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The Greenwood Ledge Aug 30, 1928

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VOL. Ill
GREENWOOD, B.C., THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 1928
No. 5
PRESENTATION TO
MAJOR AND MRS. R. GRAY
A Surprise Party long to be remembered was held at Kettle Valley on
Friday evening, August -24th, when
about 75 friends arrived at the home of
Major and Mrs. R. Gray to say farewell
to them prior to'their'-leaving in a
few days via Vancouver and the Panama canal for a stay in'England after
which they intend to return to the
Valley.
The  Gray family- were  completely
surprised and they received their guests
in   a   very   happy manner.   Their
- beautiful grounds, with beds of asters
and other flowers, was very attractive.
H. Bruce, president, of the Midway
Farmers Institute, spoke very briefly
and said all were here on an occasion
which every person regretted and that
was to say farewell to Major and Mrs.
Gray and son, Bruce, a family who had
done much for the district and had the
goodwill of all the residents at heart.
Mr. Bruce called on Mrs. A. D. McLennan, of the Rock Creek Institute,
who in addressing Mrs. Gray said:
"We are gathered here tonight as
members of a community in which you
have lived. We have learned to appreciate you very highly for yourself
personally and for the part you have
taken in the life of the community we
felt that we could not let this opportunity pass without giving some proof
of the kind feelings towards you. We
therefore ask you to accept this gift,"
not for its material valuer but trusting
that it will help to keep green in your
memory your friends in Kettle Valley
and Rock Creek." Mrs. Gray was then
presented with a club bag, also the address signed by the members, of the
Institute. Mrs. Gray feeliingly"replied,
thanking the donors and said how
much she enjoyed her few years of
residence in the Valley.
R. E. Norris was the next speaker.
He referred to the ^oming departure of
the Gray family ' and expressed the
sincere regrets of all present, saying
that the district was losing a family
that had the interests of all the residents at ��� heart, also' that whatever
undertaking was promoted for the gopd
of the district met with support from
the Gray family. The, speaker, hoped
that it would" not be" long before the*/
would be with us again. Mr. Norris then
asked the Major, to accept a small gift
(club bag) as a memento from his
district friends. The Major thanked all
for the gift saying that it had. been a
pleasure to have been associated with
the people of the district and he will
look forward to the time that he and
Mrs. Gray will return. The Major's
remarks were received with loud applause. Refreshments were served after,
which all joined in the singing of "For
^.they-are���jolly-good-fellows"-and^a
memorable evening -was brought to a
close.
Rock Creek and District Notes
il
John and Anton Portmann spent
Tuesday with Mr. and Mrs. L. Portmann in Greenwoo'd. The Portmann
boys have' finished haying after two
months of strenuous labor. They put
up over 200 tons of hay and it is considered a record crop.
MIDWAY NEWS
Mrs. H. Pannell and children" returned . on Thursday, after a month
spent at the Coast.   '
The Ladies Aid gave a farewell party
to Mrs. Emery Delisle, who will be moving to Nelson in the near future.'
��� Robbie Brown, the genial store keeper of Rock Creek, is on a vacation to
Vancouver and other Coast' points.
Sam Bender left on Thursday last for
a extended visit to Edmonton and the
Peace River country before returning.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tweedle, of
Keremeos, were visitors at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Richter, for a^few
days recently. .   ~
Sidney Smith and family, of Vancouver, formerly of Boundary Falls,
spent a few days this week at the home
of Mrs. T. Wake.
' A garden social, will be held at the
home of Mrs. Wm. Salmon on Sept.
8th. A collection will be taken in aid
of the British and Foreign- Bible
Society.
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. McMillan, of
Denver, Colorado, who have.been on a
motor trip to the Coast, are spenidg a
few days with the latter's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Kerr.
DEER SEASON OPENS SATURDAY
The following are extracts from the
game regulations:
Deer (Mule, White-tail, and Coast),
bucks " only, throughout the Eastern
District (except White-tail Deer in
North and South Okanagan and Similkameen Electoral Districts and in the
Grand Forks-Greenwood Electoral District west of the summit of the Midway
Mountains)^ open season from Sept.
1st, 1928, to Nov. 30th,-1928, both dates
inclusive.
Bear' (except White or Kermodei
Bear), in the Eastern District, open
season from Sept. 1st, to June-'30th,
both dates inclusive.
- Provided that no Bear shall be trapped in the Eastern District.
In the Eastern' District, all fur-bearing animals, open season from Nov.
1st, 1928, to'Feb. 28th, 1929, both dates
inclusive.
, Ducks (except Wood and Eider
Ducks), Wilson Snipe, Coots, Geese,
and . Brant, throughout the Eastern
District, open season .from Sept. ,15th,
1928, to December 31st, 1928, both dates
inclusive. Provided that shooting of
the migratory game birds referred to
herein-shall"not_coni*nehce"before the
hour of 7 a.m. on September 15th, 1928.
Grouse (Blue only), in the Eastern
District, in that portion thereof known
as the Grand Forks - Greenwood Electoral District and- that portion of the
Similkameen Electoral District situate
and lying to the east of Allison Creek,
the South Similkameen River, and the
Pasayten River, open season from Sept.
15th, 1928, to Oct. 15th, 1928, both dates
inclusive.
The threshing machine owned by
McKinney and Sons, Molson, was
burned recently. The fire was caused
by smut.
Bruce Uray, of Kettle Valley, caught
a four pound fish near that town last
week.
Mr. and Mrs. Andy Johnson,, and
family were in Grand Forks on Monday.
Mrs. E. P. Beckett returned on Fri-
last from a holiday spent at the Coast.
F. B. Pearce has returned from attending Summer School in Victoria.
Wm. Johnson was on a business trip
to Grand Forks on Monday.
Frank Richter made."a business trip
to Greenwood on Monday.
CURLERS RECEIVE CANTALOUPES
���' D. Burpee, of Osoyoos,: was in town
on. Thursday :last and distributed a
crate of., cantaloupes to the winners
of the Cantaloupe Competition which
was held during the 1927-28 curling
season at the Greenwood rink. The
winners were: H. W. Gregory, G. W.
