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The Greenwood Ledge Nov 22, 1928

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 ''Provincial Library
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VOI/. Ill
GREENWOOD, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1928
-No. 17
GREENWOOD SCHOOL NOTES
*    Editorial Staff:
John Campolieto, Eileen Bryan,
Ernest Johnson, Alice Clark
In spite of the 'fine weather many
pupils" are, absent from school * on
account of illness.
GOLD MINING  PROSPECTS
It was Georgina Boug's birthday on
the 20th, Tom Forshaw's on the 23rd.
The secretary of. the .Greenwood
Tigers.would be pleased if the members
would kindly pay their monthly dues.
The pupils of Division II showed
their enthusiasm in .The Junior Red
Cross by selling. 1000 Christmas seals
in a very few days. The - money will
help the people- of British Columbia
who have tuberculosis.
Division II vanquished Division I
" in the Challenge Spelling Competition.
Grade VI carried off honors with a
i' standing of 100%.   Other results were
as follows:   Grade VII���99.17%; Grade
VIII���97.9%; Grade V���95.62%; Grade
IV���86.67%.
' -The "Tigers-are handicapped by the
disappearance of the basketball pump
- and lacer.. They would greatly a'ppre-
' date the return of these articles (and
no questions asked). '
Prizes for a "Bowl of Fruit" were
awarded: in Division. Ill as follows:
Grade II���Georgina Boug.
"Grade III���Cecil Maletta.
There will be a meeting at 4 p.m. on
Friday the 23rd, in the Schoolhouse
in _ the interest of formation of a
Christmas Tree for the children. Come
and give us your ideas.
Advance Payment
What are you thrashing" your little
son for? -
He will get his school report tomorrow, and I must go away tonight.
THE RADIO GOES TO SCHOOL
Will the school textbook, pass into
history .with the coming age of'motion
picture and radio? There are those
who may welcome the thought. Is the
child of the future to discard his bulky
school bag in favor of a pocket receiving
set? Will the coming sixth grader take
pride in turning the crank of a small
camera instead of lugging home his
big geography? The convention in
Joliet, 111., at which the conjecture
which might arouse such questions was
\���-recently-made���glimpsed-a'theoretical
school of the future where sermons on
screens and books in running radios are
the order of the day. There is doubtless something in it, as all the .world
knows, says the Christian Science Monitor.
But the gradual supplanting of the
traditional textbook is the trend of an
age seeking to unshackle the child from
an artificial form of education separated
from daily living.   The textbook made
school-learning   a   thing   apart. - Toe
often the graduate found himself suddenly in an unfamiliar world in which
book knowledge was no longer distilled
for his special case; then having no
study habits which applied to the new
circumstances, he dubbed himself educated and called  it a day.   Certain
: modern schools, are now using mimeographed outlines in place of textbooks,
and are. filling.bookshelves (incidentally
that school bag also) with fascinating
books'of travel, magazines marked for
special articles, newspapers, biographies,
classic and modern fiction and nonfic-
tion;   The child of such a school should
make   an  easy   adjustment  between
broadening his thought-horizons  before and after graduation, for the processes are obviously more akin than
under* the old one-textbook .method.
Schoolbook  men   are   following   this
trend.   Some are leading it effectively.
It may therefore be sound to point
out that, while in-this movement the
radio and the motion picture are essential," they are not the essential factors.
The wide-awake school realizes that a
modern, vigorous educational idea' demands every possible form of textbook���the, museum/zoo, park, woodland, factory, public library, symphony
concert, handwork.   If the traditional
textbook goes, it will doubtless "be because * educators are jasing these, and
other, means of enriching the child's
experience���the radio and the motion
picture not least among them. "Certainly in such company a tremendous
opportunity is offered to the screen and
the loudspeaker if they are to measure
up   to  this  compelling  challenge  of
modern educational ideals.
By E. A. Haggen
in" Vancouver Province
c *
At Long Lake, close to Greenwood,
gold-telluride deposits extend the entire length of the "lake' on the east
side.- There are, several veins, and in
places they  obtain  large  dimensions.
The Old Jewel Mine, operated by an
English cqmpany, produced considerable gold.   Mr. C. A. Banks, managing
director of the B. - C. "Silver, has acquired this property with a view to
further   operation.    What   the   camp
needs is a consolidation! of all properties "and equipment,' with a modern
plant adapted to complex ores of this
type  which made -famous  the gold-
fields of Western Australia..
- At the head of the North Fork of the
Kettle River, Dean Brock, when examining that district for the Geological
Survey, found promising gold deposits
in  a  zone  which  evidently  extends
across   the   divide   south   of   Cherry
Creek' where the   writer has seen outcrops of -free *gold.   This  is  in  the
Vernon mining  division, the mineral
resources of which are much neglected.
Mission  Creek,   which  heads  in  the
same   watershed,   was   an   important
producer of placer gold 'in the early
days.   Gold associated with telluridcs
has been found on both the east and
west sides of Okanagan Lake, and some
development has been done at. Ewihg's
Landing.   Siwash , Creek should carry
quartz veins as it' has been extensively
worked for placer gold.   A new strike is
reported by'Mr.-H. J. Burton, a pioneer,
on the north side of the creek.
The Osoyoos district was the first
producer and dividend-payer from lode
gold mining in the province, when the
'Cariboo 'mine of Camp McKinney
made that camp famous. Mr. C. F.
Law of Vancouver, has ��� acquired the
Waterloo mine, which carries high
gold values,-with a view to reviving
the life .of a camp which was full of
romance in its - halcyon days, and
formed the stage for one of��the most
sensational gold-brick robberies on
record. The Fairview camp., is another of the old camps that should
come back. It has numerous quartz
veins carrying payable, values. Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. has
secured a-large..area-, there, evidently
with a view of testing" it out. If-"results are ��� sufficiently encouraging that
company will no. doubt reopen, the
camp,'and if it does, prospectors and
other investors will" follow.
On the Tulameen River there are
promising occurrencesjof gold-quartz.
The placer production .of that river
and its tributaries suggests important
possibilities. The Coquihalia gold belt,
sQUth_of_Hope_has^undergone_suffici--
ent. development* to establish, the fact
that the geology is similar to that of
the Bridge River goldfield.
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Frank Roberts of Myers Creek, was a
visitor in town today:
PLAN $1,000,000 CONCENTRATING
PLANT FOR GRAND FORKS
W. F. Trant, post office inspector,
was in town on official business last
week. .  -
C. Scott McRae has as his guest this
week, a nephew", Mr. Morrison," cf
Wayne, Michigan..
