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The Ledge Oct 25, 1917

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 -        AWia
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LEDGE
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THE  OLDEST: MINING  CAMP  NEWSPAPER   IN  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
kot,. -:X.xiy,
GREENWOOD, B. C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25,  1917.
No. 15
Do You Know
That "during Fly season your Cows will give from 25
to 35 per cent. MORE AND BETTER MILK if you
-cattkeep flies-from tormenting them.
" TMs Means Money to You
:"! RrJ Williams* Fly Spray
will do 'this positively, without tbe slightest harm to
Cattle. It is also very effective with Horses, Hogs
and Poultry.;   Put it on with our
Famous Long-Stroke Spray Pump
- vV'.'TKY OUR SPIRAL FLY CATCHER
T; M. GULLEY & CO.
New location���Russell-Law Caulfield Building
PHONE 28        X       GREENWOOD, B. C.
'STORE OF QUALITY"
Call or Phot^e when you want
Groceries, Dry Goods or
Boots and Shoes
Try My Eggs and Butter
J- G. McMYNN
MIDWAY      -    ��� -     B.C.
Around Home
__________a_s______
OPEN FOR BUSINESS
Phone 126
Help the Allies Cause
BY ECONOMISING ON WHEAT
EAT RYE BREAD
Occasionally
I MAKE IT. IT'S GOOD
PHONE  126
William C. Arthurs
THE Bread & Cake Baker
Greenwood City Bakery
i Pantry Queen Flour
*    '���: ist  PRIZE  AT  NELSON,  1916 and 1917
WHEAT, OATS, BRAN, SHORTS, ROLLED OATS, HAY i
| and CREMO the Breakfast Food
I Wm. O.  ARTHURS,   greenwood.
I
THOROUGHLY RENOVATED AND SPECIALLY
ADAPTED FOR COMMERCIAL TRADE
RMcKEE
. GREENWOOD
COAI AND WOOD
M_____|M_m3___H_M__a____MM__B__-___________l
AGENT FOR
LETHBRIDGE COAL
Carload of Briquettes . Comin?
Rock Creek   Fair   on Friday.
George Cawston bas re-opened
the meat shop in Keremeos.
Thomas Fox died   in   Phoenix
last week from typhoid.
C. V.  Setnerad has moved from
Princeton to Vancouver.
Tom Ellis of Penticton, is said
to be very ill in Victoria.
Danny Deane has soine^ notion
of locating in Princeton.
Murf Mcintyre is now a corporal in Uncle Sam's army.
In Grand Forks last week the
Court acquitted Tom Oxley.
The gophers are still to be seen
in the hills around Greenwood,
Wealthy apples from B. C, are
three for ten cents in Toronto.
Carl Carlson has gone to" Vancouver, to join   the flying corps.
Last week there were 25 patients in the Grand'Forkst hospital.
The first snow of the season,
dropped on Greenwood last Thurs
day.
Tom Peck has returned from
the South, with a fine line of old
jokes.
See our childrens sweater suits
in Tan, Navy and Grey. G. A.
Rendell.
Only about half a dozen drunks
have been seen  in   town   during
B. C." Mines
Near Nighthawk, Wash., work
bas been resumed on the Caaba.
Ore is being shipped from the
Lavina and Giant, north of Argen-
fea.
Tbe decline in the price of metals
looks like a sign'tbat the war is
nearly over.
At a public sale, W. T. Beck
bought the San Poil gronp at Republic, Wash.
The mints in the United States
are minting large quantities of sil-
vercoins from Mexico.
At Nelson, a judgment of $2,400
for rent of the Roseberyfmill, was
given against J. P. Keane.
In Franklin camp ore bunkers
will be built at the I Maple Leaf,
and an ore smelting furnace install
ed.
It is about time the price of dynamite got down to a reasonable
basis. The Powder Trust is too
greedy.
Kamloops people are buying
much stock in the new  Homesake
Western Float
Francois Key died in Merritt recently, aged 61 years.
At Invermere bay is   selling for
from $20 to $25 a ton.
Smith Curtis is running a silver
mine near Adams Lake. 1 	
J. R. McNabJdied in Kamloops
this month, aged 65 years.
One Presbyterian church in B.C.
has its hymns played on a violin.
C. P. R. sleeping berths " have
now'to be paid for^when^reserved.
