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The Ledge Oct 23, 1924

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THE   OLDEST   MINING   CAMP   NEWSPAPER   IN   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Vol.   XXXI
GREENWOOD, B. G., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1924.
No. 13
SIXTH   ANNUAL"
War Veterans Masquerade Dance
(Benefit of Greenwood District Hospital)
Thanksgiving Day���Armistice Day
MONDAY,   NOVEMBER   10,   1924
MASONIC   HALL,   GREENWOOD
(OX
The most popular and largest attended Dance in the district
Four Prizes Excellent Supper Fine Hall
BUSH'S  4-PIECE  ORCHESTRA
Masks and Costumes at Goodeve's
Now is  the time to  Brighten up your Home
We have just received an assortment of
���������/.''        ' _.. ��� o
Paints, Oils, Floor Stains, -
and Varnishes
T. M. GULLEY & CO.
PHONE 28L-
GREENWOOD. B.C.
SREGIALS
Five Roses, Purity, Royal. Household Flour
49s      -'���    -      $2.50
98s      -      -        5.00
Wholesale Prices Advanced���Buy Now
-Sultanas. New Stock 2 lbs -  25c.    4s Strawberry Jam  -  80c
&> Okanagan Delicious Apples (extra fancy)     -     $3.50
wj Wealthy Apples, Good Cookin?     -     -      ���      1.35
��3 Cocoa, 5 lb pkts  -  65c. Dates, fresh "stock per Ib  -  15c
For duality and Value Order From
Phone 46
GREENWOOD GROCERY
$
STATIONERY
.  .        Everything in
WRITING  MATERIAL  and  BLANK  BOOKS
See our Box Stationery.   /The best obtainable.
Mount your summer prints in snapshot albums.: Biff assortment. :5Dc up
���J. H. Goodeve; Druggist & Stationer
7V 7   Don't Neglect that Coueh f     7    ;f   7
. - - ���
y-xxyxy-xXX
���'���-' :���:��� ������--,���
x
I-
���
I
^Joy
Mazda and Garboii Lamps
.-In 7 AU. Sizes'
125 VOLTS
rmLOB &
Mens
Furnishings
Pants
Shirts
Underwear
Wool Tweed Shirts ,
Light and Heavy Rubbers
Fit-Reform Suits and
Overcoats
Boys Sweaters
W, Elson & Co,
A..
Auction!     Auction!     Auction!
Why not7realize on your
Surplus Stock?
Cash  in haud,  is better than a 6
���  month's'-Bill for Winter Feed.
Terms Reasonable
CHARLES   KING
AUCTIONEER
JUST ARRIVED
LADIES   '
Fall and Winter
HATS
Very Reasonably Priced
MRS. ELLEN TROUNSON
E
AROUND HOME
Greenwood Theatre
SATURDAY, OCT. 25th
.   Commencing at 8.15   p.m. f
Over'   thef Top    to    Love
. ADOLPH ZUKOR-Presents   X;-.
-    ''���)/. Agries Ayresv..'
^TheH^Raiaer''
.'. -x _;.'7 _A_'h��raJnp_untiT10MP.X .X-X:..:
'.[  ;X    A JOYFUL battle bf hearts.'. -7"
-. Iii which a lovelorn girl chases a -\
love-shy. man, captures him "for/" 7
���   ...her own and brings-him lio.mefin,
.-.    triumph; ��� V. ' 7 "       '    f - ,'.
Guaranteed.to tickle .your funny "bone,
chill your spine and play 611" your f heartstrings'.   "       .:."���      - W'. -.,     -'
ADULTS 50c
CHILDREN 25c
RHONE IT .; f.,   >V ��� -���   yyX J\ GREENWOOD
������������������4*#**4^�� ������������������������������������������������������ ���������������������������������������������������^1
^pu are invited to   attend   a   PUBLIC7MEETING
���i to be Addressed by
77':HON. :X H.:^lNG7ff 7-7W:
.        Minister of Public Worksfor the Doffllcios of Canada
X y  fiW. SUTHERLAND
'--7-\''-fLiberarCandldate;forVYaIe'SWi8e-7.''.-.^    V
COL C E. EDGETr
"y.}:y.xy AND OTHERS;"  '-   y-y.
/-VW-'.. To be held in'v -
At 8 p. m.
The same Speakers will address Meetings at
MIDWAY, Old School House, Friday, Oct. 31, 3 p.m.
BRIDESVILLE* Saturday* Nov. I, 3 p.m.
ROCK CREEK, (Riverside Hall) Sat, Nov. 1* & p.m.
GOD   SAVE   THE KING
���XX    APPLES FOR SALE . V
'   Coolcing apples* sects, per box; Wealthy
$[.60, and Mcintosh Red $1:50 per box.
'������./-; JL FORSHAW,.
"'.-/ Phone. 7L
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Minister in charge
Rev. w. R,' Walkinshaw. B. A.;
'.���_    ..'-.'.  -..Greenwood
���-."-""��� Sunday.-Oct7-26th.-7- XX;
V'7    Beaverdell 10.30 a. m.7 V. --
Greenwood 7.30 p.m.
Meetings
ionHHWBwmMn_Mmaa_a��iH
will be held in the interest of ���
GR0TE   STERLING
Conservative   Candidate, for.-Yale  by-
election-at the following plkces aid elates:
Old School -Hpuse, Midway:
f riday, Oct. 24th, 8 p.m.
Co-Op Half; Rock Creek
Saturday, Oct. 25th, 3 p.m.
Speakers:
J. W. Jones,   M.L.A.
C. H. Dickie, M.P.
and others';
Come   and } hear 7 Pofitscai
Questions discussed
. Rev. W. R. Walkinshaw moved
into the newjnanse this week.
'"John E. Benson left last week
for Beaverdell where he is employed.
D. McLaren returned on Friday
from a two week's visit to Vancouver.
i H. TR. Bidder left Vancouver
last week and is now working in
Kimberley.
'"��� Born���At Westbridge, on Friday, Oct. 17tb, a daughter to Mr.
and Mrs. Art. Miller.
7 Mr. and Mrs. A. D. McLennan,
of Rock Creek, 'wtre in Grand
Forks on Wednesday.       '    '
A football team is being selected to go to Grand Forks next
Sunday to play a match.
G. A. Rendell left for Penticton
on Tuesday morning after visiting in town for a few days.
-' Don't forget Nov. 21st, ���>' 1924.
Laffalot Girl's concert and dance.
Gome and lafif (laugh) a lot.
z Cash paid for hides at Brown's
Store, Midway.
. Mrs. Geo. Clerf left on Monday
as a delegate to the Grand Lodge
of Pythian Sisters convention at
Revelstoke.
Mr. and Mrs. G. PI. Pitman
and son, Gerald, of Rock Creek,
spent   Wodnesday   afternoon   in
Grand Forks.
(..
Besides the big 6 reel feature
at the Greenwood Theatre on
Saturday night there will be a
special comic shown.
Mrs. T. Hartland and Teddy
Bryan returned to West Grand
Forks on Wednesday morning
after a visit to Nelson and Arrow
Lake points.
About 10 car  loads ot people
are coming from Grand Forks to
l.?-PJ��y supper with  the   Pythian
Visiters on Friday night.
Mrs. . P. H. McCurrach and
daughter, Margaret, 'and Miss
Cecilia Hallstrom left on Tuesday
morning on a visit to Spokane.
Dr. A. Francis, wife and two
children arrived in town. on. Saturday and have taken up their residence in Dr. MacLean's house.
" Fall. Wheat., and Fall fRye fat
Brown's Store,-Midway;...   -
7. As we go.to press we learn that
the'result;bf. the prohibition vote
in Ontario thVfwets. are leading
by a inajority of 6ver-,44,060.' 7 ���    -
* f The^Cove^ed Wagon is.comhig^
to .the Empress Theatre, -Grand
Forks Friday and Saturday; Nov.
7th and.-8th.'', Matitiee  Saturday
at 2.30 pf tti._ V Remember the date.
... Chief-J; AV Fraser- received-
notice on Monday to ihtove to Penticton .where be ..will .-make-his
beadquarters.V Constable;!. M7
Bella will -be ; in charge of .the
Greenwood office. V
-. From the. -display.. .'advertisement in another .column it will be
seen that'fseveral public meetings'
wtll.be held iii this district in the
interest of D. ...W/ Sutherland,
Liberal candidate in:the Yale rid-.
iagr.    X)   '..;;;   -��� ")  '������)������
.Fancy costumes, clowns, spooks
and.ballet girls will make merry
in a:riot of multi-colored- dresses
in the Masonic Hall at the Masquerade dance, to be staged, on
Thanksgiving Day, Monday ..Nov.
I0th.< _The;i_tance promises tobe
up to the usual excellent standard
of all G.W.V.A dances,
The men of town are requested
to theetfat the hospital nest Wednesday afternoon at 2 p.m. sharp,
for the purpose off holding a
Work in gf Bee. A general? clean
up will sake .place and. the
greundsat. the back of the hospital _:w.iH,be improved,
..On Wednesday, evening, a well
attended public meeting was held
in the Grieenwood Theatre ia th e
interests of Grote Stirling, Conservative candidate in the Yale
bye-election. W. B- Fleming
was in the chair and on the
platform was Jbo, McKie, M.L.A.
The speakers were J. W. Jones,
M.P.P. for South Okanagan, and
C, EL Dickie, M.P. for Nanaimo,
who gave a clear and lucid explanation of the principle issues
of the day���the tariff aad transportation, questions being particularly pressed home. ':   v
Hospital Board Meeting
The Hospital Board of Management met in the city office on
Tuesday evening and transacted
considerable business in connection with hospital matters. T.
M. Gulley was appointed chairman of the Board and it was decided to ask C. King to accept the
position ot Secretary-Treasurer.
G. S. Walters acted as secretary
of the meeting; Necessary repairs to the building were ordered
to be done following an inspection of the building by the Board.
Details of cost of equipment were
thoroughly discussed and cost of
maintenance was estimated with
the help of figures supplied by
Dr. Francis and on the strength
of the amount of funds now available in the Greenwood end of the
district it was decided to-order
immediately the equipment for
five beds and the furnishings for
the kitchen and running of the
hospital generally. Dr. Francis
reported having ready for installation all the operation room
equipment which is being provided by himself. Miss L. Bawten-
heimer was engaged as matron
and will commence duty on Nov.
1st. Dr. Francis was appointed
superintendent of the hospital and
another meeting of the Board
will be held at an early date to
adopt rules and bylaws^'and decide
on a basis of rates for treatment
as well as to go into the matter
of rates for associations, societies
and individuals desiring treatment by payment of a regular
standard fee. An appeal, will be
made to the various districts by
their representatives on the
Board for help and co-operation
in making the operation of the
hospital a success.
F. Downey's at Grand Forks
are Northern Electric District
agents for Radio Sets. , They are
installing a two tube set for $75.
They guarantee every set installed to work absolutely perfect.
Write to Grand Forks, for full
information.-'
The machinery and equipment
have arrived for the parties that
will develop the D.A. and other
properties at Deadwood camp. At
present 10 men are working building a road and; getting the
camp in shape. A .5x7. tunnel
will be driven - over .600 feet to
crosscut several,veins that carry
high values.7';"-.' '-'7-.-'-
V-The7Pyth'ia'n Sisters will.'give
.a'chicken supper, infthe banquet
hall oftheir.. lodge- room infthe
Masonic, Hall' on Friday,Oct6ber.
24th. X -Stopper " will' ..-be'- served
irom.. 5.f._till-.77fW Followed by- a
social evening and dance. Supper,
adults 5'0.cts.. school children 25ct.s.
Dance commences at 8.30;'admission, adult's SO'ct's.fschool children
35cts.-7"' :..X'-���'"-���-.) yXX  '.-};}. -.-'--
John N. Luce-was arrested fat
Rock" fCrcek.'-last week xharged.
with two. infractions of the Gov-
ernment Liquor Act and' was up
before P. H.,McCurrach, S.Mfo'n
Saturday the .ISth.inst. He asked
for a remand, in order; :to - get
counsel. The trial was set for
Friday at 10.30,' but.will' be;postr
poned until Wednesday next. He
is ..-out. da-$3000-bail..,
. Dr. A. Francis and P. H. Mc-
Currach.had the privilege of play-,
ing the-.first game on Greenwood' saew'gbif 'course. f-J.ust a
few holes have been laid, for the
present but it is the intention . to
havca 9 hole course: if sufficient
interest-can beI aroused in the vicinity to accomplish this. The
site of the'edttrse lies to the north
of the town and includes the old
recreation grounds.. Dr. Francis
stated that Greenwood was fortunate in .having such -suitable
golf .links;"      -; ' ....
A very "enjoyable evening, was
spent at the home of Mrs.; James
Kerr on Friday last, when Miss
Vi Kempston entertained "a number of.yoimg people. The eveh-f
ing was pleasantly passed, in
dancing and contests. Miss Lee
and Mr. Crawley were the fortunate winners of the paper dressing
contest, Miss Lee receiving a doll
and Mr. Crowley a sewing set..
The guests included the Misses
R. Asam, 1. Keir, H. Barton, R.
Lytle, G. Lee, Messrs. N. Morrison, T. Crowley, R. Taylor, Tu.
Keir, J, Wallace,. J. Stilwell and.
E. Afndreas. . ...
Ledge ads htmg results.
Kettle Valley Notes
Capt Brew left last week for the
8hanghnessy Hospital  Vancouver.
Mre. E. W. Thorburn is visiting
at Mre, Barlee's at Grand Forks.
B. ,P. HardcaBtle has returned
from Kelowna for a week or a fortnight.
The Banff orohestra will beat
the RiverBide Hall on Tuesday,
Nov. 18th.
Service will be held in the
Anglican Chnvch on Sunday, Oct.
26t.hat 11 a.m.
Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton and
family of Golden, have been visiting afe the Bnbar ranch.    ��
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Manery and
son, Clifford, of E��nfeicton were the
guests of Mrs. E. ilichter last week.