Tony Portmann, of Nicholson Creek,
Kettle Valley, spent .Wednesday night
in" town -the guest of Mr.. and Mrs. L.
Portmann.'
Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Cudworth of
Bridesville, were the guests of Mayor
and Mrs. T. M. Gulley during the
week-end.
F. L. Peterson had the misfortune-to
have the'top of his index finger cut off
on his left hand when using an axe bn
Wednesday. -   -
Miss Catherine' Gowans of Grand
Forks was the guest at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Wm:*'Walmsley during
the week-end.
Malcolm Williamson arrived in town
on Tuesday's Coast train and is visiting
at the home of his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. R. Williamson.
C. F. Archer, of the Forestry Department, Nelson, accompanied by~E. M.
Holm are spending the week cruising
timber up Boundary Creek.
James Hallett is expected to arrive
home, from Portland, 'Oregon, this
evening. Jimmy will'spend the winter
here. . He is now a qualified aviator.    *
(Grand Forks Gazette)
"Expenditure of $1,000,000 or more in
construction work on the old Granby
smelter site of a- customs ore concentrating pant that will handle probably
2,000 tc-ns daily" of ores from numerous
properties now-under development in
the Boundary district, is the auspicious
program - which Mr. R. Crowe-Swords
of Vancouver, representing* the  Hercules  Consolidated  Mining,   Smelting'
and Power Corporation Limited, outlined to the City'Council at a meeting
last Wednesday evening, an agreement
covering which was approved by thc
Council.
Building of such .a- plant will, .of
cqursc, be contigent on tests already
made of the 12,000,000 tons of smelter
slag being borne out by thorough exploration with diamond drill, and the
agreement being ratified by the principals of -the Hercules Consolidated.
However, vit is the intention of Mr.
Crowe-Swords to have' the matter
placed before his principals - without
delay and exploratory work on the
molten slag pile would be commenced
early in the new year. In view of the
assay" returns already obtained from
sampling of the smelter slag in a cursory way there, is ample reason to
believe that the values to be found
therein will justify proceeding with the
undertaking which promises to rival if
not.surpass the big operations* which
were carried on there for years by the
Granby Consolidated Mining,' Smelting
and Power Company with its'smelting
works that were -the largest in the
Empire."
MIDWAY NEWS
-��Fritz' A. Nystrom is 'investing in a
new radio.
Mrs. H. Pannell spent the 'week-end
at Grand Forks.
Mrs. Lautard and children of Carmi,
were visiting here'on Monday.
Mrs. Sam Bender was visiting in
Grand Forks over the week-end.
Jacksqns had the misfortune to loose
some cattle last week by poisoning.
Harold Erickson is the newest radio
fan in town, having purchased a radio.-
Harold Erickson met with-a painful
accident while at his work, injuring his
leg and spraining his wrist,
J. K. Ashman, who makes his home'
here, left for the Coast on Sunday
morning on a business trip.
Johnnie Bjorn is here from California and expects to start work with his
brother Henry on their property.        '
F. Szczapanqwski has taken options,
at the uusual rate, on the. Unlucky
Pig, the Sapphire, the Nancy and the
Calamity mines in the vicinity.    ,
PROSPECTING    .
BY ELECTRICITY
NOW STANDARD
The Cribbage Card Party held in the
Old School House on Tuesday evening
proved quite interesting. Seven ladies
and seven gents turned out and the
box of apples was carried home by
Harold Erickson for being the best
cribbage player that evening.
Major and Mrs. Swanton and family
left Kettle Valley last week for Duncan,
where they will reside. * They sold their
property at Kettle Valley to Rev. Mr.
Tqyne.
GLASORD TO MERGE
- IN  BIG   CONSOLIDATION
- MrsV'Mark - Christeiisar-returned "on
Wednesday last from the Grand Forks
Hospital, where she has been since Oct.
18th. Mrs. Christensen's many friends
will be pleased to hear that she is making-splendid progress toward recovery
from her recent operation.
A. E. McDougall was in town on
Wednesday en route home to Grand
Forks from Midway where he .pur-
"chased"2"carloa"ds_of" lumber from the
McArthur Mill fqr the buildings he is
erecting at'Christina Lake for G. C.
Brown.. Mr. McDougall has a- crew of
15 carpenters busy at that point.
The Accused���I was not going thirty
miles an hour���not twenty, not*'even
ten; in fact, when the officer came, up,
T was almost at a standstill.
The Magistrate���I must stop this or
you'll be- backing into something.
Forty shillings!���London Tatler (via
Judge).  '
Greenwood, one of the busiest -mining cities iri-the interior 20 years ago,
may stage a comeback if present developments mature. Negotiations are
in "hand by a strong financial group,
American and Canadian', for the amalgamation of the Glasord Mining .Corporation and its holdings, in which
Glasord shareholders will receive four
shares of new stock for each one now
held. Par value of the new stock will
be 25 cents, and preparations are being
made for the immediate incorporation
of the B. C. company which will have
its headquarters in this province.
Capitalization is to:$2,500,000,-in 25 cent
shares.
The holdings of the new company
will include 60; crown granted claims in
the Greenwood district,. all of which
adjoin, and which included the Crescent and other claims. This will be
one of the largest consolidations'recently effected, and when carried into
effect presages activity in the Greenwood  district.
Some weeks ago Pacific Tidewater
Mines, affiliated with Ladysmith Tidewater Smelters, took bonds on old-time
property in Phoenix camp, and last
week R. R. Hedley, representing J. B.
Woodsworth, bonded property in the
Summit camp, also tributary to Greenwood.  ���Western Canada Mining News.
The Catholic Women's League held a
very successful Bazaar in Grand Forks
on Saturday, November 17th. The net
returns amounted to $605.06. The main
money maker was the -Hope Chest
which brought in $407.56. A ticket selling contest (which closed on Nov. 10)
was held in connnectioir with UV and
the first prize (watch)" was won by
Miss Florence McDonald, who sold 471
tickets totalling $105.00;. the second
and third prizes (rings), went to the
Misses Josephine Ruzicka and Grace
McDonald; the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th
prizes ��� (brooch).' were received; by the
Misses Veronica Keeva, Violet Schulli,
Mary McKinnon,;. and Helen-Potosky.
Miss Wilma Davis drew the winning
ticket .No. 10 which was held by Mrs.
