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The Greenwood Ledge Dec 13, 1928

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 ^!Provincial Library \
VOI/. HI
GREENWOOD, B.C., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1928
No. 20
GREENWOOD SCHOOL NOTES
Editorial Staff:
John Campolieto, Eileen Bryan,
Ernest Johnson, Alice Clark
It was John McGillivray's birthday
on Monday 10th.
'��� Marie McDonell  won a  prize  for
packing the best Xmas parcel.
Inspector P. H, Sheffield visited the
school on Wednesday of this week.
The pupils of Div. I are busy writing
exams. They will be relieved of a
great burden when the exams are ovei-
with.
Son���(After   reaching   home . from
school.)   Father, do teachers get paid?
Father���Why of course they do.
Son���Well wouldn't that .jar you, and
we do all the work.
On Friday evening of' last week
about twenty of the older boys tried out
their skates for the first time this
season on Boundary Creek. The ice
, was excellent, and all had a merry
time.
In last week's Spelling Competition
Div. II outclassed Div. I when Grades
VI and VII each obtained 100%. Other
results were as follows: Grade V���
99.11%; Grade IV���98.61% and Grade
VIII���94.48%.
Prizes for the leaf cards of Div. II
were  awarded:   Freda  Hammerstrom
' captured the girls prize,  a beautiful
. sewing set, and Burton and John McGiUivray tied.for the boys prize, which
was a story book.
Greenwood Plays at the Forks
Last Saturday the Tigers Basketball
team invaded Grand Porks in a return
game, and spent an evening as host of
the-Young Conservatives. The game
was nip and tuck affair, the score seesawing up and down all through the
play. In the first period the Forks
-doubled the scqre, leading by 16-8. Ir,
the next two periods our quintette displaying a smart brand of ball, gradually
��� tied the score.. In the last period the
Tigers managed to hold their own
against the clever work of the Young
Conservatives and put themselves in
,the lead. In this period the Young
Conservatives were very aggressive and
roughed it' against their lighter opponents, but it was only in the last
minute that they tied the score. In the
overtime period they added two more
counters with no response from embays, making it 34-30. Everyqne played
a fine game for the Tigers who are a
gre.atly_JmprovedJeam._now days.
After the game Ernie Hutton entertained the Club at his home where re-
frehments were served. Harry Hallstrom kindly provided transportation
for the Club.
D. A. MINE RE-OPENS
Work resumed at the D. A. mine in
���'   Deadwood camp, near Greenwood, on
Tuesday   morning.   The   property   is
owned by the J.    R. Mines, Limited
Alec Purkis is in charge.
At present the machinery is being
overhauled and it is the intention oi
.   the new management to' extend the
lower tunnel 25 feet before commencing
stoping out the ore. '    ,
CRESCENT MINES LIMITED
INCORPORATED FOR $3,000,000
Notice of the incorporation of thc
Crescent Mines, Limited (Non Personal
Liability) as a Specially Limited
Company, with the registered office in
Vancouver, was given in the currenf
issue of the British Columbia Gazette
The capital of the company is $3,000,000
divided into 12,000,000 shares,
TO CHOOSE OPPOSITION LEADER
BEAVER SILVER HAS BELL
VEIN, SAYS ENGINEER
P. E. Peterson, consulting engineer of
the Beaver Silver, returned to hi&
home in Vancouver last Friday after a
visit to the company's property, at
Beaverdell. Mr. Peterson expressed
complete confidence that, the Beaver
Silver crosscut at the 200-foot level will
meet the famed Bell vein. The Bell
adjoins the Beaver Silver on the north
and the. present workings of the Bell
are only about 70 feet from the Beaver
line.
"The strike of the Bell vein carries it
into Beaver ground and I am'satisfied
that the Beaver workings will encounter
the ore on the-200-foot level. The location of the Beavei\is such that we"
can certainly expect a continuation of
the Bell vein into the Beaver, and I
expect the Beaver to be just as profitable an operation as the Bell has been,"
said Mr. Peterson.    *    -
Mr. Peterson stated that the Boll
has one face qf ore 12 feet in width
and two others, one four feet and one
six feet, in exceptionally highgrade ore. j
He praises the future possibilities ofl
the Beaverdell district as a producer of,'
silver ores. j
Mr. Peterson said that the Beaver (
Silver  equipment  will  take  care   of i
developments for somc time to come!
and that the cost of hoisting ore from
No. 2 level would not exceed six cents
a ton, and that it would cost just as
much to, tram the ore through tunnels
as  to  hoist  by  shaft.   No 'pumping
problems present  themselves,  as the
Beaver Silver is practically dry..
The engineer states >that since his,
inspection a little over a year ago the.
shaft has been deepened  to a total-,
'depth of 202 feet  and  a new level
started at the bottom, which is the |
third level in the mine and known as
the 200-foot level, and a crosscut in a
northerly direction has extented  105
feet.   On No. 2 level���the 100-foot���a
block  of  ore  has  been stopeel  and
shipped.   This    continues    downward
and the company may expect ore from
this source after tunnels are driven underneath this section from the 200-foot
level, the engineer estimates.
Ready to Build
Copper Refinery
Consolidated Prepared to Start Project
As Soon as Independent Firms
Unite to Provide Custom Ore'
KING GEORGE SLIGHTLY BETTER
Nelson.���That the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company of Canada
stands ready to immediately build at
the coast a copper refinery for copper
from ils own coast, properties and for
custom copper furnished by coast products if those 'producers will get together, is,virtually the statement made
by President J. J. Warren of the Consolidated when passing through Nelson on
Saturday, December 8th, en route east.
His trip east follows a visit to the
company's smelting and ���* refining
plants at Tadanac, an inspection of the
West Kootenay Power & Light Company's power- plants at Bonnington,
including No. 3, just completed, and a
visit to Victoria to" discuss with the
government some company matters.
He declined to comment on the differences between the Kootenay Power
Company and the Granby Company,
saying the matter' was before the
courts.
On the subject of a smelter, Mr.
Warren said that the time was ripe for
the establishment of a cqpper refinery
on a suitable site on the British Columbia coast,,as, if treated in one refining plant, there was sufficient copper production tributary to the coast
to justify the building of a refinery
there, and one which could quote as
good rates as that at Tacoma.
Getting Enough Ore
For   Smelting   Plant
He   added   that   the   Consolidated
A bulletin received in Greenwood
this evening from Nelson states that
King* George is a little belter.
MIDWAY NEWS
Miss R. Weed is visiting with Mr. and
Mrs. William Moll in Rossland.
BRIDESVILLE NEWS
R. L. Mace made , a trip to Grand
Forks on Wednesday taking-Mr. Hol-
linger to the hospital.' .
