKE YOURSELF STRONG
People with strong constitutions
escape most of the minor ills lhat
make life miserable for others. Don't
you envy thc friend who docs not
know what a headache is, whose digestion is perfect, and who sleeps
soundly at night? How far do you
conic from this description? Have
yon ever made an earnest effort to
strengthen your constitution, to build
up your system to ward off discomfort and disease? Unless you have
an organic disease it is generally
possible to so improve your physical
condition that perfect health will be
yours. The first thing to be done is
to build up yonr blood as poor blood
is thc source of physical weakness.
To build up the blood Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills is just thc medicine you
need. Every dose helps to make new-
blood which reaches every nerve and
every part of the body, bringing color to the cheeks, brightness to the
eyes, a steadiness to the hands, a
good appetite aud splendid energy.
Thousands throughout thc country
whose condition once made them despair, owe their present good health
to this medicine. If you arc one of
the weak and ailing give Dr. Williams' Pink Pills a fair trial and nole
the daily gain in new health and
abounding vitality.
You can got these pills through
any medicine dealer or by mail post
paid at 50 cents a box or six boxes
for $2.50 from The Dr. Williams'
Medicine Co., Brockviile, Out.
Prussians Glory
In Wanton Outrages
Miserable    Misconception  That    the
World  Can Thereby  Be
Cowed
The world has long since abandoned hope of understanding the
Prussian psychology which glorifies
in such wanton outrages in defiance
of all the canons of humanity. We
have been forced by the frequency
of the attacks on hospital ships, hospitals and churches to believe that
the German commanders deliberately prefer such targets in some miserable misconception that the world
can thereby be cowed into submission by frightfulncss.
After what lias happened to the
Llandovery Castle there should be
no more suggestion of trusting-
American hospital ships to the good
faith of U-boat commanders.���From
the Pittsburg Despatch.
His Mistake
"Why don't you have your relative
examined, by ah alienist?".
"I guess not. An American doctor is good enough for mc."���Boston Transcript.
i Boasts Don't Fill. Empty Stomachs
1 "What llie Austrian people appear
to want is a larger ration of food
and a shorter ration of government
lies about whatsis going on at the
front.���Kansas  City  Star.
Germany's
Industrial Downfall
might,    pcrhap:
be   iinUhcd
time  io be  .i  large  factor in   winning
llic v..ir. J5'.:l even ii no!
ctrlainly be baiii in tunc
most important clement i-.i i��l
ing ilie wo'.hi i.i'iv-.- the \.. ���:.
lit cd i��ir Miips will o nil nine
.liter peace h.i-. incn i I'l'ckuUd
:t v\ill be manv \t:,is In tore
lrw^c ,   1,\    Mibi.i.u nil -   i'.i' i    !)"���
il     cm
tn   be   .1
U'lii;
ami
the
rrte
l.l.io
vv i i 1
pine.
������( i
I bun
--���t
il;.ii    '.. p.
. i c   i.;i>'i,i':' i   i
-( ^>-it \
I
t!
W. -- N.    ' U.
1223
It is easier for a girl to believe the
:s  j't'TUy   llian   it   is   to   make     ot!:r-r
igi-Is  bcliwc   siic  is.
Its Wisdom Equals Its  Raiity
Ffi-.!.'- '      :  -  <-i'   ���* I iii^lc cun  to
his   '-i i-i      -      i 11'���     sc'-".i:s   to   bc
I.o  rarrv
one  o i   * i ��� ���>
o ;t   ll i ;r   l "
I j ub!.:  ...'
,-UCI s
��� ���id  ru.ikc  litem
IVrvi'   Xeus.
m_s;ral'lo v.hen n fric::'l hdvipcJ mo to
try Dr. Tierce's T.-.n-rite Prescription
find one ^I'tle sc-r. ������! to give Tcnr��*j
sirtngt'. Tt stopped tLe pein in rr.j
hick, tl��r> helped rr.y nervous condition.
