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The Ledge Nov 18, 1915

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 Art^i
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LEDGE
4
THE  OLDEST   MINING  CAMP  NEWSPAPER  IN" BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Vol.   XXII;:
GREENWOOD, B. C, THURSDAY   NOVEMBER 18,  1915
No. 19
Greenwood's   Big   Furniture  Store
See Our New Lines In
_***
Mattresses, Bedsteads and General
--M House Fundings
Goods Shipped in Any Direction
T. M. GULLEY & Co.
CoppcrStrct-t-"    -��������� GREENWOOD, B.C. Phone 27
rWACf|R   G.   KENNEDY1
.GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
WHOLESALE   AND   RETAIL
I  TOBACCOS, CIGARS, CONFECTIONERY, STATIONERY I
Guns
and Ammunition
��� PULL LINE OF	
Cooking and Heating
Stoves
=|^5^2^S^3^53^S?^^^53i^^2N^
Around Home
A. L. WHITE
New and Second Hand Store
I
A.Full Stock of First Class Pipes.
B
.!��.
| The. ll-way Store for Quality Goods
Put on a pair of our rubbers, and keep your
feet dry,   Envelop yourself in one of our Mackin-
;   aws :andLdefy .the chilly wi-nfl   Sleep under our
Hudson Bay blankets and keep warm, Largest stock
in the country.
JAS.G.'McMYNN, MIDWAY, B. C
'.' *^3SSs-K!=��S5-?Sekyk^
P. S0RNS & CO.
Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish
. and Poultry.     Shops in nearly all the
towns of the Boundary and Kootenay.
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD, B.C. 1
... ^M">*��^<~.">:^^_������^_~m^
^=
Puff Pastry
F.e.schmann's   Yeast
William C. Arthurs
THE BREAD AND CAKE BAKER
Greenwood City Bakery
Highest Type of
Women's  Fashions
IDEAL   GARMENTS
Cut to your own measure
Nothing to Equal Them For
Smartness,   Service,   Long
Wear and General Satisfaction
W.Elson&Co
Copper St.
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Greenwood Liquor Co. Greenwood
;    importers and Dealers in
Wines, Liquors, Beer, and Cigars
A   FULL   LINE   OF   SOFT   DRINKS
>><">&*<<*^tt<<"&>&>#<<- �������*�����
i    Office andWarerooms adjoining the Windsor Hotel
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BANKOFMONTREAL
BOARD   OF  DIRECTORS:
.   H. V. MEREDITH. Esq.. Pr.iU.ont.
. R. B/Aastu. ����..   ������ E. B. Grsenaliielcb. Em.
Sir William M��cc_an_-IcL Hon. Robt. Maclmr.
SirThas.Shaug]>n*M7iK.C.V.O. C R. Hoimor, Em..
A. Baumgarten, Eaq. C. B. Gordon, Eaq.
H. R. Drummond. Eaq. D. Forbaa Angus, Esq.
Wm. McM_u_t��r, Esq.
SirFraderiek W-l_.______-Tay.or, LL.D.,GeaeraI Manager.
ESTABUSHED 1817
Capital Paid Up       >      $16,000,000.
Rear?      -"     ��      ��� 16,000,000.
Undivided Profit*   ���       .   1,252,864.
Total Assets (April. 1915) 289,562,678.
__���_-> wnu,fH��T-i_k,
BANK MONEY ORDERS
arki i>��_tfe'__H-l eonveaient means of transmitting money to toy point
in Canada or.the United States.   Such Money Order* may be
' obtained a* ittf Sranoh of the Bank of Montreal.
E. E. Lf Dewdney, Manager, Greenwood Branch.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
- ��� ��� ��� ;���!-'. a..
SiR'EDMtjND WALKER, C.V.O., LLX). D.C.t.. President
JOHN AIRP, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES. Ass't General Manager
OAPITAL, JS.p.OOO    RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
Upwards...' Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are .Welcomed, ^Accounts may be opened and operated by maiL
AccbuSrSTn_iy/tJe opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be-_a_ad^_-y any one of them or by the survivor. S50
���/--,.    .SAVINGS BANK DEPAITTMENT
.... .v.... ., -:.:.): G* MULLEN Manager,
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First  Class Work  and
Prompt Attention
Prices Reasonable
E. A. Black, Phoenix
W. G. Kennedy, Agent
Greenwood |
INow See What We Mave For
PRIDAY, NOV. 19
Another
PARAMOUNT  PHOTOPLAY
In Five Parts
"Featuring   WH.LrAM~ELi.IOT   iu   the
noted play
"When We Were
Twenty-One"
An  intensely  interesting story with an
amusing touch of wit aud humor
The Theatre will be warm and comfortable, and we assure you that you
will be highly entertained with
this production.
WEDNESDAYS
THE ELAINE SERIES
is Hearing tbe ei^d, the plot thickens and
you must see the finish
Christian Science service will be held
in the Oddfellows Hall on Sunday at n
a. in All welcome. On the the tlrrd
Friday of each month at 8 p. m., testimonial meetings will be held in the
same hall.. Sunday School every Sunday
morning.
English, Swiss and American watch
and clock repairing. All work guaranteed.
C. A. Adeneur, opposite Windsor Hotel,
Greenwood.
WANTS. Etc
For Sale. ��� A five-roomed
house. Apply to Mrs. E. Helbec*
que, Anaconda.
On and after November 1st,
Never Slip shoes will be $3.50 for
horse, or 90 cents a shoe���Charles
Kinney.
Lumber car just arrived, containing flooring and finish. Dry
common boards and dimension,
dry:- double dressed shiplap���
Charles Kinney.
