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Kootenay Mail Sep 7, 1895

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 FOB MEN���������  Finest Cashmere Sacks '.... 0 CO  Extra heavy wool do.    0 50  Best quality  Shetland   wool  Underwear, per suit 4 25  Finest nat. wool   "        4 00  Braces, per.pair, 30c and 10c.   :o:   The English Trading Co.  .. t  /  // ''-'  -./���������'  . *   'ti %a   i  \  V,,.,-   \vaf  Lva  C./E,/SHAW, *  I/'  \  Jf "7>^  6      Customs Bl6kery~~l  VoL 2.���������No. 22  REVELSTOKE, WEST KOOTENAY, B.C., SEPTEMBER  T, 1895.  ff    $2.00 a Year.  OTTX-SL  Goods "bought right outi  no com  mission cjiarg-otl. ' ���������  | -  Fair selection; immedia ta returns, fj  Shipping tags furnished free upon. j|  rcqnest. , 1 ^  Sliere.is 3STO D0K.on JEJurs or nay  otter floods we handle.     |  TTJ- Write for Circular sr'rtaEf Ship-  j.-.ij������r Sirection3 and ������AT:WZ HUB-  SEC PBICES.  Vl C'lVi ills  Incorporated.  u*m un"������c. / 200-212 Fret Avenue'North,  branches:j  HELENA, MONT.      .CHICAGO, ILL        VICT-IRIA, B.C.  etr.CccJ-ctBiiur^sSti. '   Vs '"Mil.".-! Et.      ���������  J'J tmsHj- St.  Kootenay Lodg-e  NO-15A.F. &A.M.  The regular meeting  are held in the Mas-  onicTeinplc, Bourne's  Hall, on the third  Monday in each  month at 8 p. m.  Visiting brethren  cordially welcomed.  CRAGK.' Skckutaky.  O. O. F., No, 25.  IU'Kulur ineetiiiKs are held'  in Oddfellows' Hall every  Thursday night nt eight  o'clock. Visiting brothers  cordially welcomed.  K. O. LBWIS/Skc.  Loyal Orange Lodge No. 1658.  Hegular mccLings arc held in  (he Odd Fellows' Hall on the  second and fourth Wednesday's  of each month at 7:30 if. in.  Visiting brethren arc cordially  invited.  K. ADAIIt.   ,T. I. WOODKOW,  W.M. Hoc. Secy.  WINNIPEG, MAN.  178 Princess SI. ,  The Confederation  Life ���������: Association" Toronto.  a. McNeil,  BARBER SHOP AND BATH ROOK,  i  ', Front Street, Revelstoke.  Capital and Assets Over  $6,000,000. J  Insurance at,Risk Over  $26,000,000  P      Before'insuring you should see the     "Rift  Model Poli'cv Contract   * Ilu <   ���������  CONDITIONS issue&"f*, RESTRICTIONS  Ful), particulars on application to Agents:  T. L. HAIG-,  Agent  for Revelstoke.  Gen  J. D. BREEZE,  ral Agent for B.C., Vancouver.  W.  COWAN,  WHOLESALE. DEAL!  R JN r.  Haircut, 25c;  Bath, ,50c.;,Six Shaving  Tickets for $1.00.  .   GUY  BARBER,  WATCHMAKER AND JEWELLER.  Repairing Neally &. Promptly Executed.  ,l      . '      ' '  '    REVELSTOKE, B. C.  r      ���������  ���������-   FURNITURE,  ,  Doors, Sashes & Blinds.  R. HOWSON,  REVELSTOKE..  COFFJNS  CARRIED  TN  STOCK.  AGENT KOlt niNGElt'QUWINO MACHINES.  NAVIGATION.  1895  TIME   SCHEDULE  ,1895  WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.  fa  V  *EB:"VELSTO*KiE3,        IB-O.  Stockholm Boase.  JOHN STONE, Proprietor.  THE  OLD  FAVOIUTE  STEAMEB <  il ii ' 1������   .  ,  ;    , (dipt, liobt. Samlcrscni) ,;   ,  , WII.I. RUN  M'TWKKN'   .  REVELSTOKE   and   NAKUSP  Stopping   at    Lakreau,     Thomson's  Landing iind Halcyon Hot  Sprincs during the  Season of 1895.  Leaving Revelstoko Wednesdays and Sntur  - days ut 7 a.m.       t     ^   .  Leaving Nolcusp Mondayi* and Thursdays al  7. ii.ni. ,  The above dates nre sulyuct to'change without notice. ���������    ���������        i  : ROHKIsT SANDKRSON.  The Dining Room is. fnpnisheil with the best the  Market affor'ds.  THE BAR IS SUPPLIED WITH THE CHOICEST  XX   WINES, LIQUORS' Ai������) CIGARS:      '.  THE CENTRAL HOTEL  ARRAHAMSON BROS.,  Proprietors.  First-class Table  ���������   Good Beds  ���������  Fire-proof Safe  Telephone   ���������   'Bus Mecits all Trains.  ' BEVELSTOEIE,      33. O-  THE  QUEEN*   HOTEL  a The Steamer Arrow  LEAVES  TOWN WHARF, REVELSTOKE,'.  Wednesdays  and   Saturdays, at 9 a.m.  s   " .     FOR���������     '     '"  Hall's Landing, Lardeau, Halcyon and  Leon Hot. Springs, fNakusp and  Bnrtiin Cifcv.  Columbia & Kootenay  ABTIA1IAMS0N  BROS.,  Everything new and First-cld:  PllOPRIHTOIIS.  ss in all Respects.  The House is stocked with the Finest Wines and Cigars in the Market  TBOTJT  LAKE [CIT"5T,   B.O-  W. A. JOWETT,  MIKING AND REAL ESTATE BROKER,  NELSON, B. C.  JLaruiea.u 6c 'Slocan Prospects Wanted.  ASSAYS and .  MILL" TESTS  .Samples  tested from.  .1 lb.  to 1 ton in weight.  W, PELLEW HARVEY, F.C.S.  Vancouver, B.C.  i,  i  All    Assays   made     in    Duplicate.  Certificates  forwiuded   by   tuLuris.  THE   REVELSTOKE   PHARMACY.  E Have  Now on Hand  A large assortment of  of Stationery of every  description.  POIVpQY'S PURE INKS,  I INCANDESCENT PENS,  'HUfifD'S-IRISH LINEN HOTE  In nil  sizes  ]   At Regular Eastern  Prices.  '   l(\'\f\ RHOfQ   Tn i-lioose from in t lie  IU(W DUU1VO   circulating Ul'wiry.  