It is rsrely a good tonic for tvemen.���
Mks. Fz*aEKCE Cvxum, ICO MUtcn &t
it ;- ''!��� . 'Iv '*., I ,.^..ii ii.-. i-nrhtv
million-: <m dell.1.-, even a 1 uudrcv!
and fifty millions, is less than the
daily cxpcrer-s o: the All-.cs at this
moment, and even were ".'ie construction cost =till gro.V."- "it would
be a -mail "price Jo pay fur thc itu-
Tcn^c advantages ot =iicli a :;i��..ui =
of comnuinic.ttion ^r.d *hc rcl<v.<c ci
l.:0i'.O'iy   <0,;i  t,f   J'ipri'iu   worth     ?A
tic   l:c?'-;it   U'X.t   ^JiJ' i.t-C" r,'"'iV,V '
A Suggestive Opir.icn
A N-vv \o:k l<.it:.:t !.����� 1--c-i r.r-
re~t'"ii tKC?".s-c v* v rots . b������"������'< i.p-
'���v.'.,'_- _, t!-c k,.ib*r. lie ::..--. ha-. <���
f'1; '-at f.'l Ii.iic:"��rs s:,T.!.; strr.-i
������;-      *-.���1'-<::��-. ; o!:<   N*ws.
; The   Price   ot   the   War   to   Germany
! Will Be a Gigantic Heritage
I ot   Woe
J     When  the  w.tr v\ as I'l^iin  by  Go-1
| many Herr Albert Hall in" wai a povv-j
j er  in   that   land,     lie   was.   pracinallv :
J the  cuator  ot"   Geraianv's   incrc.inlile
j marine,  whci.ie  ll.ig \\ ^ on   everys-'ca'
beiorc llie v. ..r.     Now   lie  i> .. btv.-keu ���'
; man.     He   knows   ���.'::it   Gtr-n.^iv      i^
I ruined,   hi i    nu.Ui.-ti :.d     p.>\viv     lh::c,
l'ni   IK'   I'll.     IkUuciI    tu   ! 'x    i' ..I l.M";- ���
at   th-; Ik;:: r-'v-  o;   ! .-ti'iti   -_     Xo'.w
; Hi rr   (i. Ij:i:   ;���,   ,i   pi ih,;,: i   , i , t    tier   -
\ ina'iv   would   i-Mlicr   nut   !n ,.i    ironi---
tin    tm'.li   ;>   .Liwniix-     -\*.   .i   -i .i-go
,uii.    ���i.ilK'ii   il   u'li   t..!.i    .���.   in    ii.i:��
t _'     ' '   I'   ":'   '���     tic     "..I'll.    I   I     '   .... 1   V Jl'.'H
��� ...   '...   . I I'i'l.   :,.ii;. >��� *   : .,\ _   .-,c. i .. -   ii
'.''in   ���>_   ;���!!:���-,'  ' o  ".Kit   i \ i ii   ;'.(   t.-cr-
<:������: .   ��� i   : I       --i.,-   \\:;1   \.i--.i^   he   \ ,.!\:c-
1' -���=   '.���'   ' .���    :\.'iiy   .lit-;'   ,:'.    '-.ar.-llcir
iJ..l!i-i   :. Li   i' c'v. .ir   l.-rd-   l'-'.:t   voli.-
iii;..;   ii'-   '.i'i1   \-..��r   innlii   pi Mihlv    i o:u-
1 Jicii'-atc Germany for the  loss oi her
! ovcr��e.i_ trade.  To-.Ir:v  Germany does-I
���n't float a  nierci'ai.t   ^!:ip ci any sea.
'Her. ports  are  r'.->=rd,  her  industries,]
; except  for   v\ar.  at" a   <.i-ind<till,-and I
every   cvfr-f.'.s   i.-.rttr;.    which   form:,
' crly   took-'rr   cvports       and       from;
; ���which she r'Cf.jvtd li cr raw material1-'
cither is at  y.-ar v ith  !:cr or has sev-
fcrfd   all   rcl.-i.ti'-:>.     A-.irrira,    which
, h,.ti  -u' ii'-cr'-i  \".'   ^!.^:������'-,   " ,!
��� ,-��� '
:.i .r:n-\ v.I'.f;: _ Licr-
prf'V oke.j -.cr ������Vm.t, :s now on
fl".: way lo I r.-..:,���'.�� ti.t.: v. i'lld">
pr'at'-st   rT.ritirr.i*  rcwrr. - Xi'. c   price
of th ' '""  "
par.