For Sale.���Road cart, in good
condition with single harness,
$20. Man's English riding saddle. $10. Bred colt "Monty,"
rising 3, halter broke, $60. Mac-
Lary Range, $15,00. House furnishings. Apply to Mrs. Colin
Cummins. Bank of Commerce
Block, Greenwood.
The water has been pumped
out of the Emma mine.
George Barrett will ship ore
from the Kokomo this winter.
Jim Drum has struck the lead
in the lower tunnel of the Sally.
Service in the Presbyterian
church Sunday, Nov. 21, at 11
a.m.
An expert will examine the
Carmi mine for Chicago capitalists.
Hugh S. Mills, died in Grand
Forks last week from typhoid
fever.
There are 6,500 empty houses
ia Toronto, and about a dozen in
Greenwood.
F. J. Lake will be here until
Friday evening. Sit for your
photos early. .
Mrs. Wm. Boyd of Halcyon
Springs, is spending the winter
in California.
A dance will be held November
26, in the Masonic Hall in aid of
the Patriotic Fund.
Rev. J. H. Hobbins will preach
in the Methodist church, Sunday,
N>v. 21, at 7:30 p.m.
Greenwood Rink Co. annual
meeting at Rink Building on Saturday evening at 8.30.
Warren Fairweather of Republic is going to the front with the
Canadian Hospital Corp. '
Miss Eileen Oliver left last
week for Trail, on a visit to her
sister, Mrs. G. McDonald.
In his big store at Midway,
James McMynn is showing a
fine line of Christmas goods.
In Phoenix last Thursday a
Syrian was fined $70 and costs,
for peddling without a license.
Frank Donald is not improving
very fast in health, and is still
confined to his room in Oroville.
On the 13th a marriage license
was issued to John D, Wilson,
and Ethel Davies, both of Phoenix. .
Tommy Lyons is a  war  prisoner     in     Giessen,      Germany.
I-Frank--..Roberts- is in  -the -same
place. '
L. L- Matthews has returned
to town, work having been suspended at the Payne mine near
Sandon.
On Tuesday evening,   $70 was
raised for the Patriotic Fund, at
a concert and dance in  Midway,
% \ held at the residence of Robert
Kerr,
An eastern firm will start a
vegetable evaporating plant in
Grand Forks, provided 2,000 tons
of potatoes can be secured for $9
a ton.
During the past month, more
than 1,500,000 pounds of Epsom
salts have been shipped from
Oroville, to New York, and other
eastern cities.
Ed Pope has received the contract to raze the B. C. Hotel for
$120. The city will use the lumber for sidewalks, and sell the
doors and windows.
Joe Kelly crme in from Spokane
last week. He is interested in
the King Soloman mine near
Beaverdell, upon which operations will soon begin.
The Carmi mine is being
pumped out for examination by
an expert. This property will
soon be worked by capitalists
from Chicago or Salt Lake City.
There are 12 vacancies in the
Independent Rifles at Grand
Forks, some of the soldiers haying recently been transferred to
Vernon, for active Overseas service.
This year J. W. Murph)*on his
ranch at Neville, Sask., raised
9,<)00 bushels of wheat and 2,500
bushels of oats. This is a good
record for i former Mother Lode
mirier.
Tom Donald is a busy man
these days. In addition to his
hotel at Bridesville, he has two
farms to look after, and this fall
he had 7000 bushels of grain
threshed.
Good wine needs no Bush; but
Joe Bush needs the good wine.
That is why he has .filled the
cellar of the Brooklyn, with the
wine that made Portugal famous.
When you are in Phoenix ask
Joe to show you the barrels.
Judge BrownX rendered his
judgement yesterday in the case
of Whitford et al vs Finucane et
al. The men are to have a lien
against the Carmi mine, and
the amount of their wages and
costs. If not paid, then the
Carmi mine can be sold, and the
wages and costs paid from the
proceeds of the sale. W. B.
Cochrane for plaintiffs and I. H.
Hallett for defendants. Hallett
stated that the case would be
appealed.
If you long to reach the independent age of twenty-one." If
you are of the fascinating age of
"twenty-one," or if you or have
been and passed the love lorn
age of "twenty-one," then see
���'When We Were Twenty-One,,
at the Star Theatre, Friday.
Joe Bush came down the hill
last Thursday, and gave Ola
Lofstadt $5 for powder purposes,
He also stated that from now
until spring, he would donate
one per cent, a month of his earnings to the Argo Tunnel. Ola
hopes that Joe will make a million a month.
In the King Soloman, Joe
Kelly has the makings of a big
gold mine. During the winter
he will put the King Solomon
group on Beaver creek, The Big
Four near Greenwood, and his
Wallace Mountain claims into a
company, and raise enough
money in Ohio to begin work in
the spring.
Sixteen denizens ot the underworld wended their way up the
hill yesterday morning, to play
their part in that revived local
farce, known as "Halletts Pink
Tea." Just as soon as the parrotlike ceremony was over in the
justice mill, the judge hopped
out of the door, and ran down
the hill in. adyance of his patrons,
evidently eager to get away from
the odor of mixed perfumery and
the rustling of silks.
Dr. C..J. McCullough, Dentist,
has opened au office in the Pacific Hotel, and will be in Greenwood until December i. The
dental equipment is up-to-date
and modern in every respect.
Special arrangements will be
made for out of town people.
Either write or phone to Pacific
Hotel No. 56. Secure an appointment to save time. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Graduate of N. W.
TJ., Chicago. Registered in the
States and B.C.    Open evenings.