Thos. Henderson. The net . proceeds
from the Sale of Fancy Work,: Home
Cooking, Etc., including the Guessing
Competition. ($12.60) was $242.50. Competitors in this competition had to guess
the number.of beans in; a jar which
was 1257. Mrs. C. A. S. Atwood and
Miss Alta Deporter each made a guess
of 1260. In the draw Miss Deporter
won the cake basket donated by the
Greenwood Catholic Women's League.
That electrical prospecting of mineral claims be allowed as assessment
work is being considered by the department of mines at Victoria. This method of ascertaining the legation of ore
bodies has been definitely proven and
is being utilized in all parts of the continent. A-preliminary electrical survey
is valuable in that unnecessary, and expensive work is avoided, and when the
survey is followed by diamond drilling
the exact value of the ore indicated can
be ascertained.-. Because of its great
value, the government of Quebec and
the Dominion government allows electrical prospecting to rank as assessment
work, and it is not improbable - that
similiar endorsation will be given by
the minster of mines at Victoria:
During the "past 12 months, oyer 60
properties' in Canada have been electri-
_cal]5LPXQsp_ecie_d__by___the_Radiore_Com=
pany of Canada, among them being
Hollinger, Amulet, Mining Corporation,
Sheritt Gordon. In British Columbia,
the company has done work for Granby
Consolidated, Victoria Syndicate, Dun-
well, Bayview and Central Copper &
Gold, Texada Island. It is probable
that several companies will utilize this
method as soon as the season opens
again in the spring.���Western Canada
Mining. News.
Mr. Begg, cattle buyer from the-
Coast was here during the week-end
and secured a number of cattle. Some
of the ranchers were not notified as to
the time the train would leave and on
this account their'cattle did not reach ���
the station until after the train left.
The present mining boom in the
Province is spreading rapidly in Midway. The Brindle Cow and Spotted
Dog mines, alongside the Great Northern are working tp capacity, but the
heavy traffic on the railroad is a source
of _much delay in .the tunnels, causing,
much suspension of blasting.      -  * '
KOOTENAY LAKE
.RAILWAY  PLANNED
BEAVERDELL BRIEFS
Francis Cousins spent the week-end
visiting at his home in Peachland.
Wasted Effort'
' A man called at \a pastry shop and
asked, for^ a cake to be made * in the
shape' of 'the letter "S". The pastry
cook said said it wouldn't be ready
until the end of the day. The customer
replied that he did not mind, and would
be back in the evening.
He. returned and saw the cake,-and
did not like it.   He wanted a script "S".
The pastry cook said he would make
another, but it would take a day or so.
The customer decided to call. at the
end of two days. He did, and liked
the cake. i
' "Where shall I deliver it?" -asked
the pastry cook.
"Don't deliver it," replied the customer. ���" "I'll eat it here."���Pearson's.
Edward Nordman left,on Friday for
a few days visit at his home in Nelson.
Mrs. C. E. Nordman is spending a
week visiting friends' in Trail and
Nelson.
Owing to shortage of water at the
Highland Lass claim, the night crew
has been laid off.
Ted Bush, who has. been employed at
the Highland Lass mine, left on'Monday for his home in Creston.
Mr. and Mrs. George Bongalis entertained at a social evening recently,
when; their guests included: Mr. and
Mrs. E. Lutneri E. Almstrom, Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Mulhern, Annie McCutcheon,
Goldie' Saunders, Mrs. Saunders and
Tommy Crowe.
W. M. Neal, general manager of the
Canadian Pacific Railway in the west,
accompanied by C. A. Cotterell, general
superintendent for British Columbia,
and party, spent two days in Nelson
over the week 0end, leaving Saturday
for the east.
They looked oyer improvements along
the Kettle Valley line and new-structures completed at this divisional
centre.
They spent some time along the
route""of the proposed Proctor-Kootenay
landing railroad/Saturday. ,Mr..Neal
had little to, say regarding the line. '
Results obtained by the. survey parties along the route will be closely
checked, then officials will make a
decision-whether or not the line will be
built, said Mr. Neal.
Completion of this line along Kootenay Lake would give Nelson direct
rail connection with Calgary and would
do away with the passenger boat and
barge service along Kootenay Lake.
Much interest is being taken in the
rich coal mines west of town, and the
workings are showing valuable findings
in anthracite and lignite coal.   A large   ,
crew of men were seen here last Thurs- '
day   and   were   the   cause   of   much
speculation in the  city.   There were
rumors that a Brickette plant_was pro=_=__
jected, similar to the one in Southern
Saskatchewan, and that the railroad
was putting- in a siding.   Further investigation disclosed the fact, that the
men consisted of a few hoboes' preparing'their midday meal."
MISSED HIS TRAIN;
FOUND OLD FRIENDS
RECORD GOLD OUTPUT
FOR   CANADIAN  MINES
Ottawa���Canada attained a new high
record on gold production last year
with 1,852,000 fine ounces, valued at
$38,500,00, or more than $200,000 over
1926." Canada is jthus the third largest
gold-producing country in the world,
United States and South Africa being
first and second. The output in fine
ounces is divided as follows: Ontario,
1,627,050; ' British Columbia, 183,094;
Yukon, 30,935; Quebec, 8331; Nova
Scotia 3151; Manitoba and Alberta, 224.
An elderly lady walked into a railroad ticket office in Toronto, and asked
for a ticket to New York.
"Do you wish to go by Buffalo?"
asked the ticket agent.   -
"Certaily not!" she replied; "by
train, if you please!"
(Cranbrook Courier)
An interesting character visited the
city on Friday last in the person of
James Henderson, pioneer of West
Kootenay. Mr. Henderson's breaking
his journey on his return from his old1
home in the-east, though unintentional,
brought no regrets. He was glad; that
he missed his train while lunching
here, he told Charles Buckless, former
Greenwood' man and an old friend.
Later Mr. Henderson located Mr. McCurrach, another of his old cronies io
exchange reminiscences and announce
himself thoroughly at home.
Mr. Henderson since coming to West
Kootenay in 1865 has had a colorful
career, as a prospector, big game hunter
and business man. He formerly, managed a papular hotel at Deadwood in
the palmy days and also resided in
Greenwood when that city was. a booming mining camp.- The old, sourdough
now retired to his home in the Kettle
Valley is as active as a man of * thirty-
five and extremely ambitious for the
.future of the province.
He expects to live to see the Kooten-;
ays develop into one of the big mining
countries of the.world.
