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The Greenwood Ledge Feb 21, 1929

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Array w
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Provincial Library*
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VOL. J]J
GREENWOOD, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1929
No.. 30
GRAND FORKS WINS ,
BOUNDARY HOCKEY CUP
The Boundary Hockey Cup, emblematic of the senior hockey championship of  the Boundary,  will make its
homo ih Grand  Forks for the next
year,  as  that  town's team  won  the
series by a total goal score of 7 to 6.
In the first game-in Greenwood, the
���Forks te-am won by 3 to 2, and the final
game in Grand Forks on Friday night
last was a tie 4 all.   The Greenwood
boys put up a,great battle to retain the
silverwear- which they have held for
many years, but the opposing team's
one goal lead could not be overcome.
Jesse Puddy got- two goals, James Hal-
let and Dick Taylor one each.   The
boys were accompanied by a number of
-rooters.   The Greenwood players were:
Harry Royce, R. C. Taylor, Jesse Puddy,
Leo. Madden,' Jas. Hallett,* Harry Hallstrom, Roy Hallstrom, Art.-Fenwick,'Joe
Klinosky  and  Charlie, Royce.- Coach
F. J. White was in charge of the team.
WALTERS'RINK WINS
CANTALOUPE COMPETITION
KETTLE VALLEY SCHOOL NEWS
' ..George * S. Walters'' rink copped off
the popular Cantaloupe competition in
the final game against, J: H.. Goodeve's
rink on Tuesday night.   The score was
*' 6 , to 5, the. same score in-which
Walters beat the Walmsley rink a
week previous. . The game was keenly
��� fought and very interesting to the large
number of spectators as well.as to' thc
players ^on both .teams. The winners
are:'Geo. S. Walters, skip; F..L. Peterson, mate; WAR. Powers,-second and
James Reid, lead. - .
E. P. Beckett
For January
-'    (Too late for last issue)
No. of Pupils        22
Aggregate Attendance       389
Average Attendance   17.68
Perfect attendance to date.���Theodore
Gane. ,      0
.Standing in Grades in order of
merit:
Grade VIIL���Eric Whiting.
Grade VII.���Ely,Toyne.
Grade VI.���Joe Gane, Pearl Lindsay,
Ruth Whiting, Mary Hindmoor, Gertie
Toyne.
Grade   V.���Myrtle   Graham,   Doris
Dainard, Gerald Dainard.  ���-
* Grade   IV.���Yvonne  McCelvey   and
Elise Gane (tie), Glenn Dainard, Violet
Graham..
< Grade III.���Theodore Gane and
Ronald Bonnett (tie), Snyder Lepen,
Jack Bonnett, Clifford Graham.
Grade IL���Jean McCelvey, Leslie
Dainard, Inga Martschinkie, Siegfried
Palkonski, Peter Lepin.   '        " " . .
BEAVERDELL BRIEFS
Mrs. Ed. Heed has'returned to Nelson
after a visit here with her family.
Monty Montgomery has returned to
camp after a week's visit to Greenwood.
P. McCallum, of Grand Forks, was a
visitor to the Wellington Mine on Tuesday.     - - ,
ROCK CREEK NEWS
Mrs. E. Fenwick Wilson was a visitor
to Greenwood this week.
MIDWAY NEWS
E. S. Reynolds has returned to Kettle
Valley from* a trip in the Okanagan.
R. L. Clothier has returned from a
business .trip to Penticton and Coast
cities. '   ;  '
Edw. Nordman has returned from a
business trip to' Vancouver and
Penticton.
GREENWOOD SCHOOL NOTES
,-'    Editorial Staff:
John Campolieto, Eileen Bryan,
Ernest Johnson, Alice Clark
��� Ye school editor is laid up with an
attack of the "Pink Eye."    -
I. Crawford, of Cascade", is the guest
of his daughter and son-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. Ted Clarke; "��� a*
The enlarging plant on Ingram
Mountain-is about completed. It has
been a steady job for several months.
The death occurred in' Spokane,
Wash., recently of the step-mother of
Andrew-'Johnson and William Johnson.
Mr. and Mrs. Wells, of Rock Creek,
were visitors to Greenwood on Tuesday.
They were accompanied by Harold
Fisher, who received medical attention
to an infected hand.
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Nordman are visitors to Nelson,, where Mr. Nordman is
receiving medical treatment,
, Mrs. C. H. Weed, of Ingram Mountain,
recently received the sad news of the
death of her mother in Minnesota on
January 28th. at the age of 95 years.
Joe Lander is visiting at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Weed.'
Frank Roberts of Meyers Creek, was
shopping in town on Tuesday.
Werner Preetzman of Kerr Creek, is
hauling wood every day into town.
Sonny Jackson is busy putting up ice
to be used in the summer months.
Mr. and Mrs.. Oscar Johnson were
visitors to Proctor over-the-week-end.
Miss Ruth Axam of Greenwood, was
the guest of Miss Alice McMynn over-
the-week-end. "
Guests at ..the Pacific /.Hotel during
the week:- Jas. Brodie. Nelson';. G.
Westover, Vancouver"; :������ ��� Hugh' *' Reid,
Lacombe, Alberta; *N,. A;' Hugg,-. C.' H.
Weed.C. Radan,-Midway; Rev. E..G.
Smyth, Kettle Valley; J:}R. Van Gelder,
Mrs. F. Van Gelder,. Westbridge ;-W. H.Johnston, Rossland; " Mrs; Fenwick
Wilson,'Rock Creek.   "-?*'
- The holder of the Ross Cup was de-
��� cided  on  Wednesday .night  and  the
Walters rink with Janies Reid as skip,
. carried of the competition getting* 32
points   in - three   games. * The   scores
follow:
Rinks-.      ���' Bryan Reid Walker"Miller
Forshaw ���
Bryan, skip
Walters
Reid, skip .
