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The Ledge Sep 27, 1917

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THE  OLDEST  MINING  CAMP  NEWSPAPER   IN   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
.Vol.   XXIV.
GREENWOOD, B. C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1917.
Do You Know
That during Fly season your Cows will give from 25
to 35 per cent. MORE AND BETTER MILK if you
can keep flies from tormenting them.
This Means Money to You
Dr. Williams9 Fly Spray
will do this positively, without the slightest harm to
Cattle. It is also^ery effective with Horses, Hogs
and'Poultry.   Put it on with our
Famous Long-Stroke Spray Pump
TRY OUR SPIRAL FLY CATCHER
T. M. GULLEY & CO.
New location���Russell-Law Caulfield Building
JPHONE 28        X       GREENWOOD, B. C.
THE  FIRST PRIZE
For the best all round loaf exhibited at NELSON FAIR,
was awarded to bread made from
Pantry Queen  Flour
Both in 1916 and again this year
WATCH  THIS SPACE
�� <^��J����"����*X<��*<<K��*"-^_��mMhX������^
THOROUGHLY  RENOVATED AND SPECIALLY
ADAPTED FOR COMMERCIAL TRADE
THE WINDSOR HOTEL is one of fehe nest furnished
hotels in the west.   It is located in the heart; of Green-
��� wood and within easy reach of all the financial and
commercial institutions of the Copper Metropolis.
Heated wifeh Steam and Life by Electricity
. Commodioas sample rooms.   The bar is replete with
* all modern beverages and fehe meals are fehe best. Rooms
reserved by telegraph.
*M
tc**��4M>��M>4><fr������4H����<G**��*$*4t^*
P. BURNS & CO.
Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish
and Poultry. Shops in nearly all the
towns of the Boundary and Kootenay.
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD, B. C.
*5=_��35^��S
*__.
V3_&_^?_-tHa��S_��
Telephoning Is
Face To Face Conversation
When a person speaks over the telephone, the tones and
ascent of the vorce are very distinct; each talker recognizes
instantly the voice of the other.
That's what makes I/ong Distance lelepeoning so satisfactory. "V.ou know whom you are talking to, you know your
message is being received, and you get your answer.
-  Every telephone is a Long Distance telephone.
BRITISH CM4JMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY. Ltd-
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
KJHN ATJtS..
i W-MJESSU G.VJCX. LI_J>. D.CX-. PrM-denC
H. V. r.IOtnS, Amft General Manager
CAPITAL JWmm    RESERVE FDKO, $13,500,000
BANKING BY MAIL
Aocrjasts may buopeaed at every branch of Hie Canadian Bank
of Commerce to be opeaied by mail, and will receive the same
careful attertfioa ��is gfvea to aU other departments oi the Basic's
business. Money snaty be deposited or withdrawn in this way as
satisfactorily as fey & pes&ail visit to the Bank. sm
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
H. C LUCAS, Manager
"STORE OF QUALITY"
Call or Phone when you want
Groceries, Dry Goods or
Boots and Shoes
Try My Eggs and Butter
J. G. McMYNN
MIDWAY      -      -B.C.
No. 11
Around Home
PHONE 126
FOR
BREAD,    BUNS,
CAKE,    PASTRIES
One Quality only      THE   BEST
William C. Arthurs.
THE Bread & Cake Baker
Greenwood City Bakery
H. McKEE
GREENWOOD
COAl AND WOOD
AGENT FOR
LETHBRIDGE GOAL
ORDER COAL EARLY
A NEW SHIPMENT OF
McCormicks High Grade
Chocolates
Just Received at the O. K. Cigar
Store
AGENT FOR
Singer Sewing Machines
R. J. MUIR, Greenwood
Christian Science service will be held
in the MELLOR BLOCK on Sunday at ii
a. m. All welcome. Every Wednesday
at 8 p. m., testimonial meetings will be
held in the same block. Sunday School
every Sunday morning.
WANTS, ETC.
For Sale.���Several Choice
Books.    Ledge office.
For Sale.���A first-class letterpress for $3. Apply at The
Ledge office.
MATTHEWS  BROS.
GRAND  FORKS
Agents for Chevrolet, Dodge, Hudson,
Chalmers, Cadillac cars, and Republic
truck motors. Garage in connection.
D. R. McELMON
WATCHMAKER and JEWELER
Copper St., Greenwood
Awful Thought
"I see a girl has sued a man for
calling her & chicken.'