Miss Smith was the guest of Miss
Mary Lawless at Penticton, over the
week-end.
Miss,Helen Davidson, who has been
attending school'at Oliver, returned on
Sunday,, owing to thc illness of her
mother.
Mr. and Mrs.. B. M. Cudworth received word last week that their
daughter, Valeria, who - is attending
school in Greenwood, had to undergo
an operation for tonsilitis.
Mrs. James Kehoe was delighted at
the improvement in her husband when
she visited him in the Grand Forks
Hospital last Thursday. Wm. Lawless
motored Mrs. Kehoe to the Forks. -
GRAND  FORKS  IS
POLICED BY THE
PROVINCIAL   NOW
police,
week
The. City of Grand'Forks is now
under supervision of * the provincial
the change taking effect -a
ago quite unheralded. The
office of chief of police was terminated on Saturday' and D. R. Docksteader, chief constable for three and a
half years was relieved of his duties
and handed a complimentary sum of
$140. an extra month's salary. Inspec-
Company has spent and was spending'tor w- R- Dunwoody of Nelson was in
thousands of dollars to gather together charge of the installation of the new
enough copper ore to warrant building officers. Constable Fred Markland,
of a coast refinery.   Some success had Victoria will head the local detachment
and Constable W. J. McKay, formerly
of Windermere, ,will also be stationed
here. The new ��� policing wilf' cost
Grand Forks $2000 per year.
COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS TREE
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20
The Community Christmas Tree and
Concert will be held in the Greenwood
Theatre on Thursday evening, Dec.
20th. The Concert committee have arranged for an excellent program by the
local school children, commencing at
7 45 pm
attended its efforts and ultimately, the
president felt sure, the full objective
would be attained.
In the meantime, he thought if the
different producers wquld join together,
the project.might be,started immediately.
President Warren said that a similar
situation to that Jn-British Columbia
existed some" years ago in'"Ontario, in
connection with the refining of nickel
there, instead of in a foreign country.
A gentle hint from the Provincial
Government resulted in the building of
a large nickel refinery at Port Col-
bqrne, where hundieds of Canadian
woikmen enjoy lucrative employment.
He thinks the time has come for the
adoption of a policy of "Canada for the
Canadians."
Mr. Warren concluded by saying that
while"copper operation at Tadanac was
suspended temporarily, pending resumption of shipments from Copper
Mountain, Consolidated was purchasing
all the copper ores offering in the district and would start the -furnaces
again^ as soon as a sufficiently large
batch" was on hand
Vancouver.,--Dr. J. D. MacLean, former premier'of British Columbia, may
be leader of the Liberal opposition in
the provincial house. This possibility
looms in consequence of the announcement by President Mary Ellen Smith
that the Provincial executive of the
B.C Liberal Association will meet in
Vancouver on January 21.
In addition to Dr. MacLean, possible candidates for the leadership are
said to include T. D. Pattullo, former
minister of lands; A. M. Manson, former attorney-general, and Ian Mackenzie, former provincial secretary.
Looking dowu into Lakes in thc Clouds near Lake Louise. Right, Ernst Lubltsch directs
the action.. Left, Barrymore and Camilla Ho-n.
DEATH OF REV. DR. FERGUSON
After an illness of a week, the result
of a fall on the verandah of his home,
Rev. J. T. Ferguson died on Tuesday,
December 4th, in Calgary.
Dr. Ferguson had been superintendent of home missions for the Presbyterian church in southern Alberta and
Kootenay since his ,, appointment in
1912. Since the union he has held the
same position in the United church.
He retired on June 30th, last.
The joke is on John Barrymore. Under the direction of Ernst Lubitsch, he, Camilia Horn, Mona
Rico and several other screen celebrities were to
spend three weeks at Lake Louise in the production
of an alpine picture "King of the Mountains". With
him he took a carload of Hollywood snow. This was
fine business for the railway companies, but almost
worse than carrying coals to New Castle as the
party discovered when, from their windows in the
Chateau Lake Louise, they looked across the lake
to where Victoria Glacier hangs witli crystal splendour the year round. High up on the mountain side,
a short saddle ride from the Chateau they found
plenty of snow, and he*-*/-** Mr. Barrymore is said to
have amazed the professional Swiss guides by his
daring. In portraying the role of a daredevil mountaineer he scorned the use of a double and sprained
both his ankles. Hobart Bosworth and Victor
Varconi support Barrymore in the picture staged at
Lake Louise.
John Barrymore is one of the few Americans to
hold a Swiss Government certificate for the climbing
01 Mont Blanc.    He therefore knows whereof he
speaks when he says that the Canadian Rockies, for
beauty, charm and thrills may not be surpassed.
During the past few years quite a number of
moving picture companies have "discovered" the
Canadian Rockies. With headquarters say at Banff
or Lake Louise they are within easy distance of
almost every scenic background which might be
desired. The low rolling foothills give the color for
the cowboy variety. Somewhere, although perhaps
high up, snow can always-be found. The myriad
lakes, streams and waterfalls; high cliffs and rugged
trails, the motor roads and the railway, pack-ponies,
dogs and wild life, the peaks and pine-clad valleys
bridges and tunnels Provide varied properties in
proximity obtainable m few other locations on the
continent. Many of the thrillers one sees now were
fi:med in the Canadian West and with the establishment of a Canadian film production company at
Calgary, a Canadian Hollywood is in a fair way to
becoming built up, particularly as the long hours of
sunshine and the clear atmosphere for which Banff
is famous are two of the major essentials for successful camera work. The Banff Winter Carnival atao
provides a splendid background.
Mrs. H. A. Nichols was visiting in
Grand -Forks over the week-end.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Roberts were
shopping in town on Thursday last.
P. H. Sheffield, School Inspector, was
visiting the Schqol here" on Tuesday
last.
Mrs. Scott is visiting . with ' her
daughter, Mrs. Harry Clark, in Seattle,
Wash.
j. Howard Pannell is busy at his old
trade. He is repairing the well owned
by Mrs. Lundy.
Boyd Nichols has been transferred to
Tadanac where he is working as a'"
watchman on the C.P.R.
Mrs. Wm. Salmon, who has been' a
patient in the Grand Forks Hospital,
returned to her home on Saturday.
George Green has been appointed
temporary engineer of the pump house,
owing to Harold Erickson's accident.
Mr. and Mrs. Werner Preetzman and
daughter, Jean, of Kerr Creek, were
visiting friends-here on Sunday lastA
Miss Mary Barker and Miss Gladys
Breretqn were visiting with Mr and
Mrs. Percy Beckett at Kettle Valley
over the week-end.
. The Card Party held in the Old
School House on Tuesday evening was
well attended. Mrs. H.. Erickson and
Mrs. Galbraith entertained. The prize
winners were, ladies prize, Mrs. Lundy;
gent's prize, R. D .Kerr.