Walmsley
Walker, skip
jGoodeve
"Miller, skip'
15
10
10
11
Totals    - 19 32        29       25
In, the above' competition the rinks
. were reversed: ���
' Div: II. again led in the spelling
match this"" week with 100%. The scores
were: Grade IX���96.67%,-Grade VIII���
94%; Grade VII���93.75%; Grade VI���
97.3%,* Grade V���100%, Grade IV���
97.25%.
Attendance,is still very irregular on
account of the prevalence'of sickness.
Our Janitor, Mr. Andy Sater is also oin
the sick list. *       -
Miss Axam's room held a- Valentine
Box on St. Valentine;s -Day. Games
were-played in which Cicely and May'
won prizes. Valentin baskets filled with
candy were-presented.'.to the small
visitors:- "*' '���*���'--  ........     ���<.-.
VANCOUVER   IS   PROSPEROUS
On Sunday last W. C. Wilson returned
from Vancouver.-, He- says ' the Coast
metropolis is enjoying* a wave of wonderful "prosperity.* Real estate is
changing hands every day and immense'
buildings are going up on all sides.
Building permits for 1929 are estimated
: {^$53,000,000. The Canadian National
i-rotel alone will cost over $3,000,000.
With new elevators and huge business
blocks under "construction it is very,
evident Vancouver is at last coming
into its own. "    ���
Upon arriving in the city one of.the
first features to attract attention is the
new style of street advertising. Neon
gas signs are supplanting the old style
electric* lights."* The Neon signs have
simply taken Vancouver by storm and
they are certainly beautiful.
Mr. Wilson went through the Neon
sign factory and was able to observe
the sign construction in every detail.
The principal of this new light was
discovevered iri Europe about twenty
years ago but was not brought into
commercial use till recently. Air is
extracted from a glass tube. Neon gas
is then inserted. "A high voltage of
electricity is then pased through the
gas. The result is the most beautiful
illumination. So far only three colors
have been produced, red, green and
blue but with these the business of
sign lighting has been revolutionized.
This light shows up even in the. day
time so the curent is left on the entire
twenty four hours. This light also may
be seen for a long distance through the
thickest fog.
While in Vancouver, Mr. Wilson purchased some garage equipment which
will soon. be rendering service "to the
public..
Hugh Reid, of Lacombe, Alberta, was
a welcome ��� caller" at * The Greenwood
, Ledge office during the week-end. Mr.
Reid stopped-off oh his way home from
a visit to friends in Vancouver. He is
an oldtimer of Phoenfc% and was a shift
boss in the Granby mine over. 20 years
ago, prior" to going on land in Alberta.
Mr. Reid is still interested in mining,
owning a group of three claims above
Rock Creek, on which he has done con-'
siderable "development and has paid
taxes on them for twenty-five years.
' During his stay he had again the pleasure of meeting -an old friend in the person of Archie Aberdeen, and was glad
to know that'Archie'was recovering
from his recent illness. Mr. Reid has
made a success of farming in Alberta
and likes that part of the country. He
has every faith in the mines of this
section and hopes for better times in
the Boundary. He left on Sunday for
Bonnington where he will visit his
nephew, Waterford* Reid,   _\
.Charlie Royce left to attend school at
Trail this week. Charlie will be missed
by the hockey boys.   ���
Ori -Thursday afterhbbn,_ February
���14th, St.-Valentine.Day,<Div. III. of the
local Public School'had; some visitors
to listen to quite'a well arranged short
program.- .-���'.'
Theii* Valentine Village, made by the
boys of Div. Ill was very interesting as
was. also 'the large":display of work
round * about the walls - in the room.
Miss Heather Harris is to be congratulated .upon the* pleasant hour she
afforded the Mothers who were able to
be present. ."['.-
In Nelson on Friday evening, Miss
Hazel Johns of- the B. C. Telephone
Company's operating staff, daughter
o.f Mr. and-Mrs. Wm. .Johns of Rock
.Creek, was united in mariage to Robert
Irwin.Cuthbert, by Rev. W. C. Maw-
hiriney.' The"* marriage * which took
place in the Manse was witnessed by
only: immediate friends, Miss' Florence
S. McPhee and Claude. Miller being
the- attendants.' ' .
Mrs. J. Christian of Christian Valley,
was a visitor ih town last week.
, Saturday ,. evening ._. .the ��� sixteenth
pupils of Div. -Ivwere'jthe guests of
Principal and Mrs. Reid at an informal
Valentine Party. . The evening passed
pleasantly ih games and Icontests,-Ruth
_Cbx."-and- Bob ;Forsha*ff'%i*:*>'ni*iig...prizes,
in the-.latter'. Atten o'clock supper'was
served' amid colorful decorations.., This
was followed by more games in which
John Compolieto and Mr:, Fred -White
were . the lucky winners. Midnight
brought an end ��� tb a very enjoyable
evening.
' .A very enjoyable. Card Party was
held-at-the Upper Rock Creek School
on Saturday, February 16th. The ladies
prize was won by Mrs. Sam Cross,'the
gentleman's went .to Henry Madge. The
ladies* -booby, went. to a very popular
young lady and the gentleman's to Mr..
Lindsay.froni Alberta. The proceeds
($14.00) * will go towards a library for
the school. This amount,with the $10
Mrs. McLennan has received from the
United Farm Women, will give a very
good .start towards-buying books. Another card party .will be given in the
the school. Another card party will be
near future.* Mrs. Ed. Madge and Mrs.
Ellett contributed excellent music and
dancing* was~ thoroughly enjoyed. The
trustees wish'-to take this opportunity
to thank all who helped to make "the
eyening^a___ success, .financially and
socially.' X * ."��� " *   *���-���-������������.-���-- ���u=^_..
John L. Bush, G. N. agent, attended
the funeral of the late Angus Cameron
in Laurier on Thursday.
John Bush won the prize last Thursday, the 14th, at the Cribbage Party
held in the Old Schobl House.
��� Miss Gladys Brereton spent the
week-end in Greenwood and while there
made some arrangements for the Dance
on Friday, 1st March.
Hugh Reid of Lacombe, Alberta, was
in town on Thursday and Friday last
and called on J. H. Bush and other old
acquaintances in town.