"Goodness! I wonder what
she'd have done if he had called
her an old hen?"
The Great Northern train service between Oroville and Princeton will revert to a tri-weekly
service next Monday. Trains
will run on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.
Corporal Bob Lamond of
Grand Forks has crossed the
great divide in France. He was
one of the best shots in this province, and his death is regretted
by a wide circle of friends.
Charles W. Stooke died ini San
Diego, California on September
15, aged 41 years, after a short
illness. He had been in the real
estate business in that city. Two
of his sisters live in B. C. one in
Victoria, and the other at Prince
Rupert,
Thanksgiving Day~ is on Oct.
8 in Canada.
Lieut. O. R. Matthews is in a
London hospital.
Lost.���A ring. Finder please
call at Ledge office.
Bill Donnelly returned from
the East this week.
Robert Wood may make his
home in Penticton this winter.
Several Rossland men are
working at the Emma mine at
Denoro.
In Greenwood, the paydays
next month, will be on the lOtb
and 23rd.
An auto, all the way from
Texas, passed through town on
Saturday.
In the Greenwood police district, 42 hotels will go booze dry
next Monday.
A. A. Frechette has invented a
hew cattle guard, that wiil be
tried by the C.P.R.
Mrs. Ashby left on Monday to
attend a meeting of the Women's
Institute in Cranbrook.
In connection with his other
business, W. C. Arthurs is opening a flour and feed store.
There is a big demand for
houses in Princeton. Might borrow a few in the Boundary
In the United States there is an
automobile for every 24 people.
Grand Forks beats that record.
Allan H. Rodgers, of Boston,
consulting engineer for the Canada Copper Co., was in town this
week.
Albert Kier and Jim Graham
are working at the Lone Star.
There are about 16 men at that
mine.
The Canada Copper Co. is
negotiating for the purchase of
Perley Russell's residence in
Princeton.
Some mining for black sand is
baiug done on Slate creek near
Tulameen. It will be tested for
chrome iron.
After being shut down for a
few days owing to a lack of coke
the Granby smelter at the Forks
will resume operations today.
Fred C. Graham and Angus
McKinnon formerly of Phoenix
have been wounded at the front,
and are in French base hospitals.
Lieut. R. S. Ashby, of the
Roval Flying Corp, sou of Mrs.
Ashbv of Greenwood is in a hospital at Rouen, France, with a
broken leg.
The time is now opportune to
make Greenwood a centre of mining activity. Conscript the ore
in the hills, and make it come
into town.
For a short time the Ladysmith smelter has shut down owing to a lack ot ore. The Boundary smelters never suffer from
that complaint.
Dentistry.���Dr. Guy, of Grand
Forks, will be at the Pacific
Hotel, Greenwood, from Oct.
8 to Oct. 20, prepared to execute all kinds of dentistry.
Sir George Bury, and other
C.P.R. officials went through
Greenwood on a special last Saturday. Sir George still advocates
mixed farming for many parts of
the great west.
With a tiny plant, a Spokane
company is concentrating platinum, at their diggings near Tulameen. The concentrates are
worth from $2000 to $5,000 a ton,
and will be sold to,the TJ. S.
government.
Last Thursday, the engine of
the easbound train jumped the
track near Fisherman. J. F,
McKaracher, and Pete McDoug-
aM, engineer and fireman received a nervous shock, but escaped
serious injury.
Joe Duhamel had a successful
auction sale at his ranch on Saturday, realizing $500 more than
he expected. Smith _t King were
the auctioneers. Mr. Duhamel
will move to Vancouver and op-
esate a laundry.