It"--"
of :hi vvsr to Gerr-iny will bc a  gi-
[ pa-rl.: hcri'r.f,'1  of  coc  '.��  !'r"':'t'.iurc
Ingt&rrts
When youth takes flight on the
Mings of years beauty of complexion goes too. unless you give yot r
skin proper and daily care. Use of
Ingram's MincvveedCTCEmwille;.-
able you to appear youthful when
you are no longer young. Its distinctive remedial efiect upon tba
tissues of the skin keeps tha con:-
plexion colorful, soft and fr��-e
from blemish. It does actually
"healthify''and beautify yourcora-
plexicu. Since 1885 there's been
no'.Itirg els* "just as good." TaVe
no other. Two sizes.SOcand $1 .Cl?.
VVa:m '-ays, bo. prhoUl v.-^sk, cr.d
kitchen heat, at'-ci^umcpcrsrirRtion and
���hin}-, oi'.y sk:n. You c��n avoid this by
u��lnf Iner��in't Velveola SouTCt��!n<
Fare Powder,50e. It blend* perfectly
with the complexion. A light touch
hides tittle lilemiahet, makea your
ccmnlexinn smooth, s'-.fl and ftawlen.
A full line cf Ingram's to.let product*,
iTicludintZodentB for the teeth, 25e, is
��� t your drugemt't.
A Picture
With Each Purchase
Each t'ir.e vcu buy a pickajre cf In-
ernr-.'t Toiltt aidt or Perfume your
drat C'��t will E-'-'e you.withc-.it rharge.
a large port rait of a ivortdf.smedraotii-rc
pieture actrcsn. Each tirie ycu c?l ��
t Ifferer.t portrait m-j ycu n-��We a coJlec-
ticn fcr your Siotse. A��W ycur dntseitt.
F. T. 7ntT*ie Co., Wiudacr. Ontario
**:
yi$ *2nmc*l>vr*M*mm*.mmiifi.},mm p ^g-^^j.
THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
THE LEDGE     |
1:- y2 .". year strictly in   advance,   or $2.50 ���
wlieu not paid for three months.   If not |     Mrs.   Hart's   resilience   oil  Gold
paid tor until the end of the year ii is ��3. j Street was totally destroyed by fire
It is always ��2.50   a  year to   the   United
States iu advance.
R. T. LOYVERY.
Editor and.Financief'
ADVERTISING RATES
,OjluK]tient Co-Owner Notices $25.00
Ci .il and Oil  Notices     7 00
Esiray Notices 3.00
Cfit'ds of Thanks     1.00
Certificate of Improvement  12.50
{WV.ete more than one claim ap-
jvnr? ir notice, $5.00 for each additional claim.)
All other legal'advertising, 12 cents a
"line first insertion, and 8 cents a line for
each subsequenti insertion, nonpariel
measurement.
Destroyed by Fire
on Tuesday night.
B. C. Mining News
Prospectors are busy on Toxada
Island.
There are 75 men working at
fehe Bosun near New Denver.
At Sidney Inlet a New York
company is working the Indian
Chief.
The blue cross means that
your subscription is due, and
that the editor would be pleased
to have more money.
This  Germs  hetter
watch on the Rhine.
pawn   their
Thb Huns have nofe yet  found a
substitute for their morale.
The  British    troops   bave
Ha-m and Haig for some time.
had
i-o<;H is a great man,
but he can
never  be  president of the United
States.
The returned soldier will have
the drop on the politicians, in the
near future.
Oveb in France Hindy's band i.s
beginning to play, "Home, Sweet
Home," with variations.
We must have all papers in Can-,
ada printed in English, aud no
community where English is not
ipoken.
Some men are greedy enough to
take the sea away from the fish, if
they were not afraid of being
drowned.
When a girl has a new pair of
silk stockings, she does not get
frightened when the wind blows,
^ven in Lethbridge.
Germany is still falling lower
��� into the sump of scornful disapproval. The papers are beginning
to spoil it with a lower case g.
V.'iiEN the . present war is over.
i'nc industrial war will begin. It
will bring a great, change in the
uitairs of church, state and society.
What is the name of that -man
in ���X.iilson,. who lost his huuter's
license by betting it in a poker
iiame, and has not had  any game
sin co?-  ''���.'���
The United  States  has  riot.yet
taxed four of the greatest things in
-lif-:��;.   Air,   sleep,   water  and sunlight.    Somebody  must be. asleep
tit the switch in Washington.'
We are still thankful for many
blowings. The brakeman still
calls the stations without charge,
and the man at the auto hospital
does not ask anything for air.
We.-do nofe think that the canoe
would be much of a success as an
ocean liner, although the records
show that not one of them has as
yet.been sunk by a submarine.