The first Basketball games of the
season here were played, in the Hall on
Friday evening- December 7th between
Grand Forks and Midway Boys and
Girls. The scores were: Grand Forks
Boys 15 and Midway Boys 21; Grand
Forks Girls 12 and Midway Girls 8.
NORWEGIAN CREEK SCHOOL
Report for November
Frances M. Benzies
No. Enrolled       14
Total Actual Attendance   234.5
Average Actual Attendance  12.34
Proficiency List
Grade VII:
Charles Riley, Louis Caron, Alexina
Gidonr Irene-Watson;���~    = "~"~
Grade VI:
James Watson, James Riley.
Grade V:
Marie Gidon,' Arthur Watson, Virginia Riley, Mary Riley.
,v       Grade HI:
Nettie' Riley,   Wilfred  Caron,  Alice
Riley.
Grade I:        -   .
Dorothy Watson. *    '
Miss Benzies' Christmas Concert will
be held on Thursday, December 20th
in the Norwegian Creek School.
BOUNDARY FALLS SCHOOL
Report for November
Margaret I. Albion
Number enrolled      17
Average Attendance  '  16.05
Proficiency  List
Grade VIII:
Helen Casselman, 85.8%; Dan Boltz,
84.67c; Edna Swanlund, 81.4%; Andrew
Swanlund, 79.4%.
Grade VII:
Ted   Bauer,   79.3%;    Alice   Bauer,
73.5%;    Verdun    Casselman,    65.3%;
Louise Swanlund, CO.8%.
Grade VI:
Grace Casselman, 77%; Svea Johnson, 75.8%.
Grade IV:
Florence   Casselman,   83.8%;   John
Swanlund, 78%; Billie Boltz, 77%.
Grade III:
Edith Swanlund, 85.2%; Celia Bauer,
76.2%.
Grade I:
Jack Casselman, Raymond Johnson.
Miss Albion's Christmas Concert will
be held in the Boundary Falls' School
on Wednesday, December 19th.
TORY RETAINS VICTORIA SEAT
With a majority of only 85 out of a,
poll of 11,195 votes, D'Arcy B. Plunkett,
Conservative candidate in the federal
by-election, defeated J. D. MacLean,
Liberal candidate in an election that
aroused more interest in Victoria than
the last general election.
The most outstanding feature of
Thursday's poll was the narrow margin
to which the Liberals reduced the Conservatives majority. In the general
election of 1926, Premier Tolmie had a
majority of 2781 over Carew Martin,
the Liberal candidate. PAGE TWO
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1928."
yj
The Greenwood Ledge
Published every Thursday at
Greenwood, B.C.
G. W. A. SMITH
Editor and Proprietor
ADVERTISING     RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices...$25.00
Coal and Oil Notices    7.00
Estray Notices       3.00
Cards of Thanks     1.00
Certificate of Improvement  12.50
(When more than one claim appears
in notice, $5.00 for each additional
claim.
All other legal advertising 16 cents
a line first insertion, and 12 cents a
line for each subsequent insertion, nonpareil measurement.
expect good, hold yourself in harmony
with the highest of ideals and you will
bring good into your experience.
All that we possess of time is the
present���the now of life. It is always
now, and he who lives to the fullest in
the present moment, realizing all he
knows of the highest and best, is enjoying to the utmost the supreme privilege of life.���Lucy Lowell.
ICE HOUSE:   A FARM NECESSITY
Subscription: In Canada and to Gt.
Britain, $2.00 a year in advance; $2.50
when not paid for three months or
more have passed. To the United
States $2.50, always in advance.
Business locals 12%c a.line each insertion.
No letter to the editor will be inserted except over the proper signature and address of the writer. This
rule admits of no exceptions.
Who said that Blondes don't last!
Here's one you'll remember for years to come !
The blue cross means that
your subscription is" due, and
that the editor would be
pleased to have more money.
CHRISTMAS SEAL HELPS THE SICK
Last year the tuberculosis Christmas
Seal made its bow to the public. It
met with immediate and enthusiastic
acceptance.- Thousands of people in
British Columbia bought and used thc
seals on their Christmas mail. Not
only that; hundreds wrote the Tranquille Tuberculosis Society commending the Christmas Seal and urging that
its sale be made an annual event.
Many mildly rebuked that organization for not having adopted the seal
years ago so that the public might
have had the opportunity of using on
their Christmas mail, a purposeful seal,
a seal that carries a message of health
as well as of Christmas. So they are
being sold again this year.
Not infrequently the question is asked. "What percentage of 'cures' does
the sanitarium turn out? The answer, if given in figures, would probably shock the average enquiries because the general public looks to the
sanatorium to cure practically every
patient admitted within its doors. It
is not generally known or realized that
70 per cent of those admitted for treatment cannot hope to be cured because
their disease has advanced beyond the
curable stage.
What does this tell us? It tells us
that a very special and urgent need
exists in British Columbia today���the
need to search out people definitely
infected with tuberculosis but not
sick enough to complain of or think of
examination. And this is what the
Tranquille Tuberculosis Society plans
to do���in fact is already doing. A
fully    qualified    nurse "with special
 training and long experience in T. B,
���wofk^has^been-eiiga'ged- to~~work-ih"
conjunction with' the provincial Travelling M. H. O. who,, visits all parts of
the province, travelling the year round.
An X-Ray machine has ..been purchased so that pictures of chests may
be made wherever necessary and this
service, together with, expert nursing
care and follow-up service, will be free
to all who are deemed in need of it.
This is the work that is being done by
the funds derived from the sale of
~ Christmas Seals���hunting out curable
cases of tuberculosis, seeing that they
are given proper treatment and care,
and returning them to their homes
and loved ones, no longer invalids but
strong and well and able to take their
places in the busy world.
The work made possible by the
Christmas Seal constitutes what is
probably the most forward step in the
prevention of tuberculosis yet taken in
the province of British Columbia.
When this fact is realized by the pub-
- He the response to the Seal Sale will be
better than ever.
(Experimental Farms Note)
In the city the housewife considers
ice an absolute necessity. It keeps food
in a fresh, cool, wholesome condition,
thereby eliminating much waste in the
hot weather. If ice is necessary in the
city it is even more so on the farm,
for besides its strictly household uses,
it will keep dairy products, poultry
products and .meats in the best of
condition until it is convenient to ship
to the market.
Following up the comparison a little
further, it is found that in the city ice
is bought by the pound, while the
farmer, in most cases, can have all he
wants for the taking. Again ice can
be put up at the time of year when
there is very little work to do. No
special tools need be purchased, an
ordinary crosscut saw and ice tongs
being the only tools necessary.