^Andrew Porter, of Myncaster, accompanied by R. D. Kerr, 'motored to
Laurier on Thursday last to attend the
funeral of the late Angus Cameron.
Mrs. Charles Graser returned to her
home on Kerr Creek on Saturday, after
sometime spent nursing her daughter,
Mrs. Sam Bender, who has been very
ill, but the writer is glad to say is much
improved. <   . -
���.-7 Mrs. Ethel Zabel died in Spokane
recently. Mrs."- Zabel was a daughter
of*Mr.-and Mrs. Steve Swanson, well
known '���' pioneers of ' the Boundary
Country.
MUSHER
MAD"
Those .sending floral tributes to the
funeral of John C. Casselman, which
was held here on Wednesday, February
13th, were: Wife and family; son,
Gordon; Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Boltz and
family; -Margaret, Frances and Nita;
Farmer's Institute, Midway; School
Children, Boundary Falls; Federated
-Association, of Letter Carriers,-.King-,
ston, Ont.
"Quebec", says Sara Hamilton
^ Birchall, in "Country Life",
. "goes musher mad". It is so.
Every year, and this one more than
ever. Go tb.Quebec between February 21st ahd 23rd. All you will
hear is, dog, dogs; huskies, niush-
ei's, St. Goddard, Nolan; Chevrier,
Seppala!���a score of other names.
You will look at the big board in
the Chateau lobby .whereon the
odds are shown, antl you will wonder what it is all about. And
then, perhaps, an enthusiastic soul
will get you in a corner and .tell
you how on the third day of lhc
last derby, the man who was considered in the running only for
second place was held up by a
freight train -so long that his dogs
shivered and began to stiffen, but
won the 120 mile three day grind
hy a short minute or so; and how
he was cheered and chaired, and
how they come, these mushers,
from all parts of the North Country, with their dogs and hounds
end' huskies. You will pick your
dogs, Siberians, Alaskans, or just
plain dogsy and before the last
entrant has started on the first
lap on the first day, the fever will
have caught you. You will see
the first team drive, panting home,
$b.e next and the naxtj tha hero-?!
of Nome, the trail dogs from Le
Pas, fuzzy animals who know the
Quebec woods trails and teams'of
dogs bred, reared and trained for
this one great derby, dogs you
wouldn't want, worth hundreds;
dogs you could love, but who only
know a trainer's hand, ahd will
give allegiance but to him; dogs
in fours ahd fives and sixes, straining, eager, panting dogs with forty
miles behind them and-eighty before. Then you too are musher
mad, and the rough, shaggy individual in* fur and wool, whose
moccasined feet had not yet fitted
into your own ideas of things becoming-, it invested in the aura of a
breo ana a _wig_^ XgH wm.Pl
his name as he mushes past. You
hold your breath as the minutes
tick before the .next, arrival. A
team of mastiffs, greyhounds or
mongrels,. swings round a corner
into.-sight. Their time is close.
They have one minute in which to
reach.the goal, and win the first
lap. You too, are musher mad.
You watch the bulletin boards with
excitement and wordily, exchange
the gossip of the racing stables.
Then, when the great exhibition of
strength and endurance is over,
you can perhaps settle down to
enjoy' Quebec herself and those
winter sports in which you are
permitted to take a personal if not
Mfjw ��tr��auo_ja pajrt,
The Ladies Aid held their mee ting-
last Thursday at the home of Mrs.
Galbraith. There was a good attendance considering the cold weather. The
meeting opened with The Lord's Prayer
after which President Mrs. R. D. Kerr
read a passage of Scripture. The.
minutes were read by Mrs. H. Erickson,
assistant-secretary; MrsT^AT- Porterr
treasurer then gave an excellent report
on the Presbyterial Mission which she
attended at Trail. It was decided to buy
a new stove for the Old School House.
At the close of the meeting a very
dainty tea was served by the School
Teachers, Miss Galbraith and Miss
Knight. The tables were prettily
decorated with Valentines. Jelly and
whipped cream were served along with
special Valentine cakes. The next
meeting will be held at the home of
Mrs R. D. Kerr.
OF LOCAL INTEREST
The death occurred at Monte Creek
on February 14th of Annie Mude, aged
73 years, beloved wife of James Mude,
of Duck Range. The funeral took
place at Monte Creek on Saturday, Rev.
George Stewart officiating. Mrs. Geo.
A. Bryan, of Greenwood, is a daughter,
and the deepest sympathy of all is extended to her in her great loss.
J. D. Harrison of Beaverdell had
his leg broken about a month ago.
The leg did not progress as well as
might be expected so Mr. Harrison went
to St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver
where Dr. DeMuth re-set the limb
which is now progressing favourably.
Mrs Harrison is visiting her-Mother,
Mrs. Kirby at Keremeos, during her
husband's illness.
Frank, Fraser of Greenwood and
Osoyoos who is now residing in Van-.,
couver was recently injured while
riding in a street car in Vancouver.
While walking to his seat the car
started with a terrific jerk, Mr. Fraser
was thrown through the rear door and
landed across the iron rail with,the
result he had five ribs broken. He
received medical;attention at once and
is now well on the way to, recovery.
Kamloops All-stars recently defeated
Merritt in the former city, in a hockey
fixture by a score of 5 to 3. Percy
Fraser, son of Staff-Sergeant and Mrs.
Fraser, who got his start in hockey in
the Greenwood rink, was one of the
Stars. In their mention of the game the
Kamloops Sentinel,says: "YoungPercy
Fraser, who would rather play hockey
than eat, had a great evening. Usually
playing in the relief role, he was in
action Wednesday more than at any
time before and proved himself an
asset to the team by scoring unassisted, one of the nicest goals in the
evening's play," PAGE TWO
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, im.
y    ?.:?   y' ,'#'..(,-r^xi
ti-        .��� *.'���       /     '.���.'."'    ���'_';''������*'':���������
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The Greenwood Ledge
Published every Thursday at
Greenwood, B. C.