Tn E, G orrnans tried Horace
Greeley's advice but had to abandon
it. Instead of going west to grow
up with the country, they are now
going east to save their bacon.
Last month', the weather went
into high every day, and dropped
into low every night. That is
what makes the climate in the
Boundary one of the finest in the
world.
--rOvEii at New Denver this summer ^wo men went fishing, and
carried a full, bottle of whiskey
with them.. .They came back afe
iLight-wifeh^
bottlej'fi'f 'whiskey;"" "This'--is..Xihe
p- izo. fi--h story of the  present -day.
7 ^i:5(^^J^i^i^^^v;
���    ''How did yC��ii cbtng:[toyWeik off
'your eiigag'emenfe^ithriMiS'SvSQOw^;
XX \iX0^^it^^ipii^^^iq cierMoses^;:
;K:'>:??f7'yaKJi:��t4^
A new strike lias been recently
made on the old Whitewater in the
Slocan.
New bunkers and a compressor
have been installed at the Monitor,
near Alberni.
Last week, Prof. Parks examined some claims in the Lardo for
P. J. Sheran.
In the Slocan Pat McGuire and
his partner have been working on
the Slocan Chief all summer.
This year the Electric Point at
Northport, Wash., will increase
its output to 100 tons a day.
A. D. Nash and Bruce White,
have almost concluded negotiations
for the Union in Fraukiin camp.
George Novak of Rossland, is
asking the government to complete
the wagon road to his claims in
Highland Valley.
So far this year, tho Boundary
mines have shipped 19,000 tons to
Trail. Mosfe of this tonnage was
from the Emma near  Greenwood.
The Kettle Valley railway at
Lynch Creek will be extended a
little over a mile so ife can receive
fluorite trammed from the Rock
Candy group.
At Qiiatsino Sound, fehe Old
Sport group of copper claims is being worked, and plans are being
made to build IG miles of railway
from the mines at Elk lake to the
coast.
Joe Deane and others have made
some locations not far from
Nakusp that run high in copper,
silver and lead. Eight chrome
locations have recently been made
iu the same district;.
In his search for platinum, Win.
Thomlinson has again visited
Franklin camp, and procured more
samples.; He is now on his way to
investigate the Kamloops and Cariboo for platinum and other valuable minerals. .
. The old mine about 800 yards
from the depot afe. Penticton, on
tHe lake shore, is. shipping ore.
The iron sulphides are sent to
Greenwood, and the other ore to
Trail. The ore gives values from
815 to 840 a. ton.    .:
The Waterloo No. 2 afe Lightning Peak, has made a five-ton
shipment of silver ore. to. Trail.
The ore had to be packed 23 miles
before it reached the wagon road
ten miles from Edgewood. This
shipment will probably ruti 1000
ounces in silver to the ton.  :
W. A. Jowett has an interest in
a mica deposit near Tefee Jaune
Cache. He is an old-timer, and
started the first daily pappr in Nelson ^ and was the auctioneer who
sold. $28,000 worth of lots in New
Denver on July 20, 1892. At that
time the writer and others thought
fehe.Lticerri of America would soon
have 20,000 people.
Hon. Martin Burr ell, the present minister of mines for the
Dominion, was interviewed last
Friday by A. D. Nash, Bruce
White and R. T. Lowery in reference to having an ore-testing laboratory established iu Kootenay.
Mr. Btirrell promised to give his
attention to the matfeerj and stated
that probably three laboratories
would be built in the west.
At Lightning Peak, Walter
Johnson recently made a location
of silver ore that assayed 425
ounces.,at the grassroots.;;���'. There
is. a. .ledge .50 "-. feet: wide on this
property: that looks : like a milling
proposition. . Johnson's:sfenke.lias
caused a sensation, and "many
prospectors are busy iii tbafc section. >. If neceasary in vthe future
the camp .can. have; a rail way. by
extending'the-KettleCV^liej'-frem
Ly nch ...Creek;;);' "i-
Masonic Hall,    Greenwood
MONDAY, OCTOBER 14th
The Famous English Entertainer and Musician
LESLIE GROSSMITH
In   a   splendid   programme   of  HUMOR,    SONGS,    MONOLOGUES,
CHARACTER SKETCHES, PIANO SOLOS, ETC
AN   ENTERTAINMENT   OF   EXCEPTIONAL   MERIT
Under the auspices of the Boundary Women's Institute.
