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The Greenwood Ledge Feb 28, 1929

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 \Provinc
ial Library   , ���
VOL. Ill
GREENWOOD, B.C., THURSDAY,-FEBRUARY 28, 1929
N6V 31
MIDWAY NEWS
R A. Brown has purchased a Ford
truck
Henry Strauss was a visitor to Greenwood on Friday last.
M'ss   Gladys   Brereton   spent   the
week-end .in Greenwood.
Miss Ruth Axam of Greenwood, was
visiting here for the week-end.
George   Guise   returned   this   week
from logging up the Main River.
MINER FOUND DEAD
Miss Nellie Knight spent the weekend at Rock Mountain and Bridesville.
Mrs. Joe Richter and Mrs. E Hawkes
were visitors to Greenwood on Monday.
Mrs. Harold Erickson entertained a
few friends for cards on Friday evening.
Wm. Johnson, road foreman of Rock
Creek, was here on business on Monday last.
Mrs. John L. Bush entertained several ladies for afternoon tea and" music
on Tuesday.
George Green reports seeing a fine
flock of blue birds around his house a
few days ago.
Mrs. R McMillan, assisted by Miss
Alice McMynn, has taken over the
work of the Sunday School.
Mr. and Mis Arthur"* Roberts of
Myers Creek, were visiting Mr. and Mrs
Joe Richter on Sanday last.
The sleighing is all over in Midway
the flat being almost dry in places and
very little water limning this year.
Mrs H Pannell entertained at hei
home for a social evening on Fnday
last, Mrs Galbraith, Miss Galbraith
and Miss N. Knight.
Mrs John L Bush invited, several
fi lends for dinner on Saturday evening
after which cards were played and a
pleasant evening was spent.
Harold   Erickson   won   the    gents
prize at Five Hundred and Mis. Jim
Bush the ladies prize, on Thursday,
-Febvuary-21strm-the Old School-House.-
The pheasants that were sent in by
the government and liberated on Joe
Richter's ranch, are looking fine, 5 hens
and one cock bird, after feeding on
Joe's oat stack all winter.
There is a fine pure bred bunch of
turkeys m Midway now, John L Bush
having imported several Bronze turkey
hens, weighing 17 and 18 pounds each
and a prize Tom weighing 28 pounds
MIDWAY'S MOTTO
Forget each kindness that you do
As soon as you have done it;
. Forget the praise that falls to you
The moment that you have won it;
Forget the slander that you hear
(J Before you can repeat it;
Forcet each slight, each spite, each sneer
Wherever you may meet it.
Remember every kindness done
To you whate'er its measure;
Remember praise by others won
And pass it on with pleasure;
Remember every promise made
And keep it to the letter;
Remember those who lend you aid
And be a grateful debtor.
���Anon
NELSON JUNIORS WIN
PROVINCIAL TITLE
BEATING GRAND FORKS
Nelson Cubs, Juniors, are the champion hockey players of British-Columbia. On Saturday night, February 23,
playing in the finals against Grand
Forks in the latter's city, the Nelson
boys thoroughly swamped the Forks'
team by a score of 15 to 2.
From the start the outcome was
never in doubt, as Nelson showed too
much hockey experience' for the opponents from the boundary. Grand
Forks was blanked until the beginning
of the last period, when Nelson led 5-0
Grand Forks got two go'als in the final
session while Nelson sharpshooters
piled in ten goals in the twenty
minutes. ' * j
John Nickin was found dead m bed
in a cabin he occupied, a short distance
below the Black Tail mme aip the
Hodges' tunnel on the CP.R. near
Eholt, on Monday, February 25th, by F
M. Ogle and E. Manderson They had
gone to the cabin to get some supplies
they had stored in the'cellar there and
they were startled on opening the door
to find that Nickm was dead with a 303
rifle beside him. Provincial Constable
W. R. Powers of Gieenwood was notified and in company with Coroner Dr.
Traux of Grand Forks, viewed the body
and had it removed to Grand Forks on
the afternoon C.P.R. passenger train,
where an inquest was held.
The deceased had worked at the
Black Tail mine since last fall and was
laid off when the mine closed on January 28th. He had put in a large supply of provisions and had intended
staying in the cabin until the mine resumed. *Mr. Ogle received a cheque
from Wenatchee, where the owners of
the mine reside, and had taken it to
Nickin on February 14th. This was.his
pay. Nickin appeared in good health
Previous to this Nickin had borrowed a
rifle and 25 ..cartridges from a rancher
on the North Fork stating that he was
going to shoot coyotes. This was the
rifle found.
It is thought that Nickin had been
dead about nine days. He left nothing
to indicate why he had taken his own
life The police were-unable to find
any trace of an.address of relatives
He had about $50 in cash and had considerable good clothes.
Very little is known of the deceased
in this section. He woiked at the
Union mine above Grand Forks for a
few months prior to coming to the
Black Tail. He was a native of Serbia
and served with the Canadians in the
Great War. He joined 'the 113th at
Calgary and was transferred to Lhe
43rd when he received his discharge
He won the military medal
He had applied for naturalization
while living at DrumheUer, Albeita.
