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The Ledge Jun 22, 1911

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Array ^^  I    ,'     'M  "*���������<���������<,  WITH   WHICH   IS   INCORPORATED; THE   BOUNDARY   CREEK   TIMES.  Vol. " XVII.  GREENWOOD, B. C., THURSDAY, JUNE) 22, 1911  -We invite your inspectiou of"the following:  Dalton's Lemonade.'   -'   -    C. & B. Lemon Squash  :,   Raspberry,. Black ahd Red Currant Vinegar  Montscrat Lime Juice. . -    -     Welsh's Grape Juice  I Around Home I  FRESH FRUIT ARRIVING DAILY  THE STORE OF PLENTY]  a '    RUSSELL-LAW-CAULFIELD Co., Ltd., GREENWOOD, B. C  ffiEESSM  ANGLER'S COMPLETE OUTFIT  ^-: HAMMOCKS :���������   '. r���������    FROM $3.00 TO $7.50. -'_  ^^s^^ttM^ti^^^itmtiMaiMMtvBimiMmiMMViiMwmmiMMMMmmimmmiwmmsiti  BASE- -BALL. Supplies  10.85  SOO  -2.50  1.50  FREEZERS,   'White Mountain'  I". 6 quart, new,uwas $6.50 is $5.20  f-12' ,\ '" -old     ��������� 15.00  |-12    ���������   ;���������',-,-      ���������-' 8.00  l-'Wonder'6 qt, old,- 3.50  II 'Gem'    ' 4 ���������    ���������    3.00  REFRIGERATORS  ; .old; large ,, 10.00  "medium size    ,,, 16,00  LA'WN MOWERS  ��������� large, good order  8.00  ORGANS. ��������� 35.00  ��������� 50.00  GRAPIIOPI-IONES  Columbia    , '   ., 18.00  Disc ,, 25.00  20.00  35.00  10.00  18.00  PIANOS (4)      .   '���������    $125.00 up  See our line of .House Furnishings ���������  III  ���������jEjIs* L  A  Phone 16   Greenwood, B. C.  6J&^rt/'b%rts&ty%'1t/^W&/Q>>'&Q  The Best Ready-to-Wear ���������  ��������� jClothing in the City  .    .  FOR SPRING  Refrigerators.   IFIy-Rroof Mearbtfies,  Verandah Chairs.   Awning; Stripe.  And Others.5-   5:-;    Drop in and We Will "Show You.  O^M/GlJLLBY&Oo.,  ,;: ������/,-.;;; greenwood,> .b.. g.  OPPOSITE   THE   POST   OFFICE.  - -"-REMEMBER - -  YOTJrP.ROFIT ^E���������*,;  This is'worth sbmething to you  IT'S FREE       -SSv  9  W.   ELSO  L"   MERCBANT TAILOR.^  PHONE  THE CANADIAN BANK  V     QFl COMMERCE'  SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L, President     -  ��������� ; ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager  ��������� CAPITAL, - $10,000,000 REST, - $7,000,000  TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES  . Issued by The Canadian Bank of Commerce are the most convenient  form in which to carry money when travelling-.    They are negotiable  "everywhere, self-identifying-, and the exact amount payable in the prin-  4 cipal foreign countries is printed on the face of every cheque.    The  cheques are issued in denominations of  $10, $20, $50, $100 and. $200 - 23S.  and may be obtained on application at the Bank., ... -     -  In connection with its Travellers' Cheques The Canadian Bank of  Commerce has issued a booklet entitled "Information of Interest to those  , about to travel", which will be sent free to anyone applying for it.  SAVINGS  BANK  DEPARTMENT  J. T. BEATTIE, Manager.        -    . Greenwood Branch.  SPECIALS  PASTRY BAKED UAILY AHD  ALWAYS FRESH.  OGILVIE'S  ROYAL HOUSEHOLD FLOUR  49 pound sack, $2.00  OGILVIE'S ROLLED OATS  8 pound sack, 40 cents  COPPER STREET.  gmmmnimtflmmmmnmimmfflnfflmmmmmmmg  I Plumbing and Tinsmithing |  - sr I have opened a Plumbing and Tinsmith- =2  -'sr ing shop in connection with my Carpenter 3  sr shop, on Government street, Greenwood. The =~  ������ plumbing and tinsmithing department will be ~3  s~ under the charge of George Clerf, and orders ~s  cr are solicited from all parts of the district. 3  ���������I PH.������2NE H. H. McAETHUR I  iuiuiiiiiiiuiiiitiuiiiiuiiiiiiimiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiuuiuiiK  IS  LIKE  A  STREETCAR  III  Bt  1 II  WATCH OUT!  Something is uoing to happen,  and "Time" only will tell  the story.  YOU "WATCH"  OUR "TIME"      -  whenever you consult a timepiece bought here.  REAL TIMEKEEPERS  AT MINIMUM COST  are what everyone gets who  buys; a watch of us. Grand  stock to select from.  A. LOGAN & Co  GREENWOOD.  $10 buys a Graphophone, A. L.  White. '    "  Pull up the weeds and beautify  the town.  Rock Creek will be a busy spot  on July 1st.  The cherries arc  uow ripe in  the Kettle Valley.  The Mavor's horse got into the  6.00 P0l11]d on Tuesday.    .  12 00      Cap. Chappel is suffering from  a dislocated shoulder.  5 00 E. G, Warren returned from  Spokane on Saturday.  Miss Tillie Graham is spending  her holidays in Greenwood.  ���������Republic wauls a Sunday train  between that city and Marcus.  Rock- Creek will have a glorious celebration on Dominion Day.  Charles Bubar has sold his  livery in Midway to George Guise  For Rent���������Furnished house's,  piano's, sewing; machines. A. L.  White.  ��������� Be sure and turn your buzz  wagon towards Rock Creek on  the 1st.  About 100 carloads of fruit will  be shipped from Grand Forks  this fall.  Jack Coryell has recovered from  his long illness and is taking a  vacation.  Alex Stewart of Eholt, is in  the hospital with a severe attack  of pleurisy.  Otto Nelson died in the Phoenix  hospital last week from a tumor  on the brain;  - It will be three weeks before  Otto Hansen will be able to leave  the hospital.    \  Dominion Day will be the  greatest -day that Rock Creek  has had for 50 years.  Two ballasting trains are  workin'gn-P. the railway grade  between Midway"arirFRCk���������Qreek.  A fire caused considerable damage at the residence of constable  Kempston, in Phoenix, on Monday.  -P. T. McCallam^went.to Bull  Creek and deported tour Italians  who had smuggled themselves  into Canada.  H. W. Conway has sold his  interest in the Phoenix Pioneer  to Gilbert Kay and left for Spokane on Tuesday.  It was Davidson, not Armstrong, who made a high score  at the rifle range at the Mother  Lode two weeks ago.  While looking for horses along  Kerr creek Billy Wilson saw one  bear, three blue grouse- and four  coyote pups.    No lives were lost.  While working in a tie camp  west of Beverdell," C. Johnson  had both legs and his collar bone  broken. He is in the hospital at  Grand Forks.  The Swayne House has been  painted and renovated from keel  to crow's nest, and the genial  captain reports an abundance of  agreeable guests.  In Phoenix on Sunday Greenwood lost the ball game by a  score of 6 to 2. This seems to be  a standard score, one side or the  other, between these two teams.  The city officials should engage  a band of boys to pull up all the  noxious weeds within the city  limits. The wild mustard plant  is about due to spread its seed all  over the community.  The Fire Brigade has engaged  the Juvenile Bostouians to play  tu Greenwood on October 4 and S;  the Dixie Jubilee Singers on January, 4; and the Castle Square  Entertainers on February 5.  ; Val Haynes and Bill Richter  came to town last week with 125  head of cattle for P. Burns & Co.  The same firm has also imported  400 sheep from Ben Hart's ranch  at Nighthawk. "-  Billy Wallace, the tailor, seems  to have flown from the high alti-  which took the form  The club  appears to  )l a  fill  social,  a  gap  that has long been aparent in thc  social conditiou of the town and  is worthy of the patronage of all  British subjects. Mr. Loring  seems to be just 'the man for the  position of secretary and he will  be pleased to give any information to anyone wishing to join.  The Hon.-"Thomas Taylor  came into town' last Thursday  from Phoenix. He was accoin-,  panied by four members of the  legislature: Messrs. Jackson,  Miller, Wright and Schofield.  Two judges from Phoenix were  also" with the party. In the  morning, after J. H. James, had  flashed his kodak at the legislative aggregation, they left iu  two horseless 'vehicles for Rock  Creek. Taylor always enjoys a  visit to Greenwood, where his  lriends are legion.  CITY COUNCIL.  <8<4a<TD<JB<T������<S<T������-<J> -<-*<<J<Ti<������8  Western Float  $  The Council met on Monday  evening, three members being absent.  A letter was read from the Vancouver Exhibition association re-  exhibits. It. was referred to the  secretary" of. the Greenwood Farmer's institute. .  The following amounts were ordered to be paid: G.-Evans, $40:  B. C. Copper Co., S3'.25; R. W.  Halcrow, $12.15.  Mr. Jenks was present, and  stated that ho was cutting into  cordwood the dead standing and  falling timber", but no live timber,  and asked for permission to keep  hogs in the barn. The Mayor informed him that the matter would  be considered, and an answer given  at the next meeting of the council.  Council adjourned until July 3.  THE GREAT FORCE  Years'"'ago!*? Ledge was the  first paper to advorate^ .Gilding  of a mint in Canada, and wantiea  the ' Government   to - build_'_it_at  Nakusp or New Denver. ' The government finally decided to build the  mint,  but could not see its way  clear to take it away from Ottawa.  A recent letter from Ottawa has  tbe following:  The final approval at'London of  the new Canadian five and ten dollar gold pieces is expected shortly.  By autumn the new coinage will be  installed. They will bo in intrinsic value and size the same as the  American coins of like denomination and will probably be accepted  at par in tj?e United States, thus  proving a great convenience to the  Canadians who go across the border unprovided with American  money. Practically the only gold  in use in Canada at present are the  American gold pieces and the number of these in this country is surprisingly large. On December 31st  last the receiver-general for Canada  had no less than $GS,000,000 thus  showing the large demand there  is for a gold coinage in Canada.  Fort George already has a public  library. '  Houses to., rent aro scarce in  Cranbrook.  Bears are plentiful in tho Slocan  this summer.  Two new banks have recently  opened" in Duncan.  The Presbyterians will build a  church in Quesnel.  Two more automobiles have arrived in Cranbrook.  Paddy Martin died in Fernie last  week from heart failure.  Spinach is being shipped from  Kelowna to Vancouver.  At Keremeos G,000 tobacco  plants have been planted.  Many residents are being . built  along tlie lake, north of Kaslo.  R. W. Bowen has been appointed  acting chief of police in Fernie.  In B. C. there will be a good  crop of the late varities of apples. ]  The soil around Alberni is highly  suitable for the growing of tobacco.  The smallest penalty for any infringement of the Bush Fire Act is  $50. '  The pay-roll of the Crow's Nest  Pass Co., last Saturday was $10,-  000. ���������  During May the police court in  Prince. Rupert collected $97 in  fines.  McAulay Bros, are fitting up the  Thistle building in Silverton for an  hotel.  ���������Local grown strawberries were  on tbe market in Grand Forks last  week.  Neil Tattrie, and Ethel Burgess  were married "in New Denver last  week.  J. F. Robilliard, C.P.R. agent  at Trail has been transferred to  Kaslo.  Last month there were 26 cases  in the police court of North Vancouver.  ���������   In   East Kootenay the  C.P.R.  has plotted a   townsite near the  'JJuuTFte-  ������,   Ontario",   this week,  make  their home   in"  Five applicationsTiavtJtTeStra?  for wholesale   liquor " licenses   in  Blairmore.  This month a black bear weighing 500 pounds was killed in-East  Kootenay.  Recently up the Skeeiia river a  tree-fell across the steamer Opera"-  tor, .and caused ������2,000' worth of  damage. ,.    '" ��������� * - "  The C.P.R. is'paying 9.G cents a  ���������1,000 gallons for water in'Rossland,  and in other places from four to  peyen cents.  'At New Denver last week Car-,  penter creek got full, aud threaten-,  ed to cut a canal through the heart  of the Lucerne.  Croquet and lawn tennis grounds  have been laid out in Fort George.  There aro two banks in that section of tho north. ���������       '   .  There is a coal famine in Calgary. It will probably bo worse  next winter, if coal does not come  in from the north.  The unsanitary condition of some  of the hotels in Vancouver is appalling, and a menace to tho health  of the community.  At Kaleden in the Okanagan a  water system is being put in that  will  cost  $S0,000.    At that point-  fruit land is selling for $2S0.  A. M. Morrison of Coleman, was  married to Miss Jessie Allcock in  Newmarket,  They will  Coleman,  In   Fernie   Fred   Waylett   has  made an assignment for the benefit  of his creditors.    Too much coal  ���������  strike in  that town for .people  to  buy bon-bons.  In the Fraser valley, between  Tete Jaune and the Grand Canyon  there aro over 100 Equatters, although that portion of the'valley is  under absolute reserve.  Felix   Darraugh   died in Kamloops this month, and was buried"  at   Okanagan   Falls.    He   was   a  well-known miner, and worked in  Camp McKinney years ago.  A Slocan man'killed a chicken the  other day,   and  found four   gold  nuggets in her gizzard.   He was so  overjoyed that he paid for the New '  Deuver paper a year in advance.  It cost the editor of the South  Fort George Herald $15,000 for his  plant and office, all made out of  land notices. His last edition is  filled with land notices from the  Peace River district.  - Jim Hill has not bought the Al-  ade berta Central railway, and declares  "*  .r>"w','',~1^'-***"*������'������r������t^--B'>j������-^i-h ^ jj.-j���������  !   in   that he does no^-know, wherirrw;^  says the Fernie1 Free Press.    Perhaps Jim does not know that he  has a railroad near Princeton.  The owner   of the Wigen fruit  Steel bodied street-ears that will f ^arm near Creston makes as high  ECKSTEIN TO MINERS  KOOMS   TO   lEt  In the Swayne House, Silver  Street. Clean, private and comfortable rooms in a quiet locality  at reasonable rates. Hot and cold  baths free to guests.  If you want to know what Ferry  was like in tho boom days, send 10  cents to tho Ledge office for a copy  of Lowery'B Claim, of Dec. 1905.  If you want a bargain, in'old newspapers call at the editorial rooms of  The Ledge.  tude of Phoenix to fresher and  greener fields. Billy had a nice  way of getting orders for suits,  ���������and quite a number of people  could get out blue papers for him.  It is said that a tailor is only the  ninth part of a man, but in the  case of Wallace, that ratio seems  to be unduly inflated.  Jack Lucy, left town on Monday with $400. in his jeans and a  ticket for Vancouver. He intends  to go into the wilds of Cariboo  and grab a fortune from nature.  Jack has brains enough to be a  Patsy Clark or Jim Croniu, and  his friends iu Greenwood hope  that he will come back with a  pack-train load of gold, Jack  took a water wagon rolled up in  his blankets. .      ,  A large company was present  at the first meeting of the Overseas  club   on  Monday  evening  At a   meeting of   the   Miners'  Union on   Saturday last,   L.   P.  