Patriotic Fund
The local Treasurer of the Canadian Patriotic Fund wiphes to acknowledge receipt of the following
subscriptions; August 23rd to September 24th, 1917:
W J Mitchell  10 oo
Canada Copper Co  ioo oo
C T Eales      4 00
P Burns & Co  7 So
J. B. Lane  2 00
Ion and Gillis  5 00
J.V.Mills  Soo
IPRoache  365
P. Mytton  330
A. J. Grenier  260
A Legault  4 35
M Bellefontaine   200
D Mcintosh   500
P \V George  5 00
W. R. Dewdney  4.85
P. H, McCurrach  3.70
W ? Miller  2 00
J L Coles  3 Jo
W. Elson & Co  3 00
Greig & Morrison  S 00
TMGulley&Co  500
Lee & Bryan  6 00
j. Simpson  5 00
J. L. White ,  600
H C Lucas  Soo
Hon. J. D. MacLean   2000
G. B. Taylor  3 00
L and J Portmann   500
G. W. A. Smith  2.00
G Swayne  400
W, C. Arthurs  5.00
Boundary Police  2320
J F Leighton  100
W B Fleming ,  2 00
G. Lamb  2 00
H. McKee  200
G. A- Rendell  3 00
Smith &King  500
Miss E Ferguson  2 30
P Burns & Co   7 So
JB Lane  2 00
C P R Employees  9 30
P Mytton   3 65
G. Grosvenor  3 3o
A. Legault     4 35
Jas Walsh .  1000
Canada Copper Co. Employees;.. 447 80
WJMitehell    . ������  1000
Western Float
may
$786.55
P. H. MCCURRACH,
Secy-Treas,
Greenwood Branch.
After 70 Years
"It is a far cry from the first
Toronto fair to the Canadian
National exhibition of today," says
the Toronto Globe. "The later
seems quite a young institution,
with its thirty-nine years, .when
one discovers that nearly seventy
years ago the first fair was held
under the present site. And farmers day brought to the exhibition
of 1917 a pioneer farmer who had
attended that first fair. He is
James Morrison, of Beaverton,
sprightly, keen and interested in
life at ninety-two years, and eager
to compare the exhibition of today
with that far-off fair when the
grounds comprised only a few
acres, and when there were few
exhibits besides cattle, horses,
hogs and hens, these lined np
against a fence, for buildings, too,
were scarce in those days." James
Morrison is the father of A. T>.
Morrison, of this city. The son
iuherits his father's penchant for
attending fairs.���Grand Forks
Sun.
New Gold Camp
Outside of Porcupine and Kirk-
land Lake there are more gold
properties opened np at and around
Bourkes than any in other district along the T. & N. O. This
district may develop into a new
gold camp. Several promising discoveries have been made as fold
from time to time in the Northern
Miner and more important still
those are being developed. Several shafts are being sank, but
with the exception of the Murray-
Mowgridge power plants have not
been installed yet. Some of the
claims show free gold end it wonld
not be surprising if a new camp
sprang np around Bourkes.
The gold finds are both east and
west of the tracks and the discovery on the Anderson Farm is within a few yards of_the station.���
Cobalt Miner.
All over Alberta ducks are plen
tiful.
Houses are scarce in Nelson and
Creston.
In Nelson milk is seven quatvz
for a $1.
Bough play has killed lacrosse
in Canada.
The price of sugar will drop
next month.
There are four autos in Kaslo,
and two in Sandon.
Nitrates are being brought to
Victoria from Chile.
Curlew butter is 50 cents a
pound in Grand Forks.
H. B. Wilson has opened a
nevelty store in Enderby.
Large buyers are offering 816 a
ton for potatoes at the coast.
A   Cranbrook    syndicate
light Creston with electricity.
Wm. Canning of Hosmer died in
Fernie this month of typhoid.
Seven Seen carloads of sheep were
recently shipped from Vernon.
In Alberta the demand for B. C.
fruit is greater than the supply.
Nelson may Boon increase its
population by taking in  Fairview.
For beating a board bill at Trail
F. H. Pulver got two months in
jail. ,
Buttermilk is two cents a glass
in Toronto. Let us build a pipe
line.
At Trail, W. E. Paull eold
$145.60 worth of peaches from 26
���trees.
Last year California raised from
50,000 acres, 250,000,000 pounds
of rice.
Bod McCrimmon, the pioneer
prospector, died in Hazelton this
month.
New Presbyterian pastors are
wanted in Kaslo, New Denver and
Nelson.
There is plenty of moose meat iu
the Yukon, and yoa can eat it at
any time.
Last week in Trail, the Smelter
men's Union gaye Billy Nicholson,
a benefit dance.
Next month nearly all of the 47
hotels in West Kootenay will be
selling soft drinks.
The government has been asked
to change the name of New Brunswick to New Windsor.
More than 300 young men from
B. C, have recently joined the
Aviation school at Toronto.
A sulphur bottom whale, weighing 80 ton, and 80 feet in ��� length
was recently caught at the coast.
The army camp at American
Lake, near Tacoma, contains 2500
buildings, and covers 70,000 acres.