The funeral was held m Grand Forks
under the auspices of the War Veterans
CONSOLIDATED WILL INSTALL
A $500,000 VAPOR RECTIFIER
SHARKEY WINS
Jack Sharkey *won the decision over
Young Stnbhng m their ten-round
bout m Miami Beach on Wednesday
night.
Habits are at first cobwebs at last
cables.���Proverbs.
Spokane.���At- a cost, of more than
$500,000 a mercury vapor rectifying
equipment has been ordered by the
Consolidated Mining & Smelting company for installation at Trail.
The plant will be the largest application of mercury vapor rectifiers to
electrolytic work in the world and will
be the first tope installed on this continent. It becomes an advance in the
general change that has taken placo
m Europe and that,is following on the
continent in the substitution of mercury rectifiers for rotary converters,
says the Engineering and Mining
Journal.
Plans are understood to be under
way by the Consolidated company for
setting up three operating units on thc
Pacific coast, the existing enterprises
at Kimberley and Trail, a copper
smelter and refinery on the Pacific
coast and a big development and mill
m the Metahne district, says the Wall
Street Journal. in a report from its
Montreal bureau.
The Kimberley concentrator of the
Sullivan mine is being increased to
6000 tons daily from its current capacity of 4000 tons. Triple phosphates will
be made to sell to the farmers in
western Canada. A 35-ton plant built
at Tadanac will utilize the sulphur
dioxide now cast into the air from the
smelters. It will produce sulphuric
acid by the contact process
It is probable that ammonium
phosphate t will be produced, The research department is trying Lo devise
other -fertilizer rthat would meet the
source of phophate will be m thc huge
beds uncovered in the Ferine distiict
PROVIDENCE SHIPS CAR OF ORE
A car of high grade ore, of about 25
tons, was loaded tins week Iiom the
Providence mine, Gieenwood, and is
ready for shipment to Trail.
Work is going on steadily at this
mine and at present the ciew aie dnft-
mg on the ore in Lhe 450-foot level
FAIRVIEW CLAIMS BONDED
AMERICAN CAPITAL
SEEKING THE P.G.E.
LINE, SAYS PREMIER
ROCK CANDY WILL RESUME
Four claims, Summit, Mountain Lion,
Bluebird" and Eureka at Oro Fino
Mountain, Summit Camp above Fair-
view, have been bonded by Thomas
Burke of Seattle, and J W. Elliot ot
Leavenworth, Wash, ancl associates,
now registered in Bntish Columbia as
the B. C. Mining Co, Ltd
It is a private company, no outside
stock*bemg sold, aiid fiom piesent indications the option will be taken up
The company has already acquired a
mill, compressor and other equipment,
and will proceed with development and
shipping as soon as the weather is
favorable.
OLD   CAMP   MCKINNEY
The Waterloo and the Fontency
properties in the old Camp McKinney,
near Bridesville, were recently leased to
C. F. Law of Vancouver, and he proposes to develop them as "soon as the
snow is off the ground
Other pioperties in that section are
attracting mining men and it looks as
if the famous camp will revive this
year
Victoria���"An offer has been made
and the directors are now considering
it from vaiious angles," said Premier
S. F. Tolmie on Tuesday in reference to
a report that American capitalists were
seeking to open negotiations for the
purchase of Lhe Pacific Great Eastern
railway. Further than that, the prem-
ici would not go
BRIDESVILLE NEWS
Miss Mary Lawless  returned  from
-Penticton on Sunday.
Joe LePage returned from Cascade
on Monday where he has been logging.
Mrs H. T Letts returned on Friday
after a two weeks visit to Trail and
Nelson.
Constable W. R. Powers of Greenwood, was in town on Saturday on a
business trip.
JOLLY   SURPRISE  PARTY
THE RODERICK DIIU
(Grand Forks Sun)
A statement from a reliable source
was given out yesterday to Lhe effect
the Consolidated Mining & Smelting
company's Rock Candy mine and mill
at Lynch Creek, a short distance north
of this city, would resumb operations on
the- first of next month. It was also
stated that the work would again De
under the supervision of Dan Matheson,
who is now in charge of the company s
properties at Ymir. "   - -
To vouch for the correctness of this
statement, it was fuithei stated that
Pete Matioda, had been engaged to
clear the road to the Noith Fork property and that he is now engaged in this
Work.
An option has been taken on the
Roderick Dhu, situated near Lhe Jewel
mine, Long Lake camp, about nine
miles from Greenwood, by Vancouver
interests Ore was shipped from this
mine to the old Greenwood smelter
about twenty yeais ago The ore
assays high m gold and also can ies a
percentage of siher values Messis.
Wanke, Mellrud and associate of
Gieenwood, are the owners of the
property.
That's  His  Experience
Teacher': "Now, Tommy, if I take a
potato/cut it m half, then m quarteis,
and then m halves again, what shall I
have?"
Tommy: "Chips, miss!"���Pearson's
Weekly.