Eckstein, barrister of Fernie, delivered a short but interesting ad-  dress.    In  the course of   his remarks he touched on the Compensation Act and how it affected the  working man aud his family.    For  instance, if a man was working in  British Columbia and met with an  accident,  being disabled,  and his  wife and children were living in another province, they would receive  no compensation.    He also pointed  out the advisability of those sending money home, even as a present,  to make the letter read that it was  sent for the purpose of support,  otherwise,  in case of accident or  death they could not expect their  .relatives to receive any compensation.    In   concluding his remarks  ho said that he hoped ho had made  the matter clear to his hearers, and  that thoy would study the different  clauses of tho Act,   and   govern  themselves accordingly.��������� Phoenix  Pfoneer,  Thero are 40 Boy Scouts in Pon-  ticton. They already own threo  bugles and will soon havo a snare  drum. After that people who aro  not deaf will want to leave tho  town.  seat 43 people are to be used in  Vancouver.  " The first female stenographer has  arrived with a typewriter iu South  Fort George.  The Bank of Commerce is putting up a $20,000 building- in  Salmon Arm.  At Bear Lake Robert Mitchell  has started a hennery for raising  fancy poultry.  Pete Annance and others have  been fined at Hope, for cruelty to  pack animals.  The postmaster at Oroville,  Wash., has had his salary raised to  $1,400 a year.  In the Kaslo district 125 men  are building trails aud roads for  the government.  There is an unprecedented run  of spring salmon in the Skeena  river this month.  The local dealers in small fruits  at Armstrong,'find it impossible to  supply the demand.  A. E. Taylor, manager of the  BanK of Montreal at Enderby owns  his own tennis court.  In North Vancouver the Express is trying; the experiment of  running a daily paper.  This spring several now business  houses ahd residences havo been  built at Okanagari Falls.  Tobacco plants aro being planted,  at Kaslo, Silverton, and otlier  places in West Kootenay.  L.'C. Barnes bar sold his interest  in the Tulameen hotel, to James  Malone, .formerly of Nelson.  The Princeton Stftr says that  HughieCampbell has taken out-his  49th mining license in B. C.  The mayor and aldermam of  Rossland have decided not to donate their salaries to that city.  The Duke of Sutherland will reside all summer on his ranch1 at  Brooks, east of Calgary, Alberta.  Latham and Reuter havo bought  tho St. Pancras building in Kaslo,  and will run it as a first-class hotel.  .��������� A $50,000 brewery is being built  in Blairmore. The coal miners  are not striking against its inception.  W. W. Craig owns a gasoline  launch and transports his own  freight from Penticton to Okanagan  Falls.  . When Frank Abbey finishes his  work of taking tho census at Trout  Lake, ho will open a drug store in  Kaslo.  as $1,200 a year from an acre of  raspberries. His strawberries'are  famous wherever sold, and others  should take a few lessons from Mr.  Wigeu's methods.  -Writing about Premier MeBride  iu the London Chronicle, T. P.  O'Connor says that in Dick's  character is blended the strength  of the Ulster Orangeman, and the  genial softness of his Roman Catholic mother.  An Italian ' musician on the  verge of starvation recently sold to  a man in Vancouver a Graud  Amati violin for $25. The violin "  was made in 1GG0, and is worth  $4000. The Italian wept when he  parted with it, and so well he  might.  The Grand Forks Sun says that  the treatment of newspapeas   by-  municipalities in different sections '  of- the country  is   an   interesting  study.    Some cities pay the papers  for   advertising , their , resources: -  others charge them  a license for  performing the same service.  The V. V. & E. Ry. is still running no further west than Princeton, and there is no sign of laying  rails on tho completed grade to  Tulameen. Plenty of rails aro  quietly rusting in the yard at  Princeton. Somebody should drop  a line to Jim Hill about this sad  stato of affairs.  Up.tho Skeena river last month,  the Indians set fire to a surveyors  cabin and burned it to the ground  with all contents. The Indians in  that section" have little friendship  for white men, and are not in favor  of tbo building of the Grand Trunk  Pacific, but moro ou racial than  political grounds.  There are about 3,000 men working on the Grand Trunk Pacific between the Tete Jaune Cache, and  the railhead to the east. It is not  yet very lively at the Cache. One  hotel is in operation at that point.  Mica is used by the settlers near  tbe Cache in lieu of window glass.  In an interview with The News  H. M. Foster states that there wore  only four married men in Nelson  in 1S91. This is an erroneous  statement. During that year there  wore about  4.0 married   men"'in  Nelson, and of that number atloasb  fifteen wero living with their wives  in that city. The writer knows,  for during that year he practically  took a census of everything in  Nelson, except tho pianos ou Baker  street and the bottles in Jim Daw-  |80ii's collar.  . 'TflV-i  ', J^-iyj\  ' ;-"������������������  ?!'>?'\  /"- ��������� 'V'\-|  ��������� * *-^"^i  4s! I  m THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.  |   B. C. MINING NEWS   g  The Hope News says "that no  matter how alluring tbe prospects  may look iu Hope or on the trail,  there is no disguising the fact  that in Vancouver skepticism  prcyails regarding'the gold possibilities of the Hope-Steamboat  district." The free use of the  drill and dynamite will soon demonstrate the value of this new  excitement in the Cascade range.  Hot air and the rosy statements  of real estate boosters never make  a permanent mining camp.  The Hope Nugget says that the  Phoenix Smelting Co., has a force  of men to work on a group of  seven claims that the Phoenix  people own at Ladncr's Creek, 18  miles up the Coquihalla river.  Several prospectors from Por-  cupiuc, Ontario, have gone to tbe  Steamboat camp.  At Merritt the Nicola Valley  Coal Co., will install a 840,000  coal washing plant, and mine  tipple.  Work is being done ou the gold  strike recently made at the Green  Slide, a few miles south of Revelstoke. A 10 stamp mill will be  installed in a short time, the lead  is, 300 feet wide, and has been  traced for three miles. There  arc 14 claims located on this lead  divided into three groups. All  these groups will be developed  this year. In addition to its gold,  the ore in this camp carries considerable value in silver, and some  platinum.  a well known mining expert. Mr.  E. E. Armstrong, ot Barkerville,  visited the property, that interest  in the proposition became general. Mr. Armstrong has spent  several days examining the ,rock  and tracing the ledge He has a  theory in connection that it is a  combination of the Barkerville  ledge, where several rich quartz  discoveries have been reported of  late.  COUNTY COURT  A sitting of the County Court  was held in Greenwood Tuesday,  before His Honor, Judge J. It.  Brown.  Naturalization papers were granted to 13 aliens.  F. C. Buckless vs Fritz Orauberg.  This was au action for a broken  rig.    Settled out of court.  Spokane Drug Co. vs C. M.  Grouse, adjourned to July 10.  R. G. Sidley vs Georgo Guise,  was settled out of court.  The caso of Mike Rukas vs John  Anderson was dismissed, each to  pay his own costs.  A. D. Bloom field and Thomas  Henderson vs E. G. Cummings.  Judgement for plaintiffs. The  counter claim was dismissed without costs.  The appeal in the dog case of  W. C. H. Wilson vs F. W. Mc-  Laine was adjourned until July 10  owing to some of tho witnesses  having the measles.  Peter Turano and Steve Miller  will have a speedy trial before  Judge Brown ou Tuesday June 20.  FOUND YEARS AGO  I    BOUNDARY fflES    ������  The Granby mines resumed operations on Monday after being  shut down for about two weeks.  The Granby smelter at Grand  Forks received" a supply of eastern coke last week, and blew  iu six furnaces early this week.  A crew of eight men under the  iorcmanshipof E. Berryman went  to work at the McKinley this  week. They will sleep in tents  until permanent buildings are  erected.  Quartz at Fort George  To the west of Fort George  townsite, and only a mile from  its boundary, lies a huge body of  free-milling gold ore, pronounced  by au expert mining man to be  the largest body of ore he has  ever seen in British Columbia.  The first discoverers of the mineral were A. B. Clarke and Chas.  Whitineyer, who staked claims on  their discovery last fall, devoting  the winter to development work.  They sent several samples of the  ore to reputable assayers in the  United States and Canada, receiving assays showing gold  values from $8 to $200 per ton.  The samples were taken from  very near the surface of the ledge  but as the depth of the lead increases the higher assays were  obtained.  Considerable local interest has  attached to the discover}', but it  was not until a week ago, when  BASEBALL  Greenwood is becoming famous  for its baseball games, and last  Sunday a large and enthusiastic  crowd witnessed a game that certainly was leaguey, between Phoenix and the home team. The  game was one of the best; ever  played in British Columbia, Phoenix being beaten by a score of 0 to  2.  Not a tally was made until the  fifth innings when Phoenix scored  twice on errors���������a two-bagger and  two singles. This was the last  hit or score made by Phoenix for  Charlton tightened up, aud retired  the visitors ia one, two, three  order for tho balance of the game.  Greenwood made two runs each in  the fifth, seventh and eighth innings.  The Phoenix battery, Blair and  Mattis, were replaced in the eighth  bi^.jSiyiiUton_aud Lang, but it was  to\ate to saWC-t^ir bacon.  OV of the featureSktr^'e game  was \e> high order oi'ifeiair/g^wl  base Pruning made by\Binei-\ij.>'  Phoenix. Greenwood playe^i* almost faultless ball as jW score indicates. All the^J&oundary teams  are playing- high-class ball this  season, and are worthy of a hearty  support by the public.  The Lixe-Up  Phoenix Greenwood  Blair P Charlton  Mattis C Quinn  Mitchell 1B Gillis  Perkins 2 B McDonald  Patterson 3 B Clerf  Lang SS Folsome  Biuer C F Clarke  Curley R F Russell  Hajn-iVl'oii    ,.   L F. . .... .       Kind  Judging from ��������� the following  taken from the Hope Nugget gold  was found in the Steamboat camp  more than 50 years ago. The Nugget says:  "Thero is now living in lvaslo,  Mr. W.. McLaehlan, aged S2, who  was in Hopo in thc employ of the  Hudson's Bay Company in 1S5(>.  Though advanced in years he still  enjoys health and vigor and looks  after a small orchard and garden  of his own.  "Among his friends of early  days was one Alexander McLean,  a trapper, who often came to the  fort at Hope to sell his furs and  renew his supplies. On one occasion, about 1S5C, McLean told Mr.  McLaehlan that ho had found rock  containing free gold on a mountain  about '10 miles south From the fort  and near the Skagit River. He  gave Mr. McLaehlan a piece of thc  rock, which is still in tho hitter's  possession.  "Mr. McLaehlan has often remembered McLean's story of gold  but other interests held him, until  ho felt too old for a long trip into  the mountains. Last summer when  the news of Stevens and Green-  wait's discoveries spread round tho  province arid tho name of Steamboat Mountain became familiar, he  at once identified the location with  tho scene of McLean's find, and  his belief has been further strengthened bj' tlie descriptions of porphy-  rilic rock containing free gold.  There can be little doubt he was on  Steamboat, Lost Musket or Red  Mountain, perhaps the first white  prospector in that country."  GREENWOOD,   B. C.  The Really Best House in the Boundary,  Recently Remodeled and Strictly Up=to=  Date.     Restaurant in Connection.  ROY & BOYER  PROPRIETORS.  "Unequalled lor Domestic Use."  f>������������S90O������������������ffl.3������O������������������a������������9������������������������'5O������������������'������������������������ffl������������������������������������������>������������������������������������������  ;;.  For making quickly and! per*  fectly, delicious hot biscuits}  hot breads, cake and pastry  there is  no substitute for  THE BOOM IN LONDON  The coronation boom in London  has climbed to a dizzy height, and  the English people are all ready  for the excitement next Thursday.  A cable to the Province says:  The huge stands cover every  vacant inch arouud Parliament  Square, front every government  building and hide every [church,  even Westminster Abbey itself, so  tbat little more than tbe towers  and tbe tops of the' buttresses aro  visible from the street. All these  are complete from floors to roofs.  The elaborate annex to the Abbey  where the King and Queen will  robe and unrobe, is so skilfully  devised that it looks almost as  though it formed part of the venerable structure which Edward the  Confessor created eight centuries  ago.  MajesticWhitehall where Charles  lost his head, is gay as never before, with rows of tall white and  gold columns festooned with white  and red roses which rise from the  beautiful arches of Ontario and  New Zealand. The costumeless  condition of the allegorical figure  which Ontario presents at the top  of her arch should forever dispel  what remains of English misapprehensions regarding the severity of  Canada's climate.  In all 1,G50,000 cubic feet of  timber is now piled up into the  seats from which their majesties  will be cheered by their subjects  of every race and color, and every  fire brigade in London lives in  terror lest a chance match should  set London aflame aud destroy  pretty well every historic building  that the metropolis holds.  ANALYSIS OF WATER.  lias recently been thoroughly  renovated and re-furnished, and  is now the greatest health re-  sorL upon the continent.   Natural hot water in baths, 124 degrees of heat. A course of baths  at Halcyon  will cure nervous  and muscular diseases and eliminate rheumatism and metalic  poisons from the system.   The  water heals liver, kidney and  stomach complaints.   The rates  are $2 a day up; or $r2 weekly  up.   PosloiTice, express and telegraph offices in connection.  Chlorine         ' S.14  I,ime       8-1-57  Alkalies as Soda         S-91  ���������Sulphuretted Hydrogen     32.00  .    TO THE. PUBLIC  .It haying been circulated that all the stores of Greenwood will-be close'd every Wednesday afternoon- during the  summer months, I wish to give public notice that the Dry  Goods and Clothing House of C. P. Stork will hot be closed  at any time this summer only upon legal holidays. I do this  for the best interests of the public. ,- ;.  ��������� Last summer it was agreed by the merchants of Greenwood to close  every Wednesday afternoon, which was observed by C. F. Stork and P.  W. George, while in some of the other stores.there was a man waiting,  inside to turn the key to anyone who might wish'to purchase goods.  Great complaint was made by the people working at the mines and  smelter and particularly the farmers who came in to make purchases.'  The city needs all the business it can get, and I-will not be an instrument to prevent the farmer and laboring man from getting the accomodation they need whenever they wish. Many stores will not be closed  in Greenwood this "summer, on Wednesday afternoons, especially ��������� the  the Dry Goods Store of yours respectfully, C. F. STORK.  MANUFACTURING JEWELER, 'I  The Only Up-to-Date Optical iiri  CAii   U- T'  Department in the Interior. Nlil^U]7UD.lJ.  g William Boyd, Proprietor,  ������80  fiakyon, B. ft ������  PHOENIX, B. C.  Is opposite the Great Northern depot and is a delightful  haven for the weary traveler. Great veins of hob water;  run through the entire house, and bathrooms are always at the service of those in search of material  cleanliness. The dining room is an enemy to dyspepsia,  while tho artistic appointment of the liquid refreshment  makes the drinks go down like eating fruit in a flower  garden, The sample rooms are the largest in the monn-  tains and a pleasure to drummers with big trunks.  JAS. MARSHALL        -       -       PROPRIETOR  ARG������  TUNNEL  The Ordinary General Meeting of the Shareholders of the Argo Mining and Tunnel Company  Limited, (non-personal liability), of Greenwood,  British Columbia, will be held at the Company's  Offiice, in Greenwood, on the 24th day of June,  1911, at 8 p. m.  Dated this 18th day of May, 1911.  OLA LOFSTAD  President  A. S. BLACK  Secretary  CREAM  Sixty Years the Standard  Made from pure Grape  Cream of Tartar  No Alum-No Lime Phosphates  "I am entirely opposed to the use ol alum In  Baking Powders."���������Pro/. Chandler, Columbia Univ.  Read the LabeB  "Alum, sodium alnxn, basic aluminum sulphate,'  sulphate ol aluminum, all mean the same thing���������  namely, BURNT ALUM."-Kansas State Board of Health:  Living on Ozone.  Over in good old London some  people can p;iy S5,000 for a scat to  view the coronation, while others  are shy tho price of a meal. The  following poem touches up a phase  of life iu the world's greatest city:  ["The lad w;is taken ill in the gallery  of a music-hall, where, an attendant  stated, boys often faint because they  are half -starved."���������ITkom tiik kwokt  OK AN INQUUST.]  There isn't no dinner for father,  And mother she ain't had a bite,  The baby is white with starvation,  So we're off to the hall to night.  There's none of us had any breakfast,  Not a crumb  that   would gladden a  mouse;  So we've raked up our coppers together,  And we're off to   the gaff���������second  'ouse.  If there isn't a good shirt amongst us,  Nor soles to our boots, what's  the  odds?  Thank Gawd, we can still muster tuppence  To buy a front seat in the "gods."  The world is all dreadful around us'  For on. c we'll get out of the strife;  No matter if stomachs is empty.  'Brel���������give ua two penn'orth of life!  (F  LYNN CREEK DAIRY  ^  DELIVERED  To any part of the city or district  OFFICE at FRED B.HOLMES'  J.McD0NELL,Proprietor  ������f*sV*Mnr isssiy.1,^1 %r UM.*.  -���������WW '  NERVINE POWDERS.  _, For Headache.and Neuralgia.'  On������ fwdir ������i!l nlrot  lad I lr������ faritn will  ir. )������>������  II i<-) hi* ������ bJ tttittbb  II r* tn sWn.N. v  ;i(������*.������������.,������,������:i.  -., . LtT.r.pp.    Vj  |f )rpi tiAt IMS Manlpj.  ckiMrts UUiaf  thtitUOfc  HARMLESS BUT HELPFUL  No injurious drugs  If vour dealer docs not keep Iheni we will  mail you a box (iS powders)on receipt of 25c  J.  L.  MATHIEU  CO., Props.,  Sherbrooke  ^mmfmnfnmmmmmmmmmmmnmimmmmm!!^  Sr Send your money to the Coast                  s -���������  I INVEST AT HOME I  2~ The value of Orchard Land increases"               ^3  .������������: every Year                                     |~3  H You cannot lose if you buy        ||  ������= Kettle Valley Orchard Land        3  Off  ESTABLISHED 1817  Capital, all paid up, $ 14,400,000.   Rest, $ 12,000,000.  UNDIVIDED   PKOFITS,   8jS9Cl.789.il.    .       .  Hon. President: Lord Strathcona And Mount Rovai,, G. C. M. G.  President: R. B. Angus, Esq.  .Vice-President aud General Manager: Sir E. S. Clouston, Bart.  Branches in London, En?, {ffl^&*} New York, Chicago  Buy and Sell Sterling Exchange and Cable Transfers.    Grant Commercial and  Travellers' Credits, available in any part of the world.  SAVINGS; BANK DEPARTMENT ne���������ri^lftt  Greenwood Branch  - C. B. Winter, Mgr.  i ^rESTTr^ TEMPERANCE  is all right if shorn of humbuggery.  Too much water drinking is just  . as injurious as too much liquor or  anything else.   .   ~ ~  OUR PURE WINES  AND LIQUORS  are medicinal if not abused. Ever}'  household should have & moderate  supply of pure wines or liquors" in  the closet for emergency���������either  unexpected visitors or sudden illness, when a drop of pure liquor  in time may forestall all necessity  for drugs.  L" Greenwood Eiquor Company, Importers, Greenwood, B. ft g  Apply at once to  I fll.llfKl.fcl  ii  I P. BURNS & GO. I  Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish, \  and Poultry.   Shops in nearly allthe  towns of  Boundary and" Kootenay.  t  7im\mmm\mimmmmmmmmm\\!L\K  A system of electric signalling  for mines to give alarm' of (ire or  other mishap operated by a hand  driven generator, has been perfect-  ! cd.  One Coming  They are always telling jokes  about the Irish, but here is one  that Tom Walsh neyer heard  before:  "Mr. Moriarity, who kept a  saloon met Mr. Driscoll, who was  a railway conductor.  Say Mr. Moriarity, "Whatdoes  it mean wheu you have a green  flag flying at the tail end of your  train, Mr. Driscoll?"  "It means that another one is  coming," was the answer.  The next day Mr. Moriarity  was seen pushing a baby-peratn-  bulator up tho street with two  green flags flying behind.  r  "���������*  The Greenwood Dairy  PURE MILK  and CREAM  A COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD *  ^mnmtmnmmminnmimmimmmmmnmmmmmK  | Greenwood to Phoenix Stage J  s~ Leaves Greenwood Daily at 3 p. m. 3  g Arrives Greenwood Daily at 1(J a. m. ~s  ST GREENWOOD OFFICE       -      L, L. MATTHEWS' CIGAR STORE 3  Tho Du Boers Company has donated $125,000 towardfl tho founding of a South African University.  A TRIAL SOLICITED  W. JENKS,  Prop.  ygf^pr  Kentucky produce more tobacco each year than any othor State  in the Union.  It is estimated that on an average  each punny in circulation changes  hands eleven times a week.  A New York school teacher,  whoso salary is $1,425 a year, test-  lies that ho owes $129,882.  | H.   M.   LAING,   PROPRIETOR ������  ^lililiiiiiliiiliiliiiiiiiilillliiaiilliiillliiiiililUiiiUillilUliai^  {VWWtfWVWWWWVWIVWWwWWlWHwWVl  Get your Razors Honed \  and your Baths at  Frawley9s  Barber . .  Shop, Greenwood,  5 Tl  The Best Arranged Cigar Factory  at tlie Coast, where^the  B.C., Old Sports  a   and the Famous (Clear Havanas)  IBEILLIANTES  arc turned out in larger quantities  than ever.  SOLD Alvlv OVER  PROVINCE  Made fcy WILBERG & WOLZ ������  0       New Westminster, B.O.      a  if  'SI  ������ /������^^<s^^  WITH   WHICH   IS   INCORPORATED   THE   BOUNDARY   CREEK   TIMES.  Vol. ' XVII.  GREENWOOD, B. C," THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1911  r, .".i.   '.'"i     "���������' * i  No. 50  We invite your inspection of the following:  Daltbn's Lemonade.    -    - ���������  C. & B. Lemon Squash  :   Raspberry, Black ahd Red Currant Vinegar  Montscrat Lime Juice.   -   ' -     Welsh's Grape Juice  FRESH FRUIT ARRIVING DAILY  FREEZERS,   'White Mountain'  6 quart, new,'.-was S6.SQ is .$5.20  10.85  ������00  2. SO  1.50  THE STORE OF PLENTY|  RUSSELL-LAW-CAULFIELD Co., Ltd., GREENWOOD, B. C.  ANGLER'S COMPLETE OUTFIT  e  ('  FROM $3.00 TO $7.50,  BASE '^.BALL. SUPPLIES  (-12. ,,      -old     ,, 15.00  ;'/12   ���������   ���������     ���������        ��������� ' 8.00 ,,  1 .'Wonder'6 ql, old, ?-50 ���������  .l.'Gem'      4 ,,    ,.    3.00 ���������  REFRIGERATORS  * .old', large       ',, 10.00',,  medium size     ,, 16100 ,,  LA'WN MOWERS ~,   ���������  ��������� large, good order   S.00,,  ORGANS-'     '    ��������� 35.00 ���������  \.';. i ������������������ so.oo ���������  gr'api-iophon'es  ^'Columbia    '     ., 18.00 ,,  'Disc ,, 25.00 ,.  PIA-NOS .(4) '���������    S12S. 00 up  . Sec our line of -House Furnishings ���������  I Around Home I  6.00  12 00  ' 5.00  20.00  35.00  10.00  18.00  Phone \6   Greenwood, B. C.  A^ify^rtr%faQ,'Wb/&%WQ/'b, -^O  Refrigerators,  ���������: Fly-Proof Me&fSafes..  Verandah Chairs.   AwninrStripe.  And Others. \  =:--.    Drop in and We Will Show You.  T;M;gxjlleit&oo.,  ;;:GREENW90D,   B.C.  )PPOSITE  THE   POST   OFFICE.  The Best Ready-to-Wear  '-.Clothing in the City  FOR SPRING  - ���������REMEMBER - -  YOUrPROFIT KpSSS^o-  This is worth sbmething- to you  '?&-:     IT'S PRiSE       "������Si  W.  EL.SON,  tr MERCHANT TAILOR.  PHONE  CAPITAL, - $10,000,000  TRAVELLERS'  THE CANADIAN BANK  OK COMMERCE  SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., L.L.D., D.C.L., President  ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager  REST, - $7,000,000  CHEQUES  , Issued by The Canadian Bank of Commerce are-tbe most convenient  -form in which to carry money when travelling.    They are negotiable  everywhere, self-identifying, and the" exact amount payable in the prin-  " cipal foreign countries is printed on the-face of every cheque.    The  cheques are issued in denominations of  $10, $20, $50, $100 and- $200 .- 23s-  ���������  and may be obtained on application at the Bank.  In connection with its Travellers' Cheques The Canadian Bank" of  Commerce has issued a booklet entitled "Information of I merest to those  about to travel", which will be sent free to anyone applying for it.  SAVINGS  BANK  DEPARTMENT  J. T. BEATTIE, Manager.        -    . Greenwood Branch.  1 Plumbing and Tinsmithing I  - B I have opened a Plumbing and Tinsmith- =s  s~ ing shop in connection with my Carpenter 3  s~ shop, on Government street, Greenwood. The 3  s~ plumbing and tinsmithing department will be ~:  s~ under the charge of George Clerf, and orders g  5~ are solicited from all parts of the district. =3  I PTE H.vHrMcAR|HUR 1  ^iiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiuiiiiiaiiiiiaiiuiiiiiiiiiiuniaiiaiiiiiiii^  SPECIALS  PASTRY BAKED DAILY AMD  .' ALWAYS FRESH. "  ' ' OGIIvVIE'S  ROYAL HOUSEHOLD FLOUR  49 pouud sack, #2.00  OGILVIE'S ROLLED OATS  8 pound sack, 40 cents  COPPER STREET.  WATCH OUT!  Something is going to happen,  and "Time" only will tell  the story.  YOU "WATCH"  OUR "TIME"  whenever you consult a timepiece bought here.  REAL TIMEKEEPERS  AT MINIMUM COST  are what everyone gets who  buys a watch of us. Grand  stock to select from.  A. LOGAN & Co  GREENWOOD.  IS LIKE  A  STREETCAR  1)  W  KOOMS   TO   IjKT  In the Swayne  House,   Silver  Street.   Clean, private and com  fortable rooms iu a quiet locality  at reasonable rates.    Hot and cold  baths free to guests.  If you want to know what Ferry  was like in tho boom days, send 10  cents to the Ledge oflico for a copy  of Lowery's Claim, of Dec. 1905,  If yoi! want a bargain in old newspapers call at the editorial rooms of  The Ledge.  $10 buys a Graphophoue, A. L.  -White.  Pull up the weeds and beautify  the towu. -  Rock Creek will be a busy spot  on July 1st.  The cherries arc uow ripe in  the Kettle Valley.   -  The Mavor's horse got into the  pound on Tuesday.    . .  Cap. Chappel is suffering from  a dislocated shoulder.  E. G. Warren returned from  Spokane on Saturday.  Miss Tillie Graham is spending  her holidays in Greenwood.  "Republic wants a Sunday train  between that city and Marcus.  Rock-Creek will have a glorious celebration on Dominion Day.  Charles Bubar has sold his  livery in Midway to George Guise  For Ren'i���������Furnished house's,  piano's, sewing machines. A. L.  White.  ��������� Be sure and tura your buzz  wagon towards Rock Creek on  the 1st.  About 100 carloads of fruit will  be shipped from Grand Forks  this fall.  Jack Corvell has recovered from  his long illness aud is taking a  vacation.  Alex Stewart of Eholt, .is in  the hospital with a severe attack  of pleurisy.  Otto Nelson died in the Phoenix  hospital last week from a .tumor  on the brain; . -���������  ��������� It will be "three weeks before  Otto Hansen will be able to leave  the hospital.   \ \ ���������' -  Dominion Day will' be the  greatest day that Rock Creek  has had for SO years. ;���������-'-  , Two ballasting'"trains ;are  working-- $x>. the railway 'grade  between Midway and1 R^ri.Creek.  A fire caused considerable damage at the residence of constable  Kempston, in Phoenix;- on Monday. -   ' .  P. T. McCallam^wenT to Bull  Creek and deported tour Italians  who had smuggled themselves  into Canada.'  H. W. Conway has sold his  interest in the Phoenix Pioneer  to Gilbert Kay and left for Spokane on Tuesday.  ' It was Davidson, not Armstrong, who made a high score  at the rifle range at the Mother  Lode two weeks ago.  While looking for horses along  Kerr creek Billy Wilson saw one  bear, three blue grouse- and four  coyote pups.   No lives were lost.  While working in a tie camp  west of Beverdell, C. Johnson  had both legsand his collar bone  broken. He is in the hospital at  Grand Forks.  The Swayne House has been  painted and renovated from keel  to crow's nest, and the genial  captain reports an abundance of  agreeable guests.  Iu Phoenix on Sunday Greenwood lost the ball game by a  score of 6 to 2. This seems to be  a standard score, one side or the  other, between these two teams.  The city officials should engage  a band of boys to pull up all the  noxious weeds within the city  limits. The wild mustard plant  is about due to spread its seed all  over the community.  The Fire Brigade has engaged  the Juvenile Bostonians to play  iu Greenwood on October 4 and 5;  the Dixie Jubilee Singers ou January 4; and the Castle Square  Eutertaiuers on February S.  Val Hayncs and Bill Richter  came to town last week with 125  head of cattle for P. Burns & Co.  Thc same firm has also imported  400 sheep from Ben Hart's ranch  at Nighthawk.  Billy Wallace, the tailor, seems  to have flown from the high altitude of Phoenix to fresher and  greener fields. Billy had a nice  way of getting orders for suits,  and quite a number of people  could get out blue papers for him.  