ONE  NIGHT ONLY!   Admission 75 cts, 50cts, Students Half Price
TO   BE   FOLLOWED   BY   A   DANCE
Reserved Tickets Admit to Dance-        Refreshments,
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Greenwood Garage
Tires, Oils, Gasoline, and
all Accessories for
Motor Cars
Repairs of any kind, and
all work guaranteed
C. E. STAMPER
Phone 27 MANAGER
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
Nelson in Five Minutes
Mr. Grey's Household Hints
Bob Yuill had a cabbage at the
Fair that weighed 25 pounds.
Annie is the sweetest girl in
Nelson. She is the faithful guardian of the sugar at the Hume.
One of Nelson's prominent citizens, is reported to have lost
$1,500 playing poker during the
past few weeks.
Jim Grier is creating typographical triumphs for W. H. Jones.
He did not like the I. W. W.
strata found in Vancouver.
In one day the writer had four
bottles pulled on him. He refused
to imbibe for fear that there might
be a squirrel in the whiskey.
After living for nearly 28 years
in Nelson, Jack Matheson is moving to the coast, largely owing to
the fact that his wife's health is
better in a lower altitude.
D. J. Robertson is selling large
numbers of Marshall's Sanitary
Mattresses these days, said to be
the best mattress in the world.
Sleep on one, and you can laugh
at Spanish influenza.
Last June Nap Mallette introduced the writer, to an old friend
by the name of Hennessy. It is
mournful to relate thafe since theu
the spirit of Hennessy has departed, leaving nothing behind but tho
aroma, and the three stars that
Ufecorated his neck.
The Denishawn School of Dancing and Related Arts, in LoT*
Angeles, is one of the greatest
schools in America. Miss Edna
Malone of Nelson has been in attendance at the echoo! for some
time past. At the closing program
of the summer term in September,
she took a leading part. The
pupilB and teachers of the school
presented in dance form the delectable tale of Cnpid and Pysche,
Miss Malone taking the part of
Pysche. All lovers of the poetry
of motion will be pleased to learn
that Nelson's most famous young
lady acquitted herself with high
honors. .
Never throw away an old pair of
rubbers. Cut them into strips and
use them on fruit jars.
Never eat yellow turnips when
they are green.
A Connecticut inventor has perfected a yardstick' that is only two
feet long.
Pancakes that have been left
over will no$ dry out if covered
with cracked ice.
Mashed potatoes can oe made
fluffier by adding a cake of yeast to
them and letting them stand two
or three days.
Cbe Central fiotel
PHOENIX.
One of the largest hotels in
the city.   Beautiful location,
fine rooms and tasty nieab.
A. O. JOHNSON      -      PROP.
oocooooooooooooo*x>ooooooo��
T.    THOMAS
CLOTHES CLEANED
PRESSED AMD REPAIRED
TAILOR ��� GREENWOOD
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
I wouldna say McTavish canna
learn the game," remarked Saudy
a3 they trudged home from the
links; "but it will be deeffieult for
him."
"Aye," agreed Donald. "At
the times he will be like to bust,
what wi' being so releegious and
tongue tied."���Everybody's Magazine.
Adventures in Plurals
'i"XX"
Careful... i aspect ion and prompt
e, (\.���'Ijlielj v and'.'.s^condly^ bI ie /repair of: tleftctiYe |1 lies, and as-
ii'ld' riothab'..::'ih.e,;':-'..an.tl. iwent and;; bestos; or .metal protection for all
rri6d:anothern;ggah-r^OvI-topk
0:i:-;r:;;'advip^
���woodwork-, hear...stoves;, and pipes
would .''materially reduce the number of fires in Canadian homes.
We'll  begin  with a box, and the plural
���':���" is boxes,.
But the   plural   of ox should be oxen
not oxes;
The one fowl is goose, but two are.called
geese,
Yet the plural of mouse should never be
meese;
You may. find a lone  inouse, or a whole
nest of mice,
Cut   the plural of house is houses, not
hice;
If the   plural   of. man is always called
���men,
Why shouldn't  the  plural   of pan   be
called pen? . ""^
The cow in the plural may be cows or
tine,
And the   plural   of vow is vows, never
.  vine,
If I speak of.a foot and you show me your
��� feet,.
And Igive you a boot,  would a pair be
called beet?