Eleven of the younger set, after
skating on Fnday evening, February
22nd, gave Mr. and Mrs. F L Peterson
a pleasant sm prise, when they appeared at the door. It did not take many
minutes until the merry crowd got
started in playing games Jesse Puddy
dressed as a 1929 Sheba, was very much
in the limelight, and his acting in the
play of shampoo, hair cut ancl shave
proved a frost to the young men of the
party Carl Miller also had a great
time at his favoiite game The good
things to eat were many and special
mention of the chicken" sandwiches and
home-made candy cannot be" overlooked In all everyone had 'a real
enjoyable Lime and thanks are rdue to
Mr and Mrs Peterson for the manner
m which thej* assisted the young people
who were on pleasure bent.
Thc Gallant General
"Among Lhe prettiest girls present
was Brigadier-General Blazer," wiote a
young reporter in his account of a
garden party.
The next day he was called Lo Lhe
editor's room
"What do you mean by writing stuff
like that?" demanded the editor.
"Well," explained the reporter, "that's
where he was."���Border Cities Star.
iiSt^SSSSSaSa^SS^S&KSS^^S^saiV^^^
Male straphanger: "Madam, you arc
standing on my foot."
Female ditto: "I beg your pardon.
I thought it belonged to the man sitting
down."
Scenes along the route. Sinclair Canyon,
Calgary and the Locks of Sault Ste. Marie.
Centre, as the Empress Hotel at Victoria will
appear.    Vancouver,  Chateau  Lake  Louise
and thc Pool at Banff where members of the
1928 tour are seen disponing Uu-msehes.
Dean Sinclair Laird of Macdonald College, Ste. Anne de
Bellevue is better known as an
educationist than a philanthropist,
but.he is really both. Some years
ago he made a tour of the Canadian west. His time was more or
less limited and in planning his
itinerary he was obliged to miss
several points he considered worth
while and to spend more time than
he thought necessary in places less
interesting. While he made up his
mind that this condition should
not obtain if he made the trip
again, he was greatly thrilled by
his j'ourney. The beauty and the
wonder of the Canadian west
deeply impressed him and he re
turned, as he says, with a more
sympathetic understanding of the
western people and problems and
more thoroughly convinced that
the education of a Canadian can
not begin until he has seen his own
country.
It was his idea that if a tour
could be organized at reasonable
cost, to cover all the important
cities and resorts west of Toronto,
and the participants wero assured
of relief from all the won ies of
travel arrangements, enough might
be interested to warrant tbe running of a special train.
Thus the first "Dean Laird
Special" came into existence and
this year, for the sixth time, and
in conjunction with the Canadian
Pacific Raih-% ay the Dean is again
organizing a de luxe all-expense
tour which for a stated sum,
affords the maximum of enjoyment and variety of scene and
recreation that can be provided
in three summer vceks.
Dean Laird de\ olc-s a great deal
of time and energy to his tour and
each year goes over much of the
same ground, hut he now kno*>\s
thc high spots in western travel,
and by carrying on jear after j-ear
he feels that ho is making his contribution towaids a greater and
more united Canada Altogether,
Mr. Laird has piloted some fifteen
hundred people through the great
cities and scenes which lie between
Montreal _ and Victoria���Banff,
Lake Louise, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Vancouver���over a diversified
route. He has found that, while
the travellers appicciale having
a special train as a home and base,
thcy appreciate tbe Great Lakes
and optional motor runs, so that
the steamships and the motor cars
are very generously used by him.
The Dean is doing a great work
and the only qualifications he
e'emands from applicants or membership in his tour are companion--
ability and the capacity for enjoyment. i'ACE i"Wi3
THE GREENWOOD LEDGL
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1929
io��vlinri*uiM
A GOOD TOWN
The Greenwood Ledge
Published every Thursday at
Greenwood, B. C.
G. VV. A. SMITH
EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR
Subscription: In Canada and Gt.
Britain, $2.00 a year in advance; $2.50
when not paid for three months or
more have passed. To the United
States $2.50, always in advance.'
ADVERTISING RATES,,
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices .. $25.00
Coal ancl Oil Notices............     7.00
Estray Notices..................    3.00
Card of Thanks...............'."    1.00
Certificate of Improvement....   12.50
(When more than one claim appears
in notice, $5.00 for each additional
claim.)
All other legal advertising 16 cents
a line first insertion, and 12 cents a
line for each subsequent insertion, nonpareil measurement.
Business locals 12Sic a line each Insertion.
No letter to the editor will be inserted except over the proper signature and address of the writer. -This
rule admits of no exception.
The blue cross means that
your subscription is due, and
that the editor would be
pleased ,to have more money.
COPPER MNING TO BE
BIG FACTOR IN INDUSTRY
Copper Mines, Quatsino, Copper cGold,
Rufus Argenta���while others are preparing Lo develop properties both on
tho lower Coast, Vancouver Island and
Portland Canal district. Pacific Tidewater Mines, associated company of
Ladj'smith Tidewater Smelters, is very
active, and with its financial backing
promises to be a big factor in provincial operations.
In 1928 commodity production of
minerals in this province was the largest on record, and the, prospect is
that it will steadily increase.���Western
Canada Mining News.