Norman Haynes ,. and Freddy
FernBferom have returned from
Kelowna where they have been
working during the summer.
The next meeting of the W. A.
will be held at Mrs. Clarke's on the
29bh. The last meeting'was held
afe Mrs. Welatead's on the 16th
Oct., nine members being present.
Dont forget the Hallowe'en Card
Party in the Co-op Hall on Friday
Oct. 31sfe. The proceeds to go to-
wards the Rock Creek childrens
Christmas treat. To avoid fehe
ghostB get there at 8.30 sharp.
Mr. and Mrs. H. 7W. Whiting
have been spending .a holiday for
the past feen days, at Vancouver for
a period to Bee their daughter,
Winnie, and latterly at Kelowna
where their son, George, is work- '
ing.
A very representative gathering
of the citizens of this part of the
district met in the Riverside Hall,
Rock Creek, last Friday night to
discuss hospital matters. Major
F. E. Glossop was in the chair and
after everything waa thoroughly
explained and. discussed, a vote
was taken and the grea�� majority
were in favor of a hospital being
established.. Major R. Gray and
Wm. Clark were appointed members of the Hospital Board.
A Football match was played on
the Hockey Grounds on Sunday,
Kettle Valley vs Grand Forks.
After a very pleasant game the result was a win for Kettle Valley by
2 to 0, Grand Forks had the best
of fehe game in the first half and
were unlucky not to score, bafe in
fehe second half fehe '"'extra wind"
of fehe locals enabled them to put
in two goals, both obtained by J.
Jacques.7 Tea was served on tha"
grounds affeer the match. A return- match is to be played afe
Grand :fForks_onff Nov,_2, _ weatber_
permitting. The . ;: {.earns were*.
Grand Forks���W. 7BV Mansfield,
D. Cavaye,   E. . Fitzpatrick,. M..
Henderson, R. Watt, B. ^Winters,
R.: Murray, H. Murrfty^L.f.Eamer, f
A.   Buchaiifand   0.77D.   Pearson..
Kettle-ValleyWGoal, G,'P/Harpnirj;
E. Richter, B. Palmer j-"F. Richter,-
F.. Bubar, B. Gane, E. Walker, J.f
Jacques, R.-Gaustmy H.; If). Ham-.
ilton and R. Norris.   ..
WEDDING
Fisher���Smith..
.A - quiet  but. pretty  wedding-
was solethnixedf1 at the .home' of
Mr. and Mrs. G._ A. Smith7 Grand
Forks, onf Wednesday," Oct. -22nd"
at .11.15 a.m., whien their. daughter; Ruby Ross Sthitli and Le Noir-
John.Fisher, son of Mr. and Mrs.
J. f T. 7Fisher,   of North .Fork,.
Grand Forks, were united'fin the'
bonds of matrimony, f .Rev. F. E.
Runnalls.  performing   the  cere-.
mony.     Only -/ relstives   of   the
contracting parties fwere present".-<
After;a light luncheon-the happy
couple   left   by  motor 7 ;for Port
Hill, Idaho, where they willmake:
their home. ,        }-.-���-X'X-y-    .'..--'.
Scouts Re-Organize
7
. A {very enthusiastic re.-organi-
zationfmeeting.of the Scouts was
held.in.the.Court House last-Friday ;night. P. H. McCurrach explained tbe reiis.on of.the meeting
arid then called ; onf Dr. G.:. .H-.
Acres, district commissioner, who
gave a tadrougli. explanation of
Scout work. A. general discussion followed and-R..C, Taylor
was asked to take the position of
Scoutma;s.ter, ���which he~ accepted^
Dr. Acres was given a .very.;
hearty vote of thanks for com ing
over and assisting. Scouts and-
Cst&s will meet every Friday at;
7.30 p.m, " HPTTT?
HE   LEDGE,   ttEEENWOODt
a
A Riot Of Color
Is
An Electrical
Century
Religious Faith Which Accompanies
Scientific Belief
A hundred years ago Mji-lKid Faraday made his Hrsi expel inn-iii in an ai-
t.einpi in obtain electricity from a
magnet.
U was seven years before ho succeeded in gi-uinj? the first evidence
Iliat au "electric current can induce
another in a different circuit."
Those were years when lie "walked
by faith"���a faith -which lias boon
crowned by a century ot" such marvelous development of power that even a
faith strong enough to move mountains
could not have hoped for such substance���or substitute for substance���
as this inscrutable, mysterious force
"weaving ill rough space" has conic to
bo, says Th? Now York Times.
The centenary of the beginning of
Faraday's experiments, of the days
when ho carried about a pocket magnet for contemplation in odd moments,
lias invited a review of the stupendous physical results of the discoveries of his time.    0
Tho religious faith which accompanied his scientific belief should not be
forgotten. In a lecture given by him
thirty years later, when he bad become a recognized master in his field
of science, he said:
"It would be improper hen
upon    this    subject    furthei
claim an absolute distinction between
religious and ordinary belief.    I shall
be reproached  villi the weakness  of
refusing to apply to those menial operations which  '.  think good in  respect
of high .things to the very highest."X- I
- am    content    to    bear the .reproach.
-.   .;' . -I have never seen anything in;
compatible between', those   .things", .of
man which can-be known by. Uie.spirii
of man which is wHhhi-.hirii and those
higher '. things   concerning-, his -futuro,
-which he 'cannot, know, by t hat, spirit."
- Faraday;-was7.t 6-bo- sunVliieralist',
when -iteamo to tlie words of .Scripture,
f,but.'this, didi riot -interfere with Iiis ac-
��� .c'ep.ting thef evidence of sciencc-as-far
-���as.it 'led him.'. 7 H(7had- Vdisentangled
���'science:���i.mL.rgligion;" "' '   -   ���"..,'-
'', .Tlie. century which has: so fully
--justified ' -Faraday's   'scientific' .'faith,.
��� which'_w:fs-.is,:a grain of,mustard.seed
'in comparison with "thc'stupendous re-f
suit, in a. unified ,])hysical. world.- will
not make -its-highest contribution io
I lie - next", century iff it "dims: life rreli-
gious.-ffait.h - which7douia.r_.ds ir.moral I
unity. , f ' ��� -'���-'-"   .-.:.   "-
to enter
than  to
English    Church     Built    In    1300
Gorgeously Decorated
Strangers to Thaxtcd, a village in
ICssox, England, about 25 miles from
London, entering its glorious old
church for iho first lime, are startled,
not by its architecture, but by the color of ils decorations.
It Js doubtful if oven in Southern
Italy a church makes greater lise of
color.
Tha.xied Church is probably the finest parish church in England. Its pillars were built in the reign of Henry
III. Here, in the year J300, tho de-
votil heard Mass. Tradition says
that Catherine of Aragon presented
the font. The roof of carved Spanish
chestnut shows the badge of Catherine,
which was ilie pomegranate.
In "lho old stained-glass within, in
lhe amazing, extravagant gargoyles
without, ln every line of this wonderful building, is something to hold the
interest of all who find the most perfect expression of beamy in architecture.
Yet it is tlie modern decoration of
the church which gives the immediate challenge.
Ono of the altars' Is draped with
hand-woven silk in more colors than
Joseph's coat ever showed. There is
none of the austerity ..to which English eyes aro accustomed in Thaxtcd
Church.
The long stretch of .Madonna blue
which hangs above the altar of the
Lady Chapel is a sharp arresting contrast to the wiiite walls; lhe plain
strip of color is beautiful, and not
fatiguing to the eyes.
Elsewhere reds, greens, blues, yellows, pinks are used in banners, in
trimmings, in cloths, with an extravagance which suggests cuttings from a
patchwork "quilt. It is amazing to
find in a church built in the, chaste
splendor of the later perpendicular
style tiny edgings of silk worked with
flowers.
Ono side, of lho chancel i.s draped
with fragile muslin.
In one of the lofts of the church 1
saw ti womrn busy weaving, tind a
framed advertisement near the porch
tolls where hand-woven material may
be obtained . "
The vicar of Tha.ued is lhe . Rev.
Conrad Noel, whoso advanced Social-
isi.'yiews litive frequently brought- hrni
publicity:"- ��� .-   7   '    - ���-'"-"      "-"���    - '"- ���"
that Zam-Buk contains in most
compact form all the essentials
of a perfect ever-ready home
skin medicine. "~
This grand herbal preparation
is beautifully soothing for cuts,
burns, scalds, etc., or for chafed
and chapped skins. It removes
aii danger of germ-infection,
poisoning or inflammation, and
heals the most troublesome wound
or sore with remarkable ease.
ZAM-BUK is "A Surgery in a
Two-inch Box," useful for both
Accidents and Skin Disease. .
wmmammmmmnmmmmmtmmmmmmmmmmtmmm
Compass Does Not Point North
Many
One Cure For All Diseases
Problem of the Compass Offer
Complications
The magnetic compass has been
used for more ihan COO-years and today is more widely employed, than
ever before; by miners underground,
IJJ'.^explorors, travellers, hunters, trappers, prospectors, pioneers, timber
cruisers and others overland; by navigators on tiie seas; and by airmen
high above the earth. 'With this
small, delicate, restless instrument
thoy- are enabled I.o tell direction. Vet
contrary to popular belief the magnetic
compass does noi. point duo north, but
more or" less eastward or westward ot
it al different places. At Halifax it
points twenty-two degrees west ol
north, at Vancouver twenty-five degrees easi of north, while at. Fort
McPherson. on 1I10 Mackenzie River,
within the Arctic Circle, it poinis
forty-four degrees east of north.
Scientists slate that Ihis is because
the magnetic polos of the earth are
not situated at the geographical poles
as shown 011 our maps of the world.
The problem of the compass is slill
further complicated by the fact that it
changes its direction from year to
year. It marches to the westward for
many years, then turns backward and
marches to the eastward, then reverses again and marches to the westward, etc. Moreover, iis very confusing behaviour is, unite different in different places. . Whether this is caused by a.shifting of the magnetic poles,"
by ..changes wiiihn the "earth.itself, or
byf some'"influence"- of. thef. sun or"
planets, '-scientists - liave iioi' yet been
able to determine.1   "W "       ' -  -   '
m��"_.."ti "      '  ��. -���  "���.     '--    ������----'   -    .5... In-order tluir tho-compass  niav" ho
New Theory May .Start; Revolution .In   u7...i wi,i7 vr>H.._w' ' "'��� "''1)a"b  '"'V.?!?
  ----- 1 "��*�����' un.n.ielianee, theretore, ihe 9%.
Ilpw
Hiijf
- 'XZ--    .;'��� .'"An'Oversight'-.' _,...'���
"'.'���Lai-ly;-- (.visiting ."prison).:W\ud.
<5id 'you;.'come, lo.bef-piit .in.-he"n'
- .rood-man?  ,   ���:; 7:..;   '"'y'y'Xy "7V
'���'���-"""J/ni" uniuck'y"'.'.i"'declared th.e-'imfi'ri's-
'.ftned wood'a 1 coh o!Vender,- who' was in
a-confidential.mood.;-. "One'of niy.ous'--
.tomers didn't go blirid.'and he. identified me."    '   ��� V.V-
.... London-can boast pf 20f Woinch undertakers, -y.'hilp' CO womenfaiv^qualified-auctioneers.-.-V:     -f���'���.-���-.���' '-���
ETTEBINvv
EVERYWAY
After Taking Lydia.E; Pink-
Yarn's Vegetable. Compound
!_   Ingomar,* N_'.S.'rr-"J took your medicine for a rundown condition and inward
troubles.   I had pains in my right side,
eo bad at times that I could not walk
any distance:'-   I"'saw'about. Lydia E.
, Pinkham's Vegetable Compound in .the
.- ������ newspapers and have taken five bottles
-: "of it.    I am better in every way and
- you can use  my letter tb help other
:   women." ��� Mrs.  Alvita  M. Peery,
'_��� Ingqmar, N. S. =  - -   ',    -'.  '
V Nervous Breakdown Relieved
Toronto, Ontario."��� "It is pretty harci
. 'to explain your feelings  in  nervous
.; "troubles.    I felt low spirited,.had pains
iii my head and eyes, aiwayaerying, arid
dFd not want" to go anywhere.   I do
-f-knitting and fancy jvork, and' I would
:. get- irritable, after... a few minutes "of
, work.   I.have been in Canada five years
.   and have - been, this wayf ever since I
came. I am taking Lydia'E. Pinkham's
- Vegetable Compound and I sleep better
. and it seems to make me eat, and I must
say I am feeling more jolly.   I" have
great faith ih in your medicine because
of what it has done for my husband's
eister and she recommended it to'me."
���Mre. A. Smith, 10 Burleigh Avenue
Todmorden, Toronto, Ontario.
' All druggists sell this dependable medr {
iicine. and women suffering from these
troubles so common to tli*ir s&x ehould
give it a trial now.; --; 7  \        ���; W
Modern'Medicine
.'.What . is    disease;? -.''-Is'"il -possible
ihat: all diseases " are really -oneVahd
tliat one antidole might'be-discovered
to cure uveryVH?        - "-������   \ ���_ ��� ��� ���
'. That is the.".s.arilis'i�� theory of ^lr.
JZ V... It.f McJjonagb, i'Mt.C:S.,Vliscuss-'
ed-in. i.he W.prl'd Today by.3Ir. .if Jolm-
sion .Abraham,' the, famous surgeon.