Any corner of a building will serve
for storage. A rough board enclosure
ten feet square and eight feet high will
supply fifty pounds per day for 130
days, after allqwing for a reasonable
amount of wastage. The bottom of the
enclosure should be covered with about
one foot of sawdust. If the soil is
impervious it will be advisable to first
put in a few inches of gravel. The ice
should be cut into meat blocks as large
as is convenient to handle and packed
tightly together, allowing one foot between ice and boards. This space
should then be packed with sawdust.
The whole should be covered with a
layer of "about the same thickness.
Where it is impossible to get sawdust,
insulation can be effected by two feet
of fine hay. o
For fuller information on the storage of ice see 'Bulletin 57, D. & C.
S. B., which can be obtained from the
Publications Branch, Department of
Agriculture,- Ottawa.
CLEAN VS. DIRTY VS.
WASHED EGGS FOR STORAGE
Special Scenes in this picture give you all the thrills of Coney Island���Side
shows���roller coasters���Luna Park���swirling crowds.    Don't miss it!
with Dorothy [Ylackaill and Jack Mulhall
Greenwood Theatre
Saturday,
Adults 50c
(5th, 8:15 p.m.
Children 25c:
Coming!   Saturday, December 22nd, "Ladies at Play"
(Experimental Farms Note)
Experience has shown that washed
eggs are-suitable only for immediate
consumption, and will not stand up
under storage conditions for any length |
of time. Although the washed egg
may get by for a short time, and be
quite acceptable on the fresh egg market, its inferiority is immediately evi-'
dent after a period of storage.
Experiments carried on at several
Dominion Experimental Farms have
shown that clean eggs which graded
75 per cent, specials and 25 per cent,
extras before storage, graded 85 per
cent extras, 12 per cent firsts, and 3 per
cent, weak and watery after six months
storage. Dirty eggs grading similarly
when placed in storage came out
practically on a par with the 'clean
eggs. Washed eggs, however, stored
under similar conditions graded only 45
pei-cent=extrasr2*l-per=cent=firsts,-and
31 per cent, weak and watery, or nearly
50'per cent, inferior to both the clean
and dirty eggs.
Evidently the washing of eggs detract from their keeping' qualities to
such an extent that it may be considered to be bad practice. It is advisable by cleanliness and sanitation on
the poultry' plant to avoid the producing of dirty eggs. Dirty eggs, when
obtained, should be marked as such.
By.,washing7them the poultry-man is
placing a product of inferior quality
upon the market.
Needs No Diagram-
First Wife: "Doesn't it make you
mad for your husband to bring a friend
home to dinner?"   , -
Second Ditto: "Not as mad as it does
for me to discover he's been taking one
out to lunch."
Heredity
DO YOUR THOUGHTS
LINGER IN THE PAST
The most difficult and at the same
time senseless task which men set up
for themselves is that'of living in three
realms at once���the past, the present
and the future.
As a matter of fact, only one of
these three actually exists���the pres-
; ent. The past���last year, last week,
the minute just ticked off���is forever
,7 gone, with its problems, its happiness,
��� sorrows, failures and triumphs it is
dead. To attempt to grasp it, dragging
it along behind you, is to expend yourself ypon a shadow.      *-    ,
Such mistakes as you have made in
this time that is - gone Aare best corrected by gratitude that you now see
them as mistakes; that through them
. you7 have grown to "freshen air .and
broader view" and that you never again
can be subject to similar errors of
thought and conduct.
And quite as the past is a shadow to
��� be dispelled in the bright light .of the
present, so is the "future. "Unborn
.tomorrows and dead yesterdays j" sqme
poet has phrased it; so 7 why be concerned with a thing which has not yet
come into being? .
Excepting, of course, in so far as you
may look forward in the serene certainty and expectancy "of good. The
thought is father of the circumstance;
"Sadie," said her mother, "why is it
that you and your little brother are
always quarrelling?"
"I don't knqw," replied Sadie, "unless I take after you and he takes after
papa."���Home Notes.
Patience is a flower that grows not
in everyone's garden.���Proverb.
TTTT'il'fl*,y'*ly','V'*'y'#vvvvy'Tv-fv^v-��v9'<'VTvrv'*'-fT-*ffV'fT'fvlfy-f,fyy,j
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada. Limited
Office, Smelting and Refining Department
'. TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS and REFINERS
��� Purchasers of Gold, Silver. Copper, Lead and Zinc, Ores
Producers, of Gold, Silver, Copper,  Pig- Lead and Zinc
; . '  "TADANAC"  BRAND
Se^MusicXestiYaitQ^R^iye Deep^Water^Chanties
CARD PARTY & AUCTION SALE
Don't forget the Farmers' Card Party,
Social and Auction Sale on Friday the
14th inst. at 8 p.m. in aid of the Boys'
-and Girls' Pig and .Chicken Clubs.
All farmers are requested to bring
produce of any description for thc sale.
Entrance: Gents 50c, Children 25c,
Ladies bring eats. Prizes will be given.
Proceeds to be used to meet farmers
share of prize money as awarded by
Agricultural Department to Club members. List of prize winners and prizes
follows:
lst.7 William Boltz  $16.00
2nd.   Zeova Klinosky     15.00
3rd.   Daniel Boltz     14.00
4th. . Louis Caron      13.00
5th.  Verona Klinosky     12.00
6th.- Jack Brown     11.00
7th.  Helen Casselman  .10.00
8th.' Frank Krouten ;..     9.00
9th.   Arnold Bombini       8.00
10th.   Alfred Maletta       7.00
11th., R. Johnson       6.00
12th. 7 J. Watson       5.00
13th.* Rthel Bender      4.00
14th.   Alice Casselman       3.00
15th.. chas. Riley      2.00
16th.   G. Watson       1.00
17th.;. Evelyn Hawkes       1.00
18th,   Verdun Casselman       1.00
19th.   Jas. Riley   - 1.00
20th.  Peter Maletta  .-...     1.00
21st.  Dale Brown      1.00
22nd.  V. Johnson       1.00
23rd.   Ernest Hawkes       1.00
24th. 7 Robt. Forshaw       1.00
25th.   Jim Forshaw      1.00
26th.   Cecil Maletta      1.00
Polite Chap
"Excuse me, madam, but do you mind
coughing more quietly so that I may be
better able to hear your friend read out
the sub-titles?"���-Hardware Age. -
ROW WELL YE MARINERS
The tide is for the shore, boya. '
And gently blows a fav'ring wind.
We'll soon touch land once more,
boys.
And leave the billowy ways behind.
Row steady and strong.
The way it is long.
So bend to you* oars.
And join in our song.
Row well, Row well.'
Row well ye Mariners.
A welcome voice is hailing.
Give answer mates with a hearty
cheer.