LEAVE  OGOPOGO   ALONE
There is a mean spirit in eastern
Canada. We have known it. for a long
time, but this last Ogopogo story proves
it. It appears that the farmers near
Norwood, Ontario, on the banks of the
Trent River, have found a sea-serpent
frozen in the ice. This sea-serpent is
���only a measly 30 feet long. It.has dark
brown skin and copper-colored spots,
and they claim it is ogopogo.     '
We deny this. Ogopogo lives in the
Okanagan Lake, in British Columbia,
and he is 300 feet long if he is an inch.
He eats fruit and scares the natives.
He has a cousin, older and bigger than
himself, which is sometimes seen by
drunken, sailors off the port of Prince
Rupert. Ogopogo has never been east,
and "does not intend to go.
If easterners can't do their bragging
about "a mean, undersized7sea-serpent
only 30 feet long without claiming it as
Ogopogo, the pride of the west, it is
time they quit drinking whisky out of
jugs.���Winnipeg Free Press.
Put a peg of prosperity, into your
community by staying with it.
Always greet your neighbor with a
grasp of confidence.
Criticize in a spirit of Godspeed.
Say a good word even if it hurts.
Remember that those who insist on
hanging themselves will do it if given
enough rope.
Give your neighbors a right to an
opinion a.s long* as tliey keep it to
themselves.
. Discuss questions involving your better welfare instead of arguing with
them.
Apply the Golden Rule regardless of
consequences.
Back up your churches and relative
affiliations. You will feel better and
besides arc setting a good example for
the young people.
Give the young people plenty of
pleasure.
Failures reflect on the entire town.
See what you can do to keep your
neighbors on top of the water. Don't
let them drown.
Let's have more handshakes and arm
in arm conferences' with a good will
parting.   It adds to the day's events.
Let's break tlie shell and step out.
The world is wondering what we arc
going to do next. Lot's show 'em.���
Saanich Review,
SEND Y<JUR
BOOTS and SHOES
    To   	
Harry -Armson, Grand Forks
The 20th Century Shoe Repairer
All work and material guaranteed
We pay postage one way.  Terms cash.
ASSAYER
E. W. WIDDOVVSON
Provincial Assayer ami Chemist
V. O. Drawer L1108, Nelson, B.C. .
Established 1900
Charges made are the standard Western
rates. - Price lists sent on application.
A. E. McDOUGALL
Contractor and Builder
MONUMENTS,        ROOFING,
LAMATCO WALL BOARD
Get my prices on
LAMATCO
on walls finished, and save 'money*
SHOP AT GREENWOOD
Box 332 Grand Forks. B.C.
Mathematics
"How do they figure the population of
a Swiss village?"
"Oh, I guess they count the number
of echoes and divide by the number of
mountain***.."���Ex.
VfT��yyvTvyvvvv-ryvyT'/ff'*>v-r***yvTT'��TTT'<''f,'f��v*>?,flffl*f*T,��l**'f*��'
\ The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada. Limited
Office, Smelting- and Refining** Department
TRAIL,, BRITISH COLUMBIA
* SA1ELTERS and REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold. Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers, of Gold, Silver, Copper, Pig** I<ead and Zinc
"TADANAC"  BRAND
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That copper production- promises to
be an important factor in the mining
industry of British Columbia is indicated by-the preliminary^figures j>f
^niinesr^Copper^tM
.;��� place again, and the prospect is that
it will continue so. The price of copper
is strong and promises to be maintained. Increased production, following
better prices, may tend to prevent a
further raise in copper prices.
An interesting* article appears in
. The Mining Journal of London, being
an abstract of an article on "The
Copper Industry of the World," by Dr.
Moritz Hochschild, a leading .German
- authority- on the -subject, and which
appeared in a Chilean financial journal. This deals with the world prd-
duction over the years 1923-24-25-20,
1920 being the last year for which complete returns were available. Apart
from its able exposition of the subject,
an interesting point is that relation to
the life of present copper mines. One
paragraph reads:
"From these percentage increases it
is seen that copper production must
steadily increase or that research must
find equivalent substitutes. In some
circles the fear has been expressed of
a comparatively early exhaustion of
copper resources, In this connection,
Dr. Charles L. Parsons, secretary of the
American Chemical Company, asserted
some time ago that the world's resources of copper-, tin, zinc, lead and an-,
timony must become exhausted in'
about .30 ycarcs,- while others have
named even a shorter period for ex-
haution." '
Such a declaration from an important
authority is of great interest to British
Columbia, where large, deposits of copper ore exist. While the article points
out that the methods of working
copper deposits has undergone a complete revolution and has become highly
systematized by large organizations, it
is not unreasonable to assume uthat
many deposits in British Columbia can
be profitably worked, particularly those
which have a copper content above the
low grade.
. Conditions augur well for increased
activity in copper mining, particularly
on the Coast. In view of late events,
attention is being directed again to the
low-gi'Ade deposits at Phoenix, which
were considered worked out years ago.
The big companies, A Consolidated,
Granby and Britannia, are increasing
their output. Within the next year or
two several properties on the Coast
promise to come into production���Coast
Copper, George Copper, Sunloch.