It is said that a tailor is only the  ninth part of a man, but in the  case of Wallace, that ratio seems  to be unduly inflated.  Jack Lucy left town on Monday with $400. in his jeans and a  ticket for Vancouver. He intends  to go into the wilds of Cariboo  and grab a fortune from nature.  Jack has brains enough to be a  Patsy Clark or Jim Cronin, and  his friends in Greenwood hope  that he will come back with a  pack-train load of gold. Jack  took a water wagon rolled up in  his blankets.  A large company was present  at the first meeting of the Overseas  club  on  Monday  evening  which took the form of a social.  The club appears to /ill a gap  that has long been apaient in the  social cohditiou of the towu and  is worthy of*the patronage of all  British subjects. Mr. Coring  seems to be just the man for the  position of secretary and he will  be_ pleased to give any information to anyone wishing to join.  The Hon.-'Thomas Taylor  came "into town'last Thursday  from Phoenix.' He was accom-,  panied by four* members of the  legislature: Messrs. Jackson,  Miller, Wright and Schofield.  Two judges from Phoenix were  also with the party. In tbe  morning, after J. H. James, had  flashed his kodak at- the legislative aggregation, they left in  two horseless vehicles for Rock  Creek.' Taylor always enjoys a  visit to Greenwood, where his  triends are legion.  CITY COUNCIL.  recently  The Council met on Monday  evening, three members being absent.     ' "   -���������  A letter was read from the Vancouver Exhibition association re-  exhibits. It was referred to the  secretary' of- the Greenwood Farmer's Institute.-  ' The following amounts were ordered to be paid: G. Evans, 8-10:  B. C. Copper Co., S3.25;- E  Halcrow, $12.15.      '    ���������  Mr. Jenks was present,  stated that he was cutting  cordwood . the dead standing and  falling timber, but no live timber,  and asked- for permission to keep  hogs iu the barn. The Mayor informed him that the matter would  be considered, and an answer given  at the next meeting of the council.  -  Council adjourned until July "3.  W.  and  into  1 ^rB'<a<B*<j>g|  Western Float 1  Fort George already has a public  library.  nouses to. rent aro scarce in  Cranbrook.  Bears are plentiful in thc Slocan  this summer,  Two new banks have  opened" in Duncan.  The Presbyterians will build a  church in Quesnel.  Two more automobiles have arrived iu Cranbrook.  Paddy Martin died in Fernie last  week from heart failure.  Spinach is being shipped from  Kelowna to Vancouver.  At- Keremeos 6,000 tobacco  plants have been planted.  Many residents are beihg .built  along the lake, north of Kaslo.  E. W. Bowen has been appointed  acting chief of police in Fernie.  In B. C. there will be a good  crop of the late varities of apples.  The soil around "Alberni is highly  suitable for .the growing of tobacco.  The smallest penalty for any. infringement of the Bush Fire Act is  $50.  The pay-roll of the Crow's West  Pass Co., last Saturday was $10i-  000. - ��������� ' '      '  During May the police "court in  Prince. Eupert -collected $97 in  fines.  McAulay. Bros, are fitting up the  Thistle building in Silverton 'for an  hotel.  Local grown strawberries were  on the market in Grand Forks last  week.  Neil Tattrie, and Ethel Burgess  were married'in New Denver last  week.  - J. F. Eobilliard, C.'P.E. agent  at Trail has been transferred to  Kaslo.   '  Last month there were 26 cases  in the police court of North Vancouver.  I     THE GREAT FORCE  Years ago ihe 'Ledge was- the      _     _   L _   ,  ,.   . t     , r     .   Ti   i   -n- In   East Kootenay the  C.P.E  hrst paper to advocated building | hag ^^ a   ^^ ^-^  of a mint in Canada, and wan tea  the _ Government to - build _ .it ...at  Nakusp or New Denver. IThe government finally decided to build the  mint, but could not see its way  clear to take it away from Ottawa.  A recent letter from Ottawa has  the following:  The final approval at'London of  the new Canadian five and ten dollar gold pieces is expected shortly.  By autumn the new coinage will be  installed. They will be iu intrinsic value and size the same as the  American coins of like denomination and will probably be accepted  at par in the United States, thus  proving a great convenience to the  Canadians who go across the border unprovided with American  money. Practically the only gold  in use in Canada at present are the  American gold pieces and the number of these in this country is surprisingly large. On December 31st  last the receiver-general for Canada  had no less than $6S,000,000 thus  showing the large demand there  is for a gold coinage in Canada.  Bull1-flyer.  '   Eecently up the Skeena river a'  tree fell across the steamer Opera'- -  tor,  and   caused $2,000 worth of  damage.       ' -,  The C.P.E. is paying/9.6 cents a  ,3,000 gallons for water in Rossland,  and in other places from four to  seven cents.        ,    ,  At New Denver last week Carpenter creek got full, and threaten-,  ed to cut a canal through the heart  of the Lucerne. '  Croquet and lawn tennis grounds  have been laid out in Fort George.  There are two banks in that 'section of tho north.  There is a   coal famine iu Cal-,,  gary.    It will probably be worse  next winter, if coal does not come-  in from the north.  The unsanitary condition of some  of the hotels in  Vancouver is appalling, and a menace to the health .  of the community.  At Kaleden in the Okanagan a'  water system is being put in that  will cost $80,000.    At that point  fruit land "is selling for $2S0.  A. M. Morrison of Coleman, was  married to Miss Jessie Allcock in  Newmarket,   Ontario",   this week'.  They   will   make their home   in-  Coleman,  In   Fernie .Fred   Waylett   has  made an assignment for the benefit -  of his creditors.    Too much coal ' ���������  strike in   that town for .people to  buy bon-bons. !  In the Fraser valley, between  Tete Jaune and the Grand Canyon  there are over 100 squatters, although that portion of the valley is  under absolute reserve.  Felix   Darraugh   died in Kamloops. this month, and was buried"  at   Okanagan   Falls.    Ho   was   a -  well-known miner, and worked in  Camp McKinney years ago.  A Slocan manfkilled a chicken the  other day,  and found four   gold  nuggets in her gizzard.   He was so  overjoyed that he paid for the New '  Denver paper a year in advance.  It cost the editor of the South  Fort George Herald $15,000 for his  plant and office, all made out of  land notices. His last edition is  filled with land notices from the  Peace Eiver district.  Jim Hill has not bought the Al-  Five applications foxve frt?<?fl.ttjnde I berta Central railway, and declares  ECKSTEIN TO MINERS  At a   meeting of   the   Miners'  Union  on   Saturday last,   L.   P.  Eckstein, barrister of Fernie, delivered a short but interesting address.    In  tho course of   his remarks he touched on the Compensation Act and how it all'ectcd the  working man aud his family.    For  instance, if a man was working in  British Columbia and met with an  accident,  being disabled,   and his  wife and children were living in another province, they would receive  no compensation.    He also pointed  out the advisability of those sending money home, oven as a present,  to make the letter read that it was  sent for the purpose of support,  otherwise,  in  case of accident or  death they could not expect their  aelatives to receivo any compensation.    Iu   concluding his remarks  he said that he hoped he had made  tho matter clear to his hearers, and  that they would study the different  clauses of tho Act,   and  govern  themselves accordingly.-���������Phoenix  Pf oncer,  Thero are -10 Boy Scouts in Penticton. Thoy already own three  bugles and will soon havo a snare  drum. After that people who are  not doaf will want to leave tho  town.  for wholesale   liquor" licenses   in  Blairmore. .   ';  This month a black bear weighing 500 pounds was killed in East  Kootenay., ���������  Steel bodied street-cars that will  seat -13 people are to be used in  Vancouver.  The first female stenographer has  arrived with a typewriter in South  Fort George.  The Bank of Commerce is putting up a $20,000 building" in  Salmon Arm.  At Bear Lake Robert Mitchell  has started a hennery for raising  fancy poultry.  Pete Aunance and others have  been lined at Hope, for cruelty to  pack animals.  The postmaster at Oroville,  Wash., has had his salary raised to  $1,-100 a year.  In the Kaslo district 125 men  are building trails and roads for  the government.  There is an unprecedented run  of spring salmon in the Skeena  river this month.  The local dealers in small fruits  at Armstrong, find it impossible toj  supply the demand.  A. E. Taylor, manager of the  BauK of Montreal at Enderby owns  his own tennis court.  Iu North Vancouver the Express is trying the experiment of  running a daily paper.  This spring several new business  houses and residences havo been  built at Okanagan Falls.  Tobacco plants are being planted  at Kaslo, Silverton, aud otlier  places in West Kootenay.  L. C. Barnes bar sold his interest  in the Tulameen hotel to, James  Malone, .formerly of Nelson.  -The Princeton Star says that  Hughie Campbell has taken out1 his  19th mining license in B. C.  Tho mayor and aldermam of  Eossland havo decided not to donate their salaries to that city.  The Duke of Sutherland will reside all summer on his ranch at  Brooks, east of Calgary, Alberta.  Latham and Eeuter have bought  the St. Pancras building in Kaslo,  and will ran it as a first-class hotel.  A $50,000 brewery is being built  in Blairmore. Tho coal miners  are not striking against its iucopt-  ion.  W. W. Craig owns a gasoline  launch and transports his own  freight from Peutictou to Okanagan  Falls.  . When Frank Abbey finishes his  work of taking tho census at Trout  Lake, ho will open a drug storo in  Kaslo.  that he docs not -know- where it is  says the Fernie' Free Press. Perhaps Jim does not know that he  has a railroad near Princeton. .  Tho owner of the Wigen fruit  farm near Creston makes as high  as $1,200 a year from an acre of  raspberries. His strawberries" aro  famous wherever sold, and others  should take a few lessons from Mr. -  Wigen's methods. " ' ~ --.  ���������Writing about Premier MeBride  iu the London Chronicle, T. P.  O'-Connor says that in Dick's  character is blended the strength  of the Ulster Orangeman, and the  genial softness of his Roman Cath- ���������  olio mother.  An Italian "musician on the  verge of starvation recently sold to  a man in Vancouver a Grand  Amati violin for $25. The violin  was made in 1660, and is worth  $-1000. The Ibaliau wept when he  parted with it, and so well he  mignt.  The Graud Forks Sun says that  the treatment of newspapeas by-  municipalities in different sections "  of- the country is an interesting  stud}-. Some cities pay the papers  for advertising their resources:  others charge them a license for  performing the same service.  The V. V. St E. Ey. is still running no further west than Princeton, and there is no sign of laying  rails ou the completed grade to  Tulameen. Plenty of rails aro  quietly rusting in the yard at  Princeton. Somebody should drop  a line to Jim Hill about this sad  state of affairs.  Up the Skeena river last month,  tho Indians set firo to a surveyors  cabin aud burned it .to the ground  with all contents. The Indians in  that section have little friendship  for white men, aud are not in favor  of the building of tho Grand Trunk  Pacific, but more on racial than  political grounds.  There are about 3,000 men working on the Graud Trunk Pacific between tho Tete Jaune Cache, and  the railhead to the east. Ib is not  yet very lively at the Cache. Ono  hotel is in operation at that point.  Mica is used by the settlers near  tho Cache in lieu of window glass.  In an interview with The News  H. M. Foster states that thore were  only four married men in Nelson  in   1891.    This is   an   erroneous^  statement.    During that year thero  wero about  4.0 married   mon   in  Nelson, and of that number at least  fifteen wero living with their wives,  in that city.   Tho writer knows,  for during that year he practically /'.'���������':  took a census   of  everything   in  Nelson, except the pianos on Baker  street and tho bottles in Jim Daw-  sou's collar.  'Wd  'r:  y  V       I    ,t , MjI  1  -' ' '���������'���������I r  TO \  I'.'    %'M  - \4\  ���������iJ .11  ! :/J������  Xi   ' I  ai:U4;n;^ag  ''v '-"'$���������,  IK'  '���������������������������m������?%'l THE   LEDGE,   GBEENV/OOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA'.  THE  LEDGE  Is located at Greenwood, B. C, and can be traced to many parts of  the earth. It, comes to the front every Thursday morning, and  believes that hell would close up if love ruled the world. It believes  in justice to everyone; from the man who mucks in the mine to the  king who sits ou the cushions of the throue. It believes that advertising is thc life of trade; and that oue of the noblest works of  ���������creation is the man who always pays the printer.  The Ledge is $2.00 a year in advance, or $2.50 when not so paid.  It is postage free to all parts of Canada, Mexico, Great Britain and  the county of Bruce. To the United States it is $2.50 a year, always  in advance.  R.  T.   LOWERY  EDITOR    AND    FINANCIER.  GREENWOOD,    JUNE   22,    1911.  A blue mark hero indicates that your Subscription has  become deceased, and that tho editor would once more  like to commune with your collateral.  VIVAT EEX!  You can see  in  London   today  something that has never been seen  in New York. ���������  If you can forget, nothing will  hurt you.         A>- easy job has ruined many a  good man.  Maxy a soul  has been saved by  good music.  Popularity  bosom friends.  and mediocrity are  Tiik newspapers������throughout tho  universe that persist in calling  Greenwood's leading excitement,  The Ledger should leave the r off  that word Ledger, and spell it  Ledge. Cent belt editors may be  excused, because the majority of  them do not know what Ledge  means, but when western editors  sin in this respect they ranst be  drunk, or exceedingly myopic.  fixed the riband and the George on  the left shoulder, fastened the star  of tho order to the left breast,  and handed his Royal Highness  the collar. Wo do not understand why the King did not put  the collar around the neck of the  Prince. With all duo deference to  royal etiquette we think that this  should have been done in order to  make the impressive ceremony  complete to tho eyes of-"all fortunate enough' to witness it.  