F. M. Christian died in Win-
nipeg this month. At one time he
was editor of the Cranbrook Prospector.
The payroll at the Lethbridge
coal mines is 8780,000 a month.
It will probably be $375,000 this
winter.
Two aviators at the training
school on North Island, were killed
in a collision 500 feet from the
ground.
For the purpose of stock raising
the Pacific Province Ltd. has
bought $200,000 worth of land in
Cariboo.
Mountain Horse and Strange
Wolf, two Blood Indians from McLeod, have been wounded at the
front in France.
A man in North Vancouver
wants to buy 100 thin pigs. He
does not want blind ones, as the
market will be overstocked with
them next month.
Lemon pickers get 25 cents an
hour in some parts of California
and pay 65 cents a day for board!
In the Imperial valley $1.50 a 100
pounds is paid for picking cotton.
At Whitehorse, an Indian boy
was sent to jail for stealing a
kodak and watch fob from another
redskin. He probably thought
that a Siwash had no right to carry
such weapons.
After being in Trail for 20 years,
John Chenowith has gone to live
in Sacremento. Since 1863 his
friends called him "Old Abe,"
owing to his resemblance pbysicaily
to Abrham Lincoln.
Argle Oagle drove a load of hay
into PrinceGeorge to get ife weighed. The official weigh man not being at the city scales he rang the
fire alarm to attract his attention.
It ban the desired effect, but the
joke cost Ogle five and costs in the
police court.
W. J. Hanna,_ and other Food
Controllers might get valuable lessons on cheap and healthy methods
of existing ; by V living ��� with the
Doukhobors for a ��� month. The
Douks always have Meatless days,
except when they take a meal in
some unbeliever's house.
B. C. Mines
Spokane men are looking for
properties in the Beaverdell camp.
Molybdeniam has been found
along the North Thompson river.
The Yankee Girl at Ymir, is
shipping to the Greenwood smelter.
Ore from the Slocan's Lucky
Jim is being milled at Kaslo and
Rosebery.
Ore is being shipped from the
Black Prince, near Slocan City, by
J. T. Tipping.
A company will be formed in
Calgary, to work the Copper Chief
on Trout lake.
The addition of ���a lead stack
would increasa the business of the
Greenwood smelter.
At the Geraldine, near Gerrard,
three feet of galena has been
struck near an abandoned tunnel.
The Vimy Bidge group of 12
copper claims in the Highland
Valley, will be worked all winter.
On Sidney Inlet the Tidewater
Co. is building a concentrator, and
has many men working in the
mine.
There is some excitement at Terrace, 95 miles east of Prince Rup-
ert over the discovery of rich gold
quartz.
Ore is being packed from the
Misty Morning, a claim about five
miles from Trout Lake City, owned
by Mrs. A. Jowett.
A 12 mile trail has been built
from Illicillewaet to the Danvegan.
Cabins are being erected and the
mine will work all winter.
Several American mining experts, have recently examined iron
and copper claims, on the west
coast of Vancouver Island.
The Enterprise on Ten Mile, in
the Slocan, is being worked by Pat
McGuire under lease. He is shipping 100 tons this month to Trill.
Near Salmo, several feet of sulphide ore have been exposed at the
Garnet claim of the Hudson Bay
Zinc Co. A concentrator maybe
built at this property.
This is a good time to dig the
silver out of the hills around
Greenwood. Ife cannot walk, and
will have to be conscripted befdre
it will move out of its hiding
places.
The Enterprise on Ten Mile, ia
the Slocan, has been leased to coast
operators, with an option to buy ife
for $125,000. About 20 years
ago an English company paid
3375,000 for the property.
Work is being rushed at the
Neutral near Chesaw. It will ship
to the Granby. The Hot Punch
on Toby creek has $10,000 worth
of ore ready to ship. The Lead
Queen on No. 3 creek��*will be a
shipper this winter.
In East Kootenay there is much
activity at Spruce Creek. In Camp
Dixie a new tunnel has been started on the Rainbow. Open cuts
have exposed much good ore on the
surface of this property. It belongs to the Tarheel group.
When the Canada Copper Coi
gets its big mill in operation at Copper Mountain, and
begins shipping the Greenwood
smelter will be able to turn out
over 27,000,000 pounds of copper a
year.
In the Yukon, a big placer
strike is reported on Kitchener
creek, in the Nansen creek district. W. S. Drury eays that all
the miners are pleased with prospects, although none has at yet
reached bed-rock. There is a
stampede from Dawson to the new
diggings.