Albert W. Lightly appeared
before W." R. Dewdney, J. P.,
yesterday, charged with stealing
two steers from E, L. Steeves,
and one from Wm. Brown, He
plead guilty and was remanded
for sentence. At the same time
Tom Donald' was charged with
receiving Brown's steer Knowing
that it" had'been stolen. Donald
was committed for trial, and will
appear before - Judge Brown,
December 1st. He was admitted
to bail; himself for $1,000, and
two sureties of $750 each, put up
by James McCreath and Alan
Eddy.
In the supreme court at Nelson
last week, Chief Justice Hunter
granted James Logan $8,000
damages against the Granby
company, in addition to the
$11,500 already paid by the company.     While   working   in   the
Western Float
Cocktail Murphy  is Belling fish
in Victoria.
Waneta will have a new school
next month.
Many houses have been built in
Clinton this year.
Even a mild luDatic ie not fib for
a police magistrate.
In Kaslo some people have quit
feeding slops to hogs.
Peter Lund has moved from
Wardner to Lethbridge.
Some work is being done on the
Buck Fraction, near Silverton.
In October there were 75 births
in New "Westminster, and 24
deaths.
Jim May lives in Hazelton and
is S3 years old. He is a Cariboo
pioneer.   ���
In October, 23 carloads of fruit
and vegetables were shipped from
Creston.
Western Canada will ship foui
million pounds of corned beef to
England.
Warburton Pike, the big game
hunter was drowned in Europe
last month.
For breaking into cabins at New
Hazelton an Indian received fonr
months in the pen.
In normal times Germany bought
annually 400,000,000 pounds of
copper in America.
Ore is being shipped from.the
Blue Grouse mine at Cowichan
Lake, Vancouver Island.
Over in Lillooet the editor hollers, "I Jove my patent shoes, but
oh you undressed kids."
A burglar broke into the store of
Frank "Wells at Revelstoke, and
stole $200 worth of goods.
Howard Thompson is superintendent of the Red" Rose copper
mine in the Hazelton district.
The Canadians have got the
German's goat, and will probably
turn him into limburger cheese.
Recently 900 dogs were shipped
from alaska to France where they
will be used-to .pack_ supplies in
the mountains.
Halibut live 23 years, although
the writer has at times eaten some
that appeared to have attained a
mach greater age.
Sea lions will dive 100 fathoms
deep in order to feed on halibut.
Fishermen tell this story, but it
sounds a little fishy.
Near Hat Creek, a cow defended
her newly born calf against coyotes
for two days, before the rancher
came to her assistance.
There   are   20   hotels   in   New
Westminster, and they  all adver
tised in the local paper for a re
Looks Like Oil
There is some talk about oil at
Oroville. If oil should be struck
there it would mean an oil boom
all the way from Greenwood to
Princeton. The Oroville Gazette
says that Mr, Cody has been drilling a well on the Eltoh G. Rice
place south of town, and is already
down some 200 feet. The six inch
casting buckled, and work was
temporarily suspended. How
ever, Mr. Cody believes that ��� be
can overcome the difficulty and expects to go on with the work.
After passing through granite at
200 feet the drill struck slate and
sandstone. S. T. Stanton, who
has had some experience with oil
lands, expresses the opinion that
tbe drill is liable to strike oil, considering that there are indications
of coal on both sides of the valley,
and that in countries where oil has
been struck the drills generally
pass through slate and sandstone
into sand just before encountering
oil.    It is worth the investment for
Mr. Rice to continue sinking.
Should he strike a flow of water
that result would be of estimable
value to tbe valley, and if such a
fortunate event occur as striking
oil that would create a boom for
the valley of greater magnitude
than would follow successful mining, irrigation or anything else in
the way of human endeavor.
Recommends Smelter
Mineralogist "W. S. Greevy of
Altoona, Fa., who has been making a mineralogical survey of the
mines and mineral claims of the
Lemon Mining Co. situated about
fifteen miles north of here in B.C.
on Rock Creek, left for home last
Friday, going by way of San Francisco where he will take in tbe
fair. He made many friends while _
here who regret to see him leave.'"
In his report to the company he
recommended that s smelter be
built on Rock creek near Bridesville to handle the Lemon mine
ore and ores from other mines in
bhe district.���Molson Leader.
South African Sacrifices
-���. - ..���.---.      .. w_.._-.-.--.w      -.-*      *___._.     --W-* -.��_.   vlm\j _-.uii    payvzi     1UI
Gold Drop mine at Phoenix in newal of their liquor licenses.
June 1914,  Logan  was perman-      Since Bill Houston passed out of
ently injured by an explosion,
while acting under orders from a
man,named Johnson, who was
Logan's boss. It was- a; case of
going back" too soon to a missed
hole. Johnson was killed aud
Logan injured for life. A.' Mac-
neil of Fernie appeared for the
plaintiff.
The annual meeting of the
Greenwood Agricultural Association was held in the Rink on
Nov. 11. There was a good attendance. The secy.-treas. reported a balance on hand of
$41.24, but some bills still remained to be paid and the deficit
would be $60. A subscription
list was passed among those present and owing to tne handsome
response, the deficit was wiped
out, The following office bearers were appointed: Hon. Pres.,
Hon. W. J. Bowser, Minister of
Agnculture; Hon. Vice-Pres.,
J. R. Jackson, M. P. P., Col.
Glossop, and O. Lachmund;
Pres., J. L. White; Vice-Pres.v
W. Jeuks; Sec-Treas/, p. H.
McCurrach; Directors^ T. Gulley,
E. E. L Dewdney^ J. D. Mac-
Lean. H, Whiting, R. Lee, W.