Our sturdy strokes prevailing.
Full soon the harbour wiil appear,
Then speed her with skill,
The waters arc still,
Our strokes are directed
With right good will.
Row well, Row well,
Row well ye Mariners.
From "English Melodies from ihc
-     13th to the 18th Centuries."
J. M. Dent & Sons.
And if you call for a song of the
sea,     --
We'll heave the capstan round,
With a yeo heave ho, for the wind
is free,
Her anchor's a-trip and her helm's
a-lee,   -
Hurrah for the homeward bound!
Even Gilbert's cheap tailor, disguised as a second trombone, could
not fumble 'the beat and the swing
in a song of the sea���simply because sea music comes as naturally
to the mariner as lullabies to a
mother, and because its spirit is
so infectious. It comes naturally
because the sea chanty lightens
the sailor's work and because from
the very beginning of navigation
it has fostered teamwork and good
feeling among seamen. But the
sailor chanties passed away with
the sailing ships. They were the
seamen's working choruses whose
utility declined when steam crowded the canvas-driven craft from
the sea. There still remains a
great and largely ungathered
treasure of sea music which today
is remembered only" by' grizzled
sailors of clipper ship days. But
as these old salts are bothered by
failing memories, the tunes and
the words they can still remember
must be recorded soon if they-are
to be preserved for the future.
This constitutes "the real significance of the forthcoming* Sea Music
Festival in Vancouver at the. Vancouver Hotel from Jan. 23 to 26;,
and .it is ' at once a, meed, and a
compliment  for - this " great  port
facing the broad Pacific.
During these four days will be
heard the finest music inspired by
the sea-from the time of the Vikings down to the present day. The
programs, arranged by Harold
Eustace Key, director of Canada's
major music festivals, will recap-
Lure lhe full flavor of the chanties
which having passed their youth
in sailing ships of thc seven seas,
now find a haven for their old age
in concert hall und schoolroom.
Two groups of songs will be presented in stage settings���"Tha
Order of Good Cheer," incorporating old French chanties of Acadia
harmonized by Dr. Healey Willan
of the Toronto Conservatory; and
"On the Deep, Deep Sea," introducing famous deep water chanties
arranged and staged by Capt..
Frederick William Wallace.
Distinguished singers,.fine instrumentalists and well-trained choirs
will appear at the nightly concerts
in the Vancouver Hotel. The singers include John Goss, famous
English baritone; Jeanne Dusseau,
Canada's great lyric soprano, late .
of the Chicago Opera; Finlay
Campbell, Ottawa baritone, familiar with Hebridean sea-songs;
Marion Copp,-rising young contralto of "Vancouver; Poul-.Bai,
Danish baritone -with a repertory
of Viking songs; and Ulysse Pa-
quin, French-Canadian basso, with
songs of the voyageurs of New
France. Others are the Hart House
Quartet, Canada's most famous
group of instrumentalists; the
Vancouver Scottish Orchestra, the
Philipino Orchestra of the liner
Empress of Russia, the North Vancouver Choral Society, and three
interesting groups organized ' by
Miss Ethel Bassin���a chorus of 250
Vancouver children, a Sea-Scout
chorus of 30 voices, and a choir oi
Hebridean Fisher Boys.
r
* I'tfilu-Myr*-,  '������""'������-ya. 1
-rr,-
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1928.
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
V
m
PAGE THREE
Greenwood Hockey Club's
New Year's Eye
V
.   DANCE
Masonic Hall, Greenwood
Now A Sea;
issic F
r
i//.2^ ,1.2-A. S.S. -^.>-.^.^,._J^_rt__^._-_^_/.^.V,_L_^^
Bush's Orchestra
Gents $1.00: Ladies or Children 50c, Kefreshments 25c.
���* * - -_	
Lucky ticket wins $10.00 Indian Blanket.
H
erean
dTh.
5 re
tim;
More than 11,000,000 tourists visited. Ontario during 1928 and spent
aboul $100,000,000, according to figures issued at the Provincial Par-1
liament Building In Toronto the
other day. This is an increase of
over 20 per cent, over the record
made last yea**.
. Production of tobacco ln 1928
totalled 40,976,375 pounds fiW
���13,138 acres. Of the total output
the Province of Ontario accounted *
for 32.265.S50 pounds from 32 654
acres; Quebec 8,546,325 pounds
from 10,368 acres, and British Columbia 164,200 pounds from 116
acres.    - - - -
. Martin Madden, aged 85 years, died
in Los Angeles, recently. He - was - a
contractor in Nelson before the C.P.R.
came in. Anthony Ma'dden of Slocan
City and R.. Madden of Trout Lake, 'are
brothers.
MIIXIAM II. WOOD
PHYSICIAN .AND.SURGKON
GREIIN'WOOD
IN THE LEGISLATURE
Ethel Cath^rwood, who ' distinguished" herself as an athlete representing Canada at the Olympic
games in Amsterdam in August, has
been honoured' by the Canadian
Pacific Railway. A station on the
recently - constructed Rosetown-
Perdue branch has been named
"Catherwood,"'after her.
Twenty-five years ago Thomas
Hubert, now employed as a bag-
��� gageman on the C. P. R. between
Ottawa and North Bay, lost a valuable silver watch_while workins in
a field near Pembroke. The other
day a glittering object was turned
by a plough. It was Hubert's
watch, the glass broken and thev
hands gone, but still retaining a
^brilliant lustre. The field had
been ploughed many times since it
was lost. " c
( Toronto ls preparing to receive
the largest number of prominent
baseball figures ever to be in Canada at one time. The National
Association of Professional Baseball Leagues will meet there shortly and every baseball club in
America will be represented. Judge
���Landis will be on hand, and the
total attendance is expected to
amount to over five hundred, dele-
���=-"gates-coming""fronrpoint"s as far as
Pueblo.
The trainload of artificial snow
that was brought from. Holly wood
to Lake Louise recently was not
required by John Barrymore, in
producing an Alpine movie story
. to be released shortly, as plenty of
the real stuff was available at the
' glaciers. TJiis popular, actor, with
Camilla Horn and a cast of about
twenty-five persons, spent some
three weeks at the Chateau Lake
Louise, rising each morning at four
o'clock in order to reach their
���"locations" on Victoria and Saddleback Glaciers in time to get tlie
best light effects In the morning
for their.various "shots".
- When a young couple from Calgary drifted buck to the station at
Winnipeg 10 minutes after the "Imperial" had left for the east, Canadian Pacific officials were given
tbe choice the other day of feeding
and 'otherwise'-'caring:.for a nine-
months-old baby for two days or
holding the train for������*:thirty-five
minutes at North Transcona. Thcy
chose<. the JaUer, much to the relief of the porter and conductor,
who are not fainflv men. The reunited family sailed on- the "Montrose" to spend Christmas in the
old country.
- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
an application will be made at the next
Session of the Legislature of. the Province of British Columbia for an Act
to ��� incorporate a company under the
name*-of- Provincial* Telephone Company with an authorised capital of five
million dollars with its head office in
the City of Vancouver and-with the
following powers:���
v    To operate telephone, \vireless~tele-
phone, radio-telephone and similar services, including services for the transmission of sound, pictures, writing or
signals; to hold and dispose of lands,
tenements and hereditaments of any
description; to provide and maintain
all such buildings, works, plant, apparatus, materials, offices and exchanges
as may be necessary for its business;
for the purposes of its business to,provide and operate steamships and other
vessels; to acquire and use any privilege granted by any Federal, Provincial
or municipal authority; to acquire and
use patent rights; to advance money to
any corporation, company or person for
providing  building  or  operating  any
telephone system;  to do anything as
contractor for others which it might do
for its own purposes; to invest and deal
with its surplus funds; to enter upon
and break up highways, streets, and
public bridges and to construct telephone lines along, across or under the
same,   or   in,   under   or   over   water
courses, rivers and lakes, subject to the
approval   of   the   city   or   municipal
council where the proposed works are
to be situated within a city or municipality, and in other cases subject to
the approval of the Minister of lands;
to construct works on its own property;
subject tb obtaining consent under. the
Naviagable "Waters Protection Act of
the Dominion of Canada, to construct,
lay and operate submarine telephone
cable or cables in any lake, river or
waterjojyhich that Act applies, also between any islands in British Columbia
and  between  such  islands  and  the
mainland; to'cut a passage for its lines
where such lines pass through woods
subject  to  compensating  the* owners
thereof for damage, and to trim trees
on or extending over highways in order
to prevent interference with good telephone service; to purchase'the whole
or any part of the undertaking of any
other company having objects in whole
or in part similar to those of the company,  or  to  amalgamate  with  such
other company, and to transfer to the
company or to the amalgamated company, as the case may be, all or any of
such franchises or statutory powers as
may be possessed by such other company; to enter into and carry out any
agreement with any company whose
undertaking nr.-purcnased as aforesaid
in the nature,of assuming the payment
of or guaranteeing- the  payment of
.The Idea of a Music Festival is
.   not new -to Vancouver, but the
Festival devoted entirely to sea
music, which is being 'organized
to "take  place in   this city next
. January, is the first of its kind,
and as such  is attracting widespread attention.   There is a vast
'amount of music connected with
"the sea, dating back as far as tlie
Song of Miriam, whicli tradition
says was sung to the Children of
Israel, on the bank of the Red
Sea.     Yet- somehow  no one till
now had,thought of devoting a
whole series-of concerts to this
subject, and it is a tribute to the
growing importance of Vancouver
as a. world port lhat the Canadian
Pacific Railway, which is organ-,
izing this Fetslval, should   have
chosen to locate it here.
It is lesa than two years ago
.since the Canadian Pacific experimented with its first Music Festival, -which was hold at Quebec
,, and dealt with the folksong preserved  by the French-Canadians
whose forefathers brought  these
old songs with them to this country three hundred years ago. That
experiment met with such favor
that it was  repeated   on a still
-   more ambitious scale last Spring.
-Both these Festivals drew  many
visitors   to   Quebec   from   other
���-parts   of Canada and from   the
- United States] the, Governor-Gen
eral showing his interest by going
down to attend the celebration-by
speoial train. They-have had thc
effect of creating a better understanding of thc French-Canadian
people, and the lovely old melodies
which had hitherto been known
mostly in the backwoods of Quebec, are now being siing all over
Canada. The loading musicians
of this country'are realizing thai
in .these melodies Canada has a
priceless heritage.
Following on the Quebec experiment, a Scottish Musical Festival
was staged at Banff, in connection
with the -Highland Gathering.
Tbis made such an appeal lo the
national pride of the Scots that
the idea was repeated al the second Festival last September.
At -AVinnipeg, the Canadian Pacific selcclci-1 another phase of
popular music available in this
country, namely, the folksongs of
the settlers of Continental European extraction, who are now
generally classified as New Canadians. Fifteen racial groups participated, ancl tiie demonstrations
of folksong and.folk dancing was
a revelation to the Anglo-Canadians. One practical result of
this Festival is the projected
open-air folk Museum,, for which
the City of Winnipeg has declared
ils readiness to provide ihe lanl
on - which   the   various    racial
groups have offered to build typical peasant collages in which their
handicrafts may be permanently
exhibited. Such a Museum would
undoubtedly provide Winnipeg
with the tourist attraction which
at present is admittedly lacking,
and would also be the source of
everlasting interest and pride to
every thoughtful .citizen of Canada. -
What will result from the forthcoming* Festival at Vancouver remains  to be seen, - but  there is
every evidence that it will be well
worth  attending.     A galaxy   of
concert slars will be supported by
a number of local choirs and by
"the Scottish Symphony Orchestra.
John Goss, Jeanne Dusseau, Paul
13ai, ancl the Hart House Quartet,
represent but a few of the names
lhal should  attract thc  crowds.
Most interesting of all, perhaps,
will lie the Sea Chanties which
F. H. Wallace, once a Captain on
a Bluonose  boat and author of
"Wooden Ships and Iron Men" will
stage.     Captain Wallace has collected chanties   from  sailors on
Canadian sailing ships, and can
thus givo a truly Canadian flavour
to those fine old Sea Songs.   The
Festival, wliich will last four days,
will be under the same direction
as the  Yuletide  Festival which
will centre *around the, Empress
Hotel at Victoria a month earlier.
A. E. McDOUGALL
Contractor and Builder
MONUMENTS,        ROOFING,
.-R1M��UJK'.'J1!BWCT��W.'.1�� 'win'ttlin-f WJ lJ'����^>}l��rjrnnM''��giBrCT
LAMATCO WALL BOARD
Get my prices on
LAMATCO
on -walls finished, and save money
Subscribe t�� The Greenwood Ledge
SHOP AT GREENWOOD
THRILLING AIRPLANE
,     CRASH FEATURED
���1- Some of.the most thrilling airplane
scenes that have ever' been put into a
picture, including a spectacular "crash,"
in. which Dorothy Mackaill and Jack
Mulhall film one of those experiences
which bring'gasps from audiences,
"Just Another,Blonde," to be shown at
ther~ Greenwood Theatre on Saturday,
December 15th; -*
There is much of color and action iri
this picture, together, with a beautiful
love story. Photographic effects such
as have never been shown on the
screen before will be-seen in the opening scenes.