SCHOOL FOR INDIANS
i
The Dominion Government is completing a program of school building for
the benefit of Indians. in British Cp-
bia with the construction of a school at
Alert Bay. The new building, which
will cost about $160,000 will be. the
fourth of the same type to be erected in
the Province in the last five years. It
will be of most modern design, giving -
the natives classrooms, recreation.
rooms, catering facilities and heating
equipment on a scale usually found
only in, large city; schools. About 150
Indian children will be accomodated in
the building, which, will stand in the
center of a large native community.
"Hespent a small fortune when he
was engaged to her."
"Still, it was a means to an end." "
"Yes, and an end to his means/' mm
2AG�� fWO
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1928
The Greenwood Ledge
Published.every Thursday at'
Greenwood, B.C.
G. W. A. SMITH
Editor and Proprietor
BATTLE DEATH IN TAIL SPIN
ADVERTISING     RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices...$25.00
Coal and Oil Notices...;........   7.00
Estray Notices    3.00
Cards of Thanks ...............   1.00
Certificate of Improvement .. 12.50
(When more than one claim appears
in notice, $5.00 for each additional
claim.
All other legal advertising 16 cents
& line first insertion, and 12 cents a
line for each subsequent insertion, nonpareil measurement.
The Salesman Type.
Subscription: In Canada and to Gt.
Britain, $2.00 a year in advance; $2.50
when not paid for three months or
more have passed. To the United
States $2.50, always in advance.
Business locals 12%c a line each insertion.
The blue cross means that
your subscription is due, and
that the editor would be
pleased to have more money.
CHRISTMAS TREES
. About seven million trees will be used
in North America this Christmas. The
question immediately arises���Are we
devastating our forests by.brightening
up the homes and making millions of
youngsters happy at Christmas time?
Prominent authorities such as Dr.
CD. Howe, Dean, Faculty of Forestry,
University of Toronto, in Canada and
Wm. G. Howard, Superintendent of
State Forests, New York State, in
United States say 'No'. Dean Howe
says "an area of-thirty square miles if
set aside and managed for Christmas
tree production, would supply the present demand for each year for all time".
The average. size of the Christmas
tree marketed in the states is six feet.
A spruce tree of this size can be grown
in the nursery inside of ten years and
in the forest in fifteen.
Mr. Howard says���"Trees are for use,
and there is no other use to which they
could be put that would contribute so
much joy to mankind as their use by
children on this great holiday." He
further states "In our state, a large
proportion of Christmas trees are cut
from. pasture lands, where they are a
nuisance, or from other lands which
the owner desires to clear for farm
purposes/so that the trees would be cut
in any event and the marketing of
them for Christmas gives, the owner
some return for. his labor.
In Europe where Forestry practice
has reached its highest development,
Christmas trees are thinnings which
are' culled out of the forest, which
practice actually improves the forest.
Hence there is scarcely a hut dweller
who has hot his Christmas tree.
In Canada, the Canadian Forestry
Association would advocate that, in
���connection==with=forest=i=plantations,.
there should be planted some spruce
and balsam for Christmas trees.
When then they reach the proper size
the owner can cut them out and market
them and still leave the timber tree
to mature for a timber crop. This
source of supply would probably be
sufficient to supply the home demand.
For export trade plantations of spruce
and balsam should prove a profitable
businessA Two, thousand Christmas
.trees..couldA,be grown, on one acre.
Thus, on a ten year rotation, ton
square,miles would supply 1*4 million
trees for all time, at a planting cost of
less than one cent per tree. Here is
an opportunity for enterprising community, townships, or individuals to
utilize some abandoned farms to good
purpose. This,year in New Brunswick
alone there, is a demand for three million Christmas trees..
Fof the present, however, certain
rules of conduct. should be observed.
To cut the top off a perfectly good
timber tree and the leave the body to
rot in the bush is a criminal waste
and unworthy of a self respecting
citizen. ��To take a Christmas tree from
private property is plain theft and a
question of public morals that should
not to be tolerated by any community.
Why not father select your tree from
pasture land or if selecting in the
bush choose cedar or balsam which
- are prolific reproducers the utilization
ot which would do little harm.       a,
By Harry Steinfield, Aviation Editor of
Portland, Oregon, News
I submit to you here a true story of
a battle with death; a bitter struggle
and brief, told in the clear, succinct
vernacular of the flying man. Any
attempt on the part of a mere writer
to embellish the account would detract
from its value..
The speaker is Cecil Graul, operator
of the Graul Flying service of Portland
and Vancouver, Wash,, a graduate of
the Rankin School of Flying, and a
skilled pilot. ...
I was flying Jim Hallett last Thursday
from. Scappoose to Vancouver. Jim,
who is one of my students, was in the
rear, or control, cockpit and I was in
the forward compartment at the'dual'.
We were over the Willamette river at-
an altitude of 1500 feet when Jim asked
me to show him the barrell(roll.
"In this, manouver the ship makes a
complete lateral revolution, Ajust like a
barfell rolling over on its side.
"I dived a little to pick up speed and
turned over iri the othodox manner
for the first half of the roll. But as
the ship eased over on its back the
control stick left its socket and came
loose in my hand.
"Out of control, the plane went into
a tight tailspin. I fought to place the
end of the stick back into the socket,
but we were hurtling around so fast
that it was impossible,   a   '     A;>
"I yelled to Jim to take the dual
controls in his cockpit and straighten
us out. The wind whistling in the
struts and braces and the noise of the
motor drowned my voice. I yelled
again, but Jim didn't hear me. He
thought I was doing the spin on purpose.
"In a last effort to make Jim understand our predicament I braced myself against the walls of the cockpit and
stuck the control stick in front of his
face.
"He grasped the situation at once
and.leveled us out, our landing gear
skimming the surface of the river,"
Two men were sitting opposite each
other in a Tube: train. Presently one
of them produced a notebook and proceeded to make a sketch of the other.
After he had completed the drawing
he closed the book and put it in his
pocket.
The man opposite was both interested and gratified by this attention,
and, leaning forward, said, "I presume
you are an artist, sir?"   .
."No," replied the other, "I'm not
exactly an artist. I'm a designer of
door-knockers.'.'���Pearson's.
ASS A V KR
E. W. WTDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, Box L1108, Nelson, B. C.
Charges���'-Gold, Silver,-Copper or Lead
$1.00 each. Gold-Silver $1.50. Silver-
Lead ?2.00. Sllvcr-Lead-Zinc $3.00.