Jlr. ...Tohnsien'Abraham believes" that
this.theory may be thefbpginning.'of'a,
new' creative, .ciisis.'.ln modern medi-f
cine.j;7 ".'-;'7'���'-':    -    7" 7 -  -:' "7
';" -"JJiseasp," -r'iie  -_wrRes;::-':if Mrfllc-
Dona'gb's thesis' be "accepied,.is 'sim:
ply a- snicessful attemiJl'.oii -the,"part,
of- ihe invading organism: lo-Vob "the
protective .particles;--iti. rhe.'."blooii  'of'
ilieir. free, eieci.riciiy:. and-: recovery
fr6nyjliseasc^is.'"a|lr(:versaL:oll"tliis.pror
'cess,  due. to   the pifoteciive, particles"
-finally gelling' llie ''upper liaiid of. the
invading" orgahism by recsipturiog .this
electricii-y.-,, ���-'-'���-   -    X,  .._.-���  '- -   ���
���f'"lt ���will.-ihus, be. seen thai  Uie"'idea
underlying iliis revolutioiiarv- dociriiie
is based, on  theelectron tlieo.ry-��� the
theory which lias, nl ready' altered/all
'modern   idi a��.-" of physics;' chemistry
and electricity..".'---'   7 V .-'���'. . .'   ���. :,:.,
In "Mr. McDonagh's .view,. the body-
posses'ses! a general.' protective   -sub-'
stance-which resists'-sen eraJJy. ./'The
basis of-curc would-be in eyery case of
organic.;.illness  the. strengthening  of
Uiisfsub3tan.ce'; and, givc.n certain poisonous conditions,  the 'antidote -most
suitable, for increasing the' condenser,
power, of the-protective' panicles;could'
be worked"out.by-chemists.- . .  V    "���
,'f This ��� antidote .would fii.e if-' cure-all.
rt- would .--put' j'ssnfprc'emenf's into ih��i
system;-to-fight the gernis of all 'dis-
t.'.asef���-London "Tit-Hits'.
ferent. countries.'bf ihe-world carry .out
magnetic, surveys' to ni'eitsurojts-exact
direction",-aiuif supply ��� ihe -information
to tlie'jiublic. ifi.jhe.foriii off magnetic
maps. _    Owing- lo.-'tlie coniinttal'shitt"-'
ing-or ."march", of ftlie coinpas.s, as -it
iis called, the" work- accomplished by a
magnetic survey  would -soori?"become
obsolete, unless proper'-correctIons~are
applied;: so'.thl'i ihar'c.hfis measured-at
.'Certain  points''and the work correct-;,
ed" accordingly fronr lime to lime.. 7 '
-   This f ���Jii'fpVmation  "is - particularly
valuable in such a lar&w.; new-.cpunfr-y.
as Canada-, -i;.nd;'it" i.s therefore";, interesting to note iliac one of.the largest
magnolic. surveys -in t.he,."worhr Is; being niade inf this country by the'Topographical-"'-Survey'   of Canada whose
iii.-ld-pii'i-ties-cbyer':.su"ch".wide areas on
their land .surveys'.     The cost .is; very
slight, -.because}these .measurements
take   '.but-' it    minute., or two.-and are
made during spare-moments - in., the
Ja rid survey's. ;7   ���. V  '  .77..   , V V" ���
,- The -magnliude.-o'f. iho' work,.accom-
plished- -siuce it .commenced-. in ISSO
is sh.'owir by the'fact lhat nearly 20,'-.
000 of iliose~mef_i.siirements have' been
inade..already and.. maps;. published,
shbw-ing    the   -results,  -for..-conipass.
users'.' ' -.-'-������-,������    -���-"     '���   "   f*"'   -'
How Manitoba Derived Its Name
Writers   Differ As To The~Origin  Of
This Euphonious Word
Manitoba is so euphonious a name
that its use was extended from the
lake fo which it was first applied fo
that of the province created 12th May,
1870.      Manitoba,  however,  was  not
the name by which the lake was first
known to white .men.     Its discover-
j-ers ancl expiorers were the La Veren
d'ryes, father and son, in 1738 and 1739.
The name applied by La Verendrye in
his   journal   for   17.18-39 is Lac des
Prairies  or, in English. Lake of the
Prairies.     Other   early   names   are
Prairie Lake, Meadow Lake, Lake of
ihe Meadows, also Assiniboine Lake in
various forms of the lerm the reference being to the Assiniboine Indians
who dwelt on ils shores.   On the map
accompanying Alexander  Mackenzie's
voyages, published in London In J S01
the lake is called Manitaubos.     Numerous other forms of the word Manitoba arc met with.     The name i.s explained in two ways.      The explanation   generally   accepted     derives    it
from Cree nianito-wapow or the Ojib-
way  nianiio-baw  meaning   the   strait
of the nianilo or spirit.     According to
this explanation  the name was first
applied to iia-island in ihe narrows,
ill. Y. Hind;'-of Toronto,'in his narrative of "The Canadian Ked l.rvor Exploring  Expedition   of JS57-8,"  says:
"The origin of this superstition in relation to Manitoba Island is due to the
sounds produced by iho waves as they.
beat upon tho beach at the foot of the
cliffs    near    its' northern   extremity.
During the night time when a gentle
breeze is blowing from ihe north, the
various  sounds  heard   on   the   island
are quite sullicicni: to strike awe into
the   minds    of   the superstitious Indians.'.'      This explanation is concurred in by Mr. ,T. I). Tyrrell, who writes
in tho report of the Geological Survey
for .1890 ihat the limestone in a beach
011  tho island  "is very  compact and
resonat and when    the    waves    boat
against  this   beach and   throw   iheso.
resounding pebbles  one  on  another;
the roaring sound will undoubtedly be
produced which has given rise lo the
superstition among the Indians
��*��fi�� Dre&arafibti wBicTBtl|aT.won..ffiexQfifi3etjee7bfi
layers /cattntry iiitdfet" the''jgrjtisICFlag-4be.'rcm'edyf
which hSBfOufihtf health'aad happiness to millions'
irfmecaffttv^cTroenin;every..partiof the. Eriipfre^
the. treatment1-'which & resorted fto everywhere-*
fo^jaUmefits. jsucj? as Sick ^Headache; Biliousness;
Indigestion and: te.onstipatton;^bften .considered,
/insignificant; yef. decidedly, in'convehicnt^ailments;
which hay0"tli6fr origin.in"a"dyspeptic condition ot
ktho [stofmacix andf ia' torpid action of tbe livers*
V/hy India Is Troubled
Economic    Conditions    Are    Causing
Most of the Unrest
There is no doubt 'as to the great
amount of uurest in India,    but   that
unrest has an economic as well as a
political basis, end a recent article in, _.   .��� ra ^ ^.    "^ ��"���
The -Hound Table points this out. The tained them from Sam Brown, a.lreas-
writer calls attention to the fact lhat! ure-seeker, who'is constantly search-
between 1872 and 1921 the population ing in this sea tor ancient spoil. One
of India increased from 200,162,360 to of Mr. Tretheway's souvenirs is an qr-
oionin   ion     -:.           ������ ���
Relics Of By-Gone Days
Brings-Home Old Chest of Spanish
Pirates From Southern Seas
Relics full of romance have been
brought from the Caribbean ' Sea to
Toronto by \V. W. Tretheway, souvenirs of his yachting cruise.    He ob-
31S.942,-ISO, or more than 50 per cent.,
and that the great difficulty Is to make
food production keep pace with tho
increase of population. Wages are
very low, farm wages being about six
cents a day in 1S00, and eighteen cents
a day in 1922, bufwith tho cost of living considerably increased India's millions are underfed and badly clothed
La Verendrye, as noted above, call-land housed.     Britain has been doing
ed The lake, Lake of the Prairie, and
there aro those who think that this is i hut the progress is slow.
what she could to increase production,
the meaning of the Indian name. Abbe
Dugas Is a strong supporter of ihe latter definition and in his book "Tho
Canadian West" published in Montreal
in J896 upholds this view. After
arguing on ihe point "of language hc
concludes: "The Indians who dwelt on
ihe shores of Luke Manitoba and.the
banks'of.the Asslniboit.e. at thc'.ii'nie
of its '"discovery., were'. Assinlboines
whose language resembles that' of the
Siou.v. -_:f There "wore tho:. tribes Mala:
ioba',- l-lic'.loba, Ti toba. . This,termination"" toba in their language .signifies "'prairie'.aiid mine, means, 'water;.'
Mine soia .means'-<ycllow.".'water,-' -mine1
applis,."" 'w'a'ier' town.'.'-, "Mine'."toba
meamV-water or lake of-the prairies.'-
The English successors lo the:French
Our missionaries iii India, over keen 10 recognize the'veal needs of.the people, are
now establishing mission agricultural
stations with the aim of giving India
belter cattle and better farms, so lhat
the people may not go perpetually hungry. Humanity and Christianity aro
very closely allied, - But ihe feeding'
of 300,000,000 of people i.s no" light
"task,-and the 'uplift of India demands
sanest -constructive Christian sfatcs-
mausliip..-. Changing the form of government would not solve liiis problem
af all���Christian Guardian.-
pronounced .'mine' fas-if *jny 'hi' and
hehcef'Mahiloba.--.' ..-V 7 f, '. -:"
The -above information is summarized 'in .the' 1Sth Report .of 'liie'.Ceo-
graphic-- Board ,of Canada recently
published whicli gives .the meaning uf
���many.Canadian.plac'e^names,- V
of
Finds An;ient Ashes
L'rns containing the-ashes of human beings believed'to have been cremated 2.C00 years- ago, have been ili's-
covereil' at Wendt-n, in the valley of
t.he'Weser, Germany. .
- .Dr. Jacob. Friesen, who made .the
find .of 137 graves, believes he has unearthed a cemetery of agriculturists
���who inhabited the AVeser district sev-
eriil. centuries-be'-ore Christ walked in-
Galilee. -
.",, He' Ought to Know-,--''-'.-':
VV.oii Jqok.7so pleased^ old' man.Vihc
-1'or.lune;���" t'o.llor .', must ��� have, 'predicted
something good.''   -���       .-"  ���-." .. 7 f
} f"You bet:/.,7 Sliu'fpredicted .'Vh.Vt.- 1
would' have-a financial., reverse./:'
.. "1,'don't. see--anyibing ' jovimis    in
".that/' ----'"''    - ' '" ' "'
"-Sou would if you knew anything
about my Hnancos. 1 tell you ihai if
they don't rcvefte pretty quick. I'll be
busted;" V    -
The Sest Proof
��� '1 can. speak from experience." said
Uie druggist.     "This is the best tonic |
���for nerves.     I take '"if.   myself,   sir;
j- $2.50 ,d. bo ttie/' f      ���-..".
"It's - done ..you    good, .anyway, if
Officia I" Intercourse'
'"Pop, what- is a diplomat?"     '-
"A diplomat,"-my" son, is "a gentleman who.can, tell-";*, liein such a manner- to-ah'other gentleman, who is- also
a" diplomat,  that -ihe;secon'd- gentleman -is compelled "to '.pretend that, he
really, believes, "the first gentleman) al-
��though' he. knows that, the- first- gentle?
nian is. a ll'ar,-who   knows   that   the'
second gentleman does  "not   bolfrve
"liim." " ' -
' "--��� '-"Scored Oil the. Lawyer .:���-,
A. yojing. docior.-Vvas summoned as
a. witness in uVasejlvit depended 7>n
technical " .evidence. - - -The' opposing
counsel was',-inclined to be'-sarcastic
nt the idea of i.o young a doctor l.'eiag
"called/ ,  .y':\ ': ���
��� "Vou are i'amiliar."-lie "said, "with'
���the'sympidnis-'of -cohcus'sion- "of    'he
brain.;'. . f V'-'-   -;y'y. ~'X.X-��� 7:    :X :.
"V"es,"'sai(I Llie, (loctor.. '.���...'
-'���Then if Mr."Smith and..myself coir
lid'ed. and hanged our- heads together,
should-'we   gel - concussion-, of   tho
brain?'���'��� v".'-. .     ' '������..}��� -   ,. ���_ '7' '   f
.' "Mr. Smith- tjiiglii^'-'sjaid the doctor.
Few Foreigners Iri Australia
Population.-' Shows 98'-.Per.'Cent.-.
x'y:, . -British Extraction ���_���
- Some interestijig figures are disclos-;
e.d ih the - latest- .Australian census.
Tliey. shoiv- that .the 'Commonwealth
hiiK.a.tqiaS popuiai.ion of 5.435,73-1.' and
that niore ..than OS '-psr'..cent-.--.are of
fBritish e'stractioii.^ - Of; the-iotal-.poi):
iii af ion ' SjHs_ per ".cent/: VverfillboriTrju
AuistraJhiv;" The remarkable homogeu-
eiiy of tlio".- Australian population .is
shown by" the, fact that - the--foreign
population consists'of only a few thousand- Japanese',- 15,000'fChiaofi.c-; fsfOOO
Italians-, 22,000 GemVans,.C.000 A"ni��ri-
c.ans and':3;000 Swedes'  " -    - ' - "f ���'���������-
natn hammered .steel chest of the pirate-period of 300 years ago, when buccaneers adventuring from the Spanish
Main look what they found and asked
no man's authority.
This, chest has heavy handles, an
excellent key-lock of fancy cut steel,'
and is hound with steel -bands back
and front. Deep notched catches at
the side assist its security. The rust
of the sea for three centuries has eaten ii through in places, hut il is easily
seen that it was a vary (serviceable
property. When found it was partly
full of Spanish gold ami silver coin
and short pieces of bullion. As it is
two feet high and Ihree .and a. half
long, it could easily contain a fortune.
Along with this is another smaller one
of iron. It is not nearly so ornamen-
lal as-lhe other, but probably has had
tjuite as interesting a history.
CONSTIPATED CHILDREN
'Constipation Is one of the most common ailments of .childhood, and the
child suffering from il positively cannot thrive. , To keep tho little-one
well (he, bowels must he kept regular
and the stomach sweet.' To do this
nothing can equal Baby's Own Tablets.
They, are a mild hut thorough laxative; are pleasant to take and can bo"
given to "1 lie new-born babe with per-,
feet..safety.-' Thousands of mothers
use no oTher .medicine.Tor" their "liltia
ones,but Baby's,Own Tablets. 'They
aro "sold .. by medicine dealers, or by
-mail .at. 25* cents 'a_}ioxf frp'n.i.iTho_T)r._:
'Willianis'^-'Merticiiifi-. Co.," Brockville,.