G. W. A. SMITH
EDITOR  AND  PROPRIETOR
Subscription: In Canada and Gt.
Britain, $2.00 a year in advance; $2.50
when not paid for three months or
more have passed. To the United
States $2.50, always in advance.
ADVERTISING RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices .. $25.00
Coal and Oil Notices      7.00
Estray Notices .-     3.00
Card of Thanks      1.00
Certificate of Improvement    12.50
(When more than one claim appears
in notice, $5.00 for each additional
claim.)
' All other legal advertising 1G cents
a line first insertion, ancl 12 cents a
line for each subsequent insertion, nonpareil measurement.
Business locals 12._c a line each insertion.
able. Only his voice, rising and falling
in sweet cadences to the accompaniment of running water or the clicking
razor strop presents 'him to the listening world as hc thinks hc is, and he
who sings loudest replases into somber
silence when, properly clad, ho prepares
to meet the world face to face.���The
Christian Science Monitor.
HARNESS SEA FOR ELECTRICITY
Mention of a vast scheme for harnessing tho Wash was made at a*��meet-
ing at Hunstantion, England, over
which Lord Fermoy, M.P., presided.
Mr. Weaver, the promoter, explained
that it was proposed to erect a wall
twenty-two miles long* and five and a
half miles out to0sea, and harness the*
tidal water for driving a-hydro-electric
plant capable of generating current at
twelve units a penny and supplying the
London and southeastern counties grid.
Parliamentary sanction was not needed, as thc Lord of the Manor owned
the foreshore and for over five miles
out to sea.
If there was no Government interference work for 4,000 could start immediately, and cheap power would
mean enormous help t'o all industries.
The cost was estimated at ��4,500,000.
Mistaken
A countryman saw a parrot on the
roof of his cottage. He climbed up to
capture it.
Thc parrot looked at him, and said
sharply:   "What do you want?"
The countryman touched his cap.
"Beg pardon, sir, I thought you was
a bird."-���Pearson's Weekly.
SEND  YOUR
BOOTS and SHOES
___   To   	
-*��� .\
Harry Armson, Grand Forks
The 20th Century Shoe Repairer
All work and material guaranteed
We pay postage one way.   Terms cash.
ASSAYER
E. W. WIDDOWSON
Provincial Assayer and Chemist
P. O. Drawer L1108, Nelson, B.C.
Established 1900
Charges made arc thc standard Western
rates.   Price lists sent on application.
A. E. McDOUGALL
Contractor and Builder
���*- !
J
MpNUAIENTS,        ROOFING,
LAMATCO WALL BOARD
Get my prices on.
LAMATCO
on walls finished, and save money
SHOP AT GREENWOOD
Box 332 Grand Forks. B.C.
The Search Diligent
CROP ROTATION AND
ROOT-ROT OF WHEAT
No letter to the editor will be inserted except over the proper signature and address of the writer. This
rule admits of no exception,
Tireless Shopper: "Thanks for showing me all these silks, but I'm not buying myself. I was just looking for a
neighbor.'.'
Weary Shopgirl: "Do you think she
could be in that one bolt of mauve
that I haven't shown you?"���College
Humor.
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting 'Co.
of Canada. Limited       -
Office," Smelting* and Refilling* Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA ,,
SMELTERS and REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers, of Gold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc    c        <
��� "TADANAC"  BRAND .
A^^A*.***.* AAA^-. A,.* JUM.AA ���=..-,  ,   .^J-. y..^.^^^^^.^A.^A^A^AAAAAAAAAAAAA.
The' blue cross means that
your subscription is due, and
that the editor would bo
pleased to have more money.
THE TUNE IN THE TUB
(Not those days in Greenwood)
A distinguished physical scientist has
set himseli seriously to thc task of explaining-why-men-havc-an-almosl-irre--
sislablo urge to sing at their morning
baths. Unhappily, like so many of his
���sort, ho relics too much on merely
physical phenomena to explicate what
is in fact an outpouring of the true joy
of existence. Moreover, he has becn
remiss in his collection of statistics.
Do as many tuneful folks warble about
thc Quilting Parly, or the Little Brown
Church in the Vale when they perform
their rather perfunctory ablutions at
night, as raise thcir lusty voices in the
morning? We think not, but the ques
tion might well be referred to the
Bureau of Economic Research. Moreover, what explanation "is to bc given
to the fact that thc philharmonists of
the morning tub ayways sing songs of
their early youth? Thousands of bathrooms this morning resounded to the
strains of mid-Victorian songs lo one
which mingled thc bejazzed melodies of
twentieth century music with the
aroma of its bath-salts.
How insufficient, ignoble even, is the
explanation given by the professor to
this resistless impulse of man to greet
the morn, as docs the lark, with a song!
He says it is because the average bathroom being small and rigidly compressed imparls so resonant a tone to
the worst' of voices that even a Will
Rogers warbling therein imagines himself a Caruso. This seems inadequate.
To begin with, it utterly ignores
thc altrustic motives which, seem
to impel these heralds of the dawn.
They sing, not for themselves alone but
. for all the inhabitants of the surrounding cubicles���especially those not yet
desirous of awakening. Nothing stimulates the sluggard of a morning more
than to hear from the bathroom across
the court the dulcet notes of Maggie
Murphy's Home and simultaneously
from the P-B-R and B above the
reminiscent melodies of the Sidewalks
of New York      -   ���
Being little versed in some of the
subtle complexities involved, we doubt
our capacity to elucidate their problem,
but we hazard this a contribution
to the literature of the Bathroom
Sonata. Man, prior to the completion of his morning toilet, is . no
engaging spectacle. Attired in pajamas
so different from those it is the fashion
nowadays to show on the stage that
they hardly deserve the same name, he
is painfully aware of his own esthetic
deficiencies. Tubbed and groomed he
may be irreproachable���before those
coa-monics he is little-short of deplor-
(Experimcntal Farms Note)
It is a well known fact that belter
crop yields are obtained by a proper
change of crops. The moisture, tilth
and fertility are improved, ancl stronger plants are produced. At least a part
of the improved fertility is associated
with the increased activity of the soil
inhabiting fungi ancl bacteria, resulting
from the change of crop or cultural
practice.