These charges made only when cash is
sent with sample. Charges for other
metals, etc., on application.
o Hope is the chief blessing of man.
���Johnson.
>V1LL.IAM II. WOOD
PHYSICIAN and SUBGKON
GUKKNWOOI)
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF YALE
HOLDEN AT GRAND FORKS
In thc Mining Jurisdiction
Between:
Mary Agnes Mining Company
Plaintiff,
and
Leslie  Robert Loomis,  James Wilson,
and Loomis-WHson Leasing Company
Limited
Defendants.
SEND YOUR
BOOTS and SHOES
A. c. McDOUGALL
Contractor and Builder
MONUMENTS,        ROOFING,
LAMATCO WALL BOARD
To
Harry Armson, Grand Forks
The 20th Century Shoe Repairer
All work and material guaranteed
We pay postage one way.  Terms cash
' Get my prices on
LAMATCO
on walls finished, and save money
SHOP AT GREENWOOD
Box 332 Grand Forks, B.C.
COST OF FEEDING HORSES
(Experimental Farms Note)
Although the tractor is being used
successfully, for a great many operations, the work horse may still be considered as the principal motive power
on the great majority, of the farms of
Canada, consequently, practically every
farmer should be interested in the
actual cost of feeding horses, particularly horses that are working most of
the time.
At the Dominion Experimental Station, Kapuskasing, Ontario, records are
kept of the amount and.cost of feed
consumed by all the work horses.
The average figures obtained over a
five year period are as follows: Number
of horses fed, 14.4;�� hours worked per
horse per day, 8.7; hay. per horse per
day, 19 pounds; grain per horse per day,
15.5 pounds; and cost of feed per horse
per year, $156.65.
It may be noted that the average cost
of feed per horse per year of $156.65,
would equal about 86 cents per day for
a two-horse team. It should be pointed
out, however, that this figure represents
conditions���where^the-^horses===are
employed almost every working hour
day in the year at- reasonable heavy,
work and, therefore, the cost of feeding
is much higher than it would be for an
idle ;horse, or even one that' was
working for only a part of the time.
In arriving at these figures,**the;hay
was charged at local farm prices, that
is, the amount it would sell for on the
farm without being pressed or hauled;
The grain was charged at local market
prices.      .       . ���. .
NOTICE IS HEREBY' GIVEN that
the goods and chattels seized by me
under a Writ of' Execution issued in
this action and to me directed, will be
sold by Public Auction at 11 a. m., on
the 28th day of November, 1928, at my
office in the Court House in the City "of
Grand Forks, B.C, and which goods
and chattels are as follows: that is to
say,��� .
1 Gardner-Denver Company's XH
type Compressor, size 265 feet.    *
1 Induction Motor, type KT546, 40
H.P., 440 volts.   ,
1 Starting Compensator H.P. 40
to 50.
1 Induction Motor, 30 H.P., General
Electric.
1 Hoist.
2 Transformers.
DATED at Grand Forks, B.C.. this
20th day of November, A.D., 1928.
JAMES HIRD,
Sheriff for the County of Yale
Grand Forks-Greenwood Electoral
District.
IN THE LEGISLATURE
DIABETES DEATHS !!
RISE AS SALE OF
��� SUGAR INCREASES
Increased consumption of sugar" is
given as.a probable explanation of the
increased death rate from - diabetes
duringAthe last thirty years, in a
^bulletin issued by the New. York City
Health Department. According ,to the
bulletin, the. diabetes death rate has
increasedfifty per cent for men during
that period, and 150 per cent for
women. "Hand in hand with this has
been a corresponding increase in the
per capita consumption of sugar," the
bulletin continues, "so that it appears
probable that we,especially the ladies,
are overtaxing our bodies with too
much sugar." The average number of
deaths per year for the .five-year penod
ended with 1902 is given as 395.
Average for successive five-year periods
from theh to the present are given as
follows: 1902-1907, 588; 1907-1912, 748;
1912-1917, 1,049; 1917-1922, 1,122, 1922-
1927, 1,359.
SWORDS FLASH IN "LOVE MART"
Lovers.of swordplay, with rapier, foil
or broadsword, will be entertained
royalty at the Greenwood Theatre on
Saturday, Nov. 24th, where "The Love
Mart," George Fitzmaurice's production, for First National Pictures, with
Billie Dove, Gilbert Roland and Noah
Beery, is the attraction.        '
Billie Dove has many romantic love
scenes and emotional moments; while
Roland, in the masculine lead; Armand
Kaliz, as a Creole fashion-plate; and
others, indulge in the gentle art of
fencing with brilliancy and prowess.
There is also some exciting broadsword play with slave-running pirates
in the early sequences.
Noah Beery plays the part of a husky
and belligerent slave-runner, a typical
corsair.
���Raymond Turner is a funny Negro
bodyservant.  "'���-���'
The scenes are exquisite and dramatic by turn, and throughout there
is a vein of romance that is inseparable
from New Orleans more than a
hundred years ago.
An Example
A 10-year-old boy was fuming over
his composition. His father suggested
that it would be easy enough if he
would simply describe something he
had seen.
"That won't do," said the boy. "The
teacher told us to'use figurative language."
"What do you understand by that?"
his father asked.
"Oh, that's where' you call a rooster
a chandelier."���Christian Register.
1,
Proud Father: "He's only eight and
he's got the ideas of a politician."
Friend .(consolingly): "Ah, well���
I shouldn't worry. He'll probably grow
out of it as he grows older."