-Out;"-   '.'"--  V '���"--'      >":���'"���-'���'
^^^^i^^^^i^^f^fb:
j*.:.N.  V.    154?
you've the nerve.to ask-that price' for
it!.','..replied .the customer.". " ���'  .    .   ���
'7T.?'.e7. roi^.f'of Captain. Cook in ..the
"Pageant, of Empire/-* ���'[ it , AVembley,
England, Vwas' filled f by fa -direct
descendant .'of the; famous explored 7:,
information
The telephone girl in a New York
hotel answered a queer call over th^
riiouse exchange ih�� other morning
about II o'clock. . \Vlien she "plugged in", a man's--voice said: "Hello.
Is.ihis So-and-So-'IIou-l?", ��� .    .-..-���'. ���
".Why, nq," answered the girl,
is the Sach-and-Such Hotel." X"ff
"Oh, all,:};ight,".said the'man."
woke, up and didn't, know,
was.*'-- -.-'-'."'' V.v- ""': V v..--
Legacy .Left For Horse
Under the will of Thomas Wild��
Fawkner, of Macclesfield. Cheshire,
marine stoie dealer, ��1 a ��� week
is .sot .aside for., the maintenance of a
.horse.*';.', 7-. ,7.7.7 ..'���.?.' " f {-7
. So  Jong ' ara. the- horse-lives, Mr..
Fawkner's;fretihoid land    is..��� not[ ',tpjjtfsion, ' ihan -' so-called.
be sold,.but with tlie stab les-and build-   i?aiil:I"ri"edeVicli-Klclnei-.
ings thereon is'to l)e-^rinwrlfy.a: liome j    itfjs ever-my. ihough.t'.that the most
for-the. animal..        ;.-���;. .-       - iGotl-Tearing man .shonid. be the most
'   ;,-.���;- .  ..   x..--'    y- ������,'..   .7-' "��� blit'he-.man.���Thomas Carlyle.'
.Among some-Indian, tribes i.if-is im-    ,-       -'y-y-Xu���'-^���~^~���
proper ior -a moiherrln-Jaw 10-speak; to   : It'is agaihst.-the lawjo.hunt goril-
her 'daughter^ ���husband. ' la^-Jn,.the' Belgian Congo. "    X
{LITTLE  HELPS  FOR, J
-.[   -.'-,   THISfWEEK.w^ff:j;
A .nierrj'. heart rioeth .good like" u"medi-
}"'['[    "cine.���Prov. xvii.. _.'2,
' Jog on, jog 011 lhc foot-path -way,  ���;
-'   ���   And mei.rily hem llie'stile-a;...   f
A merry-he'ari goes til! the day,    '
Vour sail .fires in afmiie-af
._ : . -������ " f -". -'-'' -f-i>liake"_.p_i:-;ire.'"
..-Laughing cheerfulness- throws sunlight on (ill. the paths,of' life.'\ l'oov-
ishness covers V.'i!h:iis_��lark fog even
thef,'most, distant-' horizon. Sorrow
cau'aes inoro. abiserice of":mluiI and con-
h;\ ity.���.lean
Nigerian Ruler Sees -WW
���X'X. . First"'- Moving 'Picture
fAccompa'nied By. Favorite Wives Who '
;���'.'    -     Werei Closely Veiled" ���"-.
,..- The ICmir of Katsiua/who.go.verns'-a
district of" Nigeria iniiny- tiiues larger,
tliah".Kngiand,;-attended-a ..iioviiig. picture' shpw."tii��roiher p.islit in- i:oiidon,.
for.the llrsl tinie in his'life.  -'    '.,-..- . f
.The  TOmir   was   cnihtriiastlc. about,
the movies.-    He was "accompanied, -by
his l.wo-faVprite -wives., who remained-
.cloisely,veilut! throughout the'p'erform-
ane'e..- - Upon tlieir.arriyd.i at. tiio-thea-
tni tlio.-wives wore escorted-into (he
manager's odicf 10 wall until (he light
went down 1:0 "that they-should jiot be
seen by vulgar .eyes. "   "Xx \ - ������
Women   should   be   convinend "that,
men can't be.convinceii-by..scolding. ,,
: flelp For Babl^
^��lfc:'';' -ir SCOTT'S ���
���'���'���'-y '"Buirdsw/w i,.y.y _v
SUPPLEMENT TO THE LEDGE, GREENWOOD, B.C.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1924
Kettle River Assessment District
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE, that, on Monday the 3rd day of November, 1924, at the hour of n o'clock in the forenoon at the Provincial Police Court, Penticton, B.C., I shall offer for sale at public auction the Crown-granted mineral
claims hereinafter set out, of the persons in said list hereinafter set out, lor the delinquent taxes unpaid by the said
persons on the 30th day of June 1924, and for costs and' expenses, including the cost of advertising said 'Sale, if the total
amount due is not sooner paid. ''
The Collector will be pleased to receive any information respecting the following list, where the owner ia or
was a member ol the Allied Forces, and is entitled to the benefits of Section 151 of the "Taxation Act Amendment Act,
1922." -    ���     ..
Name of Owner
Name of Claim
Lot No.
Taxes      Penalty    Costs      Total
Gooding-, John 	
Sailor Con G M Co	
Smailes, Mrs Mary H	
Fontenoy Gold Mug- Co..
r_ W Shatford (Est)	
Steve Manjfott et al	
( Brodcrick, A T	
Mrs Helen K Evans	
McDougall, Mrs M L	
Powell, B W	
Hart, D	
McKa3', W A   ................
Mangott, Steve .	
L W Shatford (Est) 	
McCurrach, P H.....	
Manprott, Steve.....	
Harrison, E	
Black, A S ct al	
Lofstad, Ola  ..'	
Mang-ott, Steve	
Brodcrick, A T	
A Mcfraw (Est) 	
Maug-ott, Steve)	
Grant, James ;.���	
McCurrach, P II	
B W Powell et all .....
Grimason, G et al 	
L \V Shatford (Est)	
Waterloo Con M & M Co _	
Enterprise & Anchor Mines .
Wilson, W. C...	
D. Mclnnes et al	
Granby Con. MS &"P Co..,..
Lofstadt, Ola	
Forshaw, Robt	
Lofstadt, Ola	
New Pom.  Copper Co	
Paton, J N	
Butcher Boy G & CM Co...
li Mclnnes et al	
XewPoni. Copper Co	
H J Cole et al	
1) Mcluucsetal	
Lofstadt, Ola	
Forshaw, A^ncs	
New Dom. Copper Co	
Jackson, Andrew	
Mortimer EH	
Skylark  flc.r Co	
A M Whiteside el al	
I'reiidcrjrast, Nellie R	
Enterprise & Anchor M Ltd.
riiiffli Sutherland ..-	
U'miler, W 'V ....
Lofhitadt, Ola	
New Dom. Copper Co .....
Fremont Mini.if; Co ...........
Black, A. S	
HaI!e.tt,I 11	
Granby Con S M & V Co	
a u     t_   __   :(   (.    ((
Mulligan, J.,...	
Grant,v Con S M & 1> Co	
Madden, M F 	
MunroR, Jas L 	
Lofstadt, "Ota ,
Wilson, W C	
McDonald, Jerome 	
New Dom. Copper Co	
Laifrev Estate, et al	
Granby Con M S & P Co	
Hallett, I II....	
Granby Con M S & P -Co..'.".'.;
Jewel 1 Denora Mines Ltd	
Black,AS..	
Granby Con M S & P Co	
S. Emerson et al .....
Lofstadt, Ola ...... .;..=...,,,.,
. -= Larjroy Estate et al	
Garland, Marv -,.' '., ."���,
Hunter. W T.f.'.....-;......:-....
' Mclnnes, Dotal "....'	
��� Forshaw. Robert.../..: -...',
��� -Granby Con M S A P Co;..'.;',
- _. ' it 11   -a   :i   a ��    .< ,���
_ :_(-       >_,.   a   u   it 1;    n
L^Iulliiran.-Johii-.,.���.-rV;rT.:rTT.-.
New Dom'Copper .Co,."..'.-...;,
'  -    U .'       il '���   -   ��� H li
- CoJ"e8,H J .....V..,"...'..\;.:.f.7
it     'ti',l _.       ' -    -.
A M Whiteside ct-al.V.'-.'.'.".'.'.':':
- Elizabeth is Carcw,'e!al 7 .'... -.
Granby Con MS &��� P Co...:'..
- Lofst.-idti'Ola ';...;..;.".,.-   .;"   .-'
- McNul'ty,. Jas->.,;.":...'..-.'.'....;::..:..,
��� ' ii. . ti .-'���':;
' New. Dom.. Copper Co ..',...-_...-..'.:
. 'GraubjvCouf M S JS.'P Co.......
-Lofstad; Ola.'..;.-........,.-;..,.-,,
Granby Co ii M - S & P Co '.
Larjrey Estate et al;_.,,,	
'Jewell,I)enora Mines ,-.,
Lofstad;'01aet.al .....	
Black A S et al ....._....
Skylark Dev Co .........-..;'...
.New Dom' Copper Co ..,;,.._.._..,
Lofstad, Ola .'..:��� ...���..���
New Dom Copper'Co. ,.,...
D Mclnnes et al..:. .". ���.
- New Dom Copper  Cb-: ,',..���
Groves, F W...... ���'���...-.������,. ..,���.
. Granby Con M S A. P Co ...���,���.
��* -    i��. .   it    iV.ii *i       41  '   -
Hallett, I -H.���-.7...-.������ W..''.^'.'."!
Granby Coa M 8 4 1�� Co;.	
it -    ,i _;��_ 1, it -ti _ t.
It ii    -    li'  il    I      ii    . Ct~
Forubaw, Robert ,...........���;,.."..,
-. Rumberg-er, G ��� W ,~...,;.;-."..";.
Mclnnes, D..' ._.....'....'....i..
Farwel), E W...: ;........
Grattby Con M S A P Co ......
North up, H H ......;'......
New Dom Copper Co ;...,'....'.
Granby Con M S 4 P. Co.... ;'.-
-.ii--.    ii   -4, ,. ti  it   ii
..Almond, S R'..-..:....'.,_;	
Granby CouM S & P Co.,;....
ii-- -. ti. ii-iiti ii. 11
.. Vanjjlian, Ii-et al..........;."_:'.
Paulson,'J H'.:..__.-.....7.......
'Holm, J etal.:.._.............'-.
: Farweh, .E W. et ���= al.."...'. Zi:. .X.
.Fraser.JSC(Est)..';.' ...7...
��� Farwel'l.EW--.-..-;-......,.:.....
" Kemp, Jesse".;.'...._'..;.............
Granby Con M S &.P Co .....;
F. Richter)Est) .v.......���:...".:.-.
Vacher,.Cle_iienl....;..". ..'...-..-.���'
Granby Con M S &"P Co......'
_ Kemp, Jesse....".;;...: Z.Z.
Boyce,'.Annie M.'....'..,".	
Bank.of Montreal ���,...:..'..	
' Mclnnes, D ....................
Colby, S,.���....���.-.......,........���
Simpson, Mrs Grace A ........
���1 ii  . it     -1* _ . '
Granby Con M S AP Co .',
New Dora Copper Co -..
.Gulley, 7S_i.,'...-.������ ���������.��������._:.��.
il        _t   �� '.
Mdanea,.D ....................
Graaby'Con MS & P.Co._...-.
11 'il      il      1. ��l   ii     1%
New Dom Copper. Co ....... ....
- Bassett, 3 3 (Est)	
Vaeber. Cleateatet ai	
.... Albion ....;	
 Cariboo Frac - 	
 Duncan 	
 Fonlcnoy	
 Flora 	
....Gold Hill ..............
.... Gipsy Frac  _	
.... Hard Cash	
 Hardscrapple No 1 Frac.
 Horn Silver,	
.....International 	
 Kniifht Rambler	
 Last Chance 	
.... Manton Frac ''.	
 Monday ; '.	
 Osoyoos	
.....Old England  ,
.... Observatory   	
 O B	
 Powis 	
.:...p a	
....Rock Creek	
 Silver Crown	
 Shoo Fly ;
 Sunday	
 Silver Bell   	
 True Blue	
i Virginia  .	
.... Western Hill	
 Waterloo	
...Anchor	
...Arcadia ....;	
...Balsam Frac	
...Banner	
...Biff Ledge	
...Blue Jay	
...Bonnie Belle	
.. .Brooklyn ...:	
.. .Buckhoru	
...Butcher Boy	
....Cabot Frac	
...CO U	
...CO D ,
., .Columbus Frac	
.. .Cosmopolitan 	
. ..Crescent No Z	
...Crown Silver	
...CR &H	
...Clatawa. No 2 ,.
...Denver	
. ..Dominion	
 Emerald	
...Enterprise	
... Enterprise	
...E I'luribiis Uiium	
... E P U Frac ..v	
. ..Ems!.(Hi 11c ;...,
...Florence Frac ,
....Fremont...,. ;..
/..GAR	
,.. Garnclt	
...Gem Frac ..���	
...Gilt Edge....,	
... Gipsy .,
...Golden Eairlc	
.. .Gold Finch ���	
,. .Great Hesper 	
...Hidden Treasure	
...Hope No 2  .'.	
.. .Hamilton	
...Idaho............ :	
. ..Idaho '. ;	
. ..Ironsides Frac ���..���J...
...J. AC ���..���......;.....,
...J AT... :....���.
./'Jerry ........
... Johannesburg../.../....
...King-of the Hills'..,.....
. ..Lakeside Frac '..,..,���,.���
...Last Chance .; .-...-,...
...Laura..,.,- ,.-;..;.,:.	
...Mamont ,:.;���....'.{.'....'/./'
.'.'.Marjrrio........;.;...;.���.'...,
.-.-. Mayflower.'.......-...'.-..._..,
/.'.Mayflower Frac...........