Other companies with excellent prospects are getting into action���Pacific
RESISTANCE OF PLANTS
TO DISEASE
G&
(Experimental Farms Note) ..
The Dominion Plant Pathology Labo-
ratory, Vancouver, has shown that none
of"tlre_commercial"vafieties of potatoes
grown in British Columbia are immune
to virus diseases. However, Netted
Gem, although far from immune,
seems to be more resistant than Bliss
Triumph and a, number of other varieties. Fortunately, virus diseases may
be controlled by the use of "certified
seed" and by the early removal of all
infected plants,, hence, it is not essential to choose relatively resistant varieties. Our . studies of- the relative resistance of-- the commercial - hop varieties to Downy Mildew have been likewise of little commercial importance,'
because the two relatively resistant
varieties, Fuggles and Kents, are not
such good yielders as the more suscep-
table variety, Clusters.
The farmer may not always profit by
knowledge of the relative resistance of
his crops to disease. The market always demands certain varieties and
types of fruit or other crops which may
or may not be resistant to local diseases.
But under practically all circumstances,
the farmer may partially reduce his
losses from* disease by studying the
factors which alter the resistance of
plants to disease. The parts of plants
above ground. are less resistant to
disease during most warm weather,
than during hot,, dry weather. When
the weather is .warm and moist, the
waxy material that covers the surface
of the leaves and stems does not form
as effective a barrier against disease
spores; During such weather it may
be profitable to supplement the wax
barrier with a coat of fungicidal dust
or spray. Conversely, during hot dry
weather, a thicker" and,; therefore, more
effective waxbarrier tends to form, and
also, the disease spores fail ;to7germinr'
ate through lack of moisture. Spray-
ing under such conditions would be a
waste of money. Om* investigations
show that the clanger period, the period
when trees lack resistance, is in the
spring when wounds are inclined to
bleed and when growth tends to be soft
and succulent. Injury to trees by
pruning or cultivation should be avoided at this period. It is best to prune or
cut out all diseased parts the previous
fall, and early enough, so that the
wounds will be well healed in. the
spring. Otherwise, these; wounds may
serve as the point of attack by disease
'during this spring danger period when
the "sap is.up." Also, the removal, in
the early, fall, of the diseased parts
eliminates the principle source of infectious spores.
it-Pays-to-Advertise
In the Local Paper
Use the Advertising Columns of
the Local Paper. It is just large
enough to make your advertisement appear one of the important things published each week.
The Greenwood Ledge
xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx V
���-��� II].
\
t
i
i
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1929
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
PRUNING TO MAKE ��
STRONG FRUIT TREES
PAGE THREE
(Experimental Farms Nolo)
The loss ehtaned each year by the
breaking down of- fruit trees is in a
largo measure avoidable if proper.care
is taken in the early years of the tree.
A great deal of the damage is a result
of poor crotches or a poorly shaped
head, judged by the standards of
strengtli. Unfortunately, when judged
by the standards of sanitation, tlie
open centre tree is perhaps a trifle
better than,the modified leader typo,
which is the type we are going to talk
about.
The modified leader system consists
in allowing the central leader to grow
to a height of four or five feet, or even
- more if a high headed tree is desired.
Along this central leader branches are
selected to form the main framework of
the tree. Probably not more than six
will be kept and these will be well
spaced around the leader to get a well
balanced head.' As soon as the uppermost branch has been selected,  the
- leader is cut off at this point. This
gives a tree with a central axis for
about five feet, with branches radiating
from.it, which is a much stronger tree
,than the old __ open  centre  or  vase-
shaped tree which is frequently seen.
A word about selecting branches for
the framework. Some branches tend
to grow upwards at a very sharp angle
to the main stem. This sharp angle
makes a weak crotch and such branches
should not be selected. Try to get
branches which are forming more of- a
right angle to the main stem. This
can better be accomplished when the
selection is made from branches two
years old. Very young branches have
not adopted their real angle of growth
and it is-difficult to make a proper
selection.
The fulfilment of duty is the truc
end of life and the true welfare ���
Jouffroy.
Trouble man
worked all
night to restore
service
Trouble on three of the
B. C. Telephone Company's
long-distance circuits, two
miles west of Mission, on the
night of January 30, resulted
in a hurry-up call-to Abbots-
ford for a repairman.
The repairman left Al>-
botsford by automobile' at
* 10 p.m., but because of the
deep snow he could not
drive farther than a half mile
beyond Mission, so he had to
make the rest of the trip on
foot.
Arriving on the scene he
found that he had an all-
night task ahead of him, but
he gamely tackled the job
and by 3:40 a.m. had all the
circuits clear.