During the investiture of the  Prince of Wales^the Prelate of tho  Order, the Bishop of Winchester,  pronounced tho following quaint  admonition:  "To honor God omnipotent and  in memorial of the Blessed Martyr  St. George, .tie about thy leg for  thy renown this noble garter.  Wear it as a symbol of the most  illustrious order, never to he forgotten or laid aside that thereby  thou mayst be admonished to be  courageous and, having undertaking any just war in which thou  shall be engaged, that thou mayst  stand firm valiantly, fight successfully and conquer."  All loyal British subjects should  ever pray, that our most noble  Prince will never lose that garter,  not even when he goes in swimming.  At ROC  JULY  CREEK  st, 1911  The Public is hereby notified that I have this  day sold to R. T. Lowery the plant, business and  good will of the Boundary Creek Times, Greenwood.  The Public is cautioned against paying any accounts  owing to the Boundary Creek Times for advertising,  job work or subscriptions, to any person or persons'  other than the said R. T. Lowery, or his authorized  agent.  Victoria, March 6th, 1911. DUNCAN ROS.S.     ������  PRIZES  PRIZES  Horse Racing :-:  Bucking Contest  Baseball Tournament  Automobile Races  f ������r ������sc ��������������������� jr tf xr ar jp #��������� jp.jr #��������� ar K* jr  Easy Transportation from Midway  Further particulars from I. CRAWFORD, Secretary  THE CALL OF GOLD  Written by H. N. Cosson for the Los  Ang-eles Mining Keview  LnTijE  progress is  contented people.  made by a  Bkoix with yourself, if you would  reform the world.  Beware of obtaining  thirst upon a pint income,  a  gallon  As a tonic laughing   beats   any  ��������� medicine advertised in the papers.  The census enumerator knows  that there i& ������ro.efab.tag m & u.wr!.<i.  Never mind trying to understand a woman. Just love her,  and you will quit winner.  He who has never made a mistake, has never produced anything  that was more than deuce high.  Owls and theologians are pretty  much alike. One blinks at the  light of day, aud the other at the  light of truth.  Long live the King, for a few  more coronations would break half  the tuft-hunters who have a craze  for front seats.  It is all day in Dawson this  week, and it would need to be, for  the postmaster has just received  900 sacks of delayed mail.  TiiEitE is a boom in London today, and many a poor soul will go  to bed in that city tonight soaked  to the upper tunnel in pale ale, and  with a kink in his neck.  And now the Presbyterians are  after the naughty Mormons with a  hot stick, and think they should be  driven off the earth, or reformed.  Like some of  the  old-timers we  read about in the bible the Mormons have a weakness for a plurality of wives, and an abundance  of children.    In the latter way the  Mormons might suit Eoosevelt, but  they must stick  to one wife   or  there name is   Dennis   with  the  Presbyterians.    We   like   to   see  war between the various religious  sects for it means more liberty for  the people.    Give dhe church the  cinch,   and  a   mantle of   misery,  stained    in    blood,    wcaid   soon  make this   beautiful   world   look  like a.cheap Gehenna on a hot day.  The   world   shpuld   nevsr   forget  Bruno, Seretus and the other old-  timers who   were roasted   at the  stake rather than give into the religious    insanity    of   their   day.  Talk about how the redskins tortured  the palefaces in  the early  days of America.    Why they were  not in it with those human devils  who ran the church in the Dark  Ages.    Too much prayer, and too  much so called religion drives people mad, and forces them to torture their fellow men for the glory  of God as they call it.  Turn to the  dark pages of history if you doubt  this assertion, and remember that  history repeats itself when the opportunity ripens.    The devil is not  dead, but sleeping.  When they are silent it is often  difficult to tell a bishop from a  butler. Each havo a lofty impassive appearance, and a pair of fat  calves encased iu strong stockings.  The'man with the rake-off is  with us from the cradle to the  grave. It costs money to get in,  go through, aud leave this world.  "From the time mother is our dairy,  until the day when the spade is  trump we are a bill of expense to  someone or ourselves.  AN IMPRESSIVE CEREMONY  With the question of marriage     This is an age of progress, and  the priest is making his last stand the people are much wiser   than  WHAT'S THE   DIFFERENCE?  Brkaklyc; the Sabbath is just a  matter of how you look at it.  Some will run an auto on Sunday  who would not pan- wood on that  day, because they think it would he  sinful. Here is an instance ttl.l  by Hub that will illustrate the subject:  "In California I went out camping for a few days. There was a  preacher with us in the party. On  Sunday tho dominie declined to  fish, and moreover, gently admonished the rest of us for so doing. And what do you suppose he  did while we were fishing?  I'll tell you, Terese: he went out  and caught grasshoppers" for bait,  so he could fish on Monday."  for temporal power, and rather  than make a fuss in church the  meek and lowly accept the cinch in  tears and silence. Blessed are the  meek, for they shall inherit the  church pews of this earth.  The Saturday Sunset has lived  four years in Vancouver and is a  winner. Its editor has nerve, its  manager push, and between the  two this handiome and fearless  piper never runs out of meal  tickets. Its editor will probably  get shot some day, but, then, he  will soon gel used to that.  they were in the early days, but  in some respects we cling to the  old customs like wet pants to a man  in Vancouver.  Now there is the Noble Order Of  The Garter. It is 560 years old  yet we worship it still. The cer-  mony is vkry elaborate and impressive. It has a tendency to fill  us with awe aEd inspiro us to push  onward to greater things. At  Windsor Castlt; rccoiitiy ihe Prince  of Wales whh invextwl with the  insignia of this noble order.  The King himself buckled the  garter on the Prince's left leg, ttf-  (CouUiiuedO  In the Far South and The Far North  Again, in 1SSG, the call of gold  came from a desolate waste from  tho   almost unknown   interior of  Africa.    The Rand was a country  very similar to Colorado���������a high.,  treeless plateau, though naturally  more fertile.    The stubborn Boers,  who had retreated thither in search  of solitude, co-operated with nature  in blocking the rush of the   gold  seekers.    They   hampered mining  by law; but unfortunately for the  Boers,  they had not learned the  story of gold.    As well might they  have tried to block the swing   of  the tides.    There iu  the   central  zone of the Rand, lay two thousand  millions in gold, and all the.  world knew it.   Higher. a.vrd' higher  rose tho flood Ground the doomed  cepaVlic���������around the simple people who had been so blind as to  build their barns on acres.that were  yellow with   gold.   Then,   inevitably, came the crash of war; and  now the deep mines of South Africa  are producing their millions of dollars in gold each month.  In 1S9G the songof the gold siren  was heard in the Klondike���������in the  lone,    white,   silent   land   of  the  north.    Coming from such a frozen  waste,  it seemed like a mocking  gibe   at   human   cupidity.     The  Klondike was not even the outer  edge of civilization.    It was two  thousand   miles, farther.      There  was no road���������nothing but a choice  between   the   riverway   for those  who preferred to drown and the  mountain way for those who preferred to freeze.    Yet men rushed  to the frozen valleys of the Yukon  as if it were the promised land.  Half came back or dropped by the  trail;  but the   others seemed immune from either death or despair.  They found gold���������scores of tons of  it���������built   railways, and planted a  city of  10,000 people under   the  shadow of the Arctic Circle.  Then the gold cry came from  Cape Nome.    Not  even the Pole  could have been much more remote  than   that desolate Bpot.    It was  almost as far from Seattle as London is from New York��������� a bleak  stretch of dark sand on the shores  of   Behring Sea.    Nothing   could  live there but gray moss and mos-  quite3.    Yet a party of five hundred, led by couple of missionaries  who had forgotten their churches in  the excitement of the gold rush,  trudged thither over the Alaskan  snow fields.    Hardships mattered  nothing. Fifty below zero mattered  nothing.    There in the frozen laud,  when they had thawed it with bonfires of drift wood, lay the precious  dust that pays all debts and   rewards all labors.    No matter what  their  sacrifices   have been,   they  were the envied victors of the world,  for they had found gold.  Following quickly after Alaska  came Nevada. As if she were trying to test the passion of men to  the utmost, the fantastic gold  sprite next sang her song in the  Great American desert. This particular region had been tho horror  spot of the West since the days of  Pike and Fremont. With its dry  and desolate valleys, its purple- ing the fairy tale  pink hills, and all   tho weirdne&s  of its painted scenery, it had always been looked upon as an unreal, theatrical country, wholly unfit for any living creatures, except  its own horned toads and lizards.  But when the go'd cry came, its  terrors were forgotten in the  twinkle of an eyo. The desert became alive. Towns of Tonopab,  Bull-frog, and Goldfield sprang up  by magic. The sage brush wastes  surrendered their treasures; and today the fatal land of drought and  mirage is so tamed that its new  made millionaires and their wives  travel through it in Pullmans and  automobiles.  Gold has always been a hide-and-  seek metal, hard to find and easy  to lose. Hundreds, possibly thousands, have hunted for those two  famous lost mines of the West���������  the Breyfogle and the Pegleg; but  the mystery that hides them is as  deep today as fifty years ago. Some  day possibly they will be rediscovered by a golf player or post hole  digger who had never heard of them  before. __ . ,.-'������������������  No mefcqitesu cricky and elusive  as gold, and yet the commerce of  tbe whole civilized world depends  upon it. Nations rise and fall,  prosper or .become bankrupt, as the  golden tide flows towards them or  recedes. What is international  trade, in fact, but a tug-of-war with  a rope of gold? if the precious  yellow stuff is coming in, what joy!  If it is goiug out,'what trepidation!  Like a group of misers, the nations  cram their treasures with gold, and  then toil and battle like frenzied  giants to get more.  There is nothing impressive  about a shipment of gold from the  treasury of one nation to another.  A million dollars, for example, appears to be no more than a dray  load of twenty small kegs, Each  keg contains ten nineteen-pound  bars, packed in sawdust. The  weight of the twenty kegs is near  ily four thousand pounds, and the  cost of carrying them between the  United States and Europe is about  three thousand dollars. It is seldom that men dare to entrust more  than fifty or sixty kegs to a single  steamship.  To   see the common little kegs  rolling down   tho gangplank of a  vessel, no one would suspect that  they were being watched with such  breathless anxiety.    Yet   if their  safety required it, warships, would  escort them from port to port, and  armies would guard them with all  the panopy of war.,  It has become  more  than  a metal, more than a  commodity, this gold.    In an age  like   ours, when   business   is supreme, it is the emblem of authority.    It is _ stored   up   ownership.  It is a permit to live without working and to enjoy without effort.  It  is superior to kingship and all aris-  tocracies.    Whoever has gold is, to  tho extent of that gold, one of the  rulers of the world.  Gold is power.    The master nations have chosen it to be the greatest common   measure of achievement.   That is the secret  of the  mystery.   It is  at least the best  answer we can give to the riddle of  the gold cry and its magic appeal.  Yet it is not wholly the gold itself that attracts men so irresistibly.  It is partly the glamour and excitement of the search.   It is the fascination of life at high pressure,  when hope  thrills men   like the  shook of an electric current.   It is  the eostacy of finding a pot of gold  at the foot of a rainbow, and mak-  of   childhood  door, to say "Open -sesame!" and  to walk into the treasure-cave and  become its owner���������this is the enthralling dream .that lures the gold  seekers into the uttermost part of  tho earth.  Then, too, then there is the semi-  savage   freedom    of   the   camps.  There is the  rough spirit of fair-  play   and democacy.    The special  piiveleges, as well as the comforts  of tho cities, are left behind, and  life becomes a simple contest 'in  which every   man  wins what he  can get and holds fast.. This, to  strong primitive natures, 'is an inducement that outweighs all risks.  There are the many who lose, of  course,  as  well as   the few who  gain.    But the search for gold is  the   game   in which the entrance  fee is the lowest and the prizes are  the highest.    It still opens the door  of wealth to the man whose  only  capital is his health and energy.  Several years since, a man in  Idaho was sentenced to be hanged  for murdex. A lawyer hecaxi.% un-.  terested in his case, believed him  to be innocent, and secured his  pardon. On his release the lawyer   "grub-staked" him, put him  Concluded on next pape.  .ft  V.  t.  '*.  f.  6  f.  fc.  A  .ft  V.  f.  .Leaves Mother Lode  9,30. a.  6:30 p.  Leaves Greenwood  2:00 p. in.  8:30 p.  m.  ra.  m.  Saturday  last    stage    leaves  Mother Lode 0 p. tn.   Returning-,  % leaves Greenwood 10 p. in.  S Greenwood Office  S NORDEN   HOTEL 2  9>  <*  '<%  jtjtjxjtjtjxjixjtjxjxjtjtjtjtjijtjt  Frank Fletcher  Provincial Land Subveyok,  Nelson, B. C.  J. K. CAMERON,  Leading Tailor of the Kootenays.  KASLO,    B.   O.  HAVE YOUR PHOTO TAKEN   BY   J. H. JAMES of Greenwood.  STAKKEY & CO.  NELSON, B. C.  WHOLESALE  DEALERS IN'  Provisions  About Float  .    Float is not a periodical.  It is a book containing 86   '  illustrations all. told, and  is filled with sketches and  -   stories of western life.   It  -  tells how a gambler cashed  in after the flush days of  Sandon ; how it rained in  ��������� New Denver  long  after  Noah was dead ;   how a  parson ,took a   drink  at  Bear Lake in early days ;  how justice was dealt in  ,  Kaslo   in  '93;   how the  saloon man outprayed the  women in Kalamazoo, ..and  graphically ' depicts   the.    :  roamings   of   a   western  editor among the tender-  feet in the cent belt.   