These were worked out by Arthur
Edeson, cameraman, and Alfred San-
tell, the director. *
principal and ^interest, or either, on
bonds, debenture stock or debentures,
or assuming or guaranteeing the carrying out of its obligations or any part
thereof; to enter into agreements for
connecting its system or lines with those
of other telephone operators; to expropriate land under the powers of the
Lands Clauses Act; to make regulations >for its internal management; to
fix from time to time a tariff of
charges for its services, and to collect,
sue for and recover the same; to borrow money; to issue preference shares,
debentures or debenture stock, either
redeemable or irredeemable; to issue
shares with or without nominal or par
value; to change its name pursuant to
the Companies Act, and other incidental powers.
DATED the 1st day of November,'
1928
-     -McPHILLIPS,
DUNCAN & McPHILLIPS.
525 Seymour Street,   I
Vancouver, B.C. |
Solicitors for the applicants.
Box 332 Grand Forks. B.C.
ASSAYER
E. W.,.WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, , Box L1108, Nelson, B. C.
Charges���Gold, Silver, Copper or Lead
$1.00 each. Gold-Silver $1.50. Silver-
Lead $2.00. Silver-Lead-Zinc $3.00.
These charges made only when cash is
sent with sample. Charges for other
metals, etc., on application.11
SEND YOUR
BOOTS and SHOES
    To   	
Harry Armson. Grand Forks
The 20th Century Shoe Repairer
a"
All work and material guaranteed
We pay postage one way
 ^CANADIAN_PACIFIC STEAMSHIPS
^,i*-^._',fl_a^rtyft^_-l**;^,,t-,'fc^
I ��� . SAILINGS-
fit FROM MONTREAL���QUEBEC
J��      MINNEDOSA  NOV. 28"
f�� to Glasgow, Belfast, Liverpool
* FROM SAINT JOHN
^      METAGAMA   DEC. 7
to Cherbourg, Southampton, Antwerp
,       MONTCLARE  ?.  DEC. 7
-i* to "Glasgow,  Belfast,  Liverpool
MELITA   DEC. 14
" to St. Heller, Channel Islands, Cherbourg, **
Southampton, Antwerp   . '   **
DUCHESS OF ATHOLL   DEC. 12
to Glasgow, Liverpool
MONTROYAL  v.  DEC. 21
to Glasgow, Liverpool
CABIN-TOURIST IIL-THIRD CLASS
Low Round Trlii Kates:    Tourist III. and Third Class.
Berth Reservations can now be made.    Dctulte and Literature
from any Agent or Write
J. S. CARTER, DISTRICT PASSENGER AGENT
M-XSON, B.C.
Georgeous Job
_.      Man Wanted���Experienced in handling girls; must do heavy lifting.���Cin-
��� cinnati Times-Star,
'riming    *
reenwoo "y y try.-';.F
!  ���,   '  ���     ' -V
PAGE FuUft
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1928.
��tf
-  Come in and Hear
The New Marconi
1929 RADIO
With Temple Air-Chrome Speaker
1 Of Local Interest \
as si
���afflfflKffl'SfflffiSaEB.BEffiESiEiEaKEK'EaEB
Robt. Lee made a business trip to
Trail this week,
Cyril Radan, of Midway, was in town
on business today.
J. B. Desrosier of Copper Mountain,
is a visitor in town.
T. M. GULLEY
Distributor for Greenwood
Christmas Specials
PLUM PUDDINGS, MINCEMEAT
JAP ORANGES, CRANBERRIES, GRAPES, ETC
CHOCOLATES in FANCY PACKAGES
CHRISTMAS MIXED CANDIES
CHRISTIE'S FRUIT CAKE
CHINESE PRESERVED GINGER, GINGER WINE
CIGARS & CIGARETTES in CHRISTMAS WRAP
CHOICE TURKEYS from LOCAL FARMERS
Please Order Early
For Quality and Value .Order From Phone 46
GREENWOOD GROCERY
C. Weed and A. Lander of Midway,
were visitors in town today.
Constable W. R. Powers is moving
into the Rendell dwelling on Long Lake
Street.
There were 12,500 letters in the first
air mail between Edmonton and Regina on Monday.        c/'
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Richter of,Park
Ranch, Kettle Valley, were visitors in
town on Monday.
Mrs. A. R. .Royce is visiting Mr.
Royce, who is seriously ill in the Trail-
Tadanac Hospital in Trail.
* S. H. Smith, of Post Falls,,Idaho, was
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. James
Skilton, during the week-end.
ANNUAL MEETING
.   ���  of the  ���
Conservative
ASSOCIATION
.     ���   of the   ���
Greenwood Polling Division
-    ���    will be held in the
Greenwood Theatre
���  on  ���
Tuesday, Dec. 18th at 8 p.m.
Business: Election of Officers
Mrs. Howard Smith of Westbridge,
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. S.
Walters for a few days this week.
Mrs. A. J. Morrison is prepared to
take patients. Prices reasonable. Telephone No. 35. P. 0. Box 426, Greenwood.
For the Christmas Table
Jap Oranges, Nuts, Table Raisins, Figs,
Xmas Crackers, Grapes, Cranberries, Etc.
Christmas Puddings,
Decorated and Slab Fruit Cakes
Special
New Cauliflower and Fresh Mexican Tomatoes
TAYLOR & SON
Phone 17
Xmas Specials
J��ijdtmla.s.._J^
Flashlights, Etc
STATIONERY
Large Range in Fancy Boxes
CHOCOLATES
Neilson's Box, Bulk Goods
CHINA
Beautiful Assortment of Everything
DURO SILVER WARE
TOYS and Dolls for the LITTLE ONES
XMAS TREE DECORATIONS, TAGS, SEALS, TWINE, ETC
XMAS CARDS, OUR SPECIALTY.   AH Prices
Goodeve's Drug Store
^i<w
McMYNN'S STORE, Midway
XMAS SPECIALS
JAP ORANGES   per box   $1.25
XMAS MIXED SATIN CANDY reg. price 35c special price 20c lb
MIXED NUTS 30c lb
CELERY, HEAD LETTUCE, SWEET POTATOES & GRAPES
A New Lot of
TOYS ON DISPLAY
,.of good quality and' inexpensive
LADIES STANFIELD'S NEVASDLK SLD?S, VESTS,
BLOOMERS, COMBINATIONS & .NIGHTGOWNS
MENS FANCY SHIRTS, TIES, SOCKS
LEATHER BDLLFOLDS, KEYHOLDERS & PURSES
Owen Wheeler, W. Johnson and F. B.
Pearce, of Rock Creek, and J. L. Bush
and C. G. McMynn, of Midway, were in
town on Thursday evening last.
The mild- weather of the past week
has held up ice making at both the
skating and curling rinks. Prospects
are that the weather will turn colder.