C. Arthurs, C. King,; W. Tippie,
Col. Glossop, J. C. Auger, W E
McArthur, and D. L. McElroy.
Bright Outlook
All told the tnining outlook for
Republic never looked brighter.
The Tom Thumb continues to
turn out the remarkable tonnage
of close to 300 tons a week. For
the past week the Ben Hur shipped
200 tonB, the Knob Hill 120, Lone
Pine 40. The latter will soon be
one of the big shippers.
The work of unwatering the
Lone Pine will be finished this
week. The macninery is all nnder
cover and ample provision has been
made for ventilating the mine.
The engine has been shipped and
is expected at any time.���News.-
Miner.
the arena, the poker games in
Kaslo have sunk to tbe bottom of
the consomme, and may never rise
again.
A merchant does not gain much
by getting his job printing oub of
his own town. The outside printer
never reciprocates by buying anything from him.
This year more than 100 United
States halibut schooners have been
outfibting, buying supplies, and
selling their fise at Prince Ruperb,
bhe Grimsby of Canada.
For the year 1914-15 the province of B. C. produced fish to the
value of $14,500,000, which is
more than 41 per cent, of the total
fishery products of Canada.
Just 21 years ago Three Forks
was the busiest town in Kootenay.
Ib is now one of tbe ghost camps of
the Slocan, but ib will come back
long before the heavens fall.
Owing to lack of support from
the business men of that city, the
Cranbrook Hearld has suspended
publication. In the near future
several other papers of bhis province will follow suit.
The besb halibut banks on the
Pacific coast are becoming exhausted by overfishing, and a close
season for halibut from December
to April may soon be inaugurated
on both sides of bhe line.
Daring the past five years 90 per
cent of the attempted farming ventures in California have been failures. This is due to inflated land
values, ignorance of local conditions, and lack of capital.
Peck McSwain has returned to
Merritt from his tour of bhe clam
beds, and an exchange says fehat
he will soon publish a book dedicated to himself and Jack Lucy,
entitled, ''The Personal Touch, Or
Overcoming The Marble Front."
If J. L. Stamford, of thePingree
Mining Co. wishes to eel! stock or
mine around Nelson, or anywhere
else, be should fulfill the promises
he made years ago, and by which
he obtained money from those who
bad faith in his word, note and
honor-
In the ranks of the South African contingent, now in a training
camp in Hertfordshire,, there are
more men who have relinquished
large salaries to serve the Mother
Country at a shilling a day than
in any other army. One private,
before his enlistment, drew a ^alary of over $25,000 a year as manager of one of the most important
firms in the South African colony.
Magistrates, well-to-do farmers
and miners, civil servants of high
position, and even men who fought
as officers in the campaign nnder
Both against German South-west
Africa, but bad no commissions
open to them in the new contingent, are in the ranks.
The Soubh African contingent is
filled with young Boers, as well as
colonials whose British parents
were pioneer in that world. Its
motto, "Eendracht maakt roacht"
(Union makes strength,) id Dutch.
Cold weather affected the troops
at first, afber their work in the
burning deserts of German Africa,
bub with warm clothing th- y rather
prefer it, as they enjoy sharper
appetites.
The contingent will be gent to
the front as soon as acclimatized.
Value of Birds
Birds attain their greatest usefulness in the forests, because the
conditions there closely approach
tbe primeval.
Forest trees have there natural
insect foes, to which they give
food and shelter, and these insects
in turn have their natural enemies
among the birds, to which the tree
also gives food and shelter. Hence
it follows that the existence of each
one of these forms of life is dependent upon the existence of the
others. Bat for the trees the insects would perish, and but for the
birds the trees would perish; aad,
to follow the inexorable laws of
nature to the conclusion of tbeir
[awful vengeance, but for the trees
the world would perish. fTHE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
THE LEDGE
J.2 a year iu Canada,   and   $2.50   in   the
United States.
R. T. LOWERY.
Editor and Financier.
ADVERTISING RATES
Delinquent  Co-Owner Notices $25.00
Coal and Oil  Notices     6.00
Application Liquor Licenses    5.00
Transfer Liquor Licenses     7.50
Kstray Notices 3.00
Cards of Thanks     1.00
Certificate of Improvement  10 00
(Where more than one claim ap-
pears'in notice, '$2.50 for_:each additional claim )
All other legal f advertising,   12 cents a
line first insertion,' and  8 cents a line fo
each   subsequent   insertion,    nouparielr
measurement.
The only real cure for tho liquor
evil is free whiskey.
The  world  does   not   welcome
ideas stuffed with sawdust.
"Without perfect liberty of mind
there can be no true religion.
.No man who laughs like a jackal
is fit to bo a polico magistrate.
You  will always be a slave if
you fail to do your  own thinking.
Christmas is just as real to the
majority of adults, as Santa Clans
is to the young children.
If you would know heaven, you
must be able to appear before gods,
without fear, trembling or misgiving. 	
Any man who is contemptible
and dishonorable in his private
business is totally unfit to occupy
any judicial position. A leopard
cannot change his spots by putting
ou a coafe.
Greed and selfistaneps has lowered Canadian politics into the
sump* of infamy. "With the exception of a few honest men, the legislators of Canada are not much better than a band of dressed up, and
disguised road agents.
Nearly all reformers have been
persecuted, .and only appreciated
long after they were dead. The
man who will open a cage, and
give a lob of wild animals their
liberty will meet with a speedy
death, -if he cannot fly. The man
who attempts to free the people
from medical, religious, sexual,
political, and social superstition
-will be stoned to death before the
mob awakens to - the fact that he
was right. The same spirit that
burned Servetus, Bruno and thousands of others still slumbers in
what some call our advanced stage
of'Civilization.