/..McKinloy ../..;	
...Monte Carlo-...'..:....',.'._..
...Monte Cristo-Frac....";..
,, .-Monte Cristo",.,.;...'.......'.,
--.-Monte Grande T.:;..���~'...
.'. .Montezuma ..:.,.:....i..
.,; Morrison ;-....;. ....'.
.. .Mystic .......-..."..../..
'- -Nellie Cotton ...,'.	
'Vno 2..	
--��� Noii...���.��� ;;_.���.. V..
[ [ _N.rl37;..;..;.;/..���,......,���;
. Nonsuch	
fffPilot ./...'...... ;._.���..
;/. Pilot :Frac' .'.;	
...Rawhide ..:.-.;'..."./.."....;.���..
..-..Rawhide FracV.-......'.;..'.
,   Republic.;.....;......;,.-:.;_.
.7 Rex. ......���.:........	
. ;..Rol)Crt Em'ntc'tt -.-...-../-..'
.'"Setii.-.-. :....;...;_....;;...
..fs. F. Frac	
.. 'Silver Cloud Frac '���...
[ ] .'Skylark'	
/-/Standard	
./.Starveout Frac../....."...
....Stemwinder..:	
.^Summit......././ /.,
....Sunset ...../��� .........__
.,..Surprise No. 3...,.,.,;	
....Tamarac .....-.......���....../.
....Tamarac Frac.-.,./	
....Tintic ,-.	
,.,.Tiptop	
....Tobouffsa .��� /...,,..;.
..i.Trianjfle Frac	
....Vernon F:ac'...;.'	
,;;WllHanteHa Frac........
,.:Aldle....:.../..:.'/..:..
.. .Alma:........ .7..'......
,..Alma Frac:..:....,.'.;.
...Alpha.-...,-. .-.,....���..-...
...Athelstan	
.-.Bank of England.."...
...Basik of England Fr.
.\Big Chief.. ......
.;Black Bear.:"../...,;..
..Black Bear-Fr.......
.'.Bryan ..i}:.:..'..'...;...
Z. .Bystander."_...........
. .Caledonia;..;.;.....;./.
..-Cantion Ball':...',-.;.......
.. Christina"..'..';_.."..:....
...Deadwood	
.. Dempster Frac	
f. Diamond;...-...-. ,
vEaule:......	
..Excelsior '...........���:.
..Fairplay Frac.........
.-.Pifi :.;.................'.
. .Florence:..;;...........
..Gold Dollar.. ,
..Hopewell	
. .Humphrey Davy........
..Iron Chief '....;........
..Iron Chief Frac	
..Ironclad Frac..........
..JackpotFrac .' ;-..
..JohaBnll 	
...Marinette	
. .Matabele Frac..........
.-.Midway .,
,.Sfoaarch.Frac_^..	
..Mocntain Rose.........
..May......;.,,... ;.
...New1 Jack of Spades ...
.New St Maaric��....	
.... 715s
 925
.... 2605
 752
.... 1086
.....1916
... 3106
... 2715
.... 3448
 1928
 1076
.... 3015
 751
.... 1978
 333S
 762
 658
.. 3252s
 828
.... 946
.... 2831
.... 2527
 442
.....1547
.... 3334
.... 2393s
 3011
.... 1087
 1085
..... 2814
 1021
 3135
.... 3296
 1847
  S26
.....1287
 880
 796
.... 1107
 1282
 1301
 928
 1532
 155
 1680
... 1257s
 7S9
 S33
 3651
 764
.... 2SS7
... S22s
....1022
 617
,..,. 3253
 3254
.. 10S1S
.....1470
, 1217
  S22
..... 2724
  5S3
,'..,.. 977
.... 1811
.......��2t
.'."". 820
,. 1887S
.... 1019-
.. .1S49S
.... 1106
......981
.... 1856
,.:. 2405
.."..'..823 ���
...: 3152
.'.. 2SS2 .-
;'/ 2072 '
,''f.f'2SS2 .
... 1023 -
..... 644 -
;.: 14.17 -.,
...... 879 -
....'303S -���
.....3295l
.:..';3302'
'....-'lffSs-
���...;. 976 .
:....338l" ���
...:,.9~5'X
.... 162a
..... 915 '
���.'.. '654 -
....2396 '
....H60 ..-
....258S.
,.:.I435 -
.. .1260. '-
......389 -���
:....'329" "
 3306
.;..:-892 -
 2813 .-'
 426
.:. 3300
;;..'.185"<
..::.2883 .
...:..832
.... '454S '
 763
...;..982
.....2944
......588
... 3157.
.....788-
....1776
,..'...783 .
:...uoo:-
;...M61'
... 1111
....3149
:..2Q82
,/ 3038
,:..W3'y
.'.".3239.'-'
.'-.1039/,
...2125
..'3174 '���
...1065
���.'12355.-'.
...'462S-
:..'.962
...1236-
...3556 '
..3241.
.'1038s.
...973 -
..J036
..1350
-:I038-
:.1186
..1326
:.:sn
...2609
..1328
.��� 1185s
.1 956s
..1762
..3294
..3032
, 1314s.
. 1315:7
.-.MOB
.3153
..2015
..2083
..2114
..1399
.. 582s
...79* .
.2217s
.2804
,.632 -
$ 25.50
1.26
26 00
12.00
18.00
26.00
1S.50
10.76
23.25
26.00
24.50
23.00
13.00
2.50
10.00
4.75
26.00
13.00
12.25
13.00
o 21.50
21.00
5-25
23.50
8.25
18.50
21.00
25.50
24.50
5.50
26.00
11.00
6.50
12.00
26.00
12.50
13.00
10.50
26.00
12.75
1.00-
25.00
;13.00
23.00
19.00
10.50
9.50
20.50
129.50
10.00
2C.00
26.00
6.50
8.00
21.09
2.00
26.00
2,50
11.75
13.00
13.00
2.25
12.50
S.25
' 2.75'
20.C0
-13.00
13.00
2.1.00
13,00
.   24.00
13.00
- 10.75'
- 13.00 .
��� -f 12.25  ���
21.00
. " 9.00
: - 11.00
f 17.25 ���
'-'- 30.25-
'. 7.75 -.
��� 23.00 '
.  -12.00-'
19.00
- . 24.50
.11.25 '
. -i3;oo
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"  ' 5,50".
.-"'22.50
'   17.50
.   11:75.-
' -13.09'.
- 19.00 "
.    26.00.
.���.5.50
.' 4.25'
44.00
.42.00'
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'   ,.25 -
5.25 -
-.  - 8.25-
""-11.25. ���
". 23.50'
'' 10,00
'  1:25'".'.
16.00
4.00' .
11.00
7.00
25,00
10.50
8.��
32.S9.
'.-   .75
'   3J78
.11.25
11.00
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:-- -��.7s
'2,007.
': 14.00
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:   3.35 f
il.��
. r 9.50     .
:���    7.50
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,10.50
.12.50
. 2.00-
"22.00 .
.'   -6:50 .
��� -10.00-
13.00 .-
7.00 '
12.75
1.50
.   13.00' ~
' IO.50
23.50
2.75
25.50-
.  13.53
19.00
-24f5Q  ,
7.25
13.00
8.25
tas
12.50
9.25
13.00
2.50
10,50
.25
16.50
12.00
25.S0
24.80
$2.55
.05
2.60
.48
1.80
2.60
1.55
.43
3.72
2.60
2.45
2.30
.52
.25
.40
.19
2.60
.52
.49
.52
2.15
2.10
.25
2.35
.33
1.85
2.10
'    2.55
2.45
.22
2.60
1.10
.65
.48
2.60
.50
.52
1.05
2.60
.51
.10
2.50
.52
2.30
1.90
.42
.95
2.05
4.44
1.00
2.60
2.60
.65
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2,10
.20
2,60
.25
''      .47
.52
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- .09
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2.10
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2.40 ..
.52
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- .49 '
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. .52
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2.25
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f. .22--
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1.60
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1.10
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1.05
2.35
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4.08
1.35
1.90
2.45
.79 .
.52-
.33
.45
1.25  .
���37
*2
.23
.43
.01
1.65
.43
Z55
2.45  '
$13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
.13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
' 13.75
13.75
13.75
13,75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13..75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75/
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
���" 13.75
13.7S
. 13.75
'-��� 13.75
13.75
13.75
. 13.75
13.75
13.75
- 13.75
- 13.75
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- 13.75 ���'
13.75
13.75-
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.   13.75
.13.75-
... 13.75
.'..13.75-'.
; 13.75 .
_ 13.75.
' -13.75
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13.75 "
- 13.75
- 13.75 '
~ri3,75"':
-.13.75
: 13,75 '
-13.75 .
13:75
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- 13.75-
' 13.75 .
13.75
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13.75
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" 13.75
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-13.75--
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' 13.75
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J3.75
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33.75   ���
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.B
13.73
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
��� 13.75 ;
33.73
13.75    .
Name of Owner
Name, of Claim
IvOtNo.       Taxes       Penalty     Costs      Total
$41.80
15.05
42.35
. 26.23
33.55
42.35
30.80
24.93
40,72
42.35
40.70
39.05
27.27
16.50
24.15
18.69
42.35
27.27
26.49
27.27
37.40
36.85
19.21
39.60
22.33
34.10
36.85
41.80
40.70
19.47
42.35
25.85
20.90
26.23
42.35
26.75
27.27
25.30
42.35
27.IU
14.85
41.25
27.27
39.05
34.65
24.67
24/.0
36.30
147.69
24.75
42.35
42.35
20.90
22.55
36.S5
15.95
42,35
16.50
25,97
27.27
27.27
16.09
26.75
22.33
16.61 -
3S.75
27.27
27.27
.   36.85
- 27.27
40.15 -
'��� 27.):7
, 24.93.
,.  27.27 -
"   26.49 .
.'   36.85'
23.11  ;
:.25.19 -
.33.86-
.' 24.41
21.81  ���
-' .39.05 :
-"  '26.95
' . 34.65 ������������
. .40.70.
25.45
27.27 -���
..- 14.53 "
"19.73
19.47
"'   38.50 '
:'-33.00
-. 25.97
���   .27.27.,
- -'34.'6S
-42,35
'    19.47
" .38.17
63,03
60.79
������' 33.00.
' 14.01
19.21.
.-'22.33   '
25.4J".
. 39.60-
24.15
. 3S.0i"
31.35
18 IS
���- 25.85..
2L45
41.35
25.30
22.07 ���
26.75"
14.53
17.65-
25.45
25.19
14.01
.22.85
15.83
7'29.14   -
27.27-.
: .17.13 '.
25.19
-: 24.20 "
21.5.-,
14.27.-
. 24.67
26.75
15.83;,
' 37.95
30.51
24.15
37.27
21.03
27.01
15.49
��� i'7.27
25.30
'39.60
16.61
43,33
2S.60
34.65
40.70
Sl.29
27.27
22.33
25.45
27.50
23.37
27.27
16.50
24.67
14.01
- 31.90
26.23
4i_se
:-*).to
Goodeve, JH o'K	
Quebec-Boundary Mnp Co  Orften Boy ....
'Granby Con M S * P Co Pheasant	
Savage, A E Richmond	
Clement, Mrs E L  Shirley Frac...
Paulson, J M Standard	
Quebec-Boundary Mngr Co Strawberry	
Smith Curtis et al Thirty-seveu ..
Goodcre, J H Toney	
McKay, W M Uncle Sam.'....
Fraser, JS C (Est) Undeen	
Smith Curtis etal Victor	
Granby CouM S&P Co Yellow Jacket.
 1478
 176*
 854
 2232
 1013
  1027s
 :1765
 1335
 1907s
 3239
.......2138'
 13.36
 13.27
$ 18.50
11.50
11.0C.
24.50
2.25
10.50
13.00
26.90
17.50
26.00
19.50
26.00
11.75
$1.85
.46
.44
2.45
.36
.42
.52
260
1.73
.2.60
1.9B
2.60
.47
$13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
$ 34.10
25.71
26.1*
40.70
16.36
24.67
27.27
42.35
33.00
42.35
35.20
42.35
25.97
Dat��d at Penticton, B.C., this 10th day of October, 1924.
E. T. COPE,
Collector.
Canadian Rockies Lure Noted Artists
CAI3L
IJUMCSIUS
Noted artists, famous moving picture directors and
expert scenic photographers, like thousands of
tourists, have succumbed to the lure of the innumerable
beauties of Banff and the Canadian Pacific Rockies.
Artist3 in increasing numbers each year spend the summer on the trail in the mountains transferring these
"beauties to canvas. For seventeen years Carl Rungius,
celebrated painter of wild animals in their native haunts,
has been a regular visitor to Banff. Now he lives there
most of the year and has built his own bungalow and
studio.7 In 1921 Rungius won the $1,000 Altman.prize,
but,#being foreign born, was disqualified, whereupon the
National Academy of Design bought the painting for
$1,000 and it now. hangs in the Corcoran Art,Gallery,
.Washington." -     - .".-.     ,..   -
. .Belmore Browne, artist, author, explorer and conqueror
of Mt. McKinley, 20,800 feet, lives in hia'own bungalow-
studio in Banff the year round except when exhibiting
in New York,' He. arid Rungius both study the'moimt'ain
-goats, shcep,! deer and bear in .their wilderness-homes
and paint them and their majestic scenic backgrounds..
- Richard. M.Kimbel, landscape .painter, has spent'two
summers in Banffrand is paintingat Lake-O'Hara, near
Lake Louise, and last year W. Langdon Kihn lived a
month on the.Stoney Indian reservation making pastel
portraits of the.big chiefs, little papooses, squaws and
guides.    Leonard   M.   Davis,   who   paints   wonderful,
landscapes in Alaska and ti'�� Canadian Rockies with a-
palette knife, has joined the Banff art colony and expects;
to make his winter home in near-by Calgary.
. The lure of Canada's Switzerland drew John Singer.