Mr. Proctor, the architect, formerly of Rnpe is dead in Wisconsin.
���^H. ^0. ^Andrews has__ been ""appointed government agent at
Anyox.
W.'.E. Hodder of Kaslo is in the
hospital at Spokane,'suffering from
paralysis.
Prohibition has increased the
consumption of poker and sluff, in
the Slocan.
THE WINDSOR HOTEL is one of the Best furnished
hotels in the west. It is located in the heart of Greenwood and within easy reach of all the financial and
commercial institutions of tbe Copper Metropolis.
Heated with Steam and Lit by Electricity
Commodious sample rooms. The bar is replete with
all modern beverages and the meals are the best. Rooms
reserved by telegraph.
<ge_f*^EiKgfr_!5_^_^^g^^
P   BURNS & CO."
X        Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish
> and Poultry.    Shops in nearly all the
towns of the Boundary and Kootenay.
COPPER STREET. GREENWOOD, B. C.
t-KMss^a^ssa^a.
A NEW SHIPMENT OF
McCormicks High Grade
Chocolates
Just Received at the O. K. Cigar
Store
AGENT FOR
Singer Sewing Machines
I R J. MUIR, Greenwood
Christian Science service will he held
in the MELLOR BLOCK on Sunday at ri
a.m. All welcome. Every Wednesday
at 8 p. m., testimonial meetings will be
held in the same block. . Snnday School
every Sunday morning.
MATTHEWS  BROS.
GRAND FORKS
Agents for Chevrolet, Dodge, Hudson,
Chalmers, Cadillac cars, and Republic
truck motors . Garage in connection.
In bad weather the telephone is vour greatest
friend. No matter what kind the day outside,
your telephone is always working and will give
you instant connection with anybody or any place.
In summer time it may be a pleasure to travel,
but in winter you will more than ever rely on
the telephone. Day or night, your telephone is
always ready for. service; day or night,' it takes
yon any where.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY, Ltd.
D. R. McELMON
WATCHMAKER and JEWELER
Copper St., Greenwood
THE CANADIAN BANK
i     OF COMMERCE
NOTICE.
Sealed Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to noon on Saturday, the
3rd day of November, 1917. for the purchase of the Pre Emption rights in what
is known as the Thomas A. McDonald
ranch (Pre Emption Record No. 274S),
and being Lot Lot No. 1220S in the Similkameen Division of Yale District, situate near Bridesville ia the District of
Yale, and said to contain 160 acres, more
or less. TERMS CASH.
Further particulars may be obtained by
applying' to the undersigned. The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted. Sale to be subject to the approval
of a Judge of the County Court   of Yale.
Dated, 24th ol October, 1917.
E. FOYLE SMITH,
Deputy Official Admistrator,
Greenwood, B. C.
LAND  ACT.
JOHN AD_9_<
, C.V_0��� IXJJ. D.CX-. FsMUeoT
& V. W. JONES. A__rt Goaeal Manager
I, CYRIL RADAN, of Kerr Creek in
the Similkameen Division of Yale District, Rancher, intend to apply for permission to lease 80 acres of land, bounded as follows:���
Commencing at a post planted at the
North-West corner of Lot 2084S; thence
Nprth 40 chains; thence East 20 chains;
thence South 40 chains; thence West 20
chains to the point of commencement,
and containing 80 acres be the same more
or less.
Dated October 20th, 1917.
CYRIL RADAN.
MNt
5
BANKING BY MAIL
Recounts may be opened at every branch of The Canadian Bank
m Commerce to be operated by mail, and will receive the sazne
careful attention as Is given to all other departments of the Bank's
business. Money may be deposited or withdrawn in this way as
satisfactorily as fey a pertooal visit to the Bank. s��
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
XxW*,.C��:; LUCAS, Manager .
About 200 men are employed at
the Granby smelter in Grand
Forks. Several of them have
beeu "with the company from ten
to nineteen years.   :
The postal rates in the United
States will be raised on November 2, to a level with Canada. It
will be just as cheap then to post
letters in Midway as Ferry.
F. W. Frederick of Phoenix,
with his pen of Rhode Island
Whites, took third prize in the Jn
ternationai egg-laying contest
that closed in Victoria on the 4th
of October.
October.