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
an application will be made, at the next
Session of-the Legislature of the Province of British Columbia for an Act
to incorporate a company under the
name * of Provincial Telephone Company with an authorised capital of, five
million dollars with its head office in
the City of "Vancouver and with the
following powers:���
��� To operate telephone, wireless telephone, radio-telephone and similar services, including services for the. transmission of sound, pictures, writing or
signals; to hold and dispose of lands,
tenements and: hereditaments of any
description; to provide and maintain
all such buildings, works, plant, apparatus, materials, offices and exchanges
as may be necessary for its business;
for the purposes of its business to pro-
-vide=and-fOperate��steamships=arid-other
vessels; to acquire and use any privilege granted by.any.Federal, Provincial
or municipal authority; :to acquire and
use patent rights; to advance money to
any corporation; company or person for
providing building or operating any
telephone system; to do anything as
contractor, for others which it might do
for its own purposes; to invest and deal
with its surplus funds; to enter upon
and break up highways, streets, and
public bridges and to construct5 telephone lines along, across, or under the
same, or in, I under or over water
courses, rivers and lakes,"subject to the
approval of the city. or municipal
council where the proposed works are
to be situated within a city or municipality, and in other ��� cases subject to
the approval of the Minister of: lands;
to construct works on its own property;
subject to obtaining consent under the
Naviagable Waters' Protection Act of
the Dominion of Canada, to construct,
lay and operate submarine telephone
cable or cables in any lake, river or
water' to which that Act applies, also between any islands in British Columbia
and between such islands and the
mainland; to cut a passage for its lines
where such lines pass through woods
subject to compensating the. owners
thereof for damage, and to trim trees
on or extending over highways in order
to prevent interference with good telephone service: to purchase the whole
or any part of the undertaking of any
other company having objects in whole
or in part similar to those of the company, or to amalgamate with such
other company, and to transfer to the
company or to the amalgamated company, as the case may be, all or any of
such franchises of statutory powers as
may be possessed by such other company; to enter into and carry out any
agreement with any company whose
undertaking is -purchased as aforesaid
in the nature of assuming the payment
of or guaranteeing; the payment of
principal and interest, or either',' on
bonds, debenture stock or debentures,
or assuming or guaranteeing the carrying out of its obligations or any part
thereof; to enter into agreements for
connecting its system or lines with those
of other telephone'operators; to expropriate land under the powers of the
Lands Clauses Act; to. make regulations for its internal management; to
fix from time to time a tariff "of
charges for its services, and to collect,
sue for and recover the same; to borrow money; to issue preference shares,
debentures or debenture stock, either
redeemable or irredeemable, to issue
shares with or without nominal or par
value; to change its name pursuant to
the Companies Act, and other incidental powers.
DATED the 1st day of November,
1928  ' A       -,   - "-
���;���; y McPHILLIPS,
���--   DUNCAN & McPHTLLIPS,
525 Seymour Street,
Vancouver, B.O
. Solicitors for the applicants
'gmeFChrislm�� 1
WL CANADIAN PACIFIC STEAMSHIPS $
ii?iffl^fp___j*'^^'**,x^,-pi--'''',-'".(^ sS
'id
28-
SAILINGS
FROM MONTREAL���QUEBEC
MINNEDOSA ...:..- -.:-:  NOV.
to Glasgow, Belfast, Liverpool
FROM SAINT JOHN
METAGAMA  DEC,
to Cherbourg, Southampton, Antwerp
MONTCLARE   DEC
to Glasgow, Belfast, Liverpool
MELITA 1  DEC.
to St. Heller, Channel Islands, Cherbourg,
Southampton, Antwerp
DUCHESS OF ATHOLL    DEC.
to Glasgow, Liverpool '
MONTROYAL  DEC.
to Glasgow, Liverpool
CABIN���TOURIST III.���THIRD CLASS
Low Round Trip Kates:    Tourist IU. and Third Class.    '
Berth Reservations can jiow bp made.    Details ancl Literature
from any Agent or.������ Write
J. S. CARTER, DISTRICT PASSENGER AGENT
NVXSON', B.C.
���_% ^'%*$!*u-Si-
14
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of Canada. Limited
Office, Smelting and Refining* Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA    *
SMELTERS and REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers, of Gold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC" BRAND
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1 o
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1928
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
PAGE THREE
B. A. NEALE
*BA. AV,Neale' ''P0Pu-la-f manager
of the Chateau Frontenac, whose
appointment as-manager of the
new Royal York Hotel in Toronto
is announced to be effective November 1st. The managing of the
.Royal York is considered the most
ambitious hotel position on the
continent. Mr. Neale has steadily
risen in Canadian Pacific service
since 1911, when he transferred to
the hotel department from the
General Superintendent's office in
Montreal.
H
erean
dThe
re
.(1730
More than 20,000 acres of Indian
lands, which include some of the
best agricultural areas in the Peace
River district, are likely to be sold
at auction in the near future. This
action will in all probability follow,
a survey that is being made in the
north country by W. Morrison,
Inspector of Indian Agencies for
/the three western provinces,-with
headqua'i ters at Regina.
A new~ industry���badger ^farming���may be started in Saskatchewan by John Rothenberger, farmer,
of Vanguard.' Last, spring Mr.
Rothenberger caught a badger and
four pups. He built a large pen,
about 15 feet long and 4 feet wide.
During summer he fed the badgers
until they are now quite tame, and
are said" to be larger than any
badger running wild. Their coats
are in excellent condition and offers, of $18 for each skin have been
received.''
A new world record was set by
the Canadian Pacific Railway recently when a train of grain more
Uian a mile in length was operated
between Stoughton and Areola, ,in
Saskatchewan.'1' It was the longest
and heaviest grain train in history,
consisting of 135 loaded grain cars,
each approximately _ 40 feet in-
"]ength7_a_w"atef~ca"r7aAcab"6ose"'andJ
engine. The gross weight -was
8,722 tons and the total contents
of the cars were 202,000 bushels
of grain.
The enthusiasm of the - citizens
of Quebec is so infectious that it
is an easy matter to interest visitors in'winter sports, stated J.' G.
Str'athdee, winter sports'" manager *
of the Chateau Frontenac, in giving
a forecast'-of this winter's programme. . Skating, skiing and tobogganing will be in full swing as
usual; the dog derby will most certainly take place; and the ice carnivals and storming of the citadel
will probably be featured again
he said. Mr. Strathdee mentioned'
the splendid co-operation given the
winter activities at the Chateau
Frontenac by the Quebec Winter
Sports Association. .    .
0{b
The number of disciples of Isaac
Walton,  Canadian  and American,
who have plied rod and reel in Canadian waters during the past season-
is greater than ever before, states
A. O. Seymour,    general    tourist
agent of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Montreal   ln   announcing1
the winners of the Ontario bunga-,'
low camp fishing trophy competi-'
tions.    Phillip Peterman of- Lau-
rium,   Michigan, won the  Nipigon
River contest for speckled trout, .
Edmund Slechbart of Chicago won
the French River "muskey" prize,'
and Theodore Kipp   of   Winnipeg
caught the largest bass entered ln-
the Devil's Gap camp competition.
��� England will havo enough Can--
adian apples shortly to keep the
doctor away for the next year, if
there is any truth in the proverb,
as ships sailing for the old country
this autumn are carrying many
boxes of souvenir apples shipped
by Canadians tj their friends overseas. This has- been the custom
for the past few years and according to J. B. Martin, manager of the
foreign department bf the Canadian Pacific Express Company, it
is becoming increasingly popular.