THE,  REVELSTOKE   PHabMACY-  Steam Navigation Co.jji  PASSENGERS FOR  Hall's Landing,  Hot Springs,  Nakusp, Three Forks  Nelson. and Slocan Points,  Kootenay Lake Points,  Trail Creek,  Rossland,  Northport and Spokane  ���������SHOULD TAKE THK���������  STEAMER LYTTON  Leaving Revt.lstoke on Monday and  Thursday Evenings ul 7 p.m.  For local time card of tho Compiiny'i* steamers on Kooteniiy Lnko upply to Uie jmrHoroii  board.  Kor full inforinalion ns to Mokels, rate.**, clc,  apply to T. Allan,  Secretary, Nelson,  li C.  OCEAN STEAMSHIPS^  royal' mail lines.  CHEAPEST routoto tho OLD COUNTRY.  Proposed Sailings from Montreal.  ALLAN  LIN* 10.  l'AKIKIAN AU|?. 31  MUNOOLIAN" Sept.    7 .  DOMINION LINK.  V.iN*f-OL*vi:n Sept.   7  MAUirosA Sept. 21  UKAVKIt LINK.  Laki; Wixnji-ko Sept.   1  1 jAKi: Ostakio Sept. 11  Caliin Svii, 950, $TA), S70. SSO and ti)iwards.  liitennedlatc Sn!0: Stoomgo SVO.  Pits-onseiN tiekehd  tlirouftli  lo all purls of  Great IJnUiin and li-clauil, and at specially low  nilos 1^1 all prirtb of the Kurupcuu eoiitiiien*.  Apply toneani-'t'steaiii.slilporrnJl'vayaKent.to  I. T. B&BWSTBS. Agent, RovclBtoko.  or lo KonuKT Kicmi, C5cn.  I ii'-seiiKcr ^\geut  VVinnipOiJ.  THE BOARD OF TRADE  Petitions the Minister of Railways re  the Columbia River Bridge.  The following petition, which has  been forwarded to Ottawa by the local  Board of Trade, fully explains itself  as regards the requirements therein  set forth. The Board is asking the,  co-operation of kindred organizations  on the coast in the mutter:  To   the Honourable,   the Minister of  Railways, Ottawa :������������������  Your   petitioners,    the    Revelstoke  Board of Trade, having had under consideration the obstruction to free navigation, caused hy the railway  bridire  across the' Columbia River, at Revelstoke, beg leave respectfully to   represent' to  the Honourable   Minister  of  Railway*   that   the Canadian .Pacific  Railway is preparing to build, immediately, a new bridge at this place, or, to  reconstruct the present one,  and" that  the time is opportune   to   require   of  said company  the   construction   of  a  bridge that will comply with  the conditions laid down and prescribed in the  Dominion Railway Act of 1SSG, chapter  109, sections 91, 92 and * 91.   which   require that no company shall cause any  obstruction in or impedetlie free navigation of any river,  stream  or canal,  Ui or across or, along which its railway  is carried; that the,company shall have  openings or construct a drawbridge or  swingbridges over the ch.-mnel of rivers';  and shall submit the proposed plan   to  the railway committee and obtain   its'  approval.  In support oE "the  request contained  herein that the Honourable Minister  of  Railways  should   cause   the   new  bridge to be constructed  according to  the requirements of the statute as regards the free navigation of  the   Columbia river, this Board  of Trade beg  leave to oiFer the following   additional  reasons:   In proof that the   Columbia  is navigable at andfaliove   Revelstoke,  refoience is made "to   the   well-known  fact that during the early excitement  of lniiiiiigin the Big Bend,  steamers  ran from Little Delles in' .Washington  to Downie Creek, about 50 miles north  "of Revelstoke. The need for the facility'  of transportation by ,steamer 0is   very  great.    As a rich placer and   hydraulic  mining district,   the Big Bendy is  already distinguished, although seriously'  handicapped by the  high freights on  shipments   by   pack-tiain.   Attention  is now  being directed, to   mineral   in  quartz, and during the present summer  a large number of claims have  been  located which promise   well* in   gold.  Several claims carrying  this precious  mineral, have been found at Game's  Creek; on Downie Creek, a number of  similar locations have been made; and  on McCulloch Creek aud other tributaries of Gold .Stream, many promising  locations have been staked.   Little tit-  tention has heretofore been given to  hydraulic   mining,   bub    one    foreign  company is now operating at Smith  Creek and   propose c making.. a  large  expenditure for machinery, which will  need better means of transportation  than  are  now   in   existence.     Other  hydraulic schemes are in contemplation  and some are in process of at rangement  on Smith and French Creeks.   Further,  north along the Columbia and ascending the Canoe and Wood  rivers from  one to two   hundred   miles,   there   is  scarcely a doubt that valuable mineral  discoveries will be made.    Already on  the Canoe and upper waterb of   Fraser  river,  very  extensive  mica mines of  good   quality . have   been   discovered.  The   natural  outlet,   and , the    only  feasihle'one, from this long stretch of  river navigation, is by ,way of the Columbia river at Revelstoke.  