About $700 was realized at the
Red Cross bazaar, in Grand-Forks
last week.
Dr. Dickson has quit the Granby at Anyox, aud will practise in
New York.
Engineer McKarracher of Midway has bought a McLaughlin
automobile.
Born.���In Oroville, October !3
to Mr. and Mrs. Quigg of Bridesville, a son.
Born.���At Grand Forks, on
October 18, to Mr. and Mrs Potter of Eholt, a daughter.
Harry Hook will take some
milling lessons in Butte, ; before
returning to Copper Mountain.
John Swanson found a gold
nugget in the Tulameen river
last week, that weighed  3J4 ozs.
We have received our fall supply of Ladies, Misses and Childrens rubbers, all sizes. G. A.
Rendell.
Pythian Sisters, Military Card
Party and Concert, have decided
to charge 50c1 instead of 60c as
stated on the Posters.
Just previous"to her departure
for Vancouver, the many friends
of Miss Tillie Graham presented
her with a purse of $91.
John H. McDonald died back
in Maine this month. He home-
steaded the land upon which part
ot the town of Molson is built.
Pte. Harry Carson has returned to Phoenix, having been invalided home from France. He was
hurt with shrapnel at Vimy Ridge.
For Sale. Tenders will be
received up to November Sth, for
the sale of the City Fire team.
Apply to G. B. Taylor, city clerk.
In future-Lee & Bryan and G.
A. Rendell will, render their
Mine and Smelter accounts on
the 1st and..15th of each month
which will be due on the Sth and
23rd of the same month.
At Hamilton Creek, 35 miles up
the river from Westbridge, a
school bas been established, and
efforts are being made to obtain a
postoffice.
Miss Mitchell, Field secretary
of the Women's Missionary Society will speak in the Prebyter-
lan church, October 31st, at S.
All invited.
Wm. Swayne is going away for
the winter. During his absence,
Alphonse Dumas, one of the most
proficient bookkeepers tn the district, will have charge of the
office work for Electric Light Co.
Re Military Service Act all
persons coming under the Act
are required to fill out a report
for service or application for exemption whether they : have or
have not been examined..; by Medical Board.
A. F. H. Meyer received word
that his youngest brother, Flight
Lieutenant,   H. F.   Meyer,   had
in   town   during]company, recently put on the market by Smith Curtis.
The western branch of the Canadian Mining Institute will meet
in Merritt on November 7, and in
Princeton on the 10th.
A. J. Curie is prospecting his
manganese claim near*Kaslo. The
government will only allow him to
export 200 tons, a fact that hinders
the development  of  the property.
The Canada Copper Co. has taken
samples from a number of claims
at Chesaw.T If results are satisfactory the"company will develop the
properties, and put them npon a
shipping basis.
The W. K. Power_Co. is making
arrangements to extend its line
from Greenwood to Copper Mountain, at a cost of $2,000,000 or
more The line will run through
Camp McKinney, ""where the Consolidated will do much work in the
nearO'future.^Branch lines may
also be built into Penticton and
Princeton.
This month, Bob Yuill and Tom
Wall sold a one-third interest in
two claims on Lockhart creek, and
received $3,000_Jin cash. Bob says
the deal was closed, and the cash
in the bank before any of the knock
ers in Nelson knew anything about
the deal. Yuill says that this
group has one of the best surface
showings ever seen in Kootenay,
and would soon make a mine, especially if the government would
help to clear the   trail.
The Cobalt, Ontario, operators
are up in arms, because Beer,
Sondheimer & Co. are demanding
hnge royalties upon patents for the
flotation process.    This    blacklist
Four lemons were grown this
year, on the tree in Noble's barber
shop in Easlo.
John Webber got three montns,
for stealing a sheep from a rancher
on Denman Island.
Let'us help to'win the war, by doing without tea, coffee and tobacco
for two days every week.
At_Merritt, Murdoch Mcintyre
has>e-modelled?his hotel, and put
in a'modern temperance'saloon.f.
The K. V. By; is building^a
roundhouse, lunch room'and lodging house at Coquahalla Summit.
Sam Walker of Burton City was
married in Nelson this month, to
Miss Jennie Daniels, of Flint,
Mich.
Two of the eleven hotels, between
Chemainus and Shawnigan Lake
have closed since the dry wave
blew in.