In most soils there are literally
millions of these microspic plants.
Sometimes several millions may be
found in a single gram of oil. The
numbers and kind of these tiny plants
depend directly on --the amount and
kind of food, ancl conditions for their
growth in the soil. Certain plants
favor the development of some kinds
more than others. When root parts or
other plant remains are added to the
soil, the fungi and bacteria quickly
multiply on this material reducing it to
plant food. At thc same timc thc
activity of th6se affects other potential
plant food in the soil, and which,
without this influence would remain
unavailable. Unfortunately, some of
these soil inhabiting fungi and bacteria
may attack both living and dead root
parts of some plants. The iungi that
cause root-rot of wheat is able to do
this. Therefore, when wheal follows
wheat for a term of years, there is an
accumulation of the rot-rotting fungi
until the amount becomes so great that
much loss may occur. _-On the other
hand, oats, llax and thc legumes are
not appreciably attacked by the fungi
which attack the roots of wheal. With
a crop of any of these the root-rotting
fungi will decrease so lhat wheat may
again be grown with comparatively
slight loss.
For extensive surveys, made by the
Dominion Plant Pathology Laboralories,
il is clear that rarely more than a
trace of root-rot occurs where wheal
follows breaking of the virgin sod.
However, there is a marked increase of
thc severity of root-rot on the second,
third and fourth crops. Thc reason for
this has not yet been determined experimentally, but there is lhe possibility that the introduction- of wheat
debris into the soil is an* important
factor. Of course, there aro many
cases where severe root-rot fails to develop, and this may be due to certain
soil or other climatic factors.
Where spring wheat follows wheat
successively on old cultivated land the
root-rots tend to become more severe.
The afTect of the timc of plowing on
thc development of root-rots" has not
been determined. There is good evidence that slubbling in a crop or the
inclusion of a largo amount of wheat
stubble will greatly favor the severity.
But summerfallow, or a crop of oats,
will undoubtedly, reduce the rool-rols
on thc following crop of wheat. But to
obtain the desired result, the oats ancl
the summerfallow must bc free from
wheat or other volunteer host grasses.
Some of the worst cases of root-rot
have occurred where wheat followed
brome sod.
In certain parts of Western Canada
where the root-rots are a menace, a
good crop rotation will be very helpful
in checking the root-rots. In fact, this
is the only method at present available.
Teacher Was Right
A pupil was having trouble with
punctuation and was being called down
by the teacher.
"Never mind, sonny," said the visiting school board president, consolingly,
"it's foolish to bother about commas.
They don't amount .to much anyway."
"Don't they," replied the teacher,
turning to the president. Then calling
on one of the pupils she ordered the
boy to write on the board this sentence:
"The president of the board says the
teacher is a fool." "Now," she continued, "put a comma after 'board' and
another after 'teacher'." -. .
;mX XX XX  XX X***  ****X XX XX  XX  XX XX XX
���^^
itJ^aystouAdvettise
In the Local Paper
Use the Advertising Columns of
the Local Paper. It is just large
enough to make your advertisement appear one of the important things published each week.
The Greenwood Ledge
xx
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
11
-IS
X\
n
w THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1926.
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
I-AGK frHREH
\o   .
ROBOT SERVANTS
SOON TO BE COMMON
<��>'
li
London.���Although England's first
Robot was created only a few months
ago, he. already has six brothers ranging in height from Jasper's six feet to
Little Rupert's five feet ten.
Despite their tender ages the services of all seven have been hired out
-under the contract-labor system during
tho School-boy's Exhibition at Horticul-
' tural Hall, and soon after the exhibition closes the Robot family will be
broken up and the brothers sent out
��� to different railway stations and street-
corners to take twenty-four-hour a day
jobs answering questions and giving
directions.
- How these dully gleaming giants of
'steel work has now been revealed .for
the first time in connection with the
Schoolboys' Exhibit, where Rupert, a"
' bright little fellow, is to be seen with
his chest and head cut open and all
his ins'ides revealed.' Young John Bull
jr., presses a button on Rupert's tummy. Almost instantly lights start from*
under Ruperts heavy eyebrows and a
voice incredibly deep booms out: "What
do" you want' to know." "
, Young ' John,, startled, stutters,
"P-please, where can I get a bite to
eat?"     . - "   -'    -
"Take the third aisle ori your left
and walk straight on," booms the voice.
-Then the lights die out and Rupert is
once again a senseless structure of cold
steel.      - ' ���
Bewildered,-young John follows the
directions, and 'sure enough, walks
straight into a restaurant. .
Now-what has happened is* this:
When the youth pushed the button on
Rupert's tummy, a light "showed on a
switchboard. in front of a man at a
table, in a control room. He immediately "plugged in" on Rupert, lighting up
Rupert's eyes .and establishing a- telephonic contact with a microphone hidden behind a silver gauze-covered hole
in Rupert's front. Thus the man at the
central control station heard young
" John's question and he promptly answered back by telephone, his words
being, amplified by a loud speaker in
Rupert's chest.       .- _ -
If the question asked is a "sticker,"
the man at the control station, and
through him, Rupert, says: "Wait a
minute," and the right answer is looked
up in handy reference books. One man
in the central control office, it is declared, will in this way be able to handle the questions asked of, say, a dozen
or more Robots installed in a railway
station, big shops, hotels, or even on
street corners, and it is predicted that
within the next few years these grim,
formidable Robot servants will be commonplace sights in all large cities.
More Useful
(
Brown was called to the police court
to receive a reward for rescuing a
woman from the water.   "I am pleased
 .-to-phi--this=.medal-4o your-breast,"--said
the magistrate,   "and also to lodge $25
-    to your  credit in  the bank  as  an
'V.' jknowledgement of your great bravery.
Brown  showed  some   little  embarrassment,,, and then said:   "If it's all
the same to you, sir, I'd rather you'd
pin the $25 to my breast and lodge
.   the medal in the bank."���Wall street
Journal.