B. C. TELEPHONE CO.
FOLK FESTIVAL FOR GREAT WEST
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Js the folk song, dance and handicraft festival developing into a
permanent- feature "of life in the
Prairie Provinces of Western
Canada? Jt would seem so. The
remarkable success of last year's
. festival at the Royal Alexandra
Hotel, Winnipeg:, raised the hope
that it would become an annual
event, and the announcement of
this year's festival to take place
at Regina, March 20th to 23rd, has
been generally welcomed as an indication of the establishing of the
Festival in the artistic life of the
prairies. Those who witnessed
last year's festival will never forget* it. National costumes formed
a riot of color, and national dances
a perfect whirl of studied and dashing movement,. while the music,
both vocal and instrumental, was
of such a standard as to set a high
mark for future festivals. -
The programme already arranged for the Regina Festival will be
thoroughly representative of "the
various races that make up
Canada's .West. Eighteen racial
groups will contribute their national songs - and dances, and
handicrafts, and . the display of
many colored national costumes
will form a series of brilliant pictures.,.    '���
All four, countries of the British
Isles will participate and European
races -that comprise these* new
Canadians will include Hungarian.**,
Czechs, Ukrainians, Serbians, Roumanians, Swedes, Icelanders, Polos,
Danes, Norwegians, Dutch, and
Germans, while from older Canada
there will be French-Canadians,
and the Department of Indian Affairs is-arranging an exhibit of the
handicrafts of the Indians of tlie
wuu-ii*��. ���*���
JNorae handicraft will be one feature of
the feitlval. Left, r-iul Hal. .amoun
Uaiilkli Haritone, who will render Viking
Songs, lti-tht,- a colorful, national co��.
tumo which will be one of qemal hundred,
The Festival will be held under*
the auspices of the Canadian Pacific Railway and the musical features have becn organized in cooperation with the. Conservatory
of Music of Regina College. It
has the support of the Government'
of Saskatchewan whose Premier,
Hon. J. G. Gardiner, suggested that
this year it be held in Regina. In
this connection W. M. Graham, Indian Commissioner, Department of.
Indian Affairs, Saskatchewan, is
arranging to provide an Indian
section where, women's work
demonstrating native industry will
be lent for the Festival from the
Saskatchewan Government collection. Further, the Canadian Handicrafts. Guild, through its Regina
committee, is arranging a general
exhibition of handicraft work, collected froni all over Canada, but
emphasizing the handicrafts of. tho
people of the West.
Special guest artists from the
east of Canada will include Poul
Bai, Danish baritone, .whose rendering   of  Viking   songs   at   the
recent   Vancouver   Sea   Festival,
will be remembered, and Charles
Marchand,   French-Canadian   folk
singer and leader of the Bytown
Troubadours,      an      aggregation
known all over Canada and. the
United, States.   The  Regina  College  of  Music  will  give  English
folkdancing, while Miss Jean Gauld
of Regina and her pupils will present the Scotch , and. Welsh varieties.   Irish dances will be given by
two Irish champions.   In this way
the British Isles will be covered.
The   Serbian  national   dance   the-
"K'ola'Vwill be rendered by twenty.
New Canadians of Regina, and a
German   mixed .choir, will   sing
under the leadership of J. W. Eh-
mann, also of Regina.   Men  and
women representative of the other
racial groups will perform national
folk dances and show handicraft
.work either in the finished state
���or in process of being made. '
A great field of varied endeavour
and the fruit of a score of different
cultures will thus be paid before
the people of the West during the ���
Festival and the way Canada is being enriched by her New Canadian
citizens . from overseas will be
demonstrated. Concerts in connection with the Festival will be given
at the Hotel Saskatchewan and in
! the Darke .Music Hall of'the Re*
-I eina College. "  "   .
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tationery
and
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Let us know your requirements and
we will gladly quote prices on same
The Greenwood Ledge
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The Greenwood Ledge PAGE FOUR
TIIE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1929
Come in and Hear
The New Marconi
1929 RADIO
With Temple Air-Chrome Speaker
T. M. GULLEY
Distributor for Greenwood
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1 Of Local Interest |
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SESiS'S.-tS3?SS*,-__.i_��XX��SS'5SSi:uj!iEB
Mrs. Geo. A. Bryan returned from
Duck Range, on Wednesday afternoon.
Remember ihc Benefit Dance in the
Farmer's Hall, Midway, on Friday,
March 1st.
Mrs. E. F. Wilson, of "Big Trees,"
Rock 'Creek, will leave in March for a
visit in England.
Wm. Johnson, road foreman of Rock
Creek, was in town on business on
Monday morning.'
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Specials
Strawberries 2s in heavy Syrup per can 30c
Mixed Vegetables 2s -       .3 cans 70c
(Good for Soups or Stews)
Elbow Cut Macaroni -      2 lbs 25c ���
fresh Salmon, Halibut & Cod fish
Every Thursday
Eresh Sausages Every Eriday
For Quality and Value Order From Phone 16
GREENWOOD GROCERY
Chas. Nichols left on Wednesday for
Nelson where he will receive special
medical treatment.
Found���A Junior Red Cross badge.
Owner can have same by calling* at The
Gieenwood Ledge Office.
' Danny Deane, of Princeton, and a
former well known resident of Phoenix,
is renewing acquaintances in town.   -
I. Parkinson arrived from Vancouver
on Wednesday and is visiting friends in
town. Mr. Parkinson is an oldtimer of
Phoenix.
GREENWOOD SCHOOL NOTES
Editorial Staff:
John Campolieto, Eileen Bryan,
Ernest Johnson, Alice Clark
Do not forget to attend the Junior
Red Cross Bazaar, which takes place in
the Ladies Auxiliary; Hall, on March
23rd, 1929,
Trustees Chas. King and Jas. Hoy
paid a visit to the school on Monday of
this week.