A. Smith, W. ,R. Powers and H. H.
Summersgill.: The cants were the
finest that could be grown and Mr.
Burpee certainly lives up to his reputation of being the "Cantaloupe King" of
Osoyoos. Mr. Burpee was accompanied
on the trip by Mrs. Burpee. Before returning home....Mr. Burpee enjoyed a
game of golf with Chas, King on the
KettleValley golf course.
B. C. FOREST FIRE
LOSSES ARE LIGHTER
The cost of fighting forest fires so far
this year is computed at $38,118 in the
weekly fire bulletin issued by the
forestry service in Victoria on Saturday.
This is a little more than half the cost
at this time last year when $63,990 had
been expended on fire fighting. The
Vancouver district, with an expenditure
of $15,853, has run up about half the
entire current bill, the remainder of
which is distributed fairly evenly all
over the province.
"The continued fine weather has
again increased'the. fire hazard over
the province generally," says the bulletin.    ...
Heavy dew and relatively high
humidity offset the lack of rain to a
considerable degree. For the. time . of
year conditions.' may be considered
fairly satisfactory.
Fires repprte'd;. to date number 1087
as against 1133 last.year and 1920 in
1926.  "���������������
In this district tliere was a heavy
rainfall during the week-end and
this will help to keep,.down'.fires. All
the look-out station men and temporary staff have been laid off ��� in this
district. ...   .     ���- ��� .  .      ��� -
359,309 Voters
Cast Ballot in B.C.
Detailed Figures  Are Recorded With
Provincial Secretary; All Ridings
Are  Represented
Victoria.���Of .the 359,309 votes cjast
in the recent provincial, election 191,374
were Conservative, 145,562 Liberal,
16,246 Labor and 6,127 Independent.
In order to give a truer index of
the number who went to the polls,
however, it must be considered that
in Vancouver the votes were distributed
among six candidates and in Victoria
among four. In Vancouver 98,382 Conservative votes were cast and in Victoria 30,105; in Vancouver 70,606 Liberal votes,were cast'and 20,078 in Victoria. The actual number of* voters
who exercised their. franchise, therefore, is 16,397 Conservatives in Vancouver and 7526 in Victoria; 11,767
Liberals in Vancouver and 6,269 in
Victoria. These 'figures do not, of
course, account for' ticket splitting.
The following returns, including
absentee votes, may be subject to minor
corrections when the mailed advices
are received:   -
- Alberni���Barnard, 253;-Hanna, 1211;
Rushton, 1024.      ��� "*.
Atlin���Falconer, 542; Kergin, 587;
Moult, 32.
��� Burnaby���-Browne,:' 1330;    Mclver,
1779; Rutledge,"2144.
Cariboo���Campbell, 400; Mackenzie,
623; Stoddart, 393.
��� Chilliwack���Atkinson, 2594;  Barrow,
2079.,    .
Columbia���Buckham, 659; Cross, 26;
Scovil, 627.
Comox���Law, 267; McKenzie, 1497;
MacNaughton, 2058.   ' -
Cowichan - Newcastle ��� Davie, 2360
Gray, 90; Guthrie, 1607.
Cranbrook���McPherson, 1833; Wal-
linger, 1661.
Creston���Lister, 1184; Putman, 978.
Delta���Berry, 2562; Paterson, 2035.
Esquimalt���Carlow, 24; Pooley, 1806;
Smith, 1076.
Fernie���MacLean, 1102; Uphill, 1639.
Fort George���Burden, 1487; Perry,
1394.
. .Grand Forks - Greenwood���Kingston,
888rMcPherson; 790.;" '"'" ���'-���---'>��� ��� ���"'
The Islands���Jackson, 683; Peck,
1148.
Kamloops���Colley, 1516; Mitchell,
1530.
Kaslo - Slocan ��� Fitsimmons, 1169;
Leary, 1113.
Lillooet���Carson,-1236; Munn, 1025.
MacKenzie���51 majority for Manson.
Nanaimo���Harrison,   1301;   Pearson,
1366; Place, 585; "Sampson, 107.
_ Nelson__rBorden,_1338;-McLean,-1183^
SCHOOLS OPEN TUESDAY
Here's .to Matrimony;���the high sea
' for which no compass has yet been in-
f vented.���Heine.
The Public and High Schools of the
Province open for, the fall term on
Tuesday, September 4th. Mr. J. Reid
of Nelson will be in- charge of the
Greenwood Superior School with Miss
Ruth Axam in Division II and Mrs.
George Bryan will substitute for Miss
Heather Harris in Division III. Miss
Harris was injured in an auto accident
at Kaslo recently and will not be able
to teach for at.least a month. V
New Westminster���Gray, 3262; San-
ford, 2546.
North Okanagan���Howe, 128; Kennedy, 2361; Van Kleek, 1881.
North Vancouver ���Loutet, 2466;
Mackenzie, 2498; MacMiilan, 396.
Omineca ��� Manson, 889; Shelf ord,
665.
Prince Rupert���Pattullo, 1370;
Thompson, 1276.
Revelstoke���Bell, 906; Sutherland,
1170.
Richmond:Pont-Grey���Carson, 3296;
Howe, 5414*
Rossland - Trail ��� MacDonald 1215;
Schofield, 1686.
Saanich���Tolmie, 2378; Whittaker,
1835.
Salmon -Arm���Bruhn, 1706; Smart,
623..
Similkameen���McKenzie, 2079; Tup-
per, 1665.
Skeena���Dockrill, 765; Wrinch, 910.
South Okanagan ��� Jones, 2145;
Sutherland, 1680.
Sputh Vancouver ���Cornett, 2452;
Feast, 696; Guy, 39; Neelands, 1981.
Vancouver City ��� Shelly, 17,486;
"Spencer, 16,717; Maitland, 16,499; Dick,
15,968; Kirk, 15,943; Walkem, 15,769;
Donaghy, 13,178; Smith, 12,514; Almond, 11,818; Thompson, 11,101; Sterling, 11,047; Hogg, 10,948; Madnnes,
6026; Skinner, 4223; Pelton, 977.