The purchase price of the Fisher
Maiden group near Silverton is
said to be 850,000. J. J. Malone
and Barney Crilly will begin the
sinking of a shaft soon as possible.
The ore already on the dump is
said to be worth 875,000, and tihis
will be probably milled in some of
the near-by concentrators. (THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
THEQ LEDGE
$2 a year in Canada,   and   $2.50   in  the
United States.
R. T. LOWERY.
Editor and Financiei.
ADVERTISING RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices $25.00
Coal and Oil Notices     6.00
Application Liquor Licenses      5.00
Transfer Liquor Licenses    7-5��
Estray Notices 3-����
Cards of Thanks    1.00
Certificate of Improvement  10.00
(Where more than one claim appears ir notice, $2.50 for each additional claim.)
AU other legal advertising, 12 cents a
line first insertion, and 8 cents a line for
each subsequent' insertion, nonpariel
measurement.
The blue] cross means that
your subscription is due, and
that the editor would be pleased
to have more money.
Orr of print, out of mind, if you
do not advertise.
Life may be chequered in Russia, bnt it is never dull enough to
cause much ennui.
In the turmoil of the age we
have not heard a single complaint
about the high  price of diamonds.
After trying to read the names
of newspapers published in Germany, wu usually feel like getting
another gun for the Allies.
By moving the equator north for
the winter, a great saving could be
effected in our coal bills. The
equator deserves a change, for it
has been in one place for a long
time. 	
In a letter we have received
from, "Somewhere in the Crow's
Nest Pass" we learn that for several minutes, the coal miners have
not been able to find an excuse for
going on strike.
Fishing
The run of sockeyes on the
Fraser River, British Columbia,
this year, has been a disappointment, and it is expected that the
pack will be very little, if at all,
in excess of that of 191G, and of
course below that of the corresponding year in the quadrennial
cycle. It is impossible at this date
to give any figures, but as au indication of the scarcity of this class
of fish, it may be Btated that the
canners have been paying 55 cents
per sockeye, the highest price on
record.
Reports of the catch of codfish
in Newfoundland waters continue
favorable, and the price paid for
the fish so far delivered is from $9
to $10 per quintal. There is as
yet no relief in sight with regard to
shipping facilities, but the Government has the matter iu hand and
will, it is hoped, succeed In making suitable arrangements. Exporters are disinclined to buy at
present prices and it is impossible
to forecast what the situation will
be during the next two months.
At St. John, N. B., cod and
hake are scarce and prices high.
A heavy run of sardines late in the
season recently resulted in reducing the price per hogshead from
$40 to $20 in one day.
Mysteries of Water
The mines in the North Sea are
all wet. They are full of sumps,
and ship their product to the bottom of the ocean, where it is
stored; until prospectors learn how
to walk under water.
The Colonel's Dream
Col. Robert Stevenson has again
returned from the headwaters of
the Tulameen river, where he had
for some time three men working
for him, Wm. Allison,  Mike Gay-
nor and Wm. Dunn.   This is the
seventh attempt the Colonel has
made since he first made the district40 years ago.    At this point
the river is only 20 feet in width,
and the canyon is nearly 200 feet
deep,   with almost  perpendicular
walls.   The river was blocked with
a timber jam tor over 30 yearB, but
went ont during the high  water of
1916 and now is as clear aB it was
40 years ago.    The men were getting on  well with the work, and
would have ueached the place in a
few days, but a two days rain set
in.   This raised the water in the
canyon over two feet and forced
the men to quit work, although
not having more than 10 feet farther to run.   The Colonel  says:
"There is no one hurt but myself,
as I am alone in the venture, and
if the weather keeps dry I will get
it yet this fall.   It is not ore of
any kind, but a pure metal of a
bluish-black color, and very tough
I saw 30 feet in length and four
inches in width of it, and it is
thought    to  be   worth  $1300 a
pound.   I bave it located and will
keep on until I do get it.    It is
worth  a  large  fortune."���Similkameen Star.
No man who has not mastered
the last subtleties of buBhcraft
should penetrate alone the western
dry lands of Australia, says Mr.
Norman Duncan in his book, Australian Byways. A Canadian
woodsman would find nothing in
his experience to enlighten him.