The Kaiser of Germany is partly
insane, and unfit to govern anything; but the troubles of his country are largely due to the political
system, started and built up by
Bismark after the war of 1870.
The Prussian military party finally
dominated the Seiche tag, and you
gee the result. The Social Demo
cratic party could have saved Germany, but ib was not strong enough
to overthrow the advocates of the
.5word. A victory fOr the Allies
will save the people of Germany
in the fature from the horrors of
tyranny. Where victory nestles
matters little to tbe rich, but all to
the poor. We expect to see a
revolution in Germany within two
���noiiths. The yoke is cutting too
ieep into the neck of the common
people.
Our Blood-Offering
Unsafe Lanterns
The season of shortened daylight
brings its own peculiar fire dangers    One of these is the use of the
! .ntern about farm buildings.    Of
����� scent years, owing to competition,
;i low priced lantern,  which is a
i rions fire menace, ha8 been placed
ipdn the market.    Instead of be^
i !g securely screwed on the  oil
':��� 'eervoir,    the burner  is  simply
' ipped on, with the result that, if
<; e lantern is upset,   the burner
<; mes (if and the oil is allowed to
i- tn   out   upon  the lighted wick,
..'he result is either an explosion or
��� serious blaze, and unless speedily
������'. ecked, damage to life and prop-
��� ������rij.   __ ���     ��� ���   -
The Graham Co. of Belleville,
') .ario, is building an evaporating
>: nt at Armstrong, that will em-
X -y 50 men and 100 Women for
-n '��t or nine months each year.
i' -nte will also be built in Vernon
a   1 Kelowna.
In the current number of the Sunset
Magazine, Arno Dosch has an excellent
article upon the soldiers of B. C, entitled "The Blood-Offering of British Columbia," from which the following extract is taken:
The stand of the Princess Pats called
the attention of the entire British Empire
to the gallantry of the Canadian troops.
They were praised by Sir John French.
They were mentioned iu reports aud
ofliciallycongratulated. Decorations were
also distributee and the Canadians were
recognized to be among the best troops
in the British army.
Now the most interesting part about
the way the Canadians were finally acclaimed was the delay in recognizing
their ability. I feel I can talk about it
now without hurting anyone's feelings.
I have talked it over with the higher
officers in charge of the recruiting in
British Columbia, and they showed so
keen au understanding of the situation
that it surprised me. Perhaps they
laughed it aside because they felt they
could afford to now.
The truth is the Canadian troops were
not appreciated when they first reached
England. They were not cast in the accepted British mold and they were regarded as something foreign���almost
Americans. If I speak of this with a
touch of bitterness still clinging to iny
memory, it is a bitterness I received from
the Canadians themselves. When I went
to British Columbia this was still fixed
iu my thoughts and I wondered whether
any of the bitterness had crept into tbe
letters home. As I had expected little of
it had. The British Columbia soldier
swallowed the affronts they received in
England and let the people at home
think they were accepted with open arms.
The astonishing part of it is that they
were not at,once taken into the bosom of
the stricken English family and treated
as succoring cousins. That was plainly
what was expected. Instead' the mass
of the English public saw them come almost with indifference and military men
regarded them as undisciplined. The
British public can be excused on the
grounds of its insularity. It showed only
the usual lack of enthusiasm over its
loyal colonies for which Kipling has frequently upbraided it. But that immobility of the English public attitude was
very exasperating to the Canadians and
they were free about saying so.
The attitude of military men they understood better, hut resented it none the
less. I have seen Canadian officers stared
down l)y English officers because they
spoke with men in the ranks on terms of
equality. I was eating dinner with an
English officer in a London hotel one
night when a Canadian lieutenant and
corporal came in and sat down at the
next table. They were obviously friends,
their difference in rank the accident of
training or preferment, They were none
the less chums and went about together.
But the English officer was too indignant
to finish has dinner.
Among the Canadian forces nothing
was thought of it. Recruting in a democratic country tbe difference in rank no
longer held. Men who had been raised
together and had the same friends were
frequently separated by rank. All could
not be officers, and the Canadian troops
recognized the situation. But the English did not. They could not conceive
the possibility of officers chumming with
the enlisted men. It was as distressing
to. the EuglishT01mnies.as.to their officers. To them it was lack ofdicipline,
and, without trying to appreciate the difference between Canada's citizen army
and the English professional soldier, they
set it down -as lack of discipline and
scorned the Canadians for it.
Audit hurt, too. A-young Canadian
of my acquaintance from New Westminster said to me one day, "I used to think
I was an Englishman. I had always considered myself a subject of the King and
the equal of any man in the Empire.
But I find over here that I am considered
as something less."
Another man whom I had known in
Vancouver said to me one day as we
worked our way among the civilians on
the Strand, ''If I had known that there
were all these -men on the streets of Lon-
non, I should never have given np my
good job iu Vancouver to come over here
and be snubbed."
If this itnformatiou comes now for the
first time to most people iu British Columbia they can take pride in the, fact
that the soldiers they sent were too loyal
to let it be known at home how they felt
about il. Their winter in the mud on
Salisbury Plains under the heavy English winter skies was terribly disheartening. I often wondered whether the Canadians would break under the strain, To
be scorned, to be snubbed, to be left in
the mud���it was hard. But there was always the hope of being sent to the front,
and by January they began to move. Ia
the excitement of action they soon forgot
everything else; still I fancied I detected
in them the one time I saw them in
France a disposition to "show them."