It  contains the early history  of Nelson and a romance  of the Silver King mine.  In   it are   printed three  western poems, and dozens of articles too numerous to mention.    Send for  one before it is too late.  The  price   is   25   cents," -  postpaid to any part of tho  wona.    auuh,������- an   letters to  R. T. Lowery  GBEENWOOD, B. C.  come   true.   To   find   tho   magic ���������TW  ���������Jy*."-  THE   LEDGE,   GBEENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.  11 AT IT HERE SIIICE 1900V  vOOW,  ff  ^erV5^  western - - Hotels.  THIS   KOOTENAY    SALOON  Sandon, B. 0., has a line of nerve  bracers unsurpassed iu any mountain town ot the Great West.   A  . glass of aqua pura given free wilh  '   1 spirits raenti.  MfTKEWDRMOHEy  WORK TOO .V.   .  fiKpEfx>srnri(TyouR5/������V/������65  WITHUSTHEyWIU-HRfl    -  4% INTEREST WHICH  WECREWTMOPITHLV .''j -  rH1P.M0PIE)ISRETURP|l-  /IBLE ON PEMflHP ��������� ���������  rtS QUICKLY/IS THEM/IILS-  Cm GARRY /T.  PEOPLE JUST/!SC/IREFli\  fWDcaimouMs  YOUCflnBE/  /1RfiWELLPLE^5EP)  AND THORDUW '  ��������� SATISFIED;  WITHTHBW/iyirlvVHItH  OUR BU5IP(fiSS IS  .TMMSfsCriZD-f, BUSIDESS1  MANAGED BY PEOPLE OF.  MTUREPeraiEME.  -*H/fifffi5TirrrefiHiiX'  flPOST/JL.GIViriG  -YOUR WMB*/1PPR������5SV  wiitPHONPTLYBRirieyflu  FULL INFORiWIOiT"  -WRITE T0fK  SHOI/LPyOUIMVErtMy  PINflHGIflL BUSINESS in  VflMGOUVCR-'VICIPIITy,  RENTS TO COltECT,'  /lGREG������fiNT5F0R5/fLE^  M0RTGnGESTOL������0H/flTER  /IMP COli-CGT,    -   -  FIRE ir/5lif?firiGfi TO FWCE.  LET US ATTEND TO IT.  WE ARE PLE/15inG.'  OTHERS WBVWIJVBE SURE  TO PLEASE YOU.  DojvJraser* Co. Ltd.  11 foifiie Stmt,  pVaixcouver B.C.<^  NKWMA15KKT   IIOTISt  Is the home for all tourists and  millionaires visiting- New Denver, British Columbia.  Henry Stogc. Fropr.  THE   PROVINCE   HOTEL  Grand Forts, is- a large three-  story brick hotel that provides  the public with good meals and  pleasant rooms. A new building,  but the same old rates.  Km 11 Larsun, Proprietor,  may be, there will be tens of thousands who will spurn the comforts  of civilization and face all dangers  to find gold. 1  IF I SAY SO IT IS SO.  TIIK   KASIjO   hotel  Kaslo, B. C��������� is a comfortable  home for ali who travel to that  city.  Cockle & Papwortn.   ;  SUEItltKOOKE   HOUSE  Nelson; B. C. Ono minute's walk  from C-. P. E station. Cuisine  unexcelled; Well heated and ventilated. ,  Uoyor liros., Proprietor  . Keep Your Eye -on  NORTH VANCOUVER  SEE ME  TKEMOHT   HOUSE  Nelson, B. C, is run ou tho American and European plan. Steam  heated rooms. All white labor.  Special attention paid to dining  room.  ItiinxoiiiG & Caniplicll, Props.  LiAKJUVTIW   1JOT1CL,  in Nelson, B. C, employs all  white help and is a home for the  world at #1.00 a day.  Nap. Malletto, Proprietor.  inium salenrices of first- and second-class lands  ,$} ��������� ail<1 S5 Per acl'e respectively.     ,  J ins   regulation   further  provided  tbat the  prices dxeil therein should apply to all  lands  with respect to which the applications to' purchase were (riven favorable consideration after  - -   --   ��������� '    - i9U>  rtue of  Gover-  rejfulation dated uYeTrd ApriulUl^bS held not  10 apply to applications to purchase vacant  J-rown lauds which were received by the Assis-  taut Commissioners of Lands on or before'the  ipril 3rd, 1911.  ROBT. A. HENWICK.  _ , Deputy Minister of I<ands.  Department of lands, '  Victoria, B. C, ICtli'of May, 1911.  523-524, Pacific Block, Vancouver, B. C.  OPPOSITE    POSTOI'TICE  The Call of Gold (concluded).  BRIDJSSVIIjIjK   noxjsr..  Eriilosville, B. C. Provides excellent  accommodation for tourists and travellers. Fi-es.li Iigffg mid Butter. Speeinl  Irish Whiskey always on luind.  ' THOMAS   WALSH,   Proprietor.  HOTEL CASTLEGAR, Castlegar Junction. All modern. Excellent  accomodations for tourists and  drummers. Boundary train leaves  here at 9.10 a.m.  VV. H.   CAGE, Proprietor  LOWERY'S GLAIM  ������  During the 37 months that Lowery's  Claim was on earth it did business all  over the world.' It waB the most  unique, independent ond fearless journal ever produced in Canada. Political  and theological enemies pursued it with  the venom of a rattlesnake until the  government shut it out of the mails,  and its editor ceasad to publish it,  partly on, account of a 'lazy liver and  partly because it takes a pile of money  to run a paper that iB outlawed. Ihere  are still 25 different editions of this condemned, journal in print. Send 10 cents  and get one or $2.50 and get the bunch.  E. T. LOWERY,  Greenwood, B. C.  IS THE GREATEST  THEATRICAL I SHOW PAPER  m THE WORLD.  S4.00 Per Year,    Single Copy, 10 Gts,  ISSUED WEEKLY.  Sample Copy Free.  ,      FRANK QUEEN PUB. CO. (Lid),  rUBLlSHKUS,  47 W. 2yru St., Ubw YoisSt  ALBERT JT. HOME.  iUNAOEK.  Baggage  transferred to  any part of the City. Furniture moved to any part of  the District. General Dray-  ing of all kinds.  SIDNEY OLIVER.  ^AMOUS PEOPLE  Ls^    BY FANNIE M.LOTHROP  ��������� HOMER   WATSON   "^^^'^  Canada's Great Landscape Painter.  Every great landscape artist is both a poet and a painter. Tho imagination,  the intuition, tlio interpretation, tho sympathy, tlio reverence, tho love, kinship  and communion with Nature of tho poet, filtering through tho mind of tho artist  find thoir medium of expression in brush and colors. Every great painting is a  poern in paint instead of in print.  Ono feels this strongly in tho prcsenco of Homer Watson's paintings, tho putting on canvas of a single mood, with detail ever subordinated to tho general  effect. They are never photographic, but aro always strongly individual interpretations, Whether it bo a rough sea with tho dancing fishcr-boata under a dull,  rain-filled sky, tho white mill catching tho high lights with its background of  foliage, tho lone rider bent over his horso plodding along a rain-wailicd road,  some noble monarch forest treo braving tho elements, or his interpretations of  any other moods of Naturo, ono always tecls tho sentiment, tho richness of color,  "���������'��������� tho atmosphero, tho glow, tho feeling���������all seem inseparable parts of a single effect.  'Tho dainty daubs of detail characteristic of som'o painters find-no placp in Mr.  Watson s work; it is ever bold, rugged, broad in treatment, breathing vigor and  vitality.  Homer Watson was bom in tho littlo villago of Doon, on Grand River, Ont.,  in 185Q, and as ajjoy at school showed his natural instinct for art when ho sur-  reptiously drew on his slato an over-vivid picture of tho strong and peculiar features of his teacher, which drow upon him deserved punishment. Ho seemed  to turn naturally to landscape work, and his first largo painting "Tho Pioneer  Mill," which appeared at tho first exhibition of thc ltoyal Canadian Academy  was purchased by tho Marquis of Lome, and now hangs in a place of honor in  Windsor Castle.  " Mr. Watson has exhibited at tho Academy in England, tho Now Gallery,  T'tho New English Art Club, tho^Glasgow Instituto and at International Exposi- ���������  tions, and been honored by one-man exhibitions where thirty or more of his paintings wcro hung together, thus enabling ono to study comparatively tho range of  Lis work. IIo makes almost annual trips to England, but loves Canada, her scenes  and her peoplo too well to take up permanent residenco abroad. It is always  dangerous to compare tho work of ono painter with another as it may curry with  it a suggestion of imitation which would bo unjust to ono whoso work is so individual as Mr. Watson's; but tho critics in their appreciation of his paintings  couple his naino with tho names of Corot, Conslublo, Diaz, Itossnau and Courbot  ������������������a noble band of masters with whom Canada's paintor may foci honored to bo  ilaaucd.  ������ii.uaJ ������ooorc Inj to Act of ihOPuriauioi.t of Camilla, In llio your IM, by W, ������."Mack it tho Dspaitmcat of AfilcuUm*  astride a burro, said "Good luck  Jack." aud sent lrim out into the  desert. Jack was an experienced  miner, and he went to the search  determined to prove himself worthy  of this confidence. A year later  the lawyer received a sack of gold.  Soon other sacks followed; and today both he and the man he befriended are independently rich.  At about the same time that  Jack made his famous ride, there  was a young Californian who had  been dreaming golden dreams. He,  too, believed that he could find the  pot of gold at the foot of the rainbow, and he set out in search of it.  One evening, in the heart of the  Nevada dasert, he came,to a spring  and camped for the night. Noticing that one of the burros was  straying too far from the camp, he  walked after it, and literally fell  into one of the richest gold mines  of the West. That is the story of  Jim Butler of Tonopah.  "There is no law in gold mining  but the point of the pick," said  John W. McKay. Any man, in  any place, may find his fortune.  Alexander McDonald, the first  millionaire of the Yukon Valley,  had blundered up and down the  gold fields' of-.the Northwest for  half a life time without success.  Then he was fooled into buying a  deserted claim that was believed to  be worthless, and in one day dug  up twenty thousand dollars as the  beginning 0f his fortune.  In Australia, the land of nuggets, a discouraged prospector was  tramping behind a pedler's cart.  A wheel of the cart bumped heavily against a boulder, and even the  dull eye of the tired miner caught  the shine of gold in the spot where  the wheel had struck. He stooped  down to look more carefully and  immediately sprang up with a shout  of delirious joy. He had become  the owner of nearly fifty thousand  dollars.  The story of each "lucky strike,"  as.it is told around the camp fire,  has almost invariably a setting that  is whimsical or romantic. There is  the old tale   of   Dan   Hill,   who  wandered out of a Californian poor  house  in 1866,   stubbed   his   toe  against a couple of nuggets, sold  themjjfor twenty-six thousand dollars, squandered  the money  in a  few weeks of revelry,  and   then  wandered back to ths poor house..,  There is the story of the Granite  Mountain mine, in Montana���������how  it was Buch a sink-hole for capital  that the owners telegraphed   the  superintendent to abandon it and  begin else where���������how he ignored  the order, dug deeper, and found  millions.  "Gold fs Where You Find It"  The largest of the Californian  nuggets was dug up by the merest  chance.    Two roystering   miners,  so it happened, were caught in a  flood.    One was swept off his feet  and drowned.    The other reached  a place of safety and next morning  proceeded to dig a shallow grave for  his dead comrade.    Several inches  below the "surface his pick struck  against   what   seemed    to be  an  eighty-pound   rock.    He   wearily  shoveled around it and pushed it  out of his way. Then, with a shock  that stunned him, he saw that it  was a mass of virgin gold.    It was  worth nearly twenty-three thousand dollars, and he got ten thousand more by putting it on exhibition.  The greatest nugget ever known  was found by a couple'of penniless  fellows named Byer and Haltman,  who were living at the time on the  charity of their neighbors. They  were digging in New South |Wales,  and getting nothing, when suddenly they came upon a thick slab of  gold that was almost twice as heavy  as themselves. ��������� They had begged  their breakfast, that morning, but  at night they were worth one hundred and forty-eight .thousand dollars.  It is the element of chance that  makes the gold cry so compelling.  When a gold region in new, at  least, the skilled and the unskilled  seem to stand equal chances. Some  tenderfoot to whom all rocks*look  alike, may snatch the prize from  under the eyes of the experts.  Some miners were busy at work  near Lotus, on the South fork of  the American river, when a tenderfoot, who came along asked where  to dig. It was considered a fine  practical joke to direct him to the  summit of a nearby ridge, alongside the new graveyard. He went  thankfully up and a few hours later  came down to tell his benefactors  how kind they had been to a perfect stranger. They went up to sse  what he had found and there stood  his gold pan, alongside the hole,  full of nuggets. ���������  At that time it was generally believed among experts that gold  could not bo found in high places,  and consequently the miners could  scarcely believe their eyes.  "Gold is where you find it," say  the experienced miners. No one  can predict the direction whence  the call slia.ll next be heard. In  Korea, in the Himalayas, in the  Philippines, there are such vague  rumors as usually precede a gold  rush. One thing alone is certain,  that   wherever the new Eldorado  Life In Glasgow  Glasgow, the second city in the  Empire, is. not' a "well-dressed"  city; a walk through, the wide  streets, and a glance around  windows of the many fine-shops  clearly, show that; but'it is essen  tially a properly dressed city.    By  that I mean that if by chance the I ^ffiSrCi,1!"SS  sun does come out, there is not an | t^u^ffAbpMM.&"lmi*n ������" ������r bc'  immediate display of light washing  dresses���������the Scotch  ladies  know  the vagaries of their climate and  cannot be tempted to indulge.    No,  they dress prepared for a deluge of  rain, in servicable frocks and oilskin coats topped   with a   fisherman's sou'-wester.   That  is   the  first impression one gets.    Another  is the fact that   there are   more  pretty women to tho Fquare .,-foot  than anywhere else in the United  Kingdom.  Ail the shops, except tobacconists and one or two other trades,  shut at eight prompt. It is impossible to' buy a loaf of bread  after this hour, be you ever so  hungry. Whisky can be got, however, up to ten. Perhaps the, latter  ir looked upon as more of a necessity than bread.  One wonders when business is  transacted in Glasgow. There are  scattered about in a very small  area in the heart of the city, some  fifty tea rooms, and in these, all  day long, are to be found from  twenty to a hundred clerks, managers, buyers from the various  emporiums, etc., etc. They seem  to drop in causually fora cigarette,  a cup of coffee and a chat with  their friends. These little visits  are frequently repeated during the  day. I saw one man come in three  times in an hour-and-a-half. I am  told that if you want to see a man  on business here, it is almost hopeless to call at his "office; you must  find out the tea-rooms he frequents.  John   JWe^ellaF  Proprietor.  MINERAL ACT.  Certificate of Improvements.  NOTICE.  Tlie "Great Laxey" aud "The Twin Mine"  Mineral Claims,/situate in the Greenwood  Mliiiiiy Division of the Yale District.  