We are glad to hear-that Mr. Sater
will be back with us again, after being
ill for some while.
It  is  Ruth   Cox's   birthday   today.
Ruth is fourteen.
Grade V again proved their superiority
by obtaining 100% in last Friday's
Spelling Competition. Results for the
other Grades were:" IV���93%; VI���
98.16%; VII���99.37%; VIII���92.09%;
IX���98.34%.
We hope that David Nichols will be
back to school soon.
Louis  Lucente  celebrated  his
birthday on Wednesday last.
13th
Mrs. E. S. Reynolds and children and
Mrs. G. B. M. Gane, of Kettle Valley,
were .the guests of Mrs. H. T. New-
march on Monday afternoon.
The additional names of Mr. and
Mrs. R. Folvik have been received by
The Greenwood Ledge as having given
a floral tribute to J. C. Casselman's
funeral. -
'WTTW-V*
Edison Mazda Lamps
Have taken another
Drop in Price
We Are The Sole Agents
TAYLOR & SON
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Phone 17
The Greenwood Hockey Club will hold
a Dance in the Masonic Hall, Greenwood, on Friday, April 12th. Bush's 5-
picce orchestra has been engaged for
the occasion.
W. E. McArthur, of Midway, was a
visitor in town on Thursday. Ted had
just returned from a three day'trip to
Christian Valley. He got as far as Deer
Creek in his Ford.
W. N. Neil, general manager of the
Western lines of the C.P.R. and C. A.
Cottrell, general superintendent of the
British Columbia division, were on thc
Tuesday eastbound passenger train.
Guests at thc Pacific _ Hotel during
the week: Henry Strauss, Midway; W.
D. Moore, Grand Forks; C. W. Nord,
Nelson; D. Caldwell, Beaverdell; F. S.
Roberts, Herman Zink; J. Copland,
Bridesville; H. Lobb, I. Parkinson, Vancouver; D. Deane, Princeton.
Beatty Miller was absent from school
this week on account of illness.
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SALE
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10% OFF on all
DRESS and WORK SHOES
���also���
MINERS & Loggers RUBBERS
Childrens Rubbers selling for SOc
MEN'S HATS, CAPS, ''
HEAVY WORK SOX, GLOVES,
OVERALLS, GERMAN SOX,
HEAVY PANTS,
WORK and DRESS SHIRTS,
DRESS GLOVES,
FANCY SILK and WOOL SOX
.Sale on llenvy Underwear
Ellen Trounson's Store <
We are inspecting the cxpector to
call any day.     v
"Freddy Clark said he saw two robins
and Edna Pope saw a blue bird the
other day."'   (Believe it or not.)
The older boys are- planning to
have a sleigh riding party this Saturday (March 2nd) at, 8 o'clock "p!m.
Anyone,, young or old wishing to havc
a real good ride are requested to fetch
along their sleighs or bobs, and do not
forget, eat before you come.
JUST EGGS !
STOCKS*       BONDS
MINING SHARES
Charles King
representing
Solloway, Mills & Co.
Dominion Wide Brokers
STOCKS & BONDS
on Installment
MINING SHARES
on Margin
Wire Your Orders
Daily Price Lisls
at Office
Copper St., Greenwood, B.C.
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Miss Heather Harris, Miss Vera
Walmsley, George Morrison and Harry
Hallstrom walked to Phoenix on Sunday. On arriving in the old berg they
we're greeted by Mayor Forpaw. After
dinner at the Fenwick camp they retraced thcir steps home. They report
thc walking good, with very little snow
for this time of the year in Phoenix,
PACSF1C HOTEL
Headquarters for
Boundary Mining and Travelling Men
first Class Accommodation
Hot and Cold Water Every Convenience
J. H. GOODEVE
Prop.
Drug Store in Connection
Jimmy Copland of Bridesville Road,
was a visitor in town during the weekend.- He had walked 10 miles, from his
cabin to reach the railway at Rock
Crek. Jimmy started mining in B.C.
in 1858 and on hearing of the Rock
Creek excitement first came there in
1860. He is enjoying good health and
will celebrate his 90th birthday on July
4th, of this year. He has a wonderful
memory and it is a pleasure to listen to
his reminiscences sinces he left Forfarshire, Scotland (his native land) in
1854.
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4
Strawberry Jam
Raspberry Jam
Gingersnaps   -
Oranges
- ,    4's   75c
- -    4's   70c
20c lb 4 lbs   75c
324's per doz   25c
Head Lettuce, Celery and Bananas
McMYNN'S STORE, Midway
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Subscribe to The Greenwood Ledge
Provincial Constable'W. R. Powers,
accompanied by Staff Sergeant Macdonald of Penticton, motored to Bridesville on Tuesday, where they expected
to meet Constable McDonald of Oliver,
who was going to motor the Staff
Sergeant to Oliver. tOn arriving at
Bridesville they did no meet McDonald
so they started down Anarchist Mountain but had to return owing to heavy
snow drifts, and travel via Molson to
Oroville,, where they met Con. McDonald, who was unable to make the
hill also on account of the snow.