That they did, and before long. After
Neuve Chapelle their commander, Sir
Horace Stnith-Dorien, let them know he
had selected experienced officers to watch
them. "I soon realized," he eaid, "that
I was going to be proud of you. From
the beginning you acted with the steadir
ness of veterans '*
That must have been salve for wounded
feelings.. Sir John French, was a little
responsible, but ended by giving the
highest praise, so all that early season of
doubt and distress passed with the summer's campaign, and there is no longer
any doubt in England about the quality
of the Canadian troops. There should
never have been any in tlie first place.
It wae due only to the gradual separation
between the mother country and the
colony, but that is all past now and there
is a better understanding between England and Canada now than there evei
was before.
This criticism of the Ijnglish coming
from an American might lead to the supposition that those 1 who complained of
their treatment were Americans who had
crossed the line to enlist. It is not the
case. I met only one American in the
Canadian army. In fact the number of
Americans who were supposed to have
enlisted was exaggerated. Of the troops
who went froni Vancouver with the original Canadian Expeditionary Force S29
were of English birth, 216 Scotch, 296
Canadian and 24 Americans.
In Vancouver I commended on the
difference between the air of the recruiting station and any similar institution in
England.. The Vancouver office was so
much freer from red tape, in consequence
so much more efficient. Its democracy
was also added to by the presence of the
recruiting officer, Mr. C. G. Henshaw, in
civilian clothes. I was surprised to find
it doing a steady business more than a
year after the war started Mr. Henshaw
told me he was standing outside the recruiting marquee one day recently when
a party of American tourists stopped to
watch the constantly' arriving recruits.
After awhile one of them said, "O, yes
this is the conscription we have heard
about." The Canadians Could afford to
laugh, for they will never need conscription.
The numbers of men finally sent away
from the training camps at Vernon and
tie Willows, I noticed, did not tally with
the enlistments. The nnniber had evidently been reduced considerably. I
asked how that happened and was told
that while the standard of physical fitness
at the recruiting offices was high, those
accepted are gradually reduced until
only the perfect, toughened specimens
are left. Of the troops so far sent to the
front thirty-five, per cent have been weeded out after being accepted. The remaining sixty five per cent, are fighting
fit. The men Canada has been sending
to the front are hand-picked.
Meeting these men only after they had
arrived in England where the loss of
friends on the battlefield had already become an every day occurrence, I did not
appreciate what their departure meant
until I visited British Columbia aud saw
that the flower of their youth was gone.
Then I tried to visualize them as they
were at Salisbury Plains and later in
France, but I could only remember that
of those first men who went away so
bravely, nearly half were.dead.
Subscription List
For the purpose of presenting a machine gun to the 54th Kootenay-Boundary
Battalion from the cit'zens of Greenwood
and district.
MOTHER LODE LIST
P. E. Crane $ 500
John Finlay, Jr  10 00
J. M. Foulds  3 00
A. MacLean  350
E E.Jackson  300
A. J. Morrison  3 50
George Boug  2 00
F. H. Hutt  2 00
J. N. MacPherson  2 50
Carl Carlson  2 50
Kenneth McDonald  2 00
Geo Hopletter  2 00
Nick Eliuk  2 00
Nicholas Coby  2 60
Pete Poul  3 50
Geo McLaren  2 00
R. Carrigan  2 50
L. Ankneid  200
Dan Ankneid  2 00
P. Schranz .,  2 00
M. Firtensky  2 00
H. T. Jones  10 00
I. Goosney  5 00
H. J. Langley  2 00
Nick Bakovich  2 00
Alex M. Campbell  5 00
M. Tarezia  2 00
A. C, MacKenzie  3 50
Alex McMillan  2 50
John Lund  2 50
C. J. Johnson  2 50
Sam Wickwire  2 00
Modest Montell  200
James MacKay  500
Dan Lichen  2 00
Ewan W. Owen  300
Theodore Witte  2 00
Wm. Donnelly  ,  350
.Silas Smith  200
Harry Sauve  2 00
A.Gaudet  3 50
Gee Sutherland  400
Hugh Adrup '.;  2 00
E. Hllerh   200
M. Petterson  200
Amos Wheeler  500
Tho_n_is Beauliey  200
H. Wickham   1 00
E. Carlson  200
�� When your local dealer is unable to supply you. =2
�� Phone or Write =3
1      THE BIG STORE      1
**"" d__S -
H At Phoenix, B.C. g
m^y        ._.      _.        .    ���      _ , -.. .. ��� .     ,       , ���      _ ,   ���,    ���        Z   ��^g
Our stock is most complete in every department. .2
particularly in Ladies', Childrens' supplies      52
DRY  GOODS,  BOOTS  &    SHOES,  CLOTHING, '3
HARDWARE,   CROCKERY,  AND  GROCERIES   ||
We  pay Mail or Express charges 3
Do not send your money out of the Country, no =2
portion of it ever returns =��
BIT AT HOME f
rrin, Thompson & Co. 1
k PHONE NO. 9 =5
|       PHOENIX, B. C      I
^iiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiauiuaaiiaK
Nearly two million
fish .are shipped east
from ��� Prince "Rupert.
pounds   of
every  month
LAKE  STUDIO
GRAND FORKS
WILL   BE   IN  GREENWOOD
DECEMBER, 13th and 14th
Up-to.Date and Best Appointed Studio
in the Boundary
Amateur   Finishing   Beautifully   Done,
Postage Paid to and from Greenwood and
Other    Points.     Best  Line of Portrait
Frame Pictures in the Boundary.
Agent for Ensign Cameras and Supplies
DEVELOPING 25cts per roll
PRINTS ;.50cts a dozen
T.   J
Winnipeg Ave..