An extensive area of rich agricultural land, ebtimated to beatleast200,-  000 acres, border the shores of the Columbia and Cnnoe rivets, some of which  is already occupied by settlers and  under cultivation, and as soon as the  means of getting into the district are  sufficiently improved, all the available  land will be eagerly taken- up. The  Provincial Government has a party of  surveyors at this time making an exploration of the lands along the Columbia and Canoe livers, which will he  printed for the heiicill-of home-seekers.  This district, it will be seen,' lias before it a great future in its milling and  agricultural expansion, depending vciy  largely upon the means oi* communication'by water and railway which  may lie provided foi it by the government; and one of thu most important  of these, your petitioners believe to be,  the free and uninterrupted navigation  of the Columbia river.  Although much has beeii said about  the erection of smelting works, and  many-places have been named as desirable points for their location, it is  not known with any certiiinty where  they will be established. If at a place  on the river below Revelstoke, as at  Bannock Point, Nakusp or Trail, the  ores of the upper l i ver must necessarily  be transported to the smelter for treatment, and the cost of 'transhipment at  Revelstoke should be avoided by providing for steamers the free navigation1  of the Columbia as provided by the  Raihvav Act.  The foregoing are some of the considerations whicli it seems to the  Bonrd, should have weight favorable  Jo the granting of the prayer of thi-*  communication--thai, is, the frije nav-  gation of the Columbia river at Revelstoke. Thev are submitted with  respectful deference, nob doubting the  honourable minister will give them  full value in determining the matter  thus brought to his attention.  ,' A Smelter at Midway.  The most important deal in the  ���������history of the mining industry in Yale  district has justcbeen completed' here,  and a long-felt want is to be supplied  to the district in the form of,a smelter,  final arrangements having been made  and papers signed on Saturday last,  providing for the building of a fifty  ton plant, to be erected at Midway by  a syndicate, represented by Mr.' S. S.  Fowler, M.E., of Chicago, ancl W. T.  Thompson, of Fairview. This result is  the consummation of a ,thorough investigation into the resources of this  district since last May b}' Mr. Fowler,  who has been constantly on the move,  quietly informing himself on t.he  mineral resources of the country and  acquiring properties suitable for his  ' purpose.���������.irftYmce.  i Slocan Star Sale.  A couple of weeks ago'we published  an item regarding the proposed sale of  the Slocan Star. Some of our S^outh  Kootenay contemporaries denied that  any change of, ownership was contemplated. But the Prospector in its last  issue has this to'say on. the subject:  " Word comes from different sources  that'the pending deal of an interest in  the Slocan Star propert}- in- Slocan  district has been consummated. The  sale was by Smith, of Milwaukee,*' of  his interest to Shaughnessy arid others  of the C.P.R. Co., at the rate of- ������1,-  400,000, for the entire 'property.  Whether the transfer is of one-third  or two-thirds of the whole property is  not known here."  Dumped Her Load.in,the Lake.  The first accident of the season on  the river occurred last Saturday,  whereby two and a half cars of ore  were lost overboard fi*om the scow.  The Lyttun left Naki^p'wtth the scow  in tow ; both steainer and scow being  loaded with three cars of ore each. A  few miles up the lake, by s-otne, as yet,  unexplained reason the bow of the  ?cow became submerged and unshipped  the greater part of its cargo, righting  ������������������herself almost immediately. Tlie scow  was then' beached and tlie. Lytton  came on up'with her. ewn cargo. , The  ore iviii1 from the Cumberland' and  Alamo mines. '    > ,  "   ILLECILLEWAET ITEMS.  Illecillewakt, Sept. 6.���������The fnan-  ager of the Maple   Leaf   Mining  company left on Wednesday for Kamloops,  where he intends to   secure   a   pack-  train with which he will lay   in a full  supply,   of    provisions    and   mining  material  for the  winter.   Fuel  is an  important item, and has to be   packed  in as the camp is above the timber line. '  Mr.  McKinuon   will   superintend the  tnihingwork, and will carry it on with .  a larger gang of men.    Win. Cleveland  will handle the pack train.  The owners of claims ate, showing '  their confidence by keeping up' their  assessments, and many locations that  had been allowed to lapse, have been  restiiked, among which are several on  Gold Hill.  Ben Green will keep at work developing his claim, the North Star, on the  North Fork, until the snow Hies.  , , Some splendid samples of ore are <  being brought, in, particularly from  the new iind on the Noi;th Fork of the  Illecillewaet. '      ,  Mr. -McKinnon accompanied the  manager as far as Revelstoke, and will  return on Saturday. ,  The veteran prospectors, Tom Bain  and John Boyd, who were the original  owners of the Lanark, will he here the  last of the week.  A' Horse on John.    ,  Sin,���������If the Revelstoke Board of  Trade, or any other missionary body,  is trying to "save" the editor of the  Nelson Tribune', they have a tough  .subject. But don't let the said editor  be disturbed by the receipt of a few  religious fly leaves. He should wait  for the second and illustrated edition  of the " Ethiopian who has not changed  his skin, and his jolly companions."  " , .     Grip. ���������  ,��������� Asbestos in the Lardeau. '  0 r  When out prospecting on the south  fork of the Lardeau, last week, Andrew  Abrahainson discovered an immense  body of asbestos. The samples brought  up shows the fiber to be very tine and  long. So far,as we know this is the  first discovery in this part of the  country, at least, of. this most useful  and valuable mineral. Th e location is  about 10 miles from Trout Lake City.  Samples have been ' forwarded to  Ottawa. ,  Caught His Man.  Unablelongcr to stand the "pressure,"  Win. K. Jamiesoh came from his hiding place on Wednesday and visited a  liquid dispensary where he was overhauled by ,',' Detective" Cadman.  Jamieson, appeared before F. Fraser,  J.P., on Thursday morning, .when a  .charge of obtaini tig. money by a forged  order was preferred against him. Tho  Crown'asked for a remand until Monday when Judge Spinks will try the  case.  1 -The Athabasca Excitement.  Many of those who made the rush to  the Athabasca gold fields a few weeks  ago appear to have been woefully disappointed. The South Edmonton  News publishes the. following letter-  signed by five prospectors: " We  thought we would drop a note to you,  re the prospects foi gold on this river.  From our own experience and from  what we can learn of those" that were  prospecting up and down the riveri  there is nothing. We have found  nolhing and will return. We advise  no one to,ronie."  Commenting upon this the News  says:- "This indeed is hard luck and  is nothing of what we expected. However those who have gone to the Mac-  leod and other tributaries of the Athabasca are making fair wages. Once in  a while a good spot i.s found but it  does not pun out long enough to make  it average all round. Tho chances arc  tho old reliable Saskatchewan is Vis  good as any. Miners, on our own  river, are making'wages. But the old  saying 'There me green fields afar  off ' is a true one, and will be an object  lesson to many."  Placer Mining in Boundary Creek.  All placer claims on Boundary  Creek were abandoned now over a  year ago, says the Midway Advance,  and until last week no fresh attempts  had been made to extract the precious  metal from the gravel and sand of the  creek bed. A party of prospectors  have, however, camped within about a  quarter of a mile from Midway, with  the ostensible object of tunneling for  bed-rock. Undoubtedly , gold, probably in large, quantities, lies at the  bottom of Boundary Creek, and  systematic work will bring its own  reward.  Provost and Falding Captured.  Holh of tlie defaulting Supreme  Court Regi'-tiars���������J. C. Prevost, of  Victoria, and W. II. Folding, of New  Wesl minster, have been arrested.  Falding was captured nt Spokane, and  Prevnsl nn isan Juan isLund-  Ore and Bullion Shipments.  \     ,'    The mineral development   is   exem-c  plified hy a comparison of the ore shipments .via Revelstoke.   Trie, total for '  the month of August 1805 was 6G2 tons   .  as against 48 tons for  the corresponding month last yeax.  The shipments for  the  past   weekr  were :  Saturday,- Aug. 31.���������Lytton, 2 cars  Cumberland and 1 car Alamo ore, for  Omaha.'- % ' '  Sunday, Sept. 1.���������Nakusp, 5 care  bullion for. Aurora.  Monday, Sept. 2.���������Lytton, 1 car o������  Alamo for ,Omaha, and two c������r������ ������������������ of  Slocan Star for Everett.  Wednesday, Sept. 4.���������Lytton, ? cars  Alamo for Omaha, and 1 car Slocan  Star for Everett.  -, Thursday, Sept. 5.���������Nakusp, 2 cars  bullion for Aurora, and 3 cars Alamo-  ore for Omaha. ���������  Worried by a Bear.  While out prospecting last week on  tbe mountain behind his ranch at  Downie Creek, A. W. Mcintosh surprised a bear and cub in the long  grass. The prospector was as much  surprised as the bear, and, while the.  cub ran away the old bear made a  determined light. Mcintosh used his  gun and knife but had one foot badly  chawed before be succeeded in finishing her bearship. He will be laid up  for a couple of weeks as a resulc of tho  encounter.  Actors From the Flowery Kingdom.  