Victoria City���Hayward, 7754; Hinch-
liffe, 7614; Beatty, 7505;. Twigg, 7232;
MacLean, 6672; Straith, 6201; Dewar,
6180; Graham, 6205; Matheson, 715;
McGregor, 349; Inward, 316; North, 894.
Yale���Gillis, 1514; Helmer, 1132.
BRIDESVILLE NEWS
Miss Elise Egg, of Grand Forks, is
visiting at the Lawless farm.
Mrs. V. Moore has accepted a position
on the teaching staff at West Summer-
land.
Miss Helen Davidson left for Oliver
last week, where she has accepted a
position.
Mrs. Alden and three children returned on Tuesday from a week's visit
in Molson, Wash.
Miss V. Kempston returned on Tuesday of last week from a visit in Penticton with Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Kerr and
family.
Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Reid and two
children returned on Tuesday of last
week from a few days visit at Nelson
with Mrs. Idiens.
Mrs. E. Cudworth and three children
and Nellie Kehoe and Billy Letts and
Laurence Gulley, ��� were visitors in
Greenwood on Friday.
Mr. and- Mrs. -A. Lightly and three
sons, of Portland, Ore., are the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Schorn and-Mr. and
Mrs. E. Johnston. Mr. Lightly is the
son of Mrs. Schorn and Mrs. Lightly is
is a sister of Mr. E. Johnston.
BEAVERDELL BRIEFS
George Rogers has returned from his
annual holiday to Vancouver.
���  Duncan Murray returned on Monday
from a visit to Victoria-and Vancouver.
Mrs. Robt. Halcrow has arrived from
Vancouver and is the guest of her
mother, Mrs. P'. Lutner.
Miss Kay Kerby has returned to her
home in Grand Forks'after a short
visit with friends in camp.
Miss Vera Kempston, who has been
the guest of Mrs. Ted Clarke, has returned to her home in Bridesville.
""-Miss- "Sara' McCalluin," of" 'Grancf
Forks, was' "'the guest of Mrs. C- E.
Nordman for a few days last week.
Mrs. White, who has been1 the guest
of her mother, Mrs.-T.-Crowe, for the
past month,- left last week for a visit to
Vancouver, before returning to her
home in Silverton.
An Eggstraordinary Story.
"Have you heard the story of the
three eggs?" -,
"No."
"Too bad!"
GREENWOOD AND
DISTRICT  HOSPITAL
The Directors of the above Hospital
very thankfully acknowledge receipt of.
the, following subscriptions:.
Previously acknowledged   $3580.85
Anonymous (annual subscription)            50.00
Total
$3630.85
Classical
Courtesy is like "an. air cushion:
There may be nothing in it, but it eases
the jolts wonderfully. :������:
Two ladies were listening to; the
band. Said one: "That is something
from Wagner, I think."'Said the other:
"I think it is a nocturne of Chopin's."
Said the: first: / "I'll go and look on
the announcement card."
[���_ And back she came tojher friend
with the word:   "We're both wrong.
It's a Refrain���from Spitting."
Miss Kathleen . Moore, diminutive Scottish dance star, with the
K W. Beatty Cup, emblematic of
the Highland dancing competition
at the. Vancouver Caledonian
Games; Miss Moore also won a
free trip to the Highland Gathering at Banff where she. will
appear in the ^competitions held
during the *. ifestiv.il; betiwsen
August 31 and September 3.-
FORESTRY ASSOCIATION
HAS 29,000 MEMBERS
E. V. Ablett, of the Lecture Tour
Parly of the Canadian Forestry ��� Association, was in Greenwood on Wednesday evening and addressed a large
audience in the Theatre. The speaker,
was introduced by Mayor Gulley and was
given a very attentive hearing. He
said the Canadian Forestry,Association
is a national institution.of some 29,000
public spirited'Canadian citizens. ^ It
is not a department of any government
nor is it identified with any particular
commercial enterprize. It represents
all classes of people, owning no timber
nor administering any,' therefore its
message, of forest protection is free
from any political or commercial
motives.
The speaker went on to say that the
object is to awaken all citizens to the
vital realization that the future timber
supply of Cana'da depends upon perpetuating the present forest crop. This
"forest consciousness" can ^ only be
created by education. The motion picture being one of the best mediums.of
education known it is used extensively
by the Association.
This Association was formed 28 years
ago by 8 men in Eastern Canada. It
has grown steadily ever since until today, it is the largest forestry Association in the world. It employs 14 field
lecture parties, 12 hi Eastern Canada
and two in .B.C. in addition to these
parties it has a railway car on the
Prairies which advocates and teaches
tree planting for prairie settlers.
The films to be shown tonight are all.
of an educational nature, travelogues,
B. C. news reels, industrial, forestry
and a comedy. The feature forestry
film this year is entitled "The Red
Destroyer." It was entirely made in
BritislvColumbia from writings of it to
the printing of the film. This reel is
1000 feet in length, took eight months
to produce and cost in the neighborhood of $2000.00 (which does not include professional actors wages, for
none were employed, men actually in
the service were used.) It takes one
through the commercial and recrea-"
tional view points of the green forests,
then reveals how fire destroys a portion"
every year of our greatest heritage. In
.-the.end.it shows how-every,loyal Can;,
adian' should co-operate in guarding -
our timber to the point of suppressing
fire whenever the opportunity presents
itself.    ��� ,
Following the address six reels of
pictures were shown. They were very
interesting from start to finish. The
feature film "The Red Destroyer" is a
show in itself and all who have the
opportunity .should not fail to see it.
The-Canadian-Forestry ^Association" are
to be commended for enabling the
public to attend such a highly educational show through its genial Lecturer,
E. V. Ablett.
Mr. Ablett will be in Midway tonight,
Friday in Rock Creek and Saturday in
Beaverdell.
OF LOCAL INTEREST
-. /
Miss Renie  Skilton,  is  visiting  in
Spokane, Wash.
Geo. Hartley returned on Monday
from a motor trip to the Coast.
Harry Bidder was in hospital a few
days, having his tonsils removed.���
Kimberley Press.
Geo. Sutherland of the Sally mine,
Beaverdell, was in town during the
week-end.