If one  is a tooth aud the whole set ar
called teeth,
Why shouldn't the plural oi booth be
called beeth?
If the singular's this, and the plural is
. these,
Should the plural of kiss be  nicknamed
keese?
Then one may be that and three would
be those,
Yet hat iu the plural would   never be
������   hose; -._-'.-':'. ��� ��� X.
And the plural Of cat is cats, not cose.
We speak of a brother and. also of breth-
yiX:^in,X:xX;yyyiy.iX..yX :
But more than:one.mpther is never called
methern: xy: XiXxXXXX
The masculine prbnouiis are he, his and
him,  ��� ':-- .
So   the:. English,   I think,  you will all;
iy   agieeXyXXiiili
Is the-most..:': tedious language you  eye
���.  did.see.;: ���'' XXi- x.:yyyrx.y..xxy.:
R. L. DOUGLAS
ROOM 18, K. W. O. BLOCK
NELSON. B.C.
Optometrist aud Graduate Optician, rectified by Provincial Board of Examiners.
H. McKEE
GREENWOOD
���0A1 AND WOOD
AGENT FOR
LETHBRIDGE GOAl
British Columbia has been
here a long time so has
the B, C, Cigar. Absolutely Guaranteed, Clear
Havana Filled, The Cigar
that never varies.   .    ,   ,
Have you tried one lately'
WILBERG&W0LTZ
B.C. CIGAR FACTORY
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.X
J 8YNOPSIS OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENT"
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed
lands only.
Records will be granted covering only
land suitable for agricultural purposes
and which is non-timber land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
but parties of not more than four may
arrange for adjacent pre-emptions, with
joint residence, but each making necessary improvements on respective claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims for
Ave years and make improvements to
value of $10 per acre, including clearing
and cultivation of at least 5 acres, before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor in occupation not
less than 3 years, and has made proportionate improvements, he may, because
of ill-health or other cause, be granted
intermediate certificate of improvement
and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence
may be issued provided applicant makes
improvements to extent of $300 per annum and records same each year. Failure to make improvements or record
same will operate as forfeiture. Title
cannot be obtained on these claims in
less than 5 years, with improvements of
$10 per acre, Including 5 acres cleared
and cultivated, and residence of at
least 2 years.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant may
record another pre-emption, If he requires land in conjunction with his
farm, without actual occupation, provided statutory improvements made and
residence maintained on Crown granted
land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites;
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.
For grazing and industrial purposes,
areas exceeding 640 acres may be leased
by one person or company.
PRE-EMPTORSV FREE GRANTS'ACT.
The scope of this Act is enlarged to
include all persons joining and serving
with His Majesty's Forces. The time
within which the heirs or devisees of a
deceased pre-emptor may apply for
title, under this Act is extended from
one year from the death of such person,
as formerly, until one year after the
conclusion of the present war. This
privilege is also made retroactive.
TOWNSITE PROPERTY ALLOTMENT
X:x"i"-X.X-X.l-'ACJ.
Provision is made for the grant to
persons holding uncompleted Agree-.
merits to Purchase from the Crown of
such proportion of the land, if divisible,
as the payments already made will
cover in.proportion to the sale price of
the whole parcel. Two or more persons
holding such Agreements may group
their Interests and apply for a proportionate allotment jointly. If it is not
considered advisable to divide the land
covered by an application for a proportionate allotment, an allotment of land
of equal value selected from available
Crown lands In the locality may bo
made. These allotments are conditional
upon payment of all taxes due the
Crown or to any municipality. The
rights of persons to whom the purchaser from the Crown has agreed to
sell are also protected. The decision of
the Minister of Lands in respect to tho
adjustment of a proportionate allotment
is final. The time for making application for these allotments is limited to
the 1st day of May, 1919. Any application made after this date will not be
considered. These allotments apply to
town lots and land3 of the Crown sold
at_j)ublle auction.
For information apply to any Provincial Government Agent or to
O. R. NADEN.
Deputy Minister of Lands,
Victoria. B. a
We've   Got   Him   Throttled   At   Last.
Who? Old man High Cost of Living. Bound and gagged, kicked
him clear of the premises. He just naturally couldn't stand our low
prices. Too bad for him but come over and let us tell you all about it.