For the  Present
When Peggy returned from her first
day at school she was asked how she
enjoyed it.
"I liked it alright," said Peggy, "but
I didn't get any present."
"What made you think you would
get a present, dear?"
"Teacher said, 'Sit there for the
present; and I sat there all morning
���and never got one."
Printing
is the inseparable companion of
Achievement
Have Your
Letterheads, Billheads, Siatements,
Envelopes, Window Cards, Posters,
Dodgers, Etc.
Printed at The..
Greenwood Ledge
WILLIAM H. WOOD
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
GREENWOOD
MIN& OWNERS AND PROSPECTORS
We have inquiries for
Good Prospects and Partly
Developed Mines
Anyone having properties*'for disposal
please get in touch with us
CHAMBER OF MINES
Nelson, B.C. Box 901
������-������--������g*--^*--!-*--^
urating the
��
oj nan
Feb: 26
Four Kinds of-
Service
1. Stalion-to-Station. You call a
number, but not a person, and you'
pay if you get the number.
2. Person-to-Person. You "call a
person, and pay if you get him.
Rate about 25r/o higher than sta-
.tion-to-staliorL day rate. -
3. Appointment.    You-placesa
call on which you wish" us, to in-'
form the called parly that you will
speak to him or her at, a specified
lime.   Rale about 50% higher than
' slalion-to-slalion day rale.
4. 'Messenger.. When lhc called
party has no telephone "a messenger will, be sent to bring him lb "a
telephone. Rate same as for appointment calls, plus actual cost of
messenger.
(~1UR system of long-distance telephone lines
has been widely extended during the past
year owing to purchases and" new construction,
and for the convenience of telephone users it is
now desirable that we adopt the standard classified method of handling calls over these new
lines. Consequently, on February 26 the new system, which is now in general.use throughout
most of Canada and the United States, will come
into effect.
The new plan will apply to all calls between
here and points on the lines of the B.C. Telephone Company's system.
One of the advantages of the classified system will be the introduction of station-to-station
service, thus giving the public a new and cheaper
type of long-distance service.
Following are some examples of the new classified rates:
Greenwood
to    -
Bridesville, ���-���
Cranbrook   -
Grand Forks
_Ki_mb.erley_____
Station-lo-Station
Day
4:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m,
First
3 Mins.
,   Each
Addl.Min.
Evening"
7:00'p.m. lo 8:30 p.m.
First "*       Each
- .".Mins.     Addl.Min.
Nelson
Penticton
Rock Creek
Trail
Vancouver
.20
1.05
.10
JL.00-
.60
.45
.15
.40
1.50
.05
.35
.05
-30.
.20
.15
.05
.10
.50.
.20
.80
-    .10
 75-
.45
���  .35
.15
.30
- 1.15
.05
.25
.05
-.25^
.15
.10
'.05,
.10
..35
Night
:30 p.m. to 4:30 a.m,
First
���3 Mins.
.20
.55
.10
-.50-
.30
.25
.15
.25
.75
Each
Add 1. Min,
.05
.15
.05
-,15-
.10
.05
.05
..05
.25
Person-to-
Person
AH Hours
First
3 Mins.
Each
Addl.Min.
.30
1.30
.15
-li-25-
.80.
.65
.20
.55
1.90
.10
.40''
.05
=----^40-
.25
.20
.05
.15
.60
Reduced evening and night rates apply only on station-lo-station calls.
Slation-to-station calls may-be made "Collect" if the initial rate is 25 cents or more.
Rates lo points not listed above, and Appointment and Messenger Rates, may be
obtained by calling "Long Distance."
B.C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
,**i^i*ta^iaHf*;**_i_-^vj^
Subscribe for
The Greenwood Ledge PAGE FOUR
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1928.
> '���y-y^-��TV,��v'y'yy'��,y'**rv****'T'yv-y'*��'vv'yTT*��-yvTT**ry,*r-yT-v,r-*��r'i'T'yvwwv-ry,
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y                             Come in and Hear                            <
������'������'                          ' 1
The INew Marconi   v
"                                  -                         '                                           '*                      '/'    '���      '                                                                           4
|                   1929 RADIO                  |
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; ������                   ���>:^ ..           ���-..������
;                        -       T.M. GULLEY               <.:
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���                        Distributor for Greenwood                        <
AAAAAA AA AA  .AttA.l.AaA..t.AAtJ..tA.t/lt.>_Mia^*'-"'*-^**1
Specials
Strawberries 2s in heavy Syrup per can 30c
Mixed Vegetables 2s       -      ���       3 cans 70c
(Good for Soups or Stews) ;
Elbow Gut Macaroni        -       -      2 lbs 25c
Fresh Salmon, halibut & Cod Eish   f
Every Thursday
fresh Sausages Every Friday
,.   ���'���.-������    -.-' * *     .. ���,    ���������.������������    ������ ���'. -���- . . '.i ��� ���.
For Quality and Value Order From Phone 4G
GREEINWOOD GROCERY
ryvvyvy'vvvyv'wvr'W'VYvyyy^rrv'
Edison Mazda Lamps
Have taken another
Drop in Price
We Are The Sole Agents
'^ AA. AAAAAA A A A -W./> A .t, A A  A A.  * A
PACIfIC HOTEL a 77 A
headquarters for
Boundary Mining and Travelling Men
^        First Class Accommodation -       --
Mot and Cold Water Every Convenience
J. h. GOODEVE
Prop.
Drug Store In Connection
Strawberry Jam     -     -     4's 75c
Raspberry Jam      -     -    4's 70c
Gingersnaps   -    20c lb 4 lbs 75c
/    ���*���
Oranges      -     324's per doz 25c
���f-��T?ffvvy��-yT,T'rv7V"��y��Tf*(*"fV7��Tvwvv��>vyv��-ov ��vvv->vfVTvr<
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_.<,.*.4*l*U*>iiU^At^ftt4AUtUitt*UA>ti.*^tM��tiH^
Head Lettuce, Celery and Bananas
McMYNN'S STORE, Midway
Subscribe to lhe Greenwood Ledge
�� ������������ ���������&]���
I Of-Local Interest f
I ��� ������.'*     A��;
Robt. Lee was in Grand Porks on
Monday ;on business.