LAKE,
Grand Porks
Reduced Prices
���IN���
Tungsten Lamps
10 to 60 Watt Lamps 50c each
In cartons of 5, $2,00
100 Watt Lamps, $1.00 each
Nitrogen Lamps
100 Watts     -     -   $1,75 each
200
300
3.00
4.25
AU
lamps sold by us are tested before
leaving the factory
You cant beat these prices oh Tungsten
lamps anywhere
Greenwood City Waterworks Company
Everything Electrical
J. B. CAMEHON,
Leading Tailor of the Kootenays,
KASiO      BO
LIQUOR   ACT,
Sec. it.
1910.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, on the first day
of December next, application will be made to
tbe Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel lice-nee to i<e_J liquor by retail in tbe hotel known as the Algoma Hotel,
situate at Deadwood, In tbe Province of British
Columbia.
Dated this I8lh day NoTember, 1915.
JAMES HF-NDBE-SON,
Applicant
"��_3.1
;.__��/.v'r-^*'x    - _.
fW
ruRs
Get "More Money" for your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx.. Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected in yonr section
SHIP TOUR FURS DIRECT <o "SHUBERT" the largest
house in the World de^fKuggu^^ SAW FOBS
a reliable���responsible���sate Kur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of acentury." a long successful record of sending- Fur Shippers prompt.S AT ISPACTORY
AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for '.ttfte Mn&tit ftftlpwr."
tlie only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.
Write lor U-NOW-K'b FREE
A. B. SHUBERT^fa^^S^^cS^I:
���p
^���<&*��mK��X":k��^^^
CANADIAN
Pacific
Winter Excursion Rates
ROUND TRIP FIRST CLASS   FROM ALL KOOTENAY STATIONS TO
Ontario, QuebeCjMaritimeProvinces
and Great Britain
FARES FROM GREENWOOD
$96.70
Toronto aud all  Ontario
Points West
Montreal
Correspond!..? rates all points
DATES OF SALE
GREAT BRITAIN
NOV.   15   to   DEC    31
FIVE MONTHS LIMIT
EASTERN CANADA
DECEMBER  1  .to    31
Tbree Months' .W��It
Tickets and details from any agent, or write
J. S. CARTER,!D. P. A, Nelson/B.C.
?
X
THOROUGHLY RENOVATED AND SPECIALLY
ADAPTED FOR COMMERCIAL TRADE
t
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
THE WINDSOK HOTEL is or_e of the ^eafejforniBhed
hotels in the west. It is located in the heart of Greenwood and within easy reach of all the financial and
commercial institutions of the Copper.Metropolis.
Heated with Steam and Lit by Electricity
:   .J.
Commodious sample rooms. The rbar-Ja.replete ?svijbh :X
all modern beverages and the meaJs-arcttbe best. Rooms ".&
reseived by telegraph-. ��� ���%
a'
Hotel Brooklyn
The Only First Class and Up^to>Datc
Hotel in Phoenix. New from cellar
to roof, Best Sample Rooms in. the
Boundary. Opposite Great Northern
Depot,   X   X   Modern Bathrooms
STEAM HEATED,
O, D, Bush, Prop,
ELECTRIC LIGHTED
Phoenix, B.C.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
^OAI. mining rights of the Dominion
**^ in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and in a portion of British
Columbia, may be leased for a term of
twenty-one years at an annual rental of
$t an acre. Not more than 2,560 acres
will be leased, to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district inwhich the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the lahd .must be
described by sections, or legal sub-divisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Bach application must be accompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded il
the rights applied for are not available
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the. rate of five cents per ton.
The person Operating the "mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn .returns
accounting; for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined ana pay the royalty
thereon: If the coal mining rights are
not being operated, such returns should
be furnishea at least once a year.
The lease will include the' coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Depart
ment of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.���Unauthorized    publication    of
this advertisement will,not be paid for.���
68782.
Re SOUTH YALE. COPPER COMPANY
LIMITED
(N0N    PERSONAL    LIABILITY)   IN
LIQUIDATION
NOTICE   OF  SALE BY. PUBLIC AUCTION
PURSUANT TO .AN .ORDER-OF THE
SUPREME JCOURT, OF BRITISH
COLUNIBIA
MR. CHARLES DAWSON .the person appointed by an Order of tbe,Supreme Court of
British Columbia dated the28th day of October
1915. will upon the .instructions of tlie Liquidator of tlie above named Comoany offer for sale
by public auction at 452 Seymours-Street in the
City oi Vancouver, British Columbia, on Monday the 6th day of December 1915 at 12 o'clock
noon the Crown Granted Mineral Claim situate
at Copper Mountain, B. C, and comprising' an
area of 52 acres or thereabouts known as the
"Sunset Mineral Claim" and described as ALL
AND SINGULAR that certain parcel or tract
of .land and premises situate lying and bziag in
the Similkameen formerly in the Osoyoos
Division of Yale District in the province of British Columbia and numbered 1077 Group 1 and
known as the'-Sunset Mineral Claim" on tbe
official plan or survey of the said Similkameen
Division of Yale District, together with all
minerals, precious and .base (save coal) which
aiipht be found in veins. lode�� or,roctc in place
and whether su.;h minerals are found separately or in combination with each other.
Particulars and Conditions of Sale may be
obtained from
WALTER ERNEST HODGES, Esq.,
Liquidator, Bank of Ottawa, Building,
002 Hastings Street W*��t,
VANCOUVER,: B.C.
Messrs. Davis, Marshall, Macneill & Pu_rh,
Barristers and Solicitors,
626 Pender Street West,
Vancouver, b.c.