A Chinese spectacular troupe of 200  members���������one carload of whom were  women���������went through by special train  Thursday. They had just arrived on  the Empress and were bound for the  International Exposition to be. held at  Atlanta, Georgia, this, fall. The  proprietors arc Yong Bros., who are  well known in Victoria, and the performance will be a spectacular production entitled the storming of "\Vei-  Hai-Wei. The proprietors intend  giving the show in Victoria on their  return.  Prisoner Escapes at Vernon.  John McKinnon, who was committed  for trial on a charge of cattle stealing,  escaped from Vernon jail at 8 o'clock  Wednesday evening. McKihiion had  filed the irons he had on and made a  dash for liberty and in five seconds  was out of sight in the bushes. He  is supposed to be safely amiss the  lKiundary. l,^d r?*~\.W-a-*  THE   KOOTENAY    MAIL.  3  ,     '       CUM RENT   NOTES.  A few years ago   theie   was  room for, a  great deal  of criticism upon   the management of county'and local fairs throughout  theJcountry. There has been great, improve-  ;meQ:, -however, within ten years, and we  are glad to say that   most of  our aniiual  fairs    are ��������� now   free   from   the    immoral  infiuenc^which made so many unworthy  -of  the support' of all honest  men.    Some,  we are sorry to say/still continue to license  gambling   concerns,   immoral shows, and  '   catohpenny    fakes,   caring' more   for  the  ' ��������� financial succei-s of the fair  than for the  influence it exerts upon the   patrons and  apon   society.     Such  fairs should be let  severely alone by all good citizens.    If the  s    managers cater   to   the worst' elements,of  ��������� society, let thoEe elements be iu  patrons.  ���������  Au agricultural fair is designed, primarily,  to    promote    agricultural   and.   kindred  interests, and tbeir moral influence should  be'pure and elevating.    Nothing that is of  'doubtful'character,   let  alone   positively  degrading     or ' demoralizing    influence,  should be admitted within the gates.  SOUTH SEA OAHIBA'LS.  THEY * HAVE    EATEN    ALL  WHITE MEN IN REACH.  THE  , This does not mean that we are opposed  to amusements. On the contrary, we advocate wholesome aud harmless amusements  at fairs, most, heartily. Ws svould secure  and advertifae attractions that would  attract and amusements that would amuse,  and at the same lime have them free from  suspicion,' and of undoubted (healthy moral  tone and influent. There is nothing wrong  in a roller-coaster, a Ferris .wheel, a balloon,  ascension, a parachule jump, a panorama  exhibition, or a fair and square testoi speed  on the track. ' They relieve the monotony  of tho f*������ir ground, and infuse the air of  enercy and life into what would otherwise  becomparatively tame and listless to a large  part of tho,attendants, if not all.      ' ,  It niust be remembered that the financial  success ot the fair is of primary importance,  and'in order to senure" tlie" largest attendance possible, a - variety of attractions,  aside from the show of farnii products and  live stock, is absolutely essential. There  are many who wilTgo to see a good race,  ', but care nothing for'the agricultural features. And so with other attractions. If  they are harmless they are legitimate, even  if not so very instiuctive. The fairs should  be educators, "surely, but to, make them  such-they must be popular, attractive, full  of life, but free from immoral practices  and iofliien^es thatdeerade- -  ��������� The moral tone o.'society throuchout the  country, and especially "on the farm, will  not now support a fair that admits gambling devices, licenses swindlers, or allows  <  the sale of liquors,, and managers who pur-  . ., Bue this policy under the belief that they  X will build up a paying institution, make a  ,< grievous mistake. Tliey may achieve temporary, success, but utter failure' cannot  long be delayed. All good citizens should  turn their faces resolutely against this class  of fairs.      Don't attend.them, and if you  . value the good moral character ot you  boys and girls, keep tliem away. t A fair  that builds a dance platform advertises the  fact .that it invites the lowest and vileBt  characters to patronize it. Promiscuous  dances have always been regarded us dan-  , '��������� gerous in the extreme,* and a fair ground  dancing platform is one of the worst forms  of this evil. .The very air is tainted, and  your boys' and girls cannot approach it  (ilosety without infection. Shun it- as you  would the smallpox or yellow fever.  GOOD JOB WELL DONE.    ���������  Steamer Tnken Out or tl-.c   Graveyard or  llic  Allnnfir.  Sable   Island   gauds.  After being embedded-for ten months in'  the sands of .Sable Island,the " graveyard  ���������af the Atlantic," the British freight steamship. Nerilo was taken to New York on  klouday. under her own steam, preceded  and partly guided by the Merritt wrecking  ���������steamer J. D. Jones. Save for a few  damaeed plates near the keel, her hull wag  in good condition. She had been stripped  of all her joiner work,^including the doors  .. of every room except the lavatory, by tlie  beach combers of the island. .All of her  brass fittings and every pane of glass had  been carried-away.  