W. Montgomery and R. Mowat left
for Beaverdell on Wednesday, where
they will be employed on the Tiger.
-*'. C. H. Weed, of Ingram Mountain,
was in town on Tuesday and Wednesday.
Mr. Weed is an oldtimer of the district
having* arrived hero in 1896.
Mr. ancl Mrs. J. W. Armstrong- and son
Jimmy returned to Lardo on Thursday
last,-after a few days visit with Mrs.
Armstrong's mother, Mrs. Casselman
at Boundary Falls.
Miss Vera Walmsley entertained a
number of friends at the home of her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm.' Walmsley
on Saturday evening last. A very
pleasant time was had by all present.
Mrs. E. E. Gibson left on Wednesday
morning for an extended trip to Boston,
New York and other eastern Cities.
Mr. Gibson will join his wife at Spokane
and will visit his old College at Boston.
���Penticton Herald.
The Greenwood Ladies Aid will meet
at the home of Mrs. James Reid on
Tuesday, February 26th at 3 p.m. As
there is a special matter for consideration a full attendance would be
appreciated.
The many friends of Archie Aberdeen
were pleased to see him about town
again after his illness. Archie caught
cold which compelled him to stay at the
homc of his great friend, Alex McKenzie
for over a month.
G. A. Guernsey, of Penticton, presided at the sitting of the Court of
Revision in Greenwood on Friday
morning last. Two cases were dealt
with. James Kerr, Assessor of Penticton was present at the sitting.
, Mrs. Reggie . Skilton and daughter
Gloria, returned Lo their home in
Wallace on Wednesday after a several
weeks visit with relatives in Greenwood.
Thcy went*via Nelson on account of the
Marcus- bridge trouble.
A survey bf current publications place
thc Family Herald and Weekly Star of
Montreal in the lead for variety and
quality of reading. Always recognized
as a steady guide and counsellor to the
farmer tho survey proclaims it almost
equally popular in urban homes.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Van Gelder, Stan
Pcttcrson, Bud Van Gelder and Frank
Christian of the Main Kettle River
were in town on Friday evening last.
They motored in Lo attend the hockey
game, but .were disappointed as the
game happened to be in Grand Forks.
WANT PLOUGHING MATCH
Mrs. A. R. Royce and two children,
Margaret ancl Charlie, left on Tuesday
"afternoon for Trail where thew will in
future reside. Mrs. Royce has been a
citizen of Greenwood for many years
ancl during her stay here has made
many^frionds_who_greatly_regret__her_
departure. Mrs. Royce was President
of the Women's Hospital Auxiliary and
did a great deal of the hard work when
the'hospital firs L, star ted. ��� She was at
all times a very willing worker and a
most capable one and so will be greatly
missed by all. The Greenwood Ledge
joins with a host of friends ih
wishing Mrs. Royce the best of every-1
thing in her new environment.
��� The regular meeting of the Midway
Farmers'. Institute will be held in the
Hall, Midway, on March 2nd. Considerable interesting, items of business will
come up for discussion, among which
is the Ploughing Match. Efforts are
being made to hold this event either in
tlie spring or fall, and suitable prizes
will be offered. Rules -for a ploughing
match are:
The following rules have been compiled from those in force at numerous
ploughing matches. They are intended
as a guide to the agricultural societies
and may havc to be changed to suit thc
particular ideas and conditions of any
society.
The, three following suggestions are
given as to who shall'compete:- ���
(a) Competition open to all comers
except, ploughmen who have won two
championships. If desired a separate
competition may be put on for these.
(b) Competition open to all members of the agricultural society.
(c) Owners of teams or their bona
fide servants must operate ploughs.
Rules.
1. Entry fee of $1.00; boys under
16 free. Any one contributing $2.00 or
over to the prize fund will be allowed an
entry for himself or servant.
2. All entries must be made before
9 a.m. on the day of the match, but
intending competitors are especially
requested to notify the secretary at
least three days in advance, so that
the ground may be staked out-in time.
3. All ploughman must be on the
grounds before 9.30 a.m.; when lots will
be drawn for position. Ploughing will
start by signal at 10 a.m. and must be
completed by 4 p.m. Any ploughmen
coming after lots are drawn will be
obliged to take his lot in rotation
with those who have drawn and finish
not later than the time limit. Any
ploughman not finished when time is
called will be ruled out. v
4. The land to be ploughed shall not
be more thaii"* % acre for single furrow
ploughs and V& acres for two furrows
ploughs.
5. Each ploughman will make. one
strike out and one finish. All crowns
must be opened out deep enough Lo cut
all weeds and grass. Five rounds shall
constitute a crown.
6. No person will be allowed Lo interfere with or help the ploughman
except in setting up aiid removing polos,
and no person will be allowed lo accompany  the  ploughman.'
7. In all cases the crowns must be
opened out and finished with the same
plough and team.that is used throughout.
8. The 'depth of the ploughing Lo be
six inches and the width of the furrow
the same as the width of the plough
used. This depth should be reached by
the third round after opening up. The
sole furrow is not Lo be lifted. Ploughmen are not required to finish a furrow
of full width.
9. Gauge wheels Lo be used in all
classes.
10. Chains or other devices for
covering* weeds to be allowed, but all
weeds must be cut.
11. No pulling or covering of weeds
with either hand or foot, or trampling
of land with feet allowed. Anyone
not coniforming to this rule will be
reduced one point for each offence.
.12.   In any  class where  not more
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. J. C. Casselman, daughters and
sons wish to thank their many friends
for their kind sympathy and beautiful
floral tributes, during their sad loss of
a loving husband and father. They
especially wish to thank Mr. and Mrs.