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Biner and children
of Calexico, Cal., were in town on
Tuesday en route to Christina Lake.
Mrs. Chas. Nichols and daughter,
Gladys, returned on Sunday morning-
after fa few days visit with Mrs. Thos.
Jenkin in Trail.
E. V. Ablett, lecturer for the Can-,
adian Forestry Association, left this
afternoon for Midway. He was accompanied by Mrs. Ablett.
. James Cuthbertson and party, Beth,
Ruth and Edith Cuthbertson, recently
returned to Blakeburn from a motor
to: the Boundary country.
Harold Mellrud of South Slocan, is
spending a few days at his home here'
prior to resuming his studies at the
Washington State College, Pullman,
Wash.
Chas. Tye returned to Hedley on
Sunday morning after a two weeks stay
in the Greenwood district. His daughter, Evelyn, who was also visiting Here
returned the same day to Vancouver.
S. T. Smith and two sons and two
daughters, of Vancouver, were renewing acquaintances in town during the
week-end.'. They lived at Mother Lode
a number of^years ago. 'While in the
district they were the guest of Mr.
Smith's mother, Mrs. T. Wake, near the
Noi17.
���o PAGE TWO
TIIE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY,- AUGUST 30, 19JJ8.-
T-
r
ing
on your car is never complete when your cylinders arc not rebored
and fitted with new pistons and rings.
Wc have purchased the latest tools for reboring or rchoning Cylinders, ancl wc have a mechanic who knows how to do those jobs���
NO GUESS WORK
Have your crank case filled with clean oil.   Thc service is
FREE
We sell the very best Oils on the market���
AMALIE and VALVELINE.      100%  PURE PENNSYLVANIA OIL
and also the CASTROL and MOBILE OILS
Harrogate; not only seething districts
of industry, but the sweet, peaceful
tracts of "Poppyland," the stretches of
Norfolk woodland and coast; for one
notes such names as Cromer and
Sheringham. So goes the railroad.
There is ahvays something inspiring
about a passing train, not to mention
tho magnificence of a train gliding
like a comet with ruby nebula across
tlie blue black night. Turner, in Iiis
"Rain, Steam and Speed," shows that
he was content with a gray, drizzly
setting,
GRAND   FORKS   GARAGE
JOHN R. MOOYBOER, Prop.      - -      Grand Forks, B.C.
The Greenwood Ledge
Published every Thursday at
Greenwood, B.C.
G. W. A. SMITH
Editor and Proprietor
Subscription: In Canada and to Gt.
Britain, $2.00 a year in advance; $2.50
when not,paid for three months or
more have passed. To the United
States $2.50, always in advance.
ADVERTISING     RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices...$25.00
Coal and Oil Notices    7.00
Estray Notices       3.00
Cards of Thanks   .1.00
Certificate of Improvement  12.50
(When more than one claim appears
in notice, $5.00 for each additional
claim.
All other legal advertising 16 cents
a line first insertion, and 12 cents a
line for each subsequent insertion, nonpareil measurement.
Business locals 12V��c a line each insertion,
THE TRAIN
No letter to the editor will be inserted except over the proper signature and address of the writer. This
rule admits of no exceptions.
MECHANIZING   FOOD
Alarming news comes from chemists
meeting in Chicago. They predict the
eventual wiping out of agriculture.
They say thirty men working in a
factory the size of a city block can
produce in the form of yeast as much
food as 10,000 men tilling 57,000 acres.
The time may come, it was said at this
meeting, when the pressure of population will create a situation where
chemists will convert sunlight and
gases of the air into food that will
sustain the human body. Such a
situation may arise only many, many
years~from now, the scientists agreedr
We are glad.
Picture an existence where .eating
would be mechanical. Think of having a tablet of concentrated food or a
cake of yeast for each meal. Then
think of the turkey and fixings, the
cranberry sauce, and all the other
delicious things we have on our tables
on Thanksgiving Day. Or, for that
matter, think of an ordinary square
meal. Which would you rather have���
the tablet or the meal?
What a sorry thing life will be in
that far distant time predicted by the
scientists!
It reminds us of the story that Stephen Leacock, Canadian humorist, once
wrote, in which he visualized a dis
tant era when all food would be con
centrated in tablets. The big family
in this story sat about a table, in the
centre which was their Thanksgiving
dinner in the form a tiny pill. Before
the father had the chance to divide the
pill into tiny pieces for the individual
members of the family group, Baby
grabbed it and swallowed it. It was a
dreadful calamity. Of course Baby
died.
But, says Leacock, he had the happy
smile on his face of a little boy who
had eaten all of a family Thanksgiving dinner.���Kamloops Sentinel.
KETTLE VALLEY GOLF
The Draw for the Annual Fall Handicap Competition is as follows:
R. Norris v Mrs. Newniarch.
H. T. Newmarch v T.N. Walker.
G. W. A. Smith v Mrs. E. Richter.
E. S. Reynolds v H. W.: Gregory.
A. Roberts v R. W. Brown.
���    Mrs; Roberts v E.P. Beckett.
A. J. Lander v G. McMynn.
C. King v Mrs. Moore.i
J. O. Thompson v Mrs. Beckett.
D. McMynn v F.: Bubar.
: Mrs.-King v Mrs. Bubar. .
Mrs. Gregory v Mrs. Walters.
Mrs. E. S. Reynolds v E. Richter.
Miss. Barker v F. Roberts.
Rev. Smyth v G. S. Walters.
A   J. H. Bruce v J. Richter.
Mrs.' Smith- v F. Richter.
S. B. Hamilton v G. B. M. Gane.
W. E. Bruce v L. Brew.
H. Whiting v Mrs; Norris.
The 1st round to be played,between
Sept. 2nd and Sept. 16th, both dates
inclusive.  -    '���'���-."
If any member does not wish to play
please scratch to their opponent.
A train is a beautiful thing. It
crosses countries, links towns, is nothing of a stay-at-home, but a tireless,
lively creature, says a writer in
The Christian Science Monitor.
Ho who loves the wide world and its
beauty, loves trains. It is the large-
hearted, virile person who feels something in common with these steeds of
thc iron road. Locomotives are like
docile, kindly giants���at one time grotesque ill proportioned figures with long-
toppers like stovepipes���now become
dignified forms dressed to the figure
and moving with majesty.