Sergeant, R. A., to beautiful Lake O'Hara, in the heart
of the Great Divide, and with his easel planted in the.
white and pink heather of an-Alpine meadow 6,G0O feet
above sea level the world-renowned painter devoted ten "
days to painting this exquisite jade-green lake and the
towering mountains in which it is cupped.   Charles W.
Simpson, R. C."A.,'of Montreal; Oliver.Dennett Grover,
of-Chicago; Philip R. Goodwin, Edward Potthast antl
Albert Groll pf New. York and-many other painters of
note have.found inspiration in this scenic wonderland."'
As for those humbler artists, the tourists with cameras;
they are ."to be'..seen snapshotting, everywhere in. the-',
bungalciw-camps,-by the lakeside and along the. trails-
making.beautiful'.pictures- which"inspire'their envious ;
friends to visit. Banff, and do. likewise. - ";;   --W'    ..---���.���
The Miheral Province of Western Canada
TO END OF DECEMBER, 1923
Hm -pnxtuc'ed-7Minerals, m   follows:   Placer   Gold,    $76,962,203;   Lode.
Gold,.$113,352,655; Silver, 163,532,655; Lead $58,132,661; Copper, $179;046,608;
:Zinc,_7;$27s904V756;^ Coal andjCoke, *260,-.
968,113; Building Stone, Brick, Cemen��, eSc., 839,415,234, making  its Miri��r��)
Production to She end of 1923 show an -..="...
Aggregate Value of
for the Year Ending
$810*722,782 j 7 XX)
, 1923,$4!;304,3
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal, and the fees lower,
shan those of any other Province in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British
Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal fees.
Absolpte Tifcles are obtained by developing snch properties, the secarity
of which ia gaaranteed by Grown Grants.     W
Full information, together with Mining Reports and Maps, may be obtained
gratis by addressing���    - .
���:-:;;:-THETbOH. THE" MINISTER OF" MINES.
--:;:w:-w,"f;f7 7.'''f7/:"       v  VICTORIA. BrftisH Columbia.   - .. . /
TOE   WEDGE.-   GREENWOOD,   B.  0.
UNION MINERS
ii    HAVE RATIFIED
NEWAGREEME
Calgary.���Alberta union miners
have ratified, the new working agreement, according to an announcement
made by Win. Sherman, President ot
District 38, United Mine Workers of
America.
President Sherman declined 1.6 give
tho figures ofthe yote. Lethbridge,
DrumheUer Vrallcy and parts of the
-Edmonton Held went against the
"agreement, which passed throughout
tlio district by a very slim majority.
Secretary Robert-Peacock will compile
figures tomorrow.
The' new "agreement, wliich was
signed at Calgary by operators and
union ollicials of District 18, calls for
si reduction of $1.17 a day on contract
work, and"ouc-eighth (about 90.cents
���a day) for day workers
Indian Would Have
Representation In Senate
Montreal.���Senatorial representation   for   the. Indian tribes of.
Canada is a possibility, according -
to assurance which    Dr.    J.    H.
Jacobs, full-blooded Iroquois, says
has ben given to him by Premier,
King, Hon. Rodolplie Leiriieux and
.. others.    Dr. Jacobs, wlio is medi-   '
cal officer of Caughnawaga, says
.   that the tribes "are too scattered to
make representation in the Commons possible, and that their only
hope of representation is through
the Senate.
Excavation Reveals
Old Algonquin Grave
Montreal Workmen Find Indian Skeleton Of Great Age ���"""'���
Montreal.���While   digging   foundation of a new warehouse at Van Home
It contains j Avenue and Pratt Street in Outremont,
Australian Surgeons
Claim New Discovery
Believe Rigid Paralysis Can Be Cured
By Operation
��� Chicago.���An operation which is believed to offer a partial cure for rigid
paralysis .was performed here by. Dr.
J. G.-Huater, .professor of"" anatomy,
and Dr. N. D. Royle, orthopedic surgeon. Both men are attached to the
University of Australia. Dr. Hunter,
who is 27 years old, is reputed .to bo
the discoverer of the method, whereby
the operation is performed.
It was explained that the operation
is only effective in cases of rigid paralysis, whcie the patient suffers a
twisted or deformed limb which he is
unable to control. ,The surgeons sever from the spinal branch the nerves
that cause the rigidity of the muscles.
The limb is then loosened and can be
controlled only by actual thought. No
reflex action remains and Uie limb
must be.educated to function, as does
a baby's hand.
Settles Claim With Germany
a three-year contract clause, subject a laborer discovered the skeleton of an
to six months' notice to terminate it
by either side after March 31 next. _.
The strike has been in effect since
March 31 last, affecting 8,000 workers
in the district, which includes air Alberta and Eastern British Columbia.
Says New Zealand
/' /f".." -WiD Not.-Arbitrate
: Premier Massey Declares Japanese
Will Not Be Admitted
Wellington, N.Z.���Premier Massey,
in replying to a question by an opposition member in tho assembly, on the
success of Japan's efforts t'o alter the
League of Nations protocol oh aribitra-
tion and security, in connection with
submission to the league of disputes
arising from internal domestic._cpn-
siderations of the. various, nations, dfi_^
clared: "We are not going to arbitrate.
We simply say that thcy cannot come
here unless we give permission���
Lcague._of Nations! That is tho law
of our country, and we will stand by
it."
Indian brave which is believed to bo
more than a thousand years old.
The remains were only two feet beneath the surface, iri sitting position,
head between the knees according to
the funeral rites of the ancient Algonquin Indians.
In. the opinion of W. H. Atherton,
local historian, the finding of the bones
may prove a long considered theory
that the Indian village of Hochelaga
was on the Northwestern side of
Mount Royal and not _ on the river
front as is generally believed.
Local authorities declare the discovery is of universal importance and will
doubtless arouse much interest on
both sides of the Atlantic.
TROUBLE OVER
CROW'S NEST
RATE DECISION
Germany Wants To
Keep Zeppelin .Works
Agitation Has Increased For Revision
Of Treaty Arrangements
Berlin.���The successful completion
of tho flight to the United States of
the '/jfl-'i has increased the agitation
in Germany for a revision of the
treaty arrangements requiring the dismantling of the Zeppelin workshops
and hangars at Fried richshafen.
A commit leu of the German trade
and industry congress has adopted a
resolution expressing . the hope that
the works may not be destroyed but
retained "to contribute to the peaceful uniting of peoples and to ihe common task of bringing about- a revival
���of European and-universal prosperity."
Japs Warned Against
-x-    Printing False Reports
Propaganda In Mukden Against United
States Brings Protest
Mukden, Manchuria. ��� Propaganda
against the United States printed in
the Japanese press here, iu which it
is stated (hat United States citizens
had landed arms in China aud United
States' soldiers-were fighting in_ihe
Peking armips resisting tlio offensive'
of Gen. Chang Tso-Lin, Manchurian
leader, brought a personal protest'
from Capt. Norman Baldwin, oflicial
United States military observer here.
As a result the Japanese consui at
Mukden has. agreed to issue a warning to all Japanese papers here to "suppress false reports.
^X^'F^^a^^S^
v>,vj?> J
;T:W Xi^si, X - *'   -"1
.   ',}>iy-<    -Xs 7,,?        >; V;
" - z-  X Xr ^   '   <���
'���&.'," t~W(^
'*xX'iXi **       <$$&?
xk-Wx%
HON. RAOUL DANDURAND
Hon. Raoul Dandurand, minister
without portfolio in the Canadian
Government and Canada's senior representative at the League of Nations
Assembly this year, who completed
the adjustment of war claims between
the clearing hojises of Canada and
Germany. The settlement enables
Canada to close its war claims oflice
in Germany.
Will Let league Decide
On Irak Controversy!
London.���The foreign office announced that the failure of Great
Britain and Turkey to reach an
agreement on the Irak controversy, or bn the interpretation of
the resolution on the subject.
adopted September 30th by the
Council of the League of Nations,
had resulted in a decision to refer
the question back to the council
for a decision. The necessary
steps, it was ..fated, wero being
taken to inform the general secre-
ary of the league. In the mean-
ime, it is understood, neither side
vill advance its forces beyond the
ine now occupied.
N
;w Canadian Pacific Lines
Wembley Exhibition
Shows Gross Profit
Says
Ottawa.���Hon. George P. Graham,
minister of railways and acting, premier, declined to discuss the situation
that arises out of the judgment of the
railway commission, in the Crow's.
Nest rates case. "I have nothing to
say," he remarked.
lit government circles generally it
is admitted that the judgment creates
a.situation that is awkward and deli- (British Empire exhibition aclministra-"
cate.      The   Crow's  Nest - agreement'
Figures    Will    Amaze    Public
Chairman of Committee
London.���In toasting the exhibition
officials at the Lord Mayor's dinner
at the Mansion House in honor of the
Dominated By Evil Forces
"Duke of Devonshire Refers to Councils
Of thej^bor Jaoyewme.ntVWf:.
���7. ��� London.���The- Suke, of Devonshire,
.speaking -at Rochdale, declared .that
. dark, sinister and evil forces domitihtr
' ed .the councils of the Labor Govcrn-
ment.f which made-gestures fof the eri-
"emios-of/civilization.   "./-'-������'"       .:-,.-
��� .'��� With regard to. theHussian loan, the
Duke said-there had .-been., mysterious"
comings.' aml: goings', fa ml odd meetings
".had been -held iri various rooms and
...ofiices; and' in a very.short fiinic" the.
. country,   bc-wiidered, - suppressed   and
;>��� exasperated, had" found.out that, despite., all denials, a .treaty; had been ef-
' ffectoilV   -"'"-���-;'".;'���    -';     -.'   V"
Trade Agreement
Not Effective Yet
Australian Pact Is To Be Submitted
.To Parliament
Ottawa, Ont.���The. new trade agreement recently concluded between
Canada and Australia is not going into
operation for some time yet. It would
be .possible to bring it into effect by an
order-in-council-% proclamation -and it
was announced lecenfly that the Do"
minionGovernment. was_reaily_to .take
this action..;. The.present intimation,
however,'is "thai the treaty will-be effective only after.''submission to par-'
lianient- and . the. prospective delay' is.
undersflooil to be" in accord with' tlie
yiewof .tlie Australian" Government.!.
-. Two.Minutes' Silence,Nov. 11.
Otiawa,'Ont;���'J'he usual Arihia'tiee
Day' two-minute. silence ,will,be observed .on Tuesday, "November"!], at
eleven/o'clock ihrough'out the Uritish'
-.'Rnapirc.' This is, in addition t�� the
observance .of Armistice Day; and
Thanksgiving Day on Monday, Novein-.
ber 10, in Canada. "X.
������;.-Conference-On .'Reparations'- -
;   Paris-���A- conference of;all. foreign
.-ministers will be held in," Paris "at an
earlj- date fof decide ���' on the .distribution of paymentsfby Germany,-under
. the. Dawes reparation plan.,..
mmMMfM
went into operation at the scheduled
time, and the prairie provinces thus
secured what they maintain they are
entitled to, but when this happened,
discriminations and disparities were
created and gave rise to protests from
governments or public bodies in the
east as well as British Columbia in the
west. The railway commission now
intervenes aud seeks to remedy the
situation and remove the discrimination by the expedient of wiping out
lhat part of the agreement effective
last July, the part ihai relates to
commodity rates from the east to the
west. Grain and flour rates eastward
are not interfered wiih, but (lie board's
judgment means that ii. has the right
to do so.
Whether or not there is an appeals
to the Supreme Court, (he question
assuredly will come up.in parliament.
Undoubtedly thoie will be proposals
for a compromise, consisting of the
maintenance of the Crow's Nest rates
on grain and flour eastward, but reverting to the. old. rates westward, .or,
if not these exactly, at least to a scale
/which will be. uniform, and not discriminatory". . The situation will be
aggravated by" tho potential "political
capital that is involved in it. --,'_���//'- ";
���'Emphasis wjll be laid on thef fact
that while fhe agreement is with the'
C.P.R., the Canadian . National- .'.will-
need to follow suit andfbe the.'hion.
acutely affected of the two/ . Thus, if
will - bc-arguedT-public ownership-may
be -imperilled,,by- demands from' that
part'of.-lhe'country'whu're the"principle
of it is.most vigorously supporter.!' -.'\
tion and the overseas representatives
at which every ]>art of the Empire, was
represented, Eight.Hon. J. H. Thomas,
secretary for the colonies, iu replying
to assertions, that the government's
actions on certain matters.were tending towards'disintegration of empire,
pleaded," amid loud applause, that* the
Empire be not made the-by-play of
party politics. 'J'he colonial oflice
should be as free of party bins as the
foreign oflice.
When the figures for attendance and
cost of the administration of the Wembley sdiow were published, showing a
large gross profit, lhe people would be
.amazed at what the exhibition had
done, according .to the claim of Sir
James Stevenson,,, chairman of ihe
i.'n-'Hvnding committee of the exhibition;
"\Mio spoke for the ollicials of the big
fair.
While a decision had- not yet been
reached by the Dominions on lhe proposal to re-open the exhibition next
year, he was very hopeful ihat they
would agree to another run. .'
Extensions to Serve Tisdale, Wadena
,  and Melfort
Phe Canadian Pacific have added to
the system during the past two. years
���127 miles of new lines in the west.
These lines tap rich farming communities and include extensions for Cut-
knife to tin win, Naicam to Melfort,
Tuffnell to Wadena and Tisdale, Wy-
mark to Coderre, Mllden to McMorran,
Gunworlh to Matador, Consul to Climax and Burstall to Schuler.
The Tisdale-Wadena line connects
at Sheho and the Melfort-Naieam line
at Lanigaii. with the Yorkton-Saskatoon-Edmonton lines of the Canadian
Pacific, thus affording a new direct
route to Southern, Eastern and Paci
fie Coast points.
Regular passenger, train, service has
been established by the Company on
all these lines.