So great has been the demand for
fresh Canadian apples each autumn
for shipment *o E*j**ope that grocers thrcuehout the country now
have standaid size boxes for.
shipping and special low rates are
granted by the express' company.
1926-7 msmmmmm
__   _   _ : ^he present valuation
| of 63 niiles of Bridges is*8.84S.qQ0
ii
PON the arteries of communication depend the
settlement and growth of the nation. First the
trails,.. then the rough oxcart ruts.. ��� the wagon roads
r. .the automobile high ways. ���. ��� "
The scattered population of British Columbia
has mac!e the construction of roads between
centres a .-natter of vital importance, y,et one
of almost insurmountable difficulties.
Mountain sides, have to be blasted away...
clefts and chasms tresselled ... rivers bridged!
"With the opening of the Cariboo Highway
through Fraser Canyon in 1926, the last link
of British Columbia's great arterial highway
... a highway unexcelled the world over as an
engineering feat and one of unmatched scenic
beauty ... was forged.
Eastern British Columbia greeted its western
brothers!. Markets and railways were brought
closer to the farmer, the miner, the industrialist. New fields for agricultural and trade
development were opened up.
For the ten years just past, an aggressive
highway programme has been carried out.
Thousands of miles of good roads and dozens
of sturdy bridges have been built.
_, Our roads system now totals 31,900 miles ...
an increase of over 5,000 miles during the last
ten years. Of this mileage, 12,000 miles are
earth roads; .4,000  gravel roads;  and  1,000
macadam, bituminous, concrete and cement
concrete; The 5,000 miles which were added to
our roads system include: 884 miles of main
trunk roads, 602 miles of lateral roads, 281
miles of industrial and mining roads, 1,133
miles of settlement and farm roads, and 2,000
.miles of .orjdinary_and_miniing_trails.-. -.- ���-
During the years just before 1917, a large
number of bridges had been constructed in the
Province, nearly all of which were temporary
timber structures. Since 1917, the problem of
maintenance and renewal of these structures
has been a serious one, involving a large expenditure, particularly between the years 1920
and 1927.
The policy has been to improve design of and
workmanship on temporary bridges and - to
renew all the large bridges on main highways
over the principal rivers with concrete and steel.
Today, the valuation of our 63 miles. of
bridges is nine million dollars.
This construction activity has distributed
wages "and salaries over our whole Province
and has been a material aid in bringing about
the current period of British Columbia's
prosperity.
Read these announcements and understand your province's j
progress . , . clip them out. and send them to friends. If you
desire extra copies of these announcements a note to this
newspaper will bring them. Advertise your Province!
B C.N. 528
Job Printing    at    The Greenwoo ���nwMmt-'-fflii^ ���"������������"	
iianwTiHaWWIil"lll MM iwii**m . ������>$; 	
'  V- "---���"' -       .:--*���      ��� "  X
- *- - \    - -
PAGE FOUR
IHE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1928
;..7A.��v~vwi vwjrwwr-v ��������*���"�� -**"
NOW ON DISPLAY
The New Marconi
1929 RADIO
With Temple Air-Chrome Speaker
T. M. GULLEY
has been appointed distributor for Greenwood
See and hear this wonderful instrument.
.AAAAAAAA AAAAAA A AAA AAAAAA A A AAA A A A __^ __, __, A __' A A A A A * A A A 4Ai
OF LOCAL INTEREST
* Walter Wartman has returned from
a business trip to Trail and Nelson.
A bull owned by Sam Bombini of*
Anaconda, was killed by a train on
Wednesday afternoon.
The Kettle Valley Golf Course is iri
good condition and if the present
weather continues move games will be'
played.
for Your
Christmas Puddings and Cakes
AUSTRALIAN CURRANTS, All nice and clean
RAISINS, The seedless and seeded kind
AUSTRALIAN SULTANAS, Of choice quality
Dates, Figs, Peels, Walnuts, Almonds,
Glace Cherries, Etc
For quality and value order from
Phone 46
GREENWOOD GROCERY
After November 1st, Mrs. A. J.
Morrison will be prepared to take
patients. Prices reasonable. Telephone
No. 35.   P.O. Box 426, Greenwood.
- Ernest Wyder  arrived home from I
Hedley on this afternoon's-train.
l"fi*'fy>yT'>.*lv|>��'*''<''''*>'>*,*;'-'*'','fir'J
A sweater coat, a pair of gloves and
a ladies hat were left at the Masonic
Hall on Nov. 12th. Owners can have
same at The Greenwood Ledge Office.
The McPherson c, Garage .Company
has started construction of an addition
to.their Garage in Grand Forks which
will double the size of the present
building.
To those who contemplate
*  buying;
Wedding Presents or Gifts
for .their - friends
Let us remind you that we can
supply you cheaper than you
can buy from Catalogue
Let us have your  .
Watch and Clock Repairs
We always do a first-class job
A. A. WHITE
Watchmaker  and  Jeweler'
F. J. White, Mgr.
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fVTi"fty'*"'yf' vvvwvwwww vv -**��� v1** /-y*'T'-ifyy-y''*f'*^T w <d
Atlantic Kippers
Finnan Haddie and Sable Filletts
will be kept in stock
Swift's Premium
PORK SAUSAGE AND WEINERS
Every Tuesday morning
TAYLOR & SON
Phono 17
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P. H. McCurrach is a member of the
Cranbrook Golf Club. He, was this
season's winner of the cup presented by
the. club for the approach and putt
competition.
Clyde White of Sandon, came in "on
Saturday's train and left the .following
day for his home accompanied by Mrs.
White, who had spent the week visiting
her mother, Mrs. A. R. Royce.
Mrs. C. J. Carlson returned recently
from a couple of months visit in Vancouver. Mrs. Carlson is recovering
from the effects,of a fall she received
at the Coast in which she sustained
a fractured arm.
Trouble on the
new line
was discovered
in time
PACIFIC HOTEL
Headquarters for
Boundary Mining and Travelling Men
first Glass Accommodation
Hot and Cold Water Every Convenience
J. M. GOODEVE
Prop.
Drug Store in Connection
Every editor an' expert. The departments of the Family Herald and
Weekly Star, Montreal, are all headed
by men .of practical ��� experience and
nation-wide fame���that's why it's first
in public esteem. The subscription
price is only $1 a year or three years
for $2.