It is not everybody who enjoys .the
pastime of watching trains go by, yet
this often becomes thrilling when one
is alongside a main railroad. , At least,
ono is sure of one's sport at regular
intervals, without submission to indefinite periods of waiting. One needs
a spacious, unobstructed view in the
peaceful countryside, well removed from
the land of the council house, small
holding, main road and outskirts
traffic. Such a point of vantage may
be found about thirty miles north of
King's Cross, London. Here one finds
a stark railroad, four tracks wide���the
main artery for the northeast country
= | with all its telegraph lines included.
One may rest amid the marguerites
and poppies of a Hertfordshire bank,
on a summer morning, and enjoy all
that trains havc to tell. It is in the
silent ancl deserted countryside that a
train seems to be a more intimate
friend. One seems to greet the other
with a "Hello! Just we two are here
together in this particular little pare of
England."
One sits alone in solitude when there
comes a "ting" over the wires, the signal arm drops on the tall lattice standard yonder, and one is warned of an
approaching train on the down main
track. Away on the horizon one can
discern tiny white puffs of smoke;
there is no sound yet, but the smoke is
extending and a dark spot gradually
appears beneath it. The spot grows
larger; now one begins to hear a distant drone. Faster and faster it draws
near,____These__jninutes___of_.__expeclation
are part of the fun. Now it is roaring,
now with deafening rattle it arrives
on the scene. Horses stampede in an
adjacent meadow at the sudden uproar.
For a moment one sees the bulky black
head and scarlet buffer plate; then all
things seem to be telescoped, from the
long, green engine and tender with
glistening brass and steel, with its busy
fireman; to an elegant dining car, a
succession of white serviettes, menu
cards and reading lamps, newspaper
readers, composed business men and
smiling children; to the tail buffers.
This is today's "Rocket" of the steel
track. One's first thought is "Where
aro you bound?" The reply sings out
from long white tablets in black lettering���"Edinburgh (Waverley) ���Dundee���Aberdeen." One's watch says it
is nearly quarter to eleven and then
there is the satisfaction of having seen
the world's most famous train���the ten
a.m. "Flying Scotsman." A poster, still
fresh on the London hoardings, announces that this famous train will
now run from King's Cross to Edinburgh without stopping���three hundred and ninety-two miles, "corridor
through tender, fresh driver and fireman takes control when running." One^
ponders over the latest of wonders,
this famous train on the world's longest nonstop run���the whole extent of
the celebrated East Coast route without
a break.
The water has hardly come to rest in
the quarter-mile long trough from
which the express has taken a long
gulp, and the smoke and dust still float
over the fields, while the signal has'just
returned to the "on" position, when
down goes another signal, this time" for
the up track. While one is conjuring
up pictures of the:queenly capital of
Caledonia and the land .of kilts and
bagpipes, loch and'heather-clad moorland there comes the slow, steady clatter of a coal train, with,each track displaying the name[[ of : some Yorkshire
colliery town. Now comes another interval of silence; again the signal
drops, then the usual crescendo of
events, this time bringing another passenger train on which one reads "Scarborough." Again we see the object of
another London poster, which introduces the "Scarabdro' Flier." Now for
a moment there is a vision of cliff and
sea and.holiday crowds. *    .
|    Glorious railway!;, It offers  one.; a
j whole  land.   Presently  one  will  see
labels indicating Newcastle, Bradford,
Leeds, Wakefield, Hull, Sheffield and
trans-Atlantic
telephone
The telephone accomplished for Lou Gordon
trans-Atlantic flier, what two
years of personal association
had failed to produce.
From London, England,
Gordon put in a telephone
call for his sweetheart at
Brookline, Mass., U.S.A. In
the short span of a three-
minute conversation, he proposed marriage and the girl
established something of a
record herself with a soul-
thrilling "yes."
Incidentally, this" was-the
first proposal by trans-Atlantic telephone. Gordon's success may lead to more.
B. C. TELEPHONE CO.
JM^MtsNuuimamMiKf^Hiiritmimt^
���wwwwwwwwwvvvwwv^rw^wwwviivvvvvvvvvvvvv
Reforestation
Much has been said recently about reforestation in B.C. The present is the result
of natural re-forestation when the human
hazard was not present to defeat.nature.
Natural "re-stocking of cut over lands
is now going on, as may be seen almost everywhere, and nature will again re-establish the
forests if only fire is kept out.
Prevent Forest Fires
You Can
B. C. FOREST SERVICE
SEND   YOUR
BOOTS and SHOES
To
Harry Armson, Grand Forks
The 20th Century Shoe Repairer
All work andr material guaranteed
We pay postage one way.   Terms cash.
^WILLIAM II. WOOD
PIIYSICIA.N A.ND SURGEON
GRRKNWOOD
Job Printing
We can supply your needs in
Letterheads? Statements,
Billheads, Envelopes,
ASSAYER
E. W. WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, Box L1108, Nelson, B. C.
Charges���Gold, Silver, Copper or Lead
$1.00 each. Gold-Silver $1.50. Silver-
Lead $2.00. Silvcr-Lead-Zinc $3.00.
These charges made only when cash is
sent with -sample. Charges for other
metals, etc., on application.
Greenwood & District*Hospital
GREENWOOD, B. C.c
Visiting  Hours:
2 to 4 p.m.; 7 to 9p.m.
Prices Reasonable
v-
Orders Promptly Attended To
The Greenwood Ledge Office
Subscribe to The ifeenweed Ledfte
-Trv^rrvvvvvv'vvvvTvvvvTVVVVV.vvvvvvvvvvvvvvv-vv-vvvvv'V'V'vvvvv'virr-vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv':
4
4
TISH   COLU
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
TO THE END OF DECEMBER, 1927
[ Has produced Minerals as follows:   Placer Gold, $78,174,795; Lode Gold, $130,651,919; Silver, $86,689,046;    s
Lead,  $121,850,734;   Copper, $221,501,079; Zinc, $59,508,692; Coal, $271,294,668; Structural Materials and    "
, Miscellaneous Minerals, $53,502,301 r making its mineral production to the end of 1927 show an
Aggregate Value of $1,048,837,828   .