Somebody* calls Billy Mclnnes,
the Big Noise of British Columbia,
while others'say he*is the voice of
the Pacific.
After [.living for 29 years' in
Kamloops, A. P. Morris, the jolly
painter, ha_Cgone>to,Vancouver,fto
look for a job.
Lee.-Corp., C. S. Brown, a returned soldier, was drowned in
Kamloops*lake.by tbe capsizing'of
his sailing skiff.
Cats are being shipped from
Kaslo to Sandon. Mice must be
plentiful in^the^ sunless city, or
sausages scarce.
At Kamloopsja man named Mc-
Lellan got'three months for having
whiskey on his person. He should
have*carriedjie inside.
This year 95 carloads of small
beans were grown in B.C. They
average 18 bushels to the acre. In
Japan fehejaverage is 15 bushels.
Silverton2wanta"a wagon road^to
Slocan City, and the Lucerne wants
one to Sandon. With Charley
Nelson at the bat their wishes
should soon be realized. The
Slocan also presents a good open-
forja ifew aeroplanes.
Upon the score of economy the
provincial jails at New Westminster, Kamloops and Saanich may
be closed, and the prisoners removed to Oakalla. The dry wave
should close a few more, provided
Prohibition is a success.
It will pay business men in any
town or district, to keep their
local paper filled with live ads.
Editors connot live on apathy, and
any place is dead indeed, of ter its
local paper takes down the flag,
and moves to a live community.
The grass has been trimmed in
the Kaslo cemetery, and the
grounds beautified, making it a
pleasant place to await the coming
of Gabriel and bis cornet. The
cemetery is not doing much busi-
Speaks In  Greenwood
Captain H. A. Pearson, "of^Toronto, who is to speak here on November 5th went to   Ecgland   with
the original 1st Canadian Division,
in September, 1914, and   was sent
to France five months in   advance
of tbe Canadian troops to establish.
Y. M. C. A. huts, etc.    He was in
all the important battles during the
first two years of the war ond   was
returned home some months ago as
physically    unfit,   suffering   from
shell shock and a broken ankle.
After being released by the Medical Board, Capt. Pearson was given
special facilities in order to tell
the story of his experiences to the
Canadian people., and he has appeared in every important city from
Halifax to Vancouver.
The story which he brings is not
one concerning the political features of the war, but a plain Btory
without attempt at oratory, of the
hardships and difficulties met with
by tbe Canadian lads in France,
and those who are interested in
the American troops as they now
come face'to face with many of the
same problems, should hear this
story. The object of Capt. Pearson's visit is not to raise funds for
the Canadian Y. M. C. A. work,
but to give the people some idea of
actual conditions in France.
LIBERAL MEETING.
A special meeting'of the Greenwood Liberal Association will be
held in tbe Liberal Committee
Rooms, Thursday evening, October, 25th, at 8.15 o'clock, for the
selection of delegates to* the Yale
Liberal Convention, to be held at
Penticton on October 31st, and for
the transaction of fother business.
J. L. WHITE,
President.
DIED
At Christian Valley, B.C., Friday, October 17th, 1917. Catherine Barth aged 60 years, the
beloved witV"of Matthew Barth.
r       ��� __._.-.      V1UV-.1111--    ���__.__...___���_,  ���- -iu,    uuiiig    ujucn   OUS1-
ed, and pro-German firm evidently "J88'  probably owing to a lack of
wish to cripple  the   production of'
minerals in America, by harassing
the mine operators injunctions, law
suits, etc. All their patents should
be annulled in Canada if they interfere with the production of minerals, essential to the conduct of
the war.
Orders have beeu received by the
superintendent' of the Tarheel Copper Co., who are workihg a group
of claims on the middle fork of the
Spiilimachine, south of Golden, to
continue development through the
winter A. C. Langley, mining
engineer for that district, recently
visited this section of the country
and   was   wonderfully   impressed
; The 10-roomed residence of R.
Blackwood-Wileman near Duncan,
was burned tnis month. Valuable Nelson and other relics were
destroyed.
In   Nakusp,   2��   years  ago tonight,  Four Fiash  Jack,   Wingy
Burke,   Kelly-On-A-String,   Silent
Sam, and  Curly  Robinson  gave a
party  to  their numerous friends.