Industrial Disputes
During
205,634" Working Days - Lost
���'y . '[} --" .September- '- ���" .-.-..-
Ottawa.���There were, at some time,
during September, eight' induslYial'tllsr
fputes, involving'S;5'0J employees and"a
lime- Joss- or-20.ri,63-l- working days,.- as
compared' with 1(5 'disputes in", August
involring., 10,169 workers anil resulting'
In a time loss of 228,572 working day's* i.jh" to. a' real .oil producer
.-.'Reports-from-.the offices-of the.Km-
jiloynieiit Serrico of Canada show that
at;the. beginning of Soptomber'the percentage ofunemploym-mt among members of trade unions- kIoocI-nt C.5, as
compared with 5.4 at; the beginning
of. August,, ami 2.2 at-Use beginning, of
September oklast year.'- f'. '���"-'���    -.'-,,.'
-Big.. Flow of Gaaf From:.Oil 'Gusher'-
; Calgary.���itoyalile No." -twell, hear
Black' Diamond, iii the. .Turner valley
lipid,-, 40 miles .'southwest of Calgary,
bl;ewin^itha,tremendous.flow-,of7gas,j(lie-,-arn];
The-new transfer-plant will oit-upy
Build Big Elevator
Sask. Go-operative Elevator-.Co. To
-- Erect" Plant In Buffalo"
Regina".-���Plans for .the erection-of a
terminal transfer elevator at- Buffalo,
N.Y.-,- by- the Saskatchewan .Co-oiiora-'
tive Elevator Co., Ltd.,"-.were made p.ub-
lic'by F^^^i_ddell,''_Kenerai..nijLiitig.er..
. 'The elsvator ..will. have 7y capacity,
of .l,"300,0qb_'bushels'"and. will' be "built-
at. a cost''of approximately $800,000.
ltf-'is.-.ex'peclej-" that..the", plant,.will be
ready, for- operation by. Aug: l, 1925.;
.' fTlie. completion bf..tlie.-.Biiffalo plant
.will see ;thp forging- of the final .link
of. ft he organization.-rwhieli, will permit "the" shipinciit .of. grain direct'..froni
estimated at -19,000,000 "cubic feett
daily. -Thereis a small quantity- of-
lighf "billspraying out with the'big gas
Uow." .-'"'-The Northwest- Company, the
development- branch..of/ the Imperial
Qii, Limited,-wliich has been" .conduct-'
ing a deep., drilling test on the well,
is. fallowing. ��he gas to-flow on the1
cJiunce tliat the. .well will drill itself
. Canadian War/Graves ..'. -
-London.���Itam'say/. MacDonald :':lias
arranged, for-Majqr:G,eneral Sir -Fabian Ware," head of the imperial graves
.cbmmisslonvto"visit' Canada, aad make-
a tour" through the country with the
aid/of (be. imovies,f dealingf.witlv the
Canadian war graves, in 'France.:- ,_He
will leave-England :oari"y in'Nbvember,
visiting-Montreal, Torbiito, Ottawa and
���Winnipeg,., -'-and ..'probably. ���' will - go'
ib'rbugh to' thc:"Pacific coast;
w. jsr.  v. mi.
White Indians Going .To School .
Brockville, Oni���The white Indians,
native's "o.f Southern Panama, after,
spending the summer-at ilie .home ol
H. O. Marsh, their discoverer, near
here,- during which period tliey vrere
the subjects of extensive investigation
by scientists, have gone to Washington, where tliey Will, be placed in a
private school, preparatory to re-turning -to Paaanss.
��� Pension Scheme For:Teache��'s ���.
, Calgary.���Establishment' of fa teach--
ers? "-pension- schema in Alberia met
���with the definite approval of-the Oil*,
gary.Public .School Teachers' Alliance
at a general meeting-here- A resolution urging the adoption of the scheme
upon- the."executive, of the alliance was
adopted unanimously,--and. the Calgary
alliance, will "seek,the .co'7opera"t_ion.of
other locals in bringing it' into effect.- -
Healtfcy live
Healthy life
Your fiver���he&My c* dogged, actfva
or sluggish���makes all the difference
bstareena.vigorous,.
cheerful life and low
spirits and faii-
.ur& To sobdue
a stubborn
liver, over
cosae consti
pation,. dizziness, bilious-
_ ������>���, be&daclbe asd th*
Mues tlaare is nothing ms sasrtfe 90 good
as^sftl^tUnrmii. Pondy vegetable.
.12,acres,of, land.
FRANCE WOULD
DISMANTLE THE
ZEPPELINWORKS
Paris.���The French reaction to tlie
successful flight of the ZR-_! is a feeling ihat Germany should be called
upon immediately to dismantle the
Zeppelin works at Kriedrichshafen as
provided by the Treaty of Versailles.
'J'he French Government, however, is
understood i.o bo reluctant to place
the subject before the ambassadors'
council at litis moment, because im-
ineiiKo interest is aroused over the
arrival of the dirigible.
- The question whether Germany shall
be'allowed lo build any more Zeppelins as larjro as ihe '/Al-Z is within the
province of tho ambassadors' council
!o -decide. ' Tha council, with great
reluctance and after six months insistence by the United Stales ambassador, gave permission to build the 7.11-3,
ir'being understood by all the.governments represented on (ho council "that
this was an 'exception which;could-not
be taken in-future as a precedent: ,,
''��� ���AnibttKS'adorWlorrick, ...obtained'- the
consent of the ambassadors* council'to'
a"ship.of.70,p0.0/;cub'ic meters capacity;-
'J'he 'council, disregarding-tlie .collec-';
-live���negative-; opinion/.- of-' tho-inter?"-;
allied military high-commission, which
ruled' against; tlie. "request ��� because
military opinion was absolutely opposed, to-authorizing Germany to perfect
an-air fleet.-.- -When Mr. Herrick- took
the (juesuoii;' up wiih f iiis-. iiixliyidiiul
cplloagiji-s. on -lly. "ambasj-adpjs'fcotin-f
eilf .all' four goverrimenis;" British,
French, "Jialiau 'and'5- Belgian,' "denied
having'-ia'ken. the initiative in the :rcf
fusal and placed the responsibility on
the others. - .^,Iapan--,i)reserv.ed.."a"n-a��-
tiiiide" of .irrtorve.'-    '" "'
U.S.HASA
PEACE MESSAGE
FORJERMANY
Washington.'���The'.ZR-3'was declared by Secretary Wilbur, speaking in
behalf of the navy, to bo "a symbol of
peace and friendship between her
owners, and other nations." To further define her role, he said the ship
would be're-christened "Los Angeles"
when the government formally lakes
possession. ~-
Mr. Wilbur's announcement was
made in the course of n speech at a
luncheon to Dr. .Hugo Eckener, head
of the German Zeppelin Company,
and several executives of tlie air
cruiser during iheir visit to Washington. The party was received by
President CooJidge, who reiterated the
congratulations he had telegraphed on
the arrival of the ZR-3 at Lakehurst,'
and, after a-conference with the national advisory council for aeronautics,
the party returned to.Lakehurst to resume supervision of activities at the
field.     -
Announcing his selection of "Los
Angeles" as the future name of the
Shenandoah's consort. Secretary Wilbur, expressed the. hope it may not
only be a constant reminder of the
Angel's song, but also that on each
Christmas eve from her place in the
heavens the song may again be broadcast to the. world: "Peace, to men ot
good-will." The visit of ZR-3 was of
great significance, hc said, assuring
the German, officials that the flag
which 'would replace theirs on the
ship's forepeak would be that of a nation "honestly desiring.the prosperity
and happiness oT all the German people."
Later addressing the advisary council. Dr. Eckner predicted the "certain
development" of trans-oceanic transportation along the lines pioneered by
the ZR-3. In answer to questions, lie
said that type of ship was the logical
carrier for the new trade because of
the measure of comfort afforded, its
safety in all weather, and Hie ease
of infprovemem.s along necessary
lines.
Ex-Service Man
Greets General
Major-Gen. Trotter Grips Hands Witli
Old Comrade
Toronto.���While Prince of Wales'
party were proceeding along the Union
Station platform, Assistant Baggageman Jack Houghton slopped Major-
Gen. Trotter.     ..    .
"Excuse me, sir," said Houghton,
saluting-the general,' "I did not know
_wheiher I should speak to you or not.
I'm Jack" Houghton, who , served in
your company, in South Africa. 1 was
witli you. the day you lost your arm.""
"A'ever ��� be afraid or ashamed to
speak to an officer of the British army
any time, or place you mee. him," said-
the general, as they gripped hands as
only-old comrades' can.       . .   -   .
New/Era 1_i_^iisportationi /;. t W|jf(.," Z^
���;Rand;-Discpverei--Dies-a- Pauper   "~
- Mplianii.eVburg,- Soutlr Africa���George
.\\"alker,':(liscovererf of "tlie, richest, gold,
"reef "in.South Africa iri -1 ��85;-died-here
recently, a. pauper.-   .lie.had been sup-,
ported.for several years b'yilie/ chamber o.f mities' iu ,'fe.cpgniiion .o'f hi* .0is-'
c-overy."'-.  ������   :,.    -':.'���  _y   -;'...  ':  ,j
Arrival of. Dirigible ;Marks Beginning
',- .. ..'Of An-Economic Revolution ',"���-'-
-, Lakehurst,- ..\7T_--T_ie' arrival of .'the
ZR-3 opens'-a; new'crii inworhl'trans-.
porta tion knii may 'mark liiu beginning
of-., an. economic -.revolution.".' Captain
Anton Heinen, .-noted Zeppelin expert,
told the United Press-here:    W
"Within. 23 years aircraft will.be
used as commonly-as automobiles today.- The dirigible will prov��"ftl>e
strongest impulse the wdrld'has evei'
known for world-wide .brotherhood
.through' improving communications
between distant places."   ������ - -   -   ���
Escaped. .Leper, Visits -Washington
-' '��� Washington.���The men- on' duty . at
police headquarters .received af shock
when Willard Centileyer, escaped.leper from-, the" federal'-colony-at1 Can-
ville, Laf, walked in and.said he had
been commissioned by .the ISO inmates there to. come to Washington
and .protest against" conditions In the
colony.   ' He-was quarantined.
/Reported" That .Constable   I "a nV M a c"*
'.'���"Donald    Was-    Drowned "-.On.  -���-
.- ~August--18th , " ' ".. 7
VEd mon ton.���- Con s t'abl e Ian" "X."' .VI a <i-
Jionald, of 'the Royat Canadian-Mbiiiji-
ed rolice,, was drowned in ,the. Arctic
Ocean .on August IS; according to mail
received via- Sah .Francisco by" -Major'
James,Iliteltie; officer .commanding the
local division of the force.-. ..' -. -' .' '.
-1 Constfiblc MacDonald was ..on. board
the schooner Maid of/Orleans,, owned
and coniniamled by Captain Klengeh-
hei'S,..old-timerfof 'the furthest north.
The'constable's-death occurred while
the vessel Av.aV.off the inouth ofthe
Indian River, north of Herschel Island.
Much Coal In Arctic"
. Seattle���Discovery: of .vast ""depb&iti -
ot coal','withiii, thfc Arctic--Circle-ii
Alaska Is reported- by' Dr. Phillip.1
Smith," of ;Washingion', D.CVgeologis1.
"j)f"the: .United'f Slates .geological-'-sur
vey_, who has-just returned here. ...-.
MRS: ALBERT- BLUNT-
Crown Prlhct To Study
L6hdpn.~r-T.lie Crown Prince or Norway has entered Balliol College, Oxford, as ah nnder-graduate under conditions which compel, him to reside in
the usual students'.houses and restrict
bis reception of visitors to allotted
hours. His course will include political eeondroyr.d.YK.s. and international
-lav. '. -.       V..""'"7   f    f ���-   '-7s" ''
yy.  . Weckly'.Budget Cost  -";-;
-������..-"      - j-     .  -���-.-.,.     - ���---
f-Qi.ta.waf���Tne cost per week of-a-list"
of "29 staple foods for an average faai-'
ily. of five "in "Canada, according to figures published-in the current issue ot
the Labor-Gazette was $10,28 at the
beginning of September, as compared'
with $10.19 for August, $1'CU6 for Sep-"
tembtr. 1923, and $7.83 for September,
1811.
Boys Unearth Treasure
Winnipeg.���Gold coins, some of
them of ancient vintage, and jeweled,
ornaments, the whole worth, probably
$2,0(f0, were unearthed from a cache-
on the banks of the Red River by boys
playing on.the river bank. h��re. Tbe'ir
ownership-is unknown.:-..'-'-
7 :iili)NE YJ^QUKbE ?;'
5?he Kidney*: ara" the   Bldod': Filte'ts-
. WheR They TVeftken and Stop Up,
.,- -Tho System Beeomes Overloaded ' .
.     ..Witli TTrJcAcid.
Toronto.;Ont.���"'I-1aa Highly-_i
lend Dr.; tierce's Aiiisric tsuti-uric
ij-ecoo .
��ae��d Dr.; Kerce's Ai.iisric (auti-nric-aci'd}.-'
Tabiets' to all  tho^e, who suffer i;V' any
vray with  th*ir liid-neys" oi- bladder.-.
.Anuric is by'far-the best medicine of the
kind I  have   erer takes.    _Mj--' tW'16?-*
xrere congested r.ud inflamed, my back'
ached 'something awful, isy bladder-was
���weat and 1 sufferied from a scalding: aad
imrasngr sensation.-   I was almost dowa-
and.oot-^-bct, "thanks to-Doctor Pierce'* -
Aanrifi (kidney) Tablets I do not .suffer
any'iaore. ' Those who -suffer-as^1 did .will
fiad Ttti riefce's Amine Tablets just lh��
medicine they need.'���3Ir=. Albert Blsiif^
6 Ele-rfns' I'lace^       ., -' ';
- Astyonr nearest" dme^ifft for' Asfnils,.
fa tablet fona.' or send 10.cents .to T*oc\ar~:
Pierce> Laboratorr ^fn Ericjrelwnr; Ostl,
for trial" pacta^c.   TVritc Dr.- Pierce, Prer-L -
TBj.-slid=*   Hnttl,  BtiSalo, N�� V";, i��r i,-��
stcdicai z&v'iixii THE LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH COLUMBIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1924
THE LEDGE
-Js $2.00 a year strictly in advance, or
$2.50 when not paid for three months oy
more have passed. To Great Britain and
the United States $2.50, always ia advance.