G. B. Watson; also Mr. R. C. Taylor.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Midway
A grand Concert is being arranged by
Miss Gladys Brereton, president of lhc
W. I., whicli she hopes to put on in the
Farmer's Hall about the middle of
April.
Jim Bush's five-piece orchestra have
kindly consented to play for the Benefit
Dance on March 1st, at a reduced rate.
s*s
The Farmer's Institute and Women's
Institute will hold' their meeting in thc
Hall on Saturday, March 2nd at 2:30
p.m.
A. Cribbage Party will be held in thc
Old School House on Thursday, Feb.
28th.
All members of thc" Women's Institute are asked to donate a cake and
50 sandwiches for ihe Benefit Dance on
Friday, March 1st.
ROCK CREEK FARMER'S INST.
________ a
A General meeting of the Rock Creek
Farmer's Institute will be held on Saturday,- next, February 23rd at the
Riverside Hall at 2:30 p.m.
Discussions:
Advisability of clean seed grain; also
clean seed potatoes; and gopher control.
All farmers wanting stumping powder
for 1929 kindly send.in their orders to
the Secretary, R. E. Norris, to enable
same to come" in one shipment from the
factory,
than one entry is made the judge shall
decide what prize, if any, shall be
awarded. The judges have a right to
withold a prize if 50 points have not
been made. '
13. Any ploughman not coniforming
to,the above rules will be disqualified.
14. Protests must be lodged with thc
secretary by noon of the day following
the match, and must be accompanied
with a deposit of $2.00. The decision
of the committee in charge of. the
the ploughing match shall be final.
Suggested Events.
1. Men's 14 inch walking plough.
2. Men's. 16 inch walking plough.
3. Men's 16 inch sulky plough, 3
horses.
4. Men's 2 furrow gang, 14 inch, 4
horses.
5. Men's single disc plough, 3 horses.
6. Boys under 16, 14 inch walking
plough.
7. Boys under 16, 16 inch walking
plough. .
8. Boys under 16, 16 inch sulky
plough, 3 horses.
9. Boys under 16, 2 furrow gang, 14
inch, 4 horses.
. 10. Boys under 16, single disc plough,*
3 horses.
Similiar prizes may be arranged for
young men from 17 to 21, or 24.
If little work is done in the district
with walking ploughs they may be
dropped out and the prizes "given for
the kind in general use.
10% OFF on all
DRESS and WORK SHOES   ,
���also���
MINERS & Loggers RUBBERS
Childrens Rubbers selling for 50c
MEN'S HATS, CAPS,
HEAVY WORK SOX,. GLOVES,
OVERALLS, GERMAN SOX,
HEAVY PANTS,
WORK and DRESS SHIRTS,
DRESS GLOVES,
FANCY SILK and WOOL SOX
Sale on Heavy Underv/car
Ellen Trounson's Store/
>MA4MAAi-J_.AAi>_UA^Att.
'          .                                                                                                                4
>
>
STOCKS         BONDS
4
4
>
>
FINING SHARES
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Charles King
>
representing
>
>
Solloway, Mills & Co.
4
4
>
Dominion Wide Brokers
4
4
��� 4
���
>
,     STOCKS & BONDS
4
4
4
4
:
4
>
on Installment
MINING SHARES
���
on Margin
4
4
>
Wire .Your Orders
4
4
iwwwmmwn
4
Daily Price Lists
4
4
>
"   at Office            ���    .
:
>
*���
Copper St., Greenwood, B.C.
<
4
Ca
A-tlAAAAAtAAAA A A A A A A A A a a a, a *
-^rvw-w^rwv-w vvvvwvv ww~:
To those who contemplate
buying
Wedding: Presents or ..Gifts
for their friends
Let us remind you that we can
supply you  cheaper than  you
can buy from Catalogue
Let us have your
Watch and Clock Repairs
Wo always do a first-class job
A. A. WHITE
Watchmaker  and  Jeweler
F. J. While, Mgr,
P 4
,-tt*ttti-.AAA*in A A A AAJt.j*J^2,
The United Church of Canada
REV. ANDREW WALKER, B.A.
.Minister in Charge, Greenwood.
SUNDAY.   FEBRUARY  24    ,
, G_r_eenw_ood,J_.:30_*am.��� ._
Benefit Dance
In aid of Mrs. Casselman
FARMER'S HALL
MIDWAY
FRIDAY, MARCH 1st, 1929
Bush's Five-Piece Orchestra
Admission $1.00 Including Supper
Come and Have a Good Time and
Help a Worthy Cause
AfPLES FOR SALE
A few more boxes of Good Apples
For Sale from 25c to $1.00 in your own
boxes.
, T. A. CLARK, Midway.
PIGS FOR SALE
Seven weeks, $6.00 each.
Apply   Mrs. W. J. McCelvey,
Kettle Valley, B.C.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
Department of Lands intends to dispose of Part 9.93 acres of the southeast quarter of the north-east quarter
Section 32, Township 70, Similkameen
Division of Yale District, Plan 7378-D.
AU persons owning material located
thereon are therefore notified to remove
same on or before August 1st, 1929,
after which date no claims will be
recognized and the property with contents will be disposed of.
G. R. NADEN,
Deputy Minister of Lands.'
Victoria, B.C.,
9Lh February, 1929.
IN TIIE MATTER OF THE
COMPANIES ACT R. S. B. C. 1924
and
IN THE ESTATE OF
GLASORD MINING CORPORATION
LIMITED IN LIQUIDATION
��� NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Glasord Mining Corporation Limited went into voluntary liquidation on
the 15th day of January, 1929, and
that the Prudential Trust Company
Limited has been appointed Liquidator
of the Estate.
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN
that the first meeting of creditors will
be held at the oflice of the Liquidator,
456 Seymour Street, Vancouver. B.C.,
on the 28th day of February, 1929, at
two o'clock in the afternoon.
Claims of creditors must be lodged
with the undersigned prior to the meeting. '
. PRUDENTIAL TRUST COMPANY
���''Si*
.'I
1
i
i
1
��� I!
Limited,
-Liquidator.

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