! Production for the year ending December, 1927, $60,729,358
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province in the Dominion, or any colony In the British- Empire. c
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal.fees. -
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties, the security of which is guaranteed by
Crown grants.
Full information, together with Mining Reports and Maps, may be obtained gratis by addressing:
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
VICTORIA, British Columbia.
N. B.���Practically all British Columbia Mineral Properties upon which - development work -has been
done are described in-some one of the Annual Reports of the Minister of - Mines. Those considering
mining investments '> should refer to such reports.- They are available without charge on application
to the Department of Mines, Victoria, B. C. Reports of the "Geological Survey of Canada, Winch
Building, Vancouver, are recommended as valuable sources of information.
Reports covering each of the Six Mineral Survey Districts are published separately,"and are-available on aippUcatlou;,: ;^/:'\���-';y���^//:':.;���..; ���;���'��� v:--���'-��� ���'''      ; ���;,. '.-���
THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 1928.
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE      """"
PAGE THREE        ,^-ih
FACTS ON FILM "COLLEGE"
Buster Keaton is the sole star. Ann
Cornwall is the leading lady.
The cast includes Grant Withers,
Snitz Edwards, Harold Goodwin,
Florence Turner, Buddy Mason, Flora
Bramley, and Paul Goldsmith. Prominent college and Olympic athletes in
"College" are Morton Kaer, Bud
Houser, Kenneth Grumbles, Charles
Borah, Leighton Dye, Lee Barnes, the
entire baseball squad of the University
of Southern California, "Shorty" Wor-
den, Robert Boling and Eric Mack.
The story is that of a high school
graduate (Keaton." who comes to college, meets The Girl, and at her instigation sets out to conquer the collegiate athletic world, making himself
a veritable pentathlon champion. The
finale occurs in a crew race, with
Keaton a vital factor in the result.
Campuses of the University of California, the 'University of Southern
California and other colleges were employed for scenes; the Southern Seas
Club, Balboa, Cal., the Coliseum, Los
Angeles, - and the Buster Keaton
Studio ,are other sites1 employed in
making the film.
"Be Pachunt"
A Toledo, O., grocer recently received
the following from a delinquent customer:     ' '    *
"Dear Sir:",I got your dune what I
owe you. Now be pachunt. I ain't
forgot you,- plese- wate. When some
other fools pay me I pay you. If this
wuz judgment day and you wuz no
more prepared to meet your Maker- as
I am this account, you sure would go
to hell. Hoping you will do, this, I remain, Yours very truly."
The Dog Star
He (ardent student of astronomy):
"Do you happen :to know the name of
the star with a tail?"
She: "Do you mean Strongheart,-of
Rin-Tin-Tin?"
SYNOPSIS OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant unreserved, surveyed Crown
lands may be pre-empted by British
subjects over 18 years of age, and by
aliens on declaring intention- to become British subjects, conditional
upon residence, occupation, and improvement for agricultural' purposes.
Full' information concerning relations regarding pre-emptions is given
in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series. *How
to Pre-empt Land," copies of which
can be obtained free of charge by addressing the Department of Lands,
toria, B. C, or to any Government
Agent.
-���Records-^will-bej-granted���covering
only land suitable for agricultural purposes, and which Is not timberland,
I.e., carrying over 8,000 board feet per
acre west of the Coast Range and
5,000 feet per acre east of that Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are to
be addressed to the Land Commissioner ofthe Land Recording Division, In
which the land applied for is situated,
and are made on printed forms, copies
of which can be obtained from the
Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five,years and improvements made to
the value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, .before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved Crown
Lands, not being timberland, for agricultural purposes: minimum price for
first-class (arable) land is $5 per
acre. Further information regarding
purchase or lease of Crown Lands is
given in Bulletin No. 10. Land Series,
'Purchase and Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of stump-
age.
HOMESITE LEASES
Unsurveyed areas not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites, conditional upon a dwelling being erected
in the first, year, title being obtainable
after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled, and land has been
surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas not exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or a company.
GRAZING
- Under the Grazing Act the Province
Is divided into grazing districts and the
range administered under a Grazing
Commissioner. Annual grazing permits are issued based on numbers
ranged, priority given to established
owners. Stock., owners may form associations for range management. Free,
or partly free, permits are available
for settlers, campers and travellers, up
to ten head.
/   ����*������
npHL material progress of our Province is known the world over.
1 We speak with pride... and rightly... of its vast natural resources
awaiting conversion into merchandise and wealth. We take the figures
of ten years ago and compare them with those of today... and the
world agrees that our progress ... considering our population ... has
been the brightest feature in the recovery of the British Empire from
the war.
j\n__Li_f_this_progress,of-which-we are sojustly-
proud, is to continue, does not the most vital
force of this country lie in our children ? Some
day, they will take the helm. Events will follow
their judgment, skill and decision. THEY ARE
OUR GREATEST ASSET!
The Boy of today is the Man of to-morrow...
the Girl, the future Mother of our citizens.
On us rests the responsibility of shaping their
formative, years so that when we hand over the
reins, they may carry on the Torch of Progress,
undimmed.
How have we met our responsibility? Can we
look Young British Columbia in the eye with
the feeling that all will be well with the future
of the province for which we have planned so
carefully and labored so faithfully?
SURELY!
In the last ten years our school population has
grown from 64,570 to 101,688 . .. 58%. We have
1,065 schools  manned   by  3,396  thoroughly
trained, competent teachers ... an increase of
31.7% and 71% respectively!
Recently we have established special vocational schools for our girls and boys, where
they may be fitted for those occupations for
which they have a natural bent.
Higher education is amply provided for at our
University of British Columbia, where two
thousand students are now enrolled, the
majority studying for their degree in Science
and Agriculture.
And to the school training of our children we
add the powerful influence of Home, the
religious and other organizations, each of
which is contributing its full measure of the
physical, mental and character upbuilding of
our dearest, most treasured asset . . . OUR
CHILDREN!
With confidence and faith we will hand over
our beloved Province's future when the time
comes!