Dan Dunn   was  thrown out of the
window about three in tbe morning,  but otherwise  the affair was
rather  tame,   most of the guests
drinking out of a bottle in a dili-
igent and talented manner.    Those
were some   days   in   Nacups,   as
Nelse Demars called the town.
:  In these days of prohibition, it
is just as  well to remember that
more than  two cupfuls  of tea or
coffee  daily are injurious to the
most   of  people,   and    that   soft
drinks, including plain water,   are
not conducive to health and longevity.    It is not necessary to get
intoxicated, in order to suffer from
an excess of fluids.    Beyond a certain point all  beverages  become a
poison,   and  an  ounce of whiskey
hurts less than a bucketful of commercial grape juice.
HEAR
been killed iu England by an} with it considering it to be a pro-
aeroplane accident "Bert," who!Hfic area only needing assistance
was at one time in the office of 1 in the way of roads and trails, to
the Mother Lode mine, went to j develop it. Owners of several
Europe with the Canadians, and; other claims in the district are
later transferred to the Royal Fly j said to be preparing for developing Corps. i ment work immediately.
Capt. H. A. Pearson
Tell the story of the
Y. M. C. A. Work with the
Canadian Boys in France
He was there two years in charge of
Y. M. C. A. work
GREENWOOD, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.
PHOENIX, Nov. 6,   8 p. m. THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
THE LEDGE
$2 a year in Canada,   and   $2.50   in  the
United States.
R. T. LOWERY.
Editor and Financlei.
ADVERTISING RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices $25.00
Coal and Oil Notices     fi 00
Estray Notices 3-00
Cards of Thanks     1.00
Certificate of Improvement  10.00
(Where more than one claim appears ir notice, $2.50 for each additional claim.)
All other legal advertising, 12 cents a
line first insertion, and 8 cents a line for
each subsequent insertion, nonpariel
measurement.
The blue, cross means that
your subscription is due, and
that the editor would be pleased
to'have more money.
Deep Salt Bed
In Kansas   a deep   well   struck
rock salt at G90 feet below the sur-
fece aud penetrated 600 feet of rock
salt in beds from 5 to 60 feet thick.
A large area in this state is underlain by salt,   which   is   mined   by
shafts and obtained by pumping the
brine.    Drilling for   oil   in  Texas
and Louisiana has revealed the pre
sence of tremendously thick deposits of rock salt at a depth of a   few
hundred feet.    Thicknesses of 2000
feet are common,   and   one   drill
hole passed   through   more   than
3000 feet of rock salt.    Most of the
salt made in Utah is   produced by
evaporating the   water   of   Great
Salt Lake, and in California   by e-
vaporating sea water.    These sources are inexhaustible, and the limit
of production by solar evaporation
will never be reached.
NEXT!
The story of the rival bootmakers, which appeared rec-
cently, is matched by a correspondent of an English paper with another story, equally worth repeating. It concerns two rival Bausage
makers. Again they lived on opposite sides of a certain street, and
one day, one of them placed over
his shop the legend;
'��� We sell sausages to the gentry
and nobility of the country.'
The next over the way appeared
the sign:
'���We sell sausages to the gentry
and nobility of the  whole country'
Not to be outdone, bhe rival put
up what he evidently thought as  a
final statement, namely:
"We sell sausages to   the   King."
Next day there appeared over
the door of the first sausage man
the simple expression     of loyalty:
"God save the King."
Card of Thanks
I wish to ^thank the people of
Rock Creek and district, for their
kindnesB and sympathy during my
recent sad bereavement.
MATTHEW BA.RTH.
Card Of Thanks
The ladies of the Catholc Church
wish to sincerely thank, all those
who so generously patronized their
chicken dinner, Wednesday evening-
What profiteth it] a man-if he
corners all the gold on earth but
lose the love of his own brother?
Disappointing
First Farmer: How is it you
110 longer pub up at the Golden
Crown wheu you drive  to market?
Second Farmer: Wby, they are
regular , take-ins. Last winter,
they made a great fuss and.gave
me a big bottle to take to bed with
me, and when I opened it^what
d'ye think it wat? Nothing but
hot water!���Chicigo Herald.
iHKKlOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
T.    THOMAS
CLOTHES CLEANED
PRESSED AND REPAIRED
TAILOR - GREENWOOD
0<>-<-"��>0000��<XK><-<X-000��00<M>C>0<>
JOHN CROPLEY
GREENWOOD
Blacksmith, Carpenter and
Wagon Maker .