GREAT SACRIFICE SALE OF HAY
For a limited time, at my ranch,
baled hay, $13.00 per ton; loose hay
from the slack in the field, $10.00 per
ton.   All strictly cash.
F. HAUSSENER,
Greenwood, B.C.
Was it the loquacious Sam Weller
who said "eggs is eggs"? The distinction may have been fine enough whon
breakfasts were leisurely, and standardization had never a thought of entering the poultry business. But it will
not do now, for England has put its
eggs into three classes: special, minimum weight V,<> ounces; standard, 2
ounces; and pullet standard, l:)i
ounces. Nor is that all. The new system of grading bars preserved eggs, and
demands that thc shells of fresh eggs
be clean and sound, the yolk translucent, and the air space less than one-
quarter inch in depth.
The obvious benefit to the consumer
need no emphasis. He will get the egg
of weight and quality he pays for. No
longer will he be baffled by distinctions,
in not a few cases imaginary. Ancl no
longer, on the other hand, will-the
grocer be at the mercy of the woman
who, having called for "black hens'"
eggs and being told by thc grocer that
he did not know a black hen's egg from
any other colored hen's egg, asked if
she_ might pick them out herself. "It
seems to me," said the grocer, as he
"watclle"d"herdd^^"tliat~th(rblacir"lTehs
lay all the big eggs." "Yes," answered
the woman, "that's the way I tell
them."
Then, too, tho consumer will cease to
puzzle, as many a man has done in
America, over descriptions in the grocer's window:
Eggs, guaranteed, 75 cents a dozen
Eggs, fresh, 70 cents
Eggs, fancy western, 55 cents
Eggs, 35 cents.
Eggs, unadorned, apparently are in
the habit of striking 'a poor market.
Or are they unadorned because they
have nothing special to be proud of?
At any rate, if the new system spreads,
advantages will accrue to all. It will
help maintain strict, standards in advertising. It will assist the merchant
in strengthening the dependability
placed upon the goods he sells. And-
it will mean much for the poultry
raiser, who has perhaps suffered most
through lack bf some system of grading.
Above all, it will protect the consumer
who not infrequently gets an egg so
small that he can barely escape feeling
that he is looking at it through the
wrong end of a telescope.���Christian
Science Monitor.
V"f7VCT-f*l
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To those who contemplate   .
,_     -    . buying
Wedding Presents or .Gifts   -
for their friends
Let us remind you that we can
supply you cheaper than you.
can buy from Catalogue
Let us have your ������[
Watch and Clock Repairs        ;
Wo always do a first-class job ��� '
A. A. WHITE
Watchmaker  and  Jeweler
F. J. While, Mcr.
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA'AAA A A A A
WILLIAM IT. WOOD
PHYSICIAN AND SURG RON  ���
GREENWOOD...
The United Church of Canada,
REV. ANDREW WALKER. B.A.   *
Minister in' Charge. Greenwood.
SUNDAY, MARCH 3
Midway, 2 p.m.
Greenwood. 7:30 p.m.
St. Jude's Church. Greenwood
REV. STAG. SMYTH
SUNDAY, MARCH 3
Service at 7:30 p.m. -
APPLES FOR SALE
. A few more boxes of Good Apples
For Sale from 25c to S1.00 in your own
boxes*
T. A. CLARK. Midway.
PIGS FOR SALE
lenefit Dance
In aid of Mrs. Casselman
FARMER'S HALL
MIDWAY
FRIDAY, MARCH 1st, 1929
Bush's Five-Piece Orchestra
Admission ��1.00 Including Supper
Come and Have a Good Time and
Help a Worthy Cause
Mrs. Brown: "So your husband was
lost at sea?" -.
Mrs. Jones: "Yes, a bathing beauty
got him."
His sister, called him "Willie,"
His mother called him "WiU";
But when he got that roadster,
It was   "Bill, Bill, Bill."
Printing
is the inseparable companion of
Achievement
Have Your
Letterheads, Billheads, Statements,
Envelopes, Window Cards, Poster's,
Dodgers, Etc.
Printed at The
Greenwood Ledge
Seven weeks, $6.00 each.
Apply Mrs. W., J. McCelvey,
Kettle Valley, B.C.
CAR HAY FOR SALE
Ten Ions Alfalfa, first cutting, balance Timothy.   A. 1. shape.   '���
NAT. ROBINSON,
Rock Creek, B.C.
*' . "   ANNOUNCEMENTS
Bridesville *
A Dance will be held in thc Bridesville Hall on Friday, Marcli 8th. Admission $1 for gentlemen; Ladies bring
lunch.
Midway'
Thc Farmer's Institute and Women's
Institute will hold their meeting in the
Hall on "Saturday, March 2nd at 2:30
p.m.
All members of the Women's Institute are asked to donate a cake and
50 sandwiches for lhc Benefit Dance on
Friday, March 1st.
A Five Hundred Card Parly will be
played in the Old School House on
Thursday next, 7th March, at 8:30 p.m.
--" ill
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