The Nerito went' aground in a fog in  September last. Her crew abandoned her  and weie taken to Halifax ou the steamship  Lunenburg. The British steamship New-  fields came along and stripped her of chain,  c.ible, hawsers, and canvas.  Her owner'colloeted the insurance from  lhe Hritish Lloyds, whose agents decided  to savo her, as she was wortli about 8250,-  000, and was oniy three years old. Tliey  emplojedthc Merritt Wrecking Company  to naul her off.  Tne steamer I. J. Merritt went to the  island in October last, but was prevented  by foul weather from doing elective work,  li: June last the J. D. Jones, in cotnmaud  ��������� of Capt. Fred. Sharpe, wilh a crew of  foity men including engineers aud stokers,  to man lhe Nerito, went to her and found  that she had been forced across two bars by  the wiuiersiorinsand was fast on the beach  oi lhe island. Canals were dredged through  the two'bars; and anchors, attached to tour  fifteen-inch mruiilla hawsers wen- dropped  astern of the Nerito. Steam winches, to  whicli the inboard ends of the hawsers  were made fast, were set going on the  Nerito, and, inch, by inch the ship made  sternway down the canals though tho inner  and outer bars. 1 he Merritt assisted in  the work by pulling on a heavy hawser  mido fast to a big bitt on the Nerito.  Twenty-one days were spent preparing for  the job rf hauling and towing the ship into  deep water. Tho actual work of moving  the ship was finished iu I en days. Sho  was damaged about $50 000., There are  nearly 500 tons of coal in her bunkers. The  Motrin Company did tho job for 920,000.  There is about ns, much rejoicing over a  gmd mini luBt, as there is over a bad one  saved.  Itrllisli   Ships Will Shell   tlie   Cannibal  '   Villages���������The   Lnless   Victims,   of the  i;iooil(l>lrsly gavasci llic   t'rew  of nn  '    Australian Trad ins Shl*> - Tlie Settler*  Fleeing rrom llic Island  In Terror or  Their Uvea. c. '  Newsi has' just .been received in this  country that the cannibal inhabitants of  the Solomon Islands have returned once  more to their barbarous practice of headhunting and man-eating. The despatches  state that the white settlers' in the neighborhood, who, after a year's 3essation from  these bloodthirsty pursuits on the part of  ihe natives, had begun to feel somewhat  secure, have been stricken with terror and  are fleeing to Australia on overy available  vessel. They ure accompanied in their  flight by numhets of missionaries, who are  well-aware that the South Sea Island cannibal lias a strong partiality for white flesh,  aiid that ho will go to the extent of slaying  even these good and harmless clergymen  when once his appetite for human flesh has  been thoroughly, excited.  In all of tho adjoining islands the,white  settlers have applied to the British Admiral, Sir A. G. Biidge, for protection.  The Admiral has dibplayed commendable  energy,in his effort'to punish,the horrible  offenders, and -according to the Iastest  reports, has embarked on board,the first-  class cruiser Orland, with the purpose of  shelling the savage hamlets and dwellings  along the coast. It is doubtful, however,  whether muoh will be accomplished by  his line of procedure, as the saTages are  'accustomed to retreat' to the interior while  the firing is going,on, and, by the deftnesB  and treachery of their' movements,; they  have often been known to seize  STRAGGLING'HOATLOADS  of the whites as they visited the shore and  to mako off.with them in triumph. .Very  few of these ��������� unfortunate captives have'  ever been seen again. ������������������ According' to the  usual practice of tho Solomon Islanders,  they are, immediately put to death and  their bodies carefully quartered by the  chief's butcher. The pieces are then hung  up on   the  branches  of shady  trees  and_  .allowed to aoquire , the .proper, degree of  seasoning.      ���������-,    ^^������., ,* ' *  The latest white victims" of the savages  were the ship's' company of the Sydney  trading sohooner Amelia, Copt. D. Kerr,  his mate, Samuel Smith, and ei^ht or ten  men. They sailed in the schooner'Amelia,  from Rubiana iii the middle of last April  and have since been missing under circumstances that leave uo question as to their  fate.,    The British   naval officers  in the  .vicinity are naturally enraged .over the  miserable destruction of these sailors', and  it is probable that swift vengeance will be  .taken upon the cannibals iLthey.fall into  the clutches of the "whites. When the  sailors failed to return to Rubiana in May,  one Nathaniel .Wheatley, of that'place,  organized a search for them and succeeded  in picking up the deck-house, thefhatches  and other parts of the Amelia, but every  one of-the men had disappeared.  