The Knob Hill Hotel
PHOENIX.
One of the largest hotels in
the city.   Beautiful location,
fine rooms and tasty mealo.
A. O. JOHNSON      -      PROP.
Sandy's Extravagance
Sandy had taken Jeanie to the
village fair. They had seen all the
"free shows," but there was a.movie show for which a charge was
made and which the girl wanted to
Eee.
"Winnaye tak' me?" she said,
persuasively.    "It's only a nickel,'
At the door, however, Sandy dis
covered the admission was a dime
for adults.
He groaned; It was too late to
retreat, and so he reluctlantly let
go the 20 cents, but when he got
inside he said:
"Jeanie, gin ye ever doob ma
love for ye? Just think 0' what I
hae spent on ye this vera   day."
ASSAYER
E. \V. WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, Box biioS, Nelson, B. C.
Charges:���Gold, Silver, Lead or Copper-
$1 each. Gold-Silver, (single assay)
$1.00. Goid-Silver (duplicate assay)
J.1.50. Silver-Lead $1.50 Silver-Lead-
Zinc $3.00. Charges for oth*r metals etc
on application.
TULAMEEN HOTEL
Princeton,  B. C  is  the   headquarters   for   miners,   investors
and railroad men.   A fine location and everything first-class
J. N. MacPHERSON, Proprietor
HOFSES  SHOD
On the most modern and scientific
principles
British Columbia has been
here a long time so has
the B, C. Cigar, Absolutely Guaranteed. Clear
Havana Filled. The Cigar
that never varys,    .   ',   ��
Have you tried one lately?
WILBERG&W0LTZ
B. C. CIGAR FACTORY
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and in a portion of the
Province of British Columbia, may be
leased for a term of twenty-one years
renewable for a further term of 21 years
at an annual rental of $1 an acre. Not
more than 2,560 acres will be leased to
one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal sub-divisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded il
the rights applied for are not available
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
iurnish the Agent wtth sworn returns
accounting for tide' full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon: If the coal mining rights are
not being operated, such returns should
be furnished at least once a year.      .
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, Or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.   B.��� Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
Exemption Tribunals.
Exemption Boards have been chosen in such a way as to make them absolutely independent and
removed from all influence. There are over 1,250 boards throughout the country, each composed of two
men, one appointed by the county judge in the district concerned and one selected bya joint committee ot
Parliament Being familiar with local conditions where they sit, the members ate wall-fitted to appreciate
such reasons for exemption as are put before them by men called up.
Exemption will be granted to those who can establish that it is in the national interest that they remain
in civilian life.   This islbr the Exemption Board to decide after having received full information in each case.
The grounds on which exemption may be claimed (which are similar to the grounds recognized in
Great Britain and the United States, are as follows:~
m
(e)
W)
(��)
That it U eipedient in the national interest that the man should, instead of feeing employed in Military Service.be
engaged in other work in which he is habitually engaged.
That it it expedient in ��he national interest that the man should, instead ol being employed in Military Service, be
engaged in other work in which he wishes to be engaged and for which he has special qualifications.
That it U expedient in the national interest that, instead di ..being employed in Military Service, he should continue
to be educated or trained for any work for which he is then being educated and trained.
That serious hardship would ensue if tbe man were placed on active service, owing to hit exceptional financial Of
business obligations or domestic position.
Ill health or infirmity.
That be conscientiously object* to the undertaking of combatant service and is prohibited from doing so by tenets
and articles of faithxin effect on the sixth day of July. 1917, of any organized religious denomination existing and
well recognized in Canada at such dale.and to which he in good faith belongs.
That be should be exempt because disfranchised under the War Time Election Act.
No Claim for Exemption should be put forward unless one or other of these grounds in fact exists,
and no loyal citizen should assist in, or allow himself to be made a party to, any Claim for Exemption unless
thoroughly satisfied that it is made in good faith.
Exemption may he applied for by the men selected themselves or by their parents, near relatives or
employers. Application for exemption must be made on printed forms to be found at every post office,
which are to be filled in and left with the postmaster if exemption is desired. The postmaster will forward
the form to a Registrar, who will send it to the appropriate Exemption Board. In due time, then, the
Applicant will get notice as to when he must present his case before the Board.