A North American Indian would
perish of ignorance. A Bedouin
of the sandy Arabian deserts would
die helpless. Australian bushcraft
is peculiar to itself. It concerns
itself less with killing the crawling desert life for food than with
divining the whereabouts of water
in aland that is as dry as a brick
in the sun.: In the midcontinental
deserts, when sun and dry winds
suck the moisture from deep in the
ground and all the world runs dry,
the aboriginals draw water from
the roots of small desert trees by
cutting them into short lengths
and letting them drain drop by
drop into a wooden bowl. But
there may be no water trees or
the roots may shrivel and dry up.
What then?
"Ah, well," said the bushman,
"they do with what they have."
"What have they?" I asked him.
"They lick the dew from the
leaves and grass 1"
It is related by a celebrated Australian traveller, Baldwin Spencer,
that, having come in a dry season
to a dry clay pan, bordered with
withered shrubs, his company was
amazed by an exhibition of aboriginal craft. There was no water,
no moisture within miles, and the
clay was baked so hard that to be
penetrated at all it must be broken
with a hatchet. A keen native
guide presently discerned little
tracks on the ground���faintest indication of life, apparently���and.
having hacked into the clay to a
depth of about a foot, unearthed a
spherical little chamber, about
three inches in diameter, in which
lay a dirty yellow frog. It was a
water holding frog and it was distended with a supply sufficient,
perhaps, to enablft it to Burvive a
drought of a year and a half. And
the water was pure and fresh.
Being heartily squeezed, these
frogs may yield a saving draft to
lost and perishing travelers.
''Find a blackfellow," said our
bushman, "and you'll get water."
"What if the aboriginal is obdur*
ate?"
���'Ah, well, if he won't tell," the
bushman explained, "you rope him
by the neck to your saddle. When
he gets thirst he'll go to water
right enough!"
The Last Good-Bye
Raoul De Gascoigne, last of a
fast disappearing line of French
aristocrats, had not faltered when
France had plunged into the great
struggle which was to secure her
freedom. From his pleaBant estate
close to the great forest of Fon-
tainebleau, he had gone to answer
the call that came to all the children of France. He took with him
his only horse, a handsome aud
powerful gelding, whose life had
been spent in peace and quiet.
It was not long before they were
attached to a famous regiment of
chasseurs, and all through those
first cruel months of the war, master and man had borne every hardship that came, linked together in
an inseparable bond of friendship
that nothing could sever. Then
came the time when the invader
was being slowly crushed back,
and Raoul and his steed were with
the others, dashing in upon retreating forces, cutting of transports and Btray artillery, leaving
behind them many a stricken man
and horse, cheerfully paying the
price of their daring and courage.
But the charm which seemed to
encircle the life of the young
Frenchman and bis horse was
broken, as it had to be. Horse
and rider, knit in bonds of patriotism and love, were caught one
morning while in a desperate cutting out expedition.
The bullet that Btruck deep into
Raoul's vitals meant death; he
knew that his chances were slim of
getting away. A word iu the ear
of his charger, aud he waB carried
into safety. Just able to make the
effort, he stumbled from his horse's
back and fell to the ground. The
faithful beast nosed his velvet
muzzel into his master's face, and
later, when the bearers carried him
into the room of the old house
among the trees, the animal refused to be taken away. Bleeding
himself from a raw flesh wound,
hungry and tired, he refused any
aid offered him. His sensitive
spirit knew that his master was
going.
All night he stayed at  the door,
Chewing
IS THE WORLD'S BEST CHEW
It is manufactured
tobacco in its purest
form.
iMPENHAGa
WM
It has
flavor.
a pleasing
It is tobacco scientifically prepared
for man's use.
New Ontario's Minerals
Items for 1916 which did not
appear on the 1915 lift of mineral
products of Ontario include lead
from the Galetta (Kingdon) mine,
operated by the James Robertson
Estate; a sample shipment of asbestos from the township of Deloro,
near Porcupine, by the Slade-
Forbes Asbestos Company; and a
considerable production of fluorspar from Madoc. The last mentioned is in great demand for use
as a flux by pig iron and stee*
makers, and the price to the producer rose rapidly during the year
to $14 per ton. Fluorspar had not
been produced in Ontario since
1911, and lead Bince 1912; while
asbestos is a new item.
Norden Hotel
GREENWOOD
When  You  Hear of Good
In People
When you hear of good in people���tell it.
When you hear a tale of evil���quell it.