C.
W. A. SMITH
Lessee
ADVERTISING RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner Notices $25.00
Coal and Oil Notices     7.00
Estray Notices 3.00
Cards of Thanks    1.00
Certificate of Improvement  12.50
(Where more  than one claim appears in notice, $5.00 for each ad-
ditional claim.)
Potato and Seed Show
The annual British Columbia
Potato Show antl Educational Seed
Exhibit will be held in Vancouver
November 27th to 29th inclusive,
under the direction of the Provincial Department of Agriculture,
working in co-operation with the
Vancouver Board of Trade and the
B. 0. Certified Seed Potato Growers
Association. Classes will be provided and prizes given similar to
those given in previous years.
Prize lists and entry forms are now
available. Those interested should
write to C. Tice, Chief Agronomist,
Department of Agriculture, Victoria, for particulars. Transportation
charges on single exhibits will be
paid as usual by the Department..
Midway Warbles
MrB. Joe Johnston
end visitor to town.
was a week-
Christian Valley and
East Fork Notes
Mr. "Warnock will soon have his
new house completed.
A. Lingren has moved into his
new seven room house.
Joe Phillip is talking of spending
the winter in the Valley.
Mr. Christian was branding and
dehorning cattle last week.
Frank Moline, of Rossland, was
up bunting and visiting in the valley. ,    , f-
There will be a party at the Valley school on the evening of Oct.
3tst. - ' ��� '
The residents of the Valley are
planning to erect a flag pole for the
school.
Frank Petterson and son Sten
was np visiting with Mr. and Mrs.,
A. Lindgren; -
C. Noren is home on a few days
visit. He is working in the.mineB
at Greenwood.
, .Miss Ester Noren-has' been very
sick but at present writing it is
thought she is a little better.
Fall crops are looking.very good
in the valley though there has been
some very- late seeding done.
Mr. Tanner lost his team of horses on the road from the Valley.
One died of colic at Deer Creek
and the other one died at Williams
Creek-from poison of-some-kind. -
H. A.'~ Tanner and his son,
-Francis have .moved back to Eock
Creek for the winter where they
will try and get work. Edward
Tanner came here a week previous;
Mr. De Latour has been helping
Mr. Able clear land on bis pre-emption. The new settlers have made
some very good improvements in
the Valley this summer. Now what
they want is -a bridge across the
Main river so that they can get
their cream to market.
. Joe Phil lipB waB down to West"
bridge, visiting. On the return, trip
he had a breakdown at Slate Creek
necessitating his walking the last
Jap.,"'- Mr. Phillips ia ia unusually
good spirits over, his-visit���cause or
-causes unknown^ though suspected
'JA mighty man's successful whirl. '"���".
Is often stopped by just one girl". .
'The Heart Raider-
}'���'��� A lawn fete ebowiijg. present day
domestic relations in." America is
one of the coiorfuL scenes in f'The.
Heart Raider," which will be
shown 7 at the Greenwood Theatre
on  Saturday,   Oct.-  25th.     Agnes
f-Ayrea..who stars infthe picture,
plays: the .part in thisfBcene of a
wife    of .1923   .being -vaccinated
. against: the divorce. germ. fv.The
husband, wearing snti- vamp armor,"
. and four deadly vamps in queer
-costumes are shown in this
sequence/ ;-
��� The.scepe is one of great interest.
;Tbe ides is to give moderns a suggestion of' what may happen to
their children in 1992. Mahlon
Hamilton, leading man, heads a
strong supporting cast which, includes    Charles    Buggies,   Marie
���Barke, Charles Riegal aad Frazer
"Ooalter. '-���}., '"):'
Sam  Bender  and   family  have
moved into the Mesker dwelling.
Chartrand   has   taken  a
to   log   for   McArthur's
Frank
contract
mill.
Mr. Sharp, C.P.R. operator at
Midway returned on Monday's
train from the coast.
C. H. Robinsou, Dominion Fishery Overseer, of Nelson, was in
town last week on oflicial business.
The
moved
Greenwood
reside.
Thompson   brothers    have
from   McArthur's  mill  to
intend
where they
to
The bird season closed in this
district on the 15th. Birds were
numerous and good sport was obtained.
A big crowd was in attendance
at the dance at Toroda Creek .last
Saturday evening. All report having had a good time.
The card party held in the old
school house last Friday evening
under the auspices of the U. F.
Womens local waB a great success.
In answer to an enquiry by two
young ladies, so far aa we know
the party mentioned has not equipped his auto with "balloon" tires
jet.
The Whist Club under the auspices of the Ladies Aid will hold a
whist drive on Friday, Oct. 31st.
Everybody come and have a good
time at the old school house.
Mr. and Mrs. Mesker and Mrs.
Doc. Griffin and daughter, Edith,
left for Spokane on Saturday
morning's train where they intend
to reside in future.
Mr. Romstead, Customs Officer
at Ferry, Wash., returned home
last Friday accompanied by Mrs.
Romstead. .They came through
from Dakota by auto.
Deer hunting has not started in
full Bwing yet. Very few bucks
have been killed so far. Hunters
complain of a scarcity of bucks,
but state the country is alive with
does. The members, of the Gun
Club should wake up.
. The sad news was received of
the death on Saturday of Mrs. S.
M. -Davison at the home of her
daughter, Mrs. '.Wm. Smith in
Grand Forks. ' The deceased lady
was well known in Midway having resided here a number of
yearsag'o. '
The hotel "De Bum" situated in
the jungles west of Midway has
been greatly patronized for the
past two weeks, guests arriving on
every train (freight trains). The
hotel is ap to date in every respect,
is fire proof and is of the collapsable
variety. It is lighted' throughout,
weather permitting, by moonshine
of the , non-intoxicating . variety.
Cooking utensils are supplied free
of charge > from the city garbage
dump nearby. The Kettle River
flows by the"back door where -the
guests can have their morning
bath.
Successful Sale of Work
sion.
The members of the W. A. wish
to thank the public for their generous support once more given then,
by means of which they have been
enabled to wipe off the remainder
of a loan from the Dioceee of $300
and will be able to effect further
repairs needed in the Church.
To wind up a successful afternoon's work an excellent Dance
was staged in the evening with the
Banff Orchestra supplying the
music. This was very well attended 'and much enjoyed by parties
from all over the district. The
Hall was very prettily decorated for
both events with evergreens, flags
aud lanternB and a very scrumptious supper was supplied by the
Ladies of the W. A.
DR.   A.   FRANCIS
Physician and Surgeon
Residence Phone 69
Greenwood
A Sale of Work by the Rock
Creek Women's Auxiliary was held
in Riverside Hall on 9th Oct. commencing at 2 p.m. in aid of the
Church Funds. Notwithstanding
the fact that unavoidable weather
conditions prevented a number of
people who had intended to come
to it from points up the Main river,
the.attendance-was good and the
financial results may ba said to
have exceeded expectations considering the difficulties.of the times
in. the district. ..The Stalls were
'.'manned" as follows: 7 Work
Stall and Notions���Mrs, Clark,
Mrs;. F7-E;. Glossop' .and -Mrs.:
Thorbara; Produce���Mrs; B. Gane
and Mrs, Q. P.. Harpur* Candy '���
Mra. Hamilton;- Bran ��� Pie and
junior .WJ A. Stall-VMembers of
the. Junior W. A..;.whilst a Shoot-;
ing Gallery with disappearing targets, was run .by. J. ;C.. Jacques.
Outside'the hall extracted further
"quarters", from7bpth. ladies."'and.
men who nad escaped from within
with any cash left in. their posseB-
Drink- - - regularly���
Special
Brew
ream
Send Your
BOOTS  and  SHOES
To
GEO. ARMSON,  Grand Forks",
The 20th Century Shoe Repairer
All work and material guaranteed.   We
pay postage one way.   Terms Cash.
S OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding- pre-emptions Is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department ; of
i.ands, Victoria, B.C, or to.any.Gov- ���.
eminent Agent
Records will be granted; .covering'
only land suitable for' agricultural-
purposes, and which ls not -timber-
land,., I.e.,. carrying .0 ver f 5,000 iboard -
feet per acre west of the Coast Range -
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that -
Range.
Applications for - pre-emptions are .
to  be addressed  to the Land  Commissioner of the Land Recording.Division, , in which the land applied .for-
-Is situated, and are made on printed-,
forms, copies of which ; can"'be- oh-
talned from the' Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years" and improvements- made
to value-of $10. per acre,'.including
clearing and cultivating- at'least.flve
acres, before a Ci'own Grant "can be
received. .
For more detailed ��� information see
the Bulletin "How" to " Pre-empt"
Land."   " - "._���    -:. -.   .
PURCHASE
Applications are received-for'pur-.
chase    of    vacant    and    unreserved -
Crown lands," not  being .tlmberland,:
for agricultural  purposes;   minimum
price of first-class (arablo) land Is $6_-
per acre/ ancl second-class (grazing) ,
-land  $2.50 per acre.    Further Information regarding  purchase, or lease
of Crown lands -Is given:in-Bulletin";:
No.  10, Land Series, "Purchase "and '
Lease of Crown Lands.'?
^Mlll.'-'factory, or Industrial'sites on '
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres, -
may be purchased or leased,, the conditions      Including       payment   .'of.-
stumpage. ;.-V
HOMESITE   LEASES        f
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding'20'
acres,  may  be  leased' as -homesltea,-
condltlonal   upon   a   dwelling   being
.erected in  the ftrat year, -Utla being.'
���obtainable  after  residence, and  im-. -'
provement  conditions~ are--fulfilled
and.land he* been surveyed..
LEASES V.   ;  7 "���
For grazing  and   Industrial-
poses area* not exceeding- 640
It's a food as well as a beverage ��� a-'tonic that feeds you and
helps you digest foods you usually find indigestible��� a beverage
'chat in itself contains abundance of easily assimilated nutriment.
Doctors prescribe it ��� because of its
scrupulous purity, its mildly stimulating effects and its marvellous bodybuilding powers.
you up
���4X Cream Stout is brewed and bottled
at British Columbia's most famous
brewhouse. It contains
best of hops and malt,
connoisseur.
only the very
brewed by a
Try it!    Sold at all
Government Vendors
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board
or by the Government of British Columbia.
.may b* leased
company.
by one' .person
pur--
acrss
or; a -
��� ./������"--. "-.GRAZING. V
Under th�� Graslng Aai the ProV-
fine* le divided into graslng.districts
and the.'ratige' administered ..under V
Grazing... Cominlsaioiier.  . " Annual
.grazing permits are Issued based on"
numbers ranged, priority being give;'.
"to. established owners:  Stock-ownors
' may -form   associations .; for'- runge.
management.; Fro*, or.partially .free,"
permit*  &r�� avail&bU   for    settlors;
camper*   and _tr*v��ll*r*,.-.up: to. ten'
���head:-"'. '." _ -'   '-.' '   ���'    .-���--.       -'.   .' -   .
The _blu�� cross means that
your- subscription, is due, and
that the editor, would.be pleased
to have more money.
jjesgeNi^
IN
MEAT MARKET
JOHN MEYER
Proprietor
GEST OFFICIAL
CANADIAN PACIFIC
LEO SQIXGWAY
Leo. Solloway, recently appointed
Asiatic Freight Agent .of the Canadian Pacific Railway.with :office.at'
Montreal and,supervision.over Ori-
. ental'.-and  Australasian, traflic via'
Pacific Ports.
- Bcrri'ln Vancouver in 1895, Mr.
Solloway. has the distinction how of,
being the .youngest'official in Canadian Pacific service, a distinction
which he has, won through fourteen
-'���' years' .service in the freight department of the - Company.    lie., com-
- merited work as stenographer in the
steamship department of.the General.
Freight office in-Vancouver in -1910,.
.and  remained in  that .department
until 1915 when he enlisted for.active..
��� service with the.72nd "Highlanders.
-. He returned from overseas in the Fall
of 1917  and was  attached to. the
. steamship export department in Van-.
couver until 1918 when hefwas loaned
"to the British Ministry of Shipping, .
f acting as assistant to the agent of the
Ministry at the- Pacific port.
Iri. Juris 1919, Mr. Solloway went.,
to. Montreal as chief clerk .to the.
Asiatic Freight Agent. .Two years
later he was appointed chief clerk to
the: General P'oreign Freight Agent,
and last. May appointed., as Acting
Asiatic Freight. Agent, which office
"has-been confirmed by promulgation.
.ThefConsolidated Mining;OmeltingfCo,
/).x'.r 7vof- Canada, Limited WW
X'- '���[ -'- Officer-Smelting- arid Refining" Department.- ;
V"   "-'    ���" V      VfTRAIL,; BRITISHCOLUMBIA ''.;}- 7)' :' .      X  }
, SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, LeM and Zinc Ores
: f-77Pfoduc<fr3~"of.7Gdld,~""Sil^
' 'T AD ANAC'' .BRAND
.it.iniri��ii����r)iHM[niMriiittiiiaiiii!iiHtniii��nuiinn��ni��ii��iiiiiiiiiii<iii!iiitiiiiiiiiiii��
DR. B. E GRIFFIN
V DENTIST
.Office above Chas. King's 683.es.'
Open'9.30 a.Bi. to 5 p.m.. 7
���-���fir
SPECIAL LIQUEUR
A. H.M, 20 YEARS
$4.75 Per
��� $5.25
K>,
er
Bottle
Bottle
This advertisement is not published or displayed by (he Liquor Control.
, "-. X-   Board or by"the Government of.British-Columbia"-.   .     .. '
M_K__I

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