THE   CANNIBAL ISLES.  The group of islands called the Solomon  Islands by early navigators, who vaguely  supposed that they were the original  depositoiy of Solomon's gold, extend from  the northwest to the southeast in latitude  5 to 11 degrees south and 154 to 163 degrees  east, at a distance of about S00 miles  northeast of Australia, They are the  largest of the numerous groups of islands  in the Pacific Ocean, and were discovered  by Alverdo ,d? Menda'ua in 1567. Vet  though they were thus among the earliest  known islands in this region, our information in regard to their topography, resources  and inhabitants has always remained very  meagre, owing to the uuamiable character  of the natives. '    ,  Tho Solomon Islanders are of a mixed  race, varying between au almost pure  Malay type and tho dark-skinned Polynesian. Though savage in their habits,  they are nevertheless intelligent, crafty,  thievish and revengeful, aud they are said,  when domesticated, to make excellent and  faithful servants. The men wear no  clothing but a loin band, and the women  wear a amall skirt. They are mostly small  of stature snd their hair and skin are  intensely black, the former being closely  frizzled. Some visitors have described  these people as the mostBavage, brutal and  degraded race on earth, but tiiis opinion is  perhaps too sevore. Alt hough-cannibals,  they are by uo means degraded ' as compared with other savage races. They had  acquired in the process of their development  and before coming in contact with Europeans n. knowledge of various simple arts,  several of which they practised " with  remarkable skill. Tliey are singularly  clever in aurgery, setting arms and legs  with bamboo splints. They have also  obtained ' some knowledge ol dentistry,  though their treatment of a patient is  somewhat of a heroic character,' s      y  A protectorate was established over the  entire group in 1S93. Tno British Government thus acquired a total area of seven or  eight thousand squore miles and a population ot about 50,000 savnges, the greater  part of whom wore cannibals. At the time  of the establishment of the protectorate the  chief of the island of San Christova, one of  the most cannibalistic of the lot, was one  Taki, a converted man-ealer.  STILL LIKE WHITE rLESIC.  Contrary lo llic general impression, the  practice of cannibalism has by no means  been extinguished. It has been supposed  that the increasing intercourse between the  whites aud savages aud tho presence of a  large number of devout niiBiionaries in the  South Sea Islands had put an end to man-  eating as a general practice, but this is not  the case. The inhabitants of many of these  islanda, and of tbe Solomon Islands in  particular, have always been "anihrop-  hagoi," or cannibals, ever since their  existence first became known to white men  in the sixteenth century. And there is  nothing in the presence of the missionaries or  in the soothing influences of intercourse  with white traders that would tend to make  these savages abandon the custom. Among  them the practice of devouring their  fellow-creatures in order to satisfy the  pangs of hunger is regarded as entirely  natural and even praiseworthy. At the  time of the second visit of the discoverer of  these islands, Alverdo do Mendaiia, the  chief  of tlie island   of   Yb.ibol, one  of   the  largest of the group, sent,to the Spanish  navigator a present of a quarter of a boy,  with the hand and arm. The Admiral,  horrified at receiving bo gruesome a gift,  ordered its instant burial, a proceeding  which both angered and perplexed the well-  meaning chief, who did not think that such  a. choice morsel as a boy's flesh should be eo  recklessly disposed of.  > The Soiomon Islanders are so addicted to  the habit of man-eating that they regard  with disgust the habit of a numbei of  neighboring tribes of nourishing the body  by means of roots, herbs and nuts. The  testimony of visitors to this region is to  the effect that the man-eaters are by far a  more vigorous and  '  '      WELL-I"ORMED RACE,    ,  and though they, are canniblilE^they are by  no means of an inferior order of intelligence  as savages go. The men are, as a rule,well  formed; and the women, iu their youth,are'  handsome and attractive, though they soon  become bent and disfigured by lhe toil to  which they are subjected. The Solomon  Island women, as is generally the , case  among savages, ia'thp slave of her husband,  and even her life is in his hands. They  are usually treated with great cruelly, and  disobedience is punished by instant death.  The body is subsequently devoured by the  htuband and, his remaining wives. It  would be considered a waste lo bury it.