Let the goodness have the light,
Put the evil out of sight,
Make the world we live in bright,
Like the heaven above.
Have you any wrong to right?   Right it
Do you have a sin to fight?   Fight it.
God Himself will help you win,
Let His spirit enter in,
Making, right the heart within,
Fit for heaven above.
���John Sterling.
What about the'eream used in
ice-cream in these days of the high
price of butter? There is room for
saving there.
A Fern Tonic
A tablespoonfnl of castor oil
poured around the roots of palms
and ferns once a month will give
them a rapid growth and keep
them fresh and green, says a gardener. Those having them would
do well to to try it
An enterprising drummer attempted to br be an old Scotch merchant by offering him a box of
cigars.
"N��, na," said the ofd chap,
shaking his head gravely. . "I
canna' tak' 'em."
"Nonsense," said the drummer.
"If you have any conscientious
ecruples you may pay me a quarter
for the box,
"Weel, weel," said the old Scot,
"I'll tak' two boxes."
and then toward morning, when
the first roseate hues of dawn heralded the coming of another sun,
he pushed his faithful head into
the door. There on an improvised
couch, held in the arms of an attendant, lay his master. The
damp dews of death were on his
brow, his cheeks were pale with
the night of pain, and his eyes
were fast losing the light of earthly life. Nothing could rouEe him;
the doctor said he would never be
conscious again. But ahi that
wonderful spirit of animal love,
pure as the unstained love of a
child, acted upon the fast slipping
life of the dying man. That gentle
whinny, full and overflowing with
mingled grief and love, asked for a
last recognition.
No human voice, no human skill
could have held that life back from
its journey into the unknown. So,
as the sun threw his firs, glowing
spears of light Over earth and sea
and sky, ^tfae spirit of the dying
Frenchman came back to his horse.
The outstretched quivering nozzle,
With its sweet entreaty of love and
good-bye, sent a message that no
one else could send. The eyes of
Raoul opened, filled for a brief
moment with life; his brain was
alive and quickened, his senses
awake, and there, on tho threshold of eternity, the soldier of
France stretched out his hand,
played for a second on the mute
nostril, murmured some broken
words of endearment that a man
might murmur to a woman, the
head fell back, and then "Adieu,
Adieu!"���Estevan (Saskatchewan)
Progress.
This hotel is conveniently situated, and is
close to all the important
institutions of the city.
The rooms are comfortable, and the bar is replete with the popular
wines, liquors and cigars.
GEORGE    LAMB
WESTERN - - HOTELS.
TULAMEEN HOTEL
Princeton, B. C, is the  headquarters  for  miners,   investors
and railroad men.   A fine location and everything' first-class
J. N. MACPHERSON. Proprietor
HOTEL PRINCETON
Princeton, B.C., n'_>w completed on the
site of the old Great Northern. Only
brick hotel in Siuiilkameen. A first
class house,
Swanson & Broomfield. Props.
RIVERSIDE HOTEL
Rock Creek, B. G. This is one of
the oldest hotels in the Kettle Valley. Excellent accommodation for
all travellers.
S. T. LARSEN, Proprietor.
The Knob Hill Hotel
.   PHOENIX.
One of the largest hotels in
the city.   Beautiful location,
fine rooms and tasty meals.
A. O. JOHNSON     -     PROP.
Leaves Mother Lode
9.30 a.m. 6.30 p.m.
Leaves. Greenwood
2.oo p. m.
8.30 p. tn.
Saturday last stage leaves Mother
Lode 6 p. -Hi. Returning, leaves
Greenwood 10 p. m.
OFFICE-PACIFIC HOTEL
In the war of 1812 Commodore
Perry converted trees from the
forests into warships in ninety
days.
Synopsis ol Coal Mining Regulations.
��^OAL mining rights oi the Dominion
^-* in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and in a portion of the
Province of British Columbia, may be
leased for a term of twenty-one years
renewal for a further term of 21 years
at an annual rental of $1 an acre. Not
more than 2,566 acres will be leased to
one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal sulxlivi-
sions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for-shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Bach application must be accompanied
by a fee of f.5 which will be refunded if
the rights applied for are not available
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output pf the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent wtth sworn return*
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon: If the coal mining rights are
not being operated, such returns should
be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the" coal mining
rights only, rescinded by Chap. 27 of 4-5
George V. assented to 12th June, 1914,
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.   B.��� Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.���
83575.