Another big shipment of woolens at prices that will make you
throw the old catalog in the stove will reach you this week'and more
on the road. Follow the crowd don't lose out on all the "good bargains. We believe lhat low prices and quick turnovers will keep our '
stock fresh and high prices will glue the stuff to the shelves and as we
are not running a cold storage plant we are selling 'em and selling
'em fast, Get in while the getting is good, that spare change you
save in buying of us will help buy another war loan bond.
Place your order quick  for grain sacks at 30c each.
Bring your eggs, we pay more than any else in the district for
real fresh ones.    Save the rotten ones for Mr. Hohenzollern.
C'mon over and see us, we're real sociable.
The Myncaster Mercantile Company
Hotel Building -       -       - Myncaster, B.C.
OOOOOOOOCK><X>00<>0<><K><>0<><>0<>00^^
For Watches, Clocks, Jewellery, Cut Glass,
Silverware, Etc.
GO   TO
TIMBERLAKE,   SON   &   CO.
"THE  QUALITY JEWELLERS"
Bridge Street. Next Telephone Exchange, GRAND FORKS
Specialty:  Fine Watch Repairs.
00<K>0<>0<>0<>00<>0<>0<>000<>0<>0<>^
Chqljy���They say, ;yod know,,
that what a irian eats he  beeoaies.
Miss Keen���Dear ine 1 Yon must
be eating.praetfcally hofching.
I For Good T
mg
I ---Economy and Satisfaction |f
=' combined with Promptness |f
fi. :';/':v./;;;r.:^
|:";. ���'    ? rittafce^'^e^
ty ''"'x iipiwtfx'x*^ ;'"A^e7 ^;|ft*ii'J��
I:        i.;one" ^ifa^ x-x/^
1, WE; PRINT ^M'ix^xx^j
-     I     L^ Noteheads,   l|=f
XyXxiXXXXx.   rr.,,; r;;4Ruled or Plain) ;v iXxyXxXX^XxiXXXiiiiyWX;ix:^
E73f��SiS'vEri
ii;;vr;y
Post ers j Dodgers,
ge
GREENWOOD
'&ixi&Mx3
Iftiil
Job Printing Department    3
m*~: .'"        ��� ��� ":~��
P. BHRNS & CO.
CANADA FOOD BOARD LICENSE NO. 113
Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish
and Poultry. Shops in nearly all the
towns of the Boundary and Kootenay.
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD, B.C.
'��ee����������e��eee����ee����i
Windsor Hotel
Greenwood, B.C.
The fflj&ilsor Hotel is one of the
oldest and most comfortable hotels in the
red metal metropolis. It is located in the
heart of the city, and convenient to all
business housesi Heated with steam and
electricity, Fine sample rooms. Many
of the bedrooms contain electric heaters.
The bar is replete with modern beverages. Hot coffee, sandwiches, and light
lunches always ready. Touch the wire
if you want rooms reserved.
rjjf
X
&<***��<&>&��& ^���$'44'4�� 4* 4* >4��4'4'4'4'4'4��4��4*+4'*f
Cbe fiumc fiotel
nel$ont !!��������,
The only up/tcdate Hotel in the interior,   First-class
in every respect,
CENTRALLY LOCATED
Hot and Cold Water; Steam Heat and Telephone in
each room.
ROOMS WITH PRIVATE BATHS.
CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BEST
. -\
First Class Cafe and Barber Shop
15   SAMPLE ROOMS
Steam Heated; Electric Lighted.
RATES 51.00 per day and up; European PJan.
Bus Meets all Trains and Boats.
ASSAYER
E. W. WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist Box biioS, Nelson, B. G.
Charges:���Gold, Silver, Lead or Copper
fi each. Gold-Silvei, jingle assay)
{x.oo. Goid-Silver (duplicate . assay)
$1.50. Silver-Lead $1.50 Silver-LeaS-
Zinc $3.00. Charges for other metals etc
on application.
"���' ���; ;;S|tfs|ac^lil&p
: ''^raijlter 'ii&n&XMwMeiyWoitexXXX
PHONE   13
Auto    and   Horse   Stages
Leave    Greenwood    Twice
Daily to Meet Spokane and
Oroville Trains
Autos For Hire. The Finest
Turnouts in the Boundary.
Light and Heavy Oraying
Palace   Livery  And  Stage
CREEHWOOOD. B.C.
W.   H.   DOCKSTEADER, Prop.
X; Be sure and send a Float to
jour soldier boy in France. It
will help to win the war.
i
#;
��

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