Where located:���������Iu Summit Camp.  TAKE NOTICE that "I," Isaac H. Hallett,  as apent for Thomas Kermeen, -Free  Miners' Certificate No. 1J29138, and Andrew  Hamilton, Free Miner's Certificate No. B2S949,  Intend sixty days from the date hereof, to  apply lo the Mliilufr Recorder for Certificates  of Improvements, for the purpose ol obtaining Crown Grants of the above claims.  And further take notice that action, under  Section 37,   must   be commenced   before   the  issuance of such Certificate  of Improvements.  Dated this <ttli day of April, A. D. 1911.  I. H. HAI/LETT. ,  NEW ADVERTISING SCALE.  The newspapers in Greenwood, Phoenix and Grand Forks have adopted the  following scale for legal advertising:  Application   for   Liquor Licence  (30 days) ������4.00.  Certificate of Improvement Notice  (60 days) $7.5o  Application to Purchase Laud No-  tiees (60 days) #7.50  Delinquent Co-owner Notices (go  days) ������10.00  Water Notices (small) 57.50  All other legal advertising, 12 cents a  line, single column, for the first insertion; and S cents a line for each subsequent insertion.  MINERAL ACT.  Certificate of Imorovements  NOTICE  ���������'Golden" and "Relief Fraction" Mineral  Claims, situate in the Greenwood Mining Division of the Yale District.  Where located:���������Dry Creek, West Fork, Kettle River.  TAKE NOTICE that I, C. J. Le/fjratt,  Barrister. Gieenwood, as agent for J. A.  Tuzo, Free Miner's Certificate No- B14342;  W. M. Law. Administrator of tlie estate of  Thomas W. Curry, Free Miner's Certificate No.  B4SOT9; and R. Wood, Administrator of the  estate of William Boyle, Free Miner's Certificate No. B29377, intend, sixty days from date  hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  Certificate of Improvements forthe purpose of  obtaining Crown Grants of the above claims.  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.  Dated this 9th day of June, A. D. 1911.  C J. LEGGATT.  MINERAL ACT. -  , Certificate of Imorovements.  NOTICE.  X.L.CR.and XX.CR. Fractional Mineral  Claims, situate in the Greenwood Mining  Division ot Yale District.  Where located:���������In T'cadwood Camp.  TAKE NOTICE That I, Isaac H. Hallett,  as agent for James Nicholas Matchett,  Free Miner's Certificate No. B2920, intend  sixty days from the date hereof, to apply to the  Min.ng Recorder for Certificates of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining Crown  Grants of tbe above claims.  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must be commenced before the issue-  anceof such Certificate of Inisrovements.  Dated this 28tli day of April, A. D. 1911.  I. H. HALLETT.  MINERAL ACT.  Certificate of Improvements.  NOTICE.  Ohservfttory Mineral Claim, situate in   the  Greenwood Mining Division of Yale District.   ���������  Where located:���������In Carmi Camp.  TAKE NOTICE That I, James C. Dale, Free  Miner's Certificate No. B14338, intend,  sixty days from date hereof, to apply to the  Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown  Grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  Section 37, must be commenced before the issue-  anceof such Certificate of Improvements.  Dated this 1st day of April, A. D. 1911.  JAMES C. DALE.  nelson, B. fr  W. V. WJELXS, Proprietor.  ���������   First-class in everything.  Steam heat,   electric  light,"  private   baths.     Telephone  in every room.   First-class  bar and barber shop.  'Bus meets all trains.  GRAND CENTRAL   HOTEL   Opposite Postoffice, NELSON, B. C.  American and European Plans.  H. H. PITTS, Prop.  CENTRAL HOTEL  PHOENIX.  The Nearest Hotel to the Granby'  Mines. - Plenty of rooms, and one  of the largest Dining Booms "in the  <%���������    A. 0. JOHNSON, Prop.  HOTEL  Stanley Street, Nelson  Best Family or Workingman's  Hotel in the city. Nicely furnished rooms with bath. Union  house.    Bed, 50c;   Meals, 35c.  J. S. BARRATT,    -    Prop.  PUBLIC NOTICE.  With a view to the better preservation  of the Public Highways the attention of  the public is herewith directed- to the  provisions of THE HIGHWAY TRAFFIC REGULATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT which enacts as follows:���������  '.'It shall be unlawful for any person to  cause to be drawn or driven on any of  the public highways of that portion of  the Province of British Columbia situate  east of the Cascade range of Mountains,  any wagon sor other vehicle carrying a  load in excess of that mentioned in  Schedule 'A' hereunto annexed.  SCHEDULE A.  Wagons and 4 wheeled vehicles shall  not carry a load in excess of the following:���������  On tires under 3 inches 2,000 lbs.  On tires 3 inches in width and under 4  inches 3,000 lbs.  On tires 4 inches in width and under 5  inches 6,coo lbs.  On tires 5 inches in width aud over   6,000 lbs. and, over.  AND NOTICE is hereby given that  the Act in every respect'inust bc strictly  complied with."  Any person guilty of an offence against  this Act shall upon summary conviction  thereof before a Justice of the Peace be  liable to a penalty not exceeding Fifty  Dollars.  MINERAL   ACT.    '  Certificate of Improvements.  NOTICE..  "Croesus"   Mineral   Claim,  situate  in   the  Greenwood Mining- Division of Yale District.  , Where located:���������In South Skylark Camp.  TAKE NOTICE that I. Isaac II. Hallett, as  apent for Joseph Ernest McEw-en, Free Miner's  Certificate, Xo. B310CS, intend, sixty davs from  tbe date hereof, toapply to thc Mining Recorder  for a Certificate of Improvements,' for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of thc above  claim.  And further take notice that action, under  Section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.  Dated this 19th day of May, A, D. 1911.  I. H. HALLETT.  D. J. MATHESON  Insurance Agent  FIKK,  LIFE AND ACCIDENT  Fidelity Bonds, Plate.Glass,  Commissioner   for   Taking  Affidavits  PHOENfiX,   B.   C.  ON THE FOLLOWING DAYS IN JUNE, 1911, THE  ireat Northern  Do not draw logs or timber over highway. Vehicles meeting ought to turn to  thc left. A vehicle overtaken ought to  turn to the left. A vehicle overtaking  another ought to turn to the right.  W. G. McMYNN,  Government Agent.  Greenwood, May 19th, 1910.  QUEEN'S   HOTEL,  FHOBisris:,    B. c.  The Newest and Largest Hotel in  the City.    Everything neat, clean  aud comfortable.     Steam heat and  electric light.   Meals and drinks at  all hours.  B. V. CHISHOLM, Proprietor.  DANNY DEANE, Manager.  Reduced Rate Tickets  On Sale at C.P.R. Ticket Office  JUNE 5, 7, 9, 10,12,16,17, 21,  22,28,29,30,  And Other Dates in July, August  and September       /;  THE RUSSELL HOTEL  Is pleasantly situated in the heart  of Grand Forks, and is convenient  to all the leading financial and  commercial instifeutinns of the city.  Travelers will find it a comfortable  place to sojourn when in the city.  FRED RUSSELL  10  ,11  Will.sell ROUND TRIP SUMMER TICKETS from Midway,  B, G, to the Pf incipal Points in Eastern Canada and the United  States at Reduced Fares, with final return limit October 31,  1911,   Liberal stopovers west of Chicago, Ills  ME 5,7,9, 10, 12, 16, 17,2f, 22,28,2<> and 30, (911  For fares, routes and reservations, write or call on tho undersigned,  V. KISTLER,  D. F. & P. A., Grand Forks, B.  O.  J. M. REILLY,  Agent, Midway, B. C,  COUNTY COURT OF YALE,  A SITTING of the County Court, of Yule will  ���������rv    bo noldoii nt llio Court Houso, Greonwood,  on  Tuesday   tho 20th dny of Aiurust, 1011, ut  eleven o'clock In tho forenoon.  By order,  W. G. McMYNN,  Registrar O. O. of Y.  WATER NOTICE  I, Jean F. Ferroiix of Carmi, province of  British Columbia, fanner, frive notice that on  thc 28th day of June, 1911,1 Intend to apply to  the Water Commlsalonerat Falrvlcw. I), C, lor  a licence to take nnd use, one cubic foot of  water per second from Carmi creek, In Slnill-  kamccit district- Thc water Is to bc taken  from the stream about 550 feet, more or less, on  thc north bank, above its mouth, ou the Went  Fork of Kottlc river, and In to bo used upon 25  acres of laud situate ou the cast of sain West  Fork, aud bcinp on, or adjacent lo Lot 23(10, for  Irrigation purposes.  J. F. FI3RK0UX.  Witness���������C. J. TjOififatt, Ilarrlster-at-Tjaw,  GrccuwooJ, II. C  WINNIPEG  TORONTO .  MONTREAL  ST. JOHN .  HALIFAX .  ST. PAUL .  CHICAGO ;  NEW YORK  PHILADELPHIA  BOSTON    .  $60.00  91.50  105.00  120.00  127.20  60.00  72.50  108:50  108.50  110.00  WINDSOR HOTEL  The Windsor Hotel is one of the  best furnished hotels in the West.  It is located in the heart of Greenwood and within easy reach of all  the financial and commercial institutions of the Copper Metropolis. Heated with steam aud lit  :: by electricity. Commodious sample rooms. The bar is replete  with all modern beverages aud  the cafe never closes. Rooms  reserved by telegraph.  The Windsor HotelJCo  E. J. Cartier, Mgr.  H. W. Farmer & Co.,  REAL ESTATE,  Rock Creek, B. O.  Rates to other points on application.  Stop-overs allowed within limits.  Good via the Grcat'Lakes in  one or both directions.  EJarly Sleeper Reservations mean best  choice.  For  further   particulars   write   or  apply to���������  E. K. REDPATH, C. P. R. Agent,  Greenwood.  SMOKE   Mountaineer and Kootenay Standard Cigars.    Made by  J. C. THELIN & Co., NELSON.  W.F.M.  Greenwood Miners  Union, No. 22, W.  F. M,, moots every  Saturday evening1 in Union Hall, Copper Htroot, Greenwood, at 7.  Also in hftll at  Mother Lode mine  Fritlayovoning-sat?.  LESTEK MACKENZIE, Secty.  .'/���������Mm  WMBsmmmm  'aStwmmSimSmi isi-ahffjfej  THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.  "     BOUNDARY MINES    1  The Belcher mine at Republic  will deliver 50,000 tons of ore to  tho Granby smelter.  S. H. 0. Miner died at Granby,  Quebec this month aged 76 years.  He was the founder of the Granby  Co. in the Boundary.  Granby stock sold for $40 in  Spokane last week.  During May 90 carloads of oro  were shipped from Republic.  The Grand Forks Gazette says  that the T>. C. Copper Co., is negotiating for more claims in the  Franklyn camp.  Last week the Granby smelter  treated S,S21 tons of ore.  Tlio Trail smelter's quarry at  Fife employs 45 men.  It is reported that the Granby  lias bought SO per cent, of tlie  Hidden Creek niines at Goose Bay  for 8400,000.  In Spokane last week 85.50 was  asked for shares of the B. C. Copper Co.  The paystreak on the Elkhorn  has widened to 14 inches and the  ore now being taken out is rich iu  gold and silver.  For additional air pipe thc Big  Tunnel uses 1000 pounds of galvanized iron every month.  There is a deal on for some properties in the Deadwood camp.  The Greenwood smelter treated  12,000 tons of ore last week.  In the year ending March 31 the  Rawhide and Athelstan mines  produced 90,000 tons of ore.  The New Dominion Copper Co.,  intend-to diamond drill the Sunset  and Montezuma mines.  Dirring April the Greenwood  smelter produced 3,127 ouncos of  gold; 13,630 ounces of silver, and  477 tons of copper. The cost of  producing the copper was 9.29 cents  a pound.  ���������   The  Jewel   mine   has  received  some more machinery.  The Argo Tunnel Co. will hold  its annual meeting on Saturday.  working at any of the big coal  miues in British Columbia, and  shows that the International Coal  & Coke Co pay their miners and  and those engaged at outside  work as big, if not bigger, wages  than any other coal mine in the  West.���������Blairmore Enterprise.  A HOT ROAST  The editor of the South Fort  George Herald is virile, if not  sweetly polite. He hits with a  club in preference to. using a  sugar-coated rapier. Here is the  ,way he hands the dope to another  editor:  "The supernumerary "editor"  of the Ashcroft Journal, an ex-  bank boy, didn't like The Herald  calling the Ashcroft Liar.���������as  his boss' journal is familiary  called iu the Cariboo���������a decrepid,  mangy old rag. No. His little  capsule brain got busy and he  "wrote something" in reply. Oh!  Cyril, you naughty boy. Before  the budding journalist goes any  further he ought to get next to  thc fact that whilst the butcher  used to wait for the 'junk-pile in  the Journal office to turn cut his  week's supply of meat wrapping,  thc genial proprietor in his front  street office used to peddle lots in  a wild-cat."  HEALTH ACT.  Regulations for ttie Sanitary Control  of Lumber. Mining, and other Camps,  Sawmills and other Industries situated in Unorganized Districts.  B. C, MINING NEWS  TWENTY YEARS AGO  Twenty years ago on July, 1st  Nelson had its fir3t Dominion Day  celebration. The ' poorest brass  band in the world furnished _ the  music from the verandah of the  Merchants saloon,'and the horse  races ended in front of the Nelson  hotel. Porcupine Billy was dressed  up as an English dude in short  pants, and .by night time there |  were a few people sober in the  camp. The celebration lasted about  seven days, and finished up by a  row with the Indians who were  camped on the flats near the C.P.R.  depot.  THIS READS WELL  A small concentrator has been  put in at the Hartney-mme, back  o������ New Denver. It is run .by a  gasoline engine.  Building operations have been  resumed at the Standard mill, near  Silverton.  Work has been resumed at the  Panama, in the Slocan.  WAGES AT COLEMAN  The statement of wages presented to the board of arbitration  here on Saturday last by general  manager Whiteside, of the International Coal & Coke Co., show a  very high average of earning by  the miners employed by his company. ^One contract man had  earned $2,533 during the past  year while during that time the  the very lowest earned by any  contract man $864.34. The average daily wages received by all  employees during the year were  83.75 and the mine was operated  2S0.6 days. It can be plainly sserr  that the wnges paid out (o all the  miners and other employees of  C. & C. Co. are considerably  larger than those received by men  . F. H. Knight, of the Boundary  Mining and Exploration company,  in which James Petrie and Francis  E. Armstrong are interested,, has  returned from a visit to the property. With him went Messrs  Fluhrerand Chapmam, of Trail,  who were so pleased with the look  of the property that they took interests in it. Two thousand pounds  of coal have been brought to Rossland and numerous tests have been  made, every satisfaction been obtained. Assays made at the B. C.  Copper Co., and the Granby properties give excellent results, and  both Mr. Knight and Mr. Petrie  say that very shortly "they will be  able to lay down a-ton of coal at  Rossland homes for the price paid  for a cord of wood.���������Rossland  Miner.  