Read these announcements and understand your province's f
progress . . . clip them out and send them to friends. If you
desire extra copies of these announcements a note to this
newspaper will bring them. Advertise your Province!
aC.H. 628
A, E. MCDOUGALL
Contractor and Builder
MONUMENTS,       ,ROOFINGf
LAMATCO WALL BOARD
' Get my prices on
LAMATCO
on walls finished, and save money
SHOP AT GREENWOOD
Box 332 Grand Forks. B.C.
Job Printing
The Greenwood Ledge
-    -    -    -    -    '    -   ��-t-t��    w-^^r-'^r-rr-r-vwr-r^-w-w^W^-W^^r VT VTTTTT VT*f VTTT i
f The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. i
of Canada. Limited
Office, Smelting and Re6ning Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS and REFINERS
������ Purchasers of Gold. Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores,
Producers, of Gold, Silver, Copper, Pig- Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC" BRAND
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PAGE FOUft
(THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 1928.
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The New IViarconi
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1929
I Of Local Interest I
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Tom Taylor left on Sunday for Vancouver.
E. G. Cummings, of Beaverdell, was
a. visitor in town on Sunday.
, Jack Taylor and R. Forshaw made a
business trip to Trail this week.
Mrs, W. Berg recently returned from
a visit to Mrs. L. Sortome at Moyie.
Joe Cavon, of Willow Point, was renewing acquaintances 'in town this
week.
F. Eric Jones, travelling auditor for
the B. C. government, was in town recently.
E. G. Berg returned on Saturday
from a holiday spent in the Nicholson
Creek district.
With Temple Air-Chrome Speaker
T. M. GULLEY
has been appointed distributor for Greenwood
Mold you Radio business until you see the new Marconi
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ies
Exercise Books, Pens, Pencils, Etc
Are Now Arriving
For quality and value order from
Phone 46
GREENWOOD GROCERY
Mass will be celebrated in the
Catholic Church on Sunday, September
2nd, at 11 o'clock.
Mrs. M. ��� Luse returned ������ to Grand
Fork's'on Friday after a few days visit
with friends in town.
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:    . <���     ���������:..��� .:.���������
Ladies and Gents
furnishings
Overalls, Work Shirts,
Boots and Shoes,
Work Socks and Fancy
Dress Socks,
Bath Towels, Pillow Slips
Bathing Suits
Call and inspect Our Stock
��� Ellen Trounson's Store j
The Greatest Gag-Gigglc-Laugh-Roar
cf the year!
Joseph M. Schenck presents
BUSTER KEATON
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e
Matins and Holy Communion, St.
Jude's Church, Greenwood, Sunday,
Sept. 2nd at 11 o'clock.
Today's   eastbound  passenger  train
was made up two engines 10 cars and;
an open observation car.
James Hallett and- G. C. Stanley returned to Portland, Ore., last week,
after a few days visit in town.
��
4
For PRESERVING
Fruit Jars, Economy, Mason and Schram Tops,
Rubber Rings, Etc.
AU this Season's Stock
Phone 17
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Mrs. Percy Hammerstrom ancl family
have'returned'to town from a visit to
Ferry and other towns in Washington.
Lewis F. Worsley, of Pembertson &
Sons, financial agents,' Vancouver, was
a caller at Chas. King's office on Friday. '������-....
Mr. and Mrs. O. V. White and Richard White of New Denver, were in town
on Saturday night en route to Vancouver.
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STOCKS BONDS
MINING SHARES
Charles King
Real Estate & Insurance Agent
announces that he has completed   arrangements   with   a" <
First-class Brokerage Firm
to handle all orders for the
purchase and sale of
Government,'Municipal, Public
Utility  and  Industrial   Bonds
��� Stock and Bond buying on the
installment plan is sound and
thrifty
Purchase and Sale of
Mining Shares
��� Prompt and careful attention
', given to all enquiries
|aaa4__aaaAAAAAAaaa,4A_.aa_k__,.;
Ra-a-a-a-a-Rnh!       Ra-a-a-a-a-Rah!
. Keaton Gels 'Em!
Kiss! Kiss! Kiss!
College Makes 'Em
Ha-a-a-a-ah! Ha-a-a-a-ah!
You will have 'em!
LAUGHS!       LAUGHS!"      LAUGHS!
Happiest of all Keaton Comedies
Greenwood Theatre
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1st
Commencing at 8:15 p.m.
Adults SOc.
Children 25c
Coming! --    Coming!
Saturday, September 8th
BABE RUTH    (The Sultan of Swat)
���   in  ���
"Babe Conies Home"
TIMBER SALErX10438
Sealed tenders will be received by
the District Forester; Nelson, not later
I than noon on the 5th day of September, 1928, for the purchase of Licence
X10438, 2 miles West of Beaverdell, to"
cut 5860 hewn fir and larch ties.
One (1) 'year will be allowed for
removal of timber. - ���-
Further particulars of the District,
Forester, Nelson.
Chas... King, W. B. Fleming and G.
W. A. Smith attended the Gray surprise party in Kettle Valley on Friday
evening;
Eugene   McGiUivray   has   returned,
to  town  from  the   Coquahalla  Pass'
where he has been employed during
the past three week's.
Miss M. N. Jardine, R.N., of Hamilton, Ont., who has been the guest of
Mrs. Walter Clark, for several weeks,
has left for Hafford, Sask.
About a month ago Wm. Riley, of
Norwegian Creek, had two horses killed
by being struck by lightning. A third
was also struck but has since recovered.
.���nTyv-,WTfTV��*,vTv^vi��nr
To those who contemplate.   _ <
buying
Wedding Presents or Gifts
'.for their friends
Let us remind you, that we can
supply you cheaper than you
can buy/ from. Catalogue
Let us have your
Watch and Clock Repairs
We always do a first-class job
A. A. WHITE
Watchmaker  and. Jeweler
F.-J. White, Mgr.
The United Church of Canada
REV. ANDREW WALKER, B.A.
Minister in Charge, Greenwood.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2nd
Bridesville, 11 a.m.
Midway, 3 p.m.
Greenwood, 7:30 p.m.