Issued by The MditaQ Service Council
138
Capenftmgmfi
Chewing
IS THE WORLD'S BEST CHEW
It is manufactured
tobacco, in its purest
form.
It has a pleasing
flavor. *
It is tobacco scientifically prepared
for man's use.
CASH paid for
Hides,   Pork,    Fresh
Eggs and Country
Produce
BROWNS - Midway, B.C.
I
am
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited
Offices, Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
TADANAC BRANP PIG LEAD, BLUESTONE, COPPER AND SPELTER
Mazda Tungsten Lamps
15 to 40 Watt Lamps���50c each.
60 Watt Lamps���75c each.
 100 Watt Lamps���S1.25 each,
NITROGEN
LAMPS
60 Watts
100    ������
200   ������
$125 each
2.00 ������
3.50 ��
STORAGE BATTERIES
CHARGED and REPAIRED
ELECTRIC
VULCANIZING
Greenwood City Waterworks Co.
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
mmmmmem
Why Canada Needs
oney
TIP to date the war has cost Canada about $700,000,000.
Canada has spent in Canada over $400,000,000 on her own account*
Canada has spent in Canada on behalf of Great Britain over $300,000*000,.
What Canada spends for Great Britain is really loaned to Great Britain
and will be repaid or credited to Canada later on.
Great Britain needs so much ready-
cash to finance her own expenditures at
home for herself and for our Allies that she
must buy on credit from Canada, and from
every other country where she can get
credit.
Of course Great Britain's credit is so
good that other countries, in order to get her
trade, are quite as willing to give her credit
as we are in Canada.
Canada wants to help Great Britain
not only because Canada wants Britain's
trade but because we are Canada and she is
Great Britain���both members of the same
great Empire, km of our kin, our motherland.
For Canada it is both a filial and
patriotic duty to supply Great Britain's
war needs and remember, her needs are our
needs. Also it is in Canada's self-interest
to supply those needs and thus keep open
a market for our products.
*""."'"'".'*"'������' '    "*'
Now, Britain needs our wheat, our
cheese, cattle, hogs, and many manufactured articles.
Canada also needs many of these things
���between the two it amounts to more
than a million dollars a day in cash.
And tlie producers must be paid in
cash.
Neither Canada nor Groat Britain
could go to a Canadian farmer ar.d buy
his wheat or his cattle on credit.
The farmer and all other prouiiccrs
might be ever so willing to give their
country credit but they could not de- it
because they have to pay cash for wages,
for rent, materials, etc. They must be paid
in cash, or its equivalent.
So Canada says to Great Britain:���"I
will lend you tlie money so that you can
pay.cash to Canada's producers for what
you want.
"I will borrow this money from our
own psople just as you borrow money from
your people. .���.
"I will also borrow from the people of
Canada money to pay cash for all the products that Canada, as. well as Great Britain,
needs in Canada."        ...
That is Canada's'practical, patriotic
part in helping to win the war.
Without this credit the Canadian pro^
duccr co:.:ld not sell to Great Britain, and
witliout���.these Canadian products the war
would be prolonged.
So it is necessary for Canada to give
to Great Britain the credit in order that-
Canada's own producers, who need a market,
will have one; ana in order, that Great
Britaiiiwhich needs the products to win the
war, will get them. .
Now how does Canada :--get'>'%ri^;;.-:itto__iLey;:
by vvliich both Canada and Brit^ncaii pay
cash for Canada's products?
By borrowing it from the people ;of
Canada through the sale of Canada's
Victory Bonds to be offered in November.
That is why Canada's Victory Bonds
are offer.. 4 to the people���to raise money
to help t > finish the war.
"Oa- :ada must keep her shoul<ie* itp the-
wheel even though it be a chariot 61 fire,"
a::d '_.?_.? way for Canada to keep^fcer
shoulder to the wheel is by buying;'
';Ai>&>
Canada's Victory Bonds
Next week th'? space will tell why Cariadvraises money
by selling Canada's Victory Bonds
lamed by Canada's Victory Loan Com-n.Ltee
in co-operation with the Minister of Fin___.ce
of the Dominion of Canada.
V    tt

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