The Conservative Association of the
Greenwood.Polling Division will hold
their annual meeting in the Greenwood
Theatre oh Tuesday, December 18th at
8p.ni.77 7:
The Schools throughout the Province
close on. Friday, December 21, for the
Christmas and New Year holidays.
The spring term .opens ��� on Monday,
Jauary 7. .:,       yy-- *'
The United Church of Canada
REV. ANDREW WALKER, B.A.
Minister in Charge, Greenwood.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16th
Beaverdell, 11 a.m.
Johnson Creek, 2:30 p.m.
Greenwood, 7:30 p.m.
Tree blown
on
telephone lines
by wind
Ladies and Men's
Furnishings
Now is the time to do your
XMAS SHOPPING
Call and inspect our goods
Sale of
WOMEN'S & CHILDREN'S
FELT HATS
Now on
We carry
Goodrich Hi-Press Dress and'
._ Work Rubbers ,
Special Price on
Children's Rubbers ,
Sizes up to 12 M- @ 65c
Ellen Trounson's Store
li
11 ���
' .*��� ���*
IV
A
���Ih
II!
First in the list of Canadian Farm
papers is the Family Herald and
Weekly Star, Montreal. It's only $1 a
year or* three years for %2y It is
attracting world-wide attention.
Keep in mind the Hockey Club Dance
on New Year's Eve in the Masonic
Hall A Greenwood.: An advance sale of
tickets will commence this week-end.
The holder of the lucky ticket will receive an Indian Blanket valued at $10.
The Family Herald and Weekly Star
of Montreal is not only a money maker
but a money saver to the farmers of
Canada, while the' farmer's family
circle, in the, accompanying magazine,
gets^what^isladmitted to he.the best
of all.
Guests at the Pacific Hotel during
the week: Tom Allen, L. Rogers, E.
Jones, Trail; Harold Grisdale, J. Otterbine; WAR. Manson, A. L. McCallum, M<
Bailey, Walter Ronald, Ernie Hutton,
Grand Forks; Sam ��� Cameron, G T.
Rogers, Andrew Larson, Rock Creek;
T. J. Jones, Carmi; P. H. Sheffield,
Nelson; Freeman.& Cross;, C. Radan,
Midway.        .
Apple Sauce
"What are thim?" asked one Irishman,
of another. 7
"Thim is cranberries."
"Are they fit to eat?"
<-,. "Are they? Why whin thim cranberries is stewed they make better apple
sauce than prunes does."
ANNOUNCEMENTS
��� Midway
Rev. E. A. St. G. Smyth will hold
Service in Midway on Sunday evening
next at 7:30 o'clock.
There will be Cribbage Game on
Tuesday evening, December 18th. in the
Old School House. Special prizes donated by L. E. Salter.
The Annual Meeting of the Institutes
(Men and Women) will be held in the
Farmers Hall, Midway, on Saturday,
January 5th at 2 p.m. Election of
officers and the annual program for the
year will be decided. It is likely that
the Pig Club prize money will be dis-"
tributed at this meeting.
Don't forget the Farmers' Card Party,
Social and Auction Sale on Friday; the
14th inst. at 8 p.m. in aid of the Boys'
and Girls' Pig and Chicken Clubs.
All farmers are requested to bring
produce of any description for the sale.
Entrance: Gents 50c, Children 25c,
Ladies bring eats. Prizes will be given.
Proceeds to be used to meet farmers
share of prize money as awarded by
Agricultural Department to Club members.
FOR SALE
1 Yorkshire Boar. 10 months old, with
papers, $30.00 from Agassiz Farm.
1 Bull, 2 years old, red pole, good type
$75.00.      Apply   J. C. BOLTZ,
-Boundary Falls, B.C.
A tree,- blown down by a
high wind, landed on the *
Vancouver - Nanaimo longdistance lines on November
30, cutting the wires in two
and suspending telephone
Service ��� between Vancouver
and Nanaimo. Twelve wires
were severed,'" putting eight
circuits out of commission.
Telephone repairmen lost'
no time in getting on the job.
The trouble was reported at
2:35 p.m., and a half-hour
later���at 3:10 o'clock, to be
exact���the first circuit was
back in order. All lines were
' restored to service by 3:40.
B. C. TELEPHONE CO.
STOCKS BONDS
MINING SNARES
Charles King
Real Estate &. Insurance Agent
*������x
Arrangements with first class     '
BROKERAGE  FIRMS
Some to handle BONDS,
others. STOCKS,
others MINING SHARES
STOCKS and BONDS
on installment system
MINING and OTHERS
on  margin
Call and state your business
I:
'
ii
Jf
!i
;
*r-'*"*>T'*r����'r'*�� ��������!>����� yfff vwv wv tt-
*      To those who contemplate
'-' buying   .
Wedding Presents or Gifts
for their friends
Let us remind you that we can
supply. you cheaper than you
can buy from Catalogue
BIRDS FOR SALE-
One  Singer,  One Nest Bird.   Price
for Birds and Cage $6.00.
Ellen Trounson, Greenwood.
Let us have your
Watch and Clock Repairs
We"" always do a-first-class job
-A. A. WHITE
Watchmaker  and  Jeweler
F. J. White, Mgr.
A AAAAAAAA AAAAAA AAAAAA AAA.
ti
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4
4
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11'
-I ft.
' <���'
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FOR SALE
  ��� i[
Will sell-my entire Stock of Ladies,-.]
Men's and Children's Wearing Apparel;,
at a reasonable sacrifice. M
~Wili"seii"Buildingvery-cheap.-^ --jjj
For particulars see owner, 1,1
ELLEN TROUNSON,    (I
Greenwood, B.C.jl
im
We Are Overstocked
In order to move our goods quickly we are making Drastic Reductions in price all through the
Month of December
offering Today���
SUGAR     100   @   $7.00        Twenties   @   $1.55
BURNS SHAMROCK LARD   51bs   $1.00   ,
Limit to customer 10 lbs
SWIFT PREMIUM BACON   41c lb
TOMATOES   2MsS AYLMER BRAND   7 for $1.00
COFFEE���CHASE & SANBORNS
Ground as you like it
Regular   55c Ib   2 lb for 95c
SPECIAL COMBINATION OFFER
1 Galvanized Pail value       85 cents
10 'Bars Pearl White Naptha Soap       50 cents
2 Sally Ann Cleanser      25 cents
ii
Total Value $1.60
SALE PRICE 99 CENTS
Another shipment���Blue Phoenix Cups and Saucers
95c per Dozen
BROWN'S STORE, Midway
Special Prices For Cash.
���fl&tifea
Greenwood Meat Market
CHOICE LINE OP MEATS
We Solicit Your Patronage
Strictly Cash
JOHN MEYER - - Proprietor

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