I. H. HALLETT, Esq.,
Barrister and Solicitor,
P. O. -Drawer 10,
GREENWOOD, B.C.
or
The Auctioneer,
CHARLES DAWSON,_E��<_,
6.0 S. ymour Street.
VANCOUVER, B.C,
and the property may be viewed by orders to
to obtained of the Liquidator.
nelson, B.C-
*
#
The only up/'to/'date Hotel in the interior,   f?__?st-class ^
in every respect
CENTRALLY LOCATED
Hot and Cold Water; Steam H^Uad-Iel$]>hQne in
each jcooQi.
ROOMS WITH eRIVA.TJEjRAT.HS-!
CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BEST
First Class Bar and Barber Shop
15
SAMPJLEM^OMS
Steam Heated; Electric lighted.
RATES $1.00 per day and up; -European Plan.
Bus Meets all Trains and-Boats.
ae��f*+��f���f��f��f��f,f***��f��f��4' -+4**HL******
WESTERN - -HOTELS.
HOTEL PRINCETON
' Princeton, B.C., now completed on the
.site of the old Great Northern.   Only
brick hotel in Similkameen,    A first
class house,
Swanson & Broomfield, Props.
THK   PAULO    HOTEL   .
Kaslo, B. C���   iB a  comfortable
home for all who travel to that
city    Under new management
-  WALSH & HAYD0N, Proprietors.
BUSINESS CARDS.
iftSSAYSR
_4.E*' 7!f' WOPOWSON,. Assayer and
Chemist, "Box BiroS, Nelson, B. C
.Chargesr-GolcUSUver, J_��ead or Copper
|i each Gold-Silver, (single Jsay)
goo Gold-Silver (duplidte __X
$l.SO.j. #itafrl����ad $i.so Silver-Wd-
Zinc fe-oo. Charges for other metals etc
on application.
BKIDBSV11_LE    HOTEl.
Bridesville,   B. C.   This hotel  is
within easy reach of all the leading
Boundary towns and the centre ol
a fine farming district.
THOMAS   DON AID,   Proprietor.
RIVERSIDE HOTEL
Rock Creek, B. C. This is one of
the oldest hotels in the Kettle Valley. Excellent accotntnodation-for
all travellers.
S. T. LARSEN, Proprietor.
ALGOMA HOTEL
Dead-wood, B. C. This hotel.is
within easy distance of Greenwood
and provides a comfortable home
for travellers. The bar has-the
. best of wines, liquors anel cigars.
JAMES HENDERSON'Proprietor
fl Prices Reduced |f
je:        All round on __3
I Flo-.-ad Feed 1
5= ���AT��� 3
���Ss  Adams  Feed  Store  ~2
o<x>o<k>ooooo<>o<>o<>ooooo<>o��k>p
T.   THOMAS
CLOTHES CLEANED
PRESSED AMD REPAIRED
TAILOR - GREENWOOD
oo^^oooooceooooooooooooooo
tt��B8B��8tfti��aift_tt^^
CO., LI'D.
Leaves Mother Lode
9.30 a. m. 6.30 p. m.
Leaves Greenwood
2.00 p. ta.
8.30 p. _n.
Saturday last stage leaves Mother
Lode 6 p. in. Returning, leaves
Greenwood 10 p. m.
OFFICE-PACIFIC'flOTEL
m
TULAMEEN HOTEL
Princeton, B.  C . is tf.e  headquarters  for  miners,  investors
and railroad men.   A fine loca
tion and everything first-class
W. J. KIRKPATRICK, Proprietor.
THE COLDWATER HOTEL
Merritt, B. C. The leading hotel
in Merritt Hot and cold water in
every room. Steam heated throughout. Large sample rooms. Sales-
nieiis headquarters.
MURDOCH MclNTYRE, Proprietor.
The Knob Hill Hotel
PflOBNIX.
One of tlie largest hotels in
the city.   Beautiful location,
fine rooms and tasty meals.
A, O. JOHNSON
Direct from the Factory to the coflsuner
Bjr PARCE'I< POST
at wholesale prices    to advertise onr .
Brands.
Every cigar we make is absolutely (roar- I
anteed filled with get-aloe Havana-
Filler
Box of ��o's B.C. full weight, fiveM
inches long $3.50.
Box of so's O.S    4  inches long,
Conchas, $3 00.
Box of "Brillantes" Clear  Havana
Wiapper, full weight, S inches
long, 50 S $5.00.
Send money order, or certified
cheque.   Do not send money unless registered.
References:���R. G. DtTNN & CO.
WILBERC & W0LZ.
New Westminster, B. C.
FRED A. -STARKEY,
NELSON, B. C.
MINING
-.BROKER
PROSPECTS   BOUGHT   AND    SOLD
OR. A. MIIiLOY
All   the   tatest,.methods  jn   h.gfa-class
_;Bfiatisjtry.
:l^MJn^pmG
rCorner Abbott. AUwting^ Streets.
MMMmr      -  - ifiC,
PUCOTE   13
Auto   and   Morse   Stages
Leave    Greenwood    Twice
Daily to Meet .Spokane and
-..ProYflle ^Trains
Autos for Jlrre.   The Finest
Turnouts,In .tfee .Boundary.
LitM._aj.Kl-tlea vy.Braying
palace ^tteeiy AM Stage
j(fREBi��WpQ0D. B.C
F. C. BTJ0KLE8S, Proprietor.
jSM o ke��. *.
Imperator and Kootenay Rtandard
Cigars.   Made by
PROP.*      J, C THEUH fc Co., &ELS0R
A ....
tt
I*
your Razors Honed
.aidft**!*. Baths at
GRBBNWOOD.

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