British Columbia has been
here a long time so has
the B, C. Cigar. Abso^
lutely Guaranteed. Clear
Havana Filled. The Cigar
that never varys.    ,   ,   .
Haveyou triedonelately?
WILBERG&W0LTZ
B. C. CIGAR FACTORY
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
ir ir ir ir ir * *+* *** *
ASSAYER
E. W. WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, Box biio8, Nelson, B. C
Charges:���Gold, Silver, Lead or Copper
$1 each. Gold-Silver, (single assay)
$1.00. Goid-Silver (duplicate assav)
$1.50. Silver-Lead $t.$o Silver-Lead-
Zinc $3.00. Charges for ot_i��r metals etc
on application.
ir
ir
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C LOA.T is not a periodic-
*���     al.   It is a book con
taining 8(3 illustrations all
told, and is filled with
sketches and stories of
western life. It tells how
a gambler cashed in after
the flush days of Sandon ;
how it rained in New Denver long after Noah was
dead; how a parson took a
drink at Bear Lake in
early days; how justice
was dealt in Kaslo in '93;
how the saloon man out-
prayed the women in Kala- . ���
mazoo, and graphically de- j*
picts the rpamings of a ir
western editor among the ��jp*
tender-feet in the cent belt. ��|>
A It contains the early history j.
of Nelson and a romance T
of the Silver Bang mine. J*
In it are printed three v
western poems, and dozens 4s
of articles  too  numerous 4>
*
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��� +
*
*
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited
Offices, Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
TADANAC BRAND PIG LEAD, BLUESTONE, COPPER AND SPELTER
/    ,
Mazda Tungsten Lamps
15 to 40 Watt Lamps���50c each.
60 Watt Lamps���75c each.
100 Watt Lamps���$L25 each.
NITROGEN
LAMPS
60 Watts
100    ���'
200   ��
$125 each
2.00 ��
3.50"
STORAGE BATTERIES
CHARGED and REPAIRED
ELECTRIC
VULGARIZING
Greenwood City Waterworks Co.
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
$4* ���&���'$*'�����'$"-$"$"&"&'4* 4* 4* 4��4*4'4*4'4**tMft,4"i��'ft��4��.K
I tbe fiume fiotel f
1- nelson, B*& +
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<=$�� The only upz-to/date Hotel in the interior.   First-class
ir in every respect
ir ���-
| CENTRALLY LOCATED
ir ���
4�� Hot and Cold Water; Steam Heat and Telephone in
J each room.
ROOMS WITH PRIVATE BATHS.
CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BEST
First Class Bar and Barber Shop
75   SAMPLE ROOMS
ir
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Steam Heatedj Electric Lighted.
RATES 51.00 per day and up; European Plan.
Bus Meets all Trains and Boats,
ft***** **.t-.fr*.f..f..f..t..f. **********
*
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PHONE   13
Auto    and   Horse   Stages
Leave    Greenwood    Twice
Daily to Meet Spokane and
Oroville Trains
DR. A.MIL.LOY
DENTIST
Autos For Hire.   The Finest
Turnouts in the Boundary.
Light and Heavy Praying
Palace   Livery  And  Stage
GREENW000D. B.C
GILLIS & ION, Proprietors.
J.  K. CAMERON,
Leading Tailor of the Kootenays.
KASLO    B O
All   the   latest  methods  in  high-class
Dentistry.
LOO BUILDING
Corner Abbott & Hastings Streets.
VANCOUVER.   -   -   -   BX.
0<>00��0000000009<_KK_K>0000<>00
T.    THOMAS*
CLOTHES CLEANED
PRESSED AND REPAIRED
TAILOR-GREENWOOD
FRED A. STARKEY,
NEi-soN.B.c.
MINING
BROKER
PROSPECTS   BOUGHT   AND   SOLD
to mention. Bend for one
before it is too late. The
price is 25 cents, postpaid to any part of the
world. Address all letters to
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t R* Te Lowery
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GREENWOOD, B. C.
ir
*************
For Good
Job Printing
���Economy and Satisfaction
combined with Promptness
are the features which go to
make up the Service we give
our customers. Are you
one of them?
WE PRINT
Letterheads, Noteheads,
(Ruled or Plain)
Envelopes, Billheads,
(All Sizes)
Statements, Business Cards,
Posters, Dodgers, Etc., Etc.
The Ledge      PHONE 29
greenwood       job Printing Department
i
Ml
I
J

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