Guests at the Pacific Hotel during
the'week: Tom Allen, L. Rogers, W..J.
Wartman, Trail, H.. A. Gow, Sandon;
W. P. Trant, B. H. Pearson,' P. A.
Caldwell, W. E. Ekens, Vancouver; S.
C. .Miller, A. W. Wilkenning, Jno. B.
McDonald, A. B. Winter;'Grand-Forks;
Eugene McGiUivray, City; J. A. McMaster, Denoro; W. Mathers, AVemon;
B. L. Jamieson, Calgary; C. H. Robinson, Nelson.
Rev. Andrew Walker is a yery keen
hunter and enjoys trying to outwit the
elusive buck so that he can bring home
the venison.;, Recently he had a rather
unique experince in the Jewel Lake
camp. While moving quietly along an
old road h'e spied a coyote on the hill
a short distance away,. He immediately put his rifle to his shoulder and
felled Mr. Coyote. Mr. Walker then
rushed up to his fallen prey and was
greatly surprised when he discovered
that the coyote was caught in a trap,
being held only by the claws on one
foot.
v WW TV w ������-**���������> ���-������'��� v v �� vw wTfvvy<v./ v-j/v ���j>v^>rTV')-'��;'��-r'��VY'*f*f,f��'f
McMYNN'S STORE, Midway
See our Stock of
MEN'S WOOLEN & FLANNELL SHIRTS & SOCKS
STANFIELD'S JJNDERWEAR, MACKINAW COATS, and WOOLEN
PANTS, BELTERS and LEATHER COATS
I 	
Let us fill your Radiator with
MAPLE LEAF ANTI-FREEZE
and insure against freezing
We have the CORRECT GRADES of OIL for the COLD WEATHER
Greenwood Meat Market
Under New Management
CHOICE LINE OE MEATS
We Solicit Your Patronage
Strictly Cash
JOHN MEYER
Proprietor
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
Midway
Don't forget the Benefit Dance in the
Fanners Hall on Friday, November
23rd. Institute members are asked to
donate a cake and 50 sandwiches.
The usual Card Party will be held in
the Old School House on Tuesday.next
the 27th at 8:30 p.m.
BAILED HAY FOR SALE
Good mixed hay at 16.00 dollars per
ton at my ranch, in lots of five tons or
over only. Cash with orders. Price
changed without notice.
F. HAUSSENER,
Box 364, Greenwood, B.C.
The United Church of Canada
REV. ANDREW WALKER, B.A.
Minister in Charge, Greenwood.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25th
Bridesville, 11 a.m.
Midway, 3p.m.
Greenwood, 7:30 p.m.
Catholic Church, Greenwood
REV. FATHER A. L. McINTYRE
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25th
Mass at 11 o'clock
W. E. Ekens, representing the Vancouver Province, was in town for several days this week.
Eve7y-branch_of-farm-workf-farnv
machinery, stock, etc., has an expert
writer in the Family Herald and
Weekly Star, the recognized first
writers in Canada.
BASKETBALL
The Junior Conservative Association
Basketball team of Grand Forks will
play the Greenwood School team in the
Greenwood Basketball Hall on either
Friday at 8 p.m. or Saturday at 6:30
p.m. of this week. As soon as the date
is definitely decided notices will be |
posted up around the city.
VETERANS '*��� MEETING
A meeting of the Great War Veterans will be held at the Court House,
Saturday Dec. 1st at 7.30 p.m. to decide
on the disposal of balance of funds
from the Armistice Dance. All ex-
service men are invited to be present.
HOCKEY CLUB MEETING
A meeting of the Greenwood Hockey
Club will be held on Monday, Nov. 26th
at 8 p.m. in the Manager's office of
Thc Canadian Bank of Commerce.
Business: To review the past season's
affairs and to decide on the club's
activities for the coming season. AU
interested kindly attend.
GENERAL MEETING OF THE
GREENWOOD CURLING CLUB
A General Meeting of the Greenwood
Curling Club will be held in the Court
House at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, November
27th, 1928. Any person intending to
become a member for the Season of
1928-29 please advise the Secretary to
that effect on or before the aforementioned date.'
S.B.HAMILTON,
Secretary-Treasurer.
FOR SALE
Will sell my entire Stock of Ladies,
Men's and Children's Wearing Apparel
at a reasonable sacrifice.
. Will sell Building very cheap.
For particulars see owner,
ELLEN TROUNSON,
Greenwood, B.C.
Betty B.
Felt Hats
_   for  ���
..  Ladies and Girls
A Hat" that can be made into
one of a hundred styles in a
few minutes
Men's, Ladies and
Children's Rubbers
We carry the
Good rich Hi ���press
���M
'__ f. A a a a a A AAAAA A A AAA AAAAA.AA
Ellen Trounson's Store
Although the new direct
telephone line across British
Columbia to Calgary opened
on November 6 without a
hitch," no less than three _
cases of trouble developed
on the circuit the night before. Had they been undetected or unremedied, the
history-making conversations,
scheduled for the next morning, would have been "off."
But vigilant telephone
men were on the job. Test
calls revealed the trouble
cases when they developed,
and repairmen speedily made
the necessary adjustments.
It meant a sleepless night
for some, but the circuit was
clear when thej .time, for the
first call arrived.
B. C. TELEPHONE CO.
���yTvvTV-*r-y'*��v'*rv'��f'y'r*'f'y'*f'yT'<��'y'��'*>;'.
'*<<
STOCKS BONDS
MINING SHARES
Charles King
Real Estate & Insurance Agent
Arrangements with first class
BROKERAGE  FIRMS
Some to handle BONDS,
others STOCKS,
Others MINING SHARES
STOCKS and BONDS
on installment system .-
MINING and OTHERS
on  margin <���
Call and state your business
Attend
Benefit Dance
Midway
This Friday
Nov. 23rd
Everyone Assured of a Good Time
-t t yTy ��?��-rv VT-ffTTT-fT ��v y ff.v* v y v ��-�� v^
You'll Love Her More Than Ever!
The screen's most
beautiful star in
her greatest role.
More glorious
than "The Stolen
Bride!" More
exquisite than
"American Beauty." She's wonderful!
supported by
Gilbert Roland
and
Noah Beery
Greenwood Theatre
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24th
Commencing at 8:15 p.m.
Admission:   Adults 50c   Children 25c
COMING!
Saturday, December. 1st
Johnny Hines   in "White Pants Willie"
COMING!
If
11
1
1!

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