FREE
Motion Pictures
The Catholic Ladies will hold the
_first^of=the=season!s_Whist_Drives_in
the Parish House, Greenwood, on Wednesday evening, Sept. 5th.   Admission
25c.   Everybody welcome.
PACIPIC HOTEL
headquartersfor
Boundary Mining and Travelling Men
<>     First Class Accommodation
Hot and Cold Water
J. H. GOODEVE
Every Convenience
Prop.
Drug Store in Connection
Greenwood Meat,Market"
Under New "Management
CHOICE LINE OP MEATS
We Solicit Your Patronage
Strictly Cash
JOHN MEYER - - Proprietor
n
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McMYNN'S STORE, Midway
Order Your BINDER TWINE
from us.   It is new stock
Specials this week���
CHOICE FRESH BEEF ,
. K. C. Plum Jam 3'^'s per tin 50c
Buy Lime Juice or Lemon Cup.
Either make an excellent drink in hot weather
Fresh TOMATOES, PEACHES and APRICOTS
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FOR SALE
Mrs. Bert Hopkins and two sons, of
Hammerless Shot Gun, 12' guage,
Parker Bros. Apply at The Greenwood
Leage_6fficl��    '    !   ""^        "   =
LABOR DAY DANCE
Don't forget the Labor Day Dance,
Kimberley, who have been the guests^ Farmers'  Hall,. Midway,  on  Monday,
of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Christensen, left September 3rd.   Members of the W.I.
on Tuesday for Trail where they will'are reqUested to bring cakes. /
visit  with 'Mrs.,, Hopkins'   sister   and ( -   _. ,
brother before returning to their home.
PACIFIC HOTEL GUESTS
Mrs.-S. Walker and family left for
their home in Moyie on Sunday after a
several'weeks, visit''with Mrs. Walker's
Guests at'the Pacific Hotel during
the week:   F. H. Fox, C. H. Hanna, S.
parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. W.'Auger on �� Williams, Guy W. Davis Nelson;'L.
the Eholt road.   Mr. Walker who spent
a week here returned with his family.
H.   Maplan,   Seattle,   Wash.;   M.   C
Duvall, J. Tricker,.W. Pickering, Bell-
  ingham, Wash.; G. S. Mongie, W. Mon-
?_'_���_.,' gie, Davenport, Wash.; F. M.'Handy,
W. H. Bryan motored to Penticton on Spokanei Wash.; Mr. and Mrs. O. V.
Sunday and returned in the evening white, Richard O. White, New Denver;
with Mrs. Bryan who was en route Mrs> Wi Young and family, L. S. Mc-
home from Vancouver. Mrs. Bryan's Kinnon) A. Latzkor, Bert Hodge, E. C.
many friends will regret to learn that Nevason, Vancouver; Mr. a'nd Mrs. J. L.
she took ill on Tuesday and was taken Nordman( Eric sjoberg, John Butticci,
to Vancouver on Wednesday mornings Geo w Rogers> Beaverdell; Fred Aslin,
train by Mr. Bryan. ; Burn's Lake; A. B Scofleld and wife,
"  'Salinas, Cal.; Mrs. J. Turnbull, H. I.
Mrs. E. T. Smith of Seattle and Turnbull, New Westminster;- Vernon
nephew James Reid, of Tacoma; and cole, Kelowna; E. H. Cagnon, A. F.
Miss .A. Legault, of Smith Falls, Ont.,; Michener, A. E. McDougall, J.Zunich,
were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. A.' Grand Forks; J. Macdonald, Penticton;
Legault last week. The visitors left on Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Ingham, J. R. In-
Thursday last for Seattle accompanied^gham, Olympia, Wash.; Joe Caron,
by Mrs. Legault who will remain in willow Point; Mr. and Mrs. E. V.
the American city for a short time.        Ablett,- Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. J. M.
 ��� _ Sterling,  Calgary;   Mr.  and -Mrs.  J.
Mrs. Hugh McGiUivray is visiting in Clark, HiUcrest^ Mr. and Mrs. J. Mc-
Trall.
A Motion Picture Lecture Party,
operating under thc auspices of the
Canadian Forestry Association will visit
this district and will be in
ROCK CREEK on AUG. 31st
BEAVERDELL on SEPT. 1st
^Commencing at 8-*p.m.each-p!ace-
This is your opportunity to see
5,000 FEET OF NEW MOVIES
Showing: ."The Red Destroyer," British Columbia Travelogue, Provincial
News Reel, arid other Interesting
Educational Pictures.
FREE TO ALL
Come and spend a pleasant hour
Forest   Protection   is:    My   Business,
Your Business and Mighty
Good  Business
Canadian Forestry Association
GREETINGS
Artney, Coleman.
TfT��y
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Save Time, Money and Expense
Invest in a New
John Deere or McCormick
lower and Rake
Place your orders for your repairs now
BROWN'S STORES
Midway   and   Rock Creek
,A.A****AAr tlSA-ia
^^^A^A.^.A.A.AAAMttttUtt****-^
We extend our greetings to the
people of Greenwood and District. We
have made arrangements to take care
of all who need Chiropractic adjustments.;  ;   '���,'. t:   "    .        ��� ��� " :'
'���:y.     ���������'.���������' a. g. McLaren, .
j. c. McLaren,
.  Palmer Graduates.
P.O. Box 387, Greenwood.
KETTLE  RIVER  &   SOUTH  OKANAGAN PIONEER  SOCIETY
There will be a reunion of the above
Society on Sept. 15th, ,1928 at Midway,
B.C. All residents of the district prior
to Dec. 31st, 1904, are eligible to join.
Business meeting at 7 p.m. to be followed by a banquet at thc Midway
Hotel.
Those intending to attend please
notify the Secretary.
A. ROBERTS, Secretary,
Kettle Valley, B.C.
APPLES, &C. FOR SALE
-Apples picked from 50c in your own
box. Falls 25c. Strawberries 10c a box.
T. A. CLARK, Midway.
COMEVG EVENTS
Keep in mind the Labor Day Dance
tc be held in the Farmer's Hall, In
Midway on Monday evening, Sept. 3rd.
Watch for posters, ,
I

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