1. Everv employer of labor on any work in  am" luniljeriiiir, minliifr conslriirtioii, or oilier  camp, sawmill, or oilier industry sjluated in  am- portion of an itnoi'tfiuiiml district, shall,  upon Ihe establishment of eacli nud eveiy camp  or work, forthwith notify (ho Sanitary Inspector of the Province of the establishment of the  same, and when reti'ucsted lo do so shall furnish,  such particulars as may ba required by the said  Inspector. ' '.'   '.' ������������������ ��������� ���������  2. The owner, niauaifcr, a-reul, or foreman  of anv lumber, luliiiiif.', or other camp, sawmill  or other Industry located within an iiiiorjfiiii-  ized district, shall, lu connection with every  such Industry or.works, be responsible for the  execution nnd enforcement ot any regulation  herein cinitnined or hereafter lo bo adopted.  3. If in the opinion of tbe Sanitary Inspector  the site of auy camp or works is unhealthy or  unsanitary, lie may order the removal of such  camp or works lb some oilier Kile to be selected  by Ulni.  4. Any house, tent, or dwelling occupied by  the employees citira'tred iu any industry located  within an unorganized 'district shall contain  sullicient cubic feet of air space for every occu ���������  rant thereof as uiav iu each instance be deemed  necessary bv the Sanitary Inspector, and shall  furiher be p ovlded wi'li eflicieut means of  ventlllation. The Moor of every ihvelliut! shall  be constructed of boards or planks or oilier  material equally suitable for tlie purpose,  raised ou supports at least oue foot from the  irrotiud. and so made that it >!ia1l be tiR-lit.  Evert- dwelling' oilier than a tumpuo lulU ���������<���������>���������'������ 1  be lighted by windows so constructed that they  can be opened when necessary.     ���������  5. The method of veutillatioii of everv dwelling in which a stove or furnace is used shall  be such as will satisfy the Sanitary Inspector.  Tlie temperature of the room shall be maintained .11 from CO to fo decrees I-'ahr., and :i  shallow pan supplied with water shall bc keut  011 the stove to supply air moisture.  B. Every cninp or works of every industry  comiuir under these regulations shall bu equipped Willi a wash-house or laundry containing a  stove aud tubs for batliiuc purposes.  7. livery camp or wniks shall be supplied  with a building'or "lout properly constructed  aud set apart asa kitchen, and having a dining-  room in connection'therewith, with proper conveniences for the cleanliness and comfort of  the employees. :       *  8. Proper receptacles must be kept on hand  iuto which all refuse, whether liquid or solid,  must be placed, aud such lefusc must be rej'ii-  larlv destroyed by lire or removed to a safe  distance froniany'liuildiiiir and be kg deposited  as-to not create a nuisance or contaminate the  drinking water.  9. Latrines, earth, or other closets must be  located,constructed ahd tnainta'ucd iu a manlier satisfactory to the said Saniinry Inspector.  10. Stables in connection with any camp or  works must be located as not to contaminate  the water supply, and must not he less than 12o  feet distant from ;any. dwelling or kitchen.  This distance may be increased at the discretion of the Sanitary Inspector.  11. The water supply of any camp or works  must be uucoiilaiiiinated and obtained from a  source satisfactory to tlie Sanitary Inspector.  12. Printed copies of these regulations may.  be obtained from llio Sanitary Inspector.  13. Should the Sanitary Inspector Mud that  auy of these regulations are not complied with,  he'inay, whtre tier:, ssary, take steps to enforce,  them, mid the expense of such fiction shall be  paid by the employer or bis agent,  14. The penalties contained and provided iu  section 97 of the "Health Act"'shall apply lo  the violalions of uny of these regulations.  15. The Sanitary Inspector may, where  deemed necessary, obtain the sorvices of any  Provincial constable or constables to assist  him iu the performance of his duties and to aid  in the enforcement of these regulations.  13y Order,  L' 'r>   DAVIS, M. D.,  Sanitary Inspector,  Victoria.  GREENWOOD,  The Really Best House in the Boundary,  Recently Remodeled and Strictly Up=to������  Dale.     Restaurant in Connection.  ROY & BOYER  PROPRIETORS  " Unequalled lor Domestic Use.  tm������ 5>i>������ffi������vB������o������^������S9������������������������B������a0������������������������������������������������������o������Qe������o������������������������������ ������������e������������������������s ������������fi  o  TO THE  PUBLIC  Hi  It having been circulated that.all.the stores of Greenwood will be closed everv Wednesday afternoon during the  summer months, I wish to give public notice that the Dry  Goods and Clothing House of C. P. Stork will not be closed  Na't any time this summer only upon legal holidays. " I do this  for the best interests of the public. ,.   ;  Last summer it was agreed by the merchants of Greenwood to close,  - every Wednesday afternoon, which was observed by C. K.' Stork and P.'  W. Georq-e, while in some of the other stores there was a man waiting1  inside to turn the key to anyone who migh't wish to purchase goods.'  Great complaint was made by the people working at the mines and ���������  smelter and particularly the farmers,who came in to make purchases.  'The city needs all the business it can g-et, aud I will not be an instrtt-  Tnent to prevent the farmer and laboring- man from getting the accbnio-.'  elation they need whenever they wish.   Many stores will-not be closed-  in Greenwood this summer, on Wednesday afternoons," especially  the  the Dry Goods Store of yours respectfully, C. F. STORK.     ' ���������  ���������" -  ANALYSIS OF WATER  Chlorine    S. 14  Sulphuric Acid  36343  Silica    74-29  Lime  S4.57  Alkalies as Soda   5.91  Magnesia  232.00  I/ilhia  -S6  Sulphuretted Hydrogen ' 32.00  lias recently been thoroughly  renovated and re-furnished, and  is how the greatest health resort upon the continent. Natural hot water iu baths, 124 degrees of heat. A course ol baths  at Halcyon will cure nervous  and muscular diseases and eliminate rheumatism and melalic  poisons from the system. The  water heals liver, 'kidney and  stomach complaints. The rales  are $2 a day up; or $12 weekly  up. Poslo'fTice, express and telegraph offices in connection.  MANUFAGTURING JEWELER,  The Only Up.-to-Date-Optical- JL] IT I   C A jl i: o' C-  Department in the Interior. V\ tAs^VJvK) D.U.  GREENWOOD  l'UIJMC SC1IOOI,  DAN'S SMELTER  A despatch from Toronto says :  Following the negotiations with Sir  Donald Man, of McKenzie &  Mann, in respect to the Island  Smelter Company, it was decided  at a meeting of the executive to  call a. meeting of the shareholders  on June 29, to ratity a sale of the  process and assets of the company.  If Dr. Island can demonstrate to  Sir Donald Mann that his method  will apply to the refractory ores of  British Columbia, then Sir Donald  is not only prepared to take it over  but will agree to forma$10;000,000  company and give the present  shareholders share for share in the  new. company, in addition to pays  ing Dr. Island and his associate-  S5,000,000, Owing.to the fact that  Sir Donald Mann is on his way to  the Old Country, these statements  conld not; hp verified, hut tl)P shareholder.* of tho wjLupajjy ate all  quite prepared to accede to Kir  Donald's offer, which ^was ma tie  some t mc Cg).  JANITOR  Wanted a Janitor for  the   Public   Scliool,  salary, ������I5.00 a monlli.   Applications will lie  received   by tlie iimlcrsiiriiud up to June 301 h.  Duties to commence August latli, 1911.  TENDERS FOR COAL  Tenders will be received by  Uie undersigned  for twenty tons of coal, delivered at tlie scliool  not later tliau September 15th.   Tlie lowest or  any tender not necessarily accepted,  Dated at Greenwood, Ii. C, June 19th, 1911.  (i.  U. TAYTjOK,  Secretary lu the Hoard.  I SUHliam Boyd, Proprietor,     .:     :  fialcyon, B. (K.  PHOENIX, B. C.  Is opposite the Great Northern depot and is a delightful  haven for the weary traveler. Great veins of hot water  run through the entire house, and bathrooms are al- v  ways at tbe service of those in search of material  cleanliness. The dining room is an enemy to dyspepsia,  while the artistic appointment of the liquid refreshment  makes the drinks go down' like eating fruit in a flower  garden, The sample rooms are the largest in the monn-  -   tains and a pleasure to drummers with big trunks.  JAS. MARSHALL        -       -       PROPRIETOR  ARG������  TUNNEL  The Ordinary General Meeting of the Shareholders of the Argo Mining and Tunnel, Company  Limited, (non-persona!liability),.of Greenwood,  British Columbia, will be held at the Company's  Offiice, in Greenwood, on the 24th day of June,  1911, at 8 p. m..  Dated this 18th day of May, 1911.  OLA LOFSTAD  President  A. S. BLACK  Secretary-  CHRISTINA LAKE  Sixty Years the Standard  CREAM  A straight, honest, Cream of Tartar  Baking Powder. Made from Grapes.  Makes better, more healthful food.  Soid without deception*  NO ALUM-NO LIME PHOSPHATE  "Alum la food must therefore act as a poison."  ~Prof. Johnson, Yale Unitenity. ���������  Read the faheh  Buy no baking powder unless  the BaheB shows it to he mssie  from Qreanr of Tartar*  Ola Johnson's addition to the  hotel will be finished enough to  accomodate the crowd Thursday.  He is also re-painting his launch  the- Idle Wild. His youngest  daughter celebrated her first birthday with an elaborate lawn party'  and an elaborate lunch. '  O. B. Smith's new house boat is  down here from the head of tjie  lake receiving its finishing touches  at the hands of M. Lachapplc and  W. X. McDonald. It is named  the /'Marion" after his youngest  daughter. M. Lachapple has caught  several 2 and 3 pound trout .from  its decks and says that he will get  all the trout before O. B. gets back.  Last   Thursday quite a distinguished party wero here with J. A.  Bertois and E. Spraggett as chaf-  feurs,    namely:     Hon.    Thomas  Taylor of "Victoria, Harry Wright,  Ernest Miller, and J. H. Schofield.  Sunday    morning   early   another  party was   brought   down  by E.  Spraggett.    They had some speak-  ;ing, songs, shooting, and a ride in  E. E. Gibson's fino launch, followed  by some games among which  was bowling on the green, in which  E. E. Gibson succeeded in bowling  onto the hotel porch, then caroming through the dining room window which  brought the cook out  with his hair standing straight up.  E. Miller succeeded in hitting the  corner of the hotel oflice.    Judge  W.  K. Williams say's they  were  aiming at him as he had retired.  No truth in it thougli as they both  say they are his friends.   Charles  Flood of Fife was master of ceremonies.   J. R. Jackson, M. P. P  was referee.  Sunday night E. E, Gibson and  party caught two large trout, sufficient for a feast for the party of  18. One log lbs and the other 7i  lbs.  There is a barber at the hotel.  Ola says that he will soon procure  lawn tennis balls and bata, archery,  shuffle board and a variety of out  door games together with Home new  open awings.  fc  LYNN CREEK DAIRY  ==fc  DELIVERED  To any part of the city or district  OFFICE at FRED B. HOLMES''  ^  J.McDONELL,Proprietor  JJ  MATHIEU'S  NERVINE POWDERS.  . Fer Heaiuie.and Neuralgia '  On* juaikr nill  nl������������t  ui 1 (<���������  pwdtrt ������i'l  Ityniirh.  lt)w^St,4  hi4 ttnU;fc*  1       !l r������. t������t U Cnpp,     ���������-/  %       !' YJ" ivXtt tV ib MunlpA  >*+* I  -.-- ALLAY FEVER PAINS AT ONCE  Act Instantly and effectually  If vour dealer does not keep tliem we will  ma.il you a box (iS powdcrsjon receipt of 25c  J.  L.  MATHIEU   CO., Props., Sherbrooke  ESTABLISHED 1817  Capital, all paid up, $ 14,400,000.   Rest, $ 12,000,000.,  -'   UNDIVIDED   PROMTS,   8961,789.11. ''  Hon. President: I^ord Strathcona and Mount Royai.. G. C. M. G. ,  Piesident: R. B. Angus, Esq.  Vice-Presidentand.General Manager: Sir E. S. Cr,ousT0N, Bart.  Branches in London, En������f, {ffitf ������&} New York, Chicago  Buy and Sell Sterling Exchange and Cable Transfers.    Grant Commercial and  Travellers' Credits, available in any part of tlie world.  SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT';I"tc0l^,i^.,lt  Greenwood Branch   - C. B. Winter, Mgr.  ��������������� ;                 Send your money to the Coast *  2s  I INVEST AT HOME I  jr The value of Orchard Land increases ������3  ^ every Year ~s  g You cannot lose if you buy ^  % Kettle Valley Orchard Land Jl  ������**"" !T2  *"~ *^^  ������ Apply at once to ~  1 ^.^TS^TTTtvw������������������ TEMPERANCE/ ..'  ���������  is all right if shorn of humbuggcry.  Too much water drinking .is just  as injurious as too much liquor or  anything else. ��������� _  OUR PURE WINES  AND LIQUORS  are medicinal if not abused. Every  'household should have a moderate  supply of pure wines or liquors in  the closet for emergency���������either  unexpected visitors or sudden.illness, when a drop of pure liquor  in time'may forestall all necessity  for drugs.  L" Greenwood Eiquor Company, importers, greenwood, B. 0. s  fMJifirt!  BURNS & G  Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats/Fish, "  and Poultry. ' Shops in nearly all the  towns of Boundary and Kootenay.  A COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD *%  r  "i  GREENWOOD CITY WATERWORKS  CO.  The Greenwood Dairy  PURE MILK  and CREAM  i  A TRIAL SOLICITED  W. JENKS,  Prop.  J  GREENWOOD and  MIDWAY STAGE  LoavcH Greenwood for Spokane  at 7 a. m., mid fonOrovillo at 2:30  P������ m. Archie Qillis.  Kentucky producps more tobacco each year than any other State  in the Union.  It is estimated that on au average  each penny in circulation changes  hands eleven tim'cH a week.  A New York school teacher,  whose salary is $1,425 a year, test-  lies that ho owes $129,882.  ininimiitHniiminiiimmmmiiimninmimnHmmm!?^  to Phoenix Stage I  Leaves Greenwood Daily at 3 p. m. ~|  Arrives Greenwood Daily at 10 a. m. =2  GREENWOOD OFFICE       -      L. L. MATTHEWS' CIGAR STORE ~������  g H.   M.   LAING,   PROPRIETOR 3  ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiaaiiiii^iiiiiaiUiiiiiiiiiaiaituiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiil  Get your Razors Honed ]  and your Baths at  Frawley9s  Barber , .  Shop, Greenwood,  The Best Arranged Cigar Factory  w at the Coast, where the  B.G., Old Sports j  and the Famous (Clear Havanas)    f  IBRILLIANTESl  are turned out in larger quantities  than ever.  SOLD AM, OVER  PROVINCE  Made by WJLBERG & WOLZ  L   New Westminster, B.O.       e  ' ,  i;  ''I  il!  11  !  j'i  l  m  Ml  Ml  i jt  .4������'  Ii  ; .1  '<'-  '4$  u  (���������'?!  ii  its  >l if  hi  )  (     i  m  IIUAUM  nMM^h\imiuim*a!#tiMi!i������mmwitiii

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