-  The chiefs are especially given to man-  eating, aud in a raid of the kind which has  jufet been reported,all of the tenderest flesh  is submitted to them. Each cllief is provided with a butcher, whose duty it is to  put to death tho captives and prepare their  bodies for feasting. It is, porhap-s, advisable to bear in mind that the attitude of  these butchers towards the captives is ' noi  ono of hostility or vengeance, but merely  tho professional attitude of one who has a  certain piece of work to perform,and whose  sole desire is to perform it with excellence.  The prevailing notion that'the human food  of cannibals is prepared by .boiling 'the  whole body in a pot,is, of course erroneous.  ���������Aside from the absence of pots, the human  flesh is of a character that is best prepaied,  not by boiling, but by hanging up in a  shadyspot for a day or two and then roasting like pork.  The taste is said'to resemble that ��������� of  swine very closely.' In fact, the Biblical  injunction against the eating of Bwine ia  said to be founded on this resemblance.  ��������� HOW  UU.MA.V  FLESH   TASTES.    ,  The flesh of a white man is peculiarly  agreeable to the taste of a cannibal. During the uprisings of the Solomon Island  "���������'head hunters" uo person 'is safe, be he  white or black, so great is the frenzy ' of  these fearful creatures for human blood.  But if a white man should be encountered  the occasion is celebrated by a'banquet or  feast of unusual ceremouy. dipt. William  'LYWawn, an Euglishirian, who spent years'  in the Queensland labor trade and who was  quite familiar with the character and habits  of the Solomon Islander, relates the following experience, illustrating" this peculiar  custom i ' '  " On Nov. 8 the natives had captured  ,a recruiting boat belonging to the Mystery  labor schooner. .They had killed her crew���������  four native boatmen���������and two white men  ���������Thomas Muir, mate,' and John Renlon,  O. A. * ' ���������     ,_  "The' motive for these murders was'not  revenge, but simply'cannibalism., A great  feast had been'arranged to take" place, to  'which all the surrounding, tribes had lieen  invited. The'chief of the tribe that gave  it desired to show hospitality on a grand  scale, and accordingly provided the rare  dainty of white man's flesh to do "honor to  his guests on the occasion." "  The natives not only employ the flesh of  their captives, but they also make excellent  use of other portions of the body.  ��������� THK LARGER BOXES,  sucb as the femur or thigh bone and the  large arm bones, are used in making spear  points, and iu various other crude arts.  The skulls are chiefly employed iu decorat  ing the houses and sepulchres. One of the  favorite architectural effects appears to  consist in arranging a series of skulls  along the edge of the thatched roof. The  skulls are also placed around the base of the  square stone mounds, which are built to  contain the bones of dead ^natives. The  skulls on the exterior, however, are those  of'captives, as may be easily known by  observing the gapB or clefts whore they  have received the death 'blow, in most  cases, from the hand' of the professional  butcher. ���������  ',  The suggestive name of "head hunting"  is eiven to the practice, common' among  these people, of going abroad,-either singly  or in bands, and scouring the neighboring  territory in the search for these horrible  trophies. Head hunting is carried on to  scmeextentiu connection wilh cannibalisms  but much'more from the desire of the chief,  simply to accumulate ehulls, as a token of  political power, physical prowess, or for  the purpose of decoration. There are some  contigeuciesin the social life of the Solomon  Islanders on the happening of which ib is  quite necessary,according to the established  custom, that a'head should ' be provided.  Amcng the principal of these may be  mentioned : Tne death of a chief ;. the  launching of a'new war canoe ; the completion of a lamboo-house. The tamboo,  or tambu-house, is' 'a building erected  to contain tne boneB of some . departed  savage. The bones so treated are generally  those of chiefs or men of importance.  A Holy Relle.  The only gold aud silver bound, diamond-  incrusted book in tae world was lately  enshrined iu the holy Mohammedan city of  Isnan-Ruza,Persia.    Tbe book is,of course,  a copy of the Alkorau, and is a gift from  Abd-ur-Rahman, Emir of Afghanistan,  The covers of this unique volume, the sides  of which are nine and one-half hy four  nches,are of solid gold plates one-eighth of  on inch in , thickness, lined, with silver  sheets of the same thickness.' The centrepiece, as well as the corners are symbolic  designs, wrought in diamonds, rubiee uud  pearls. The centre figure is acrescem, with  ������ star between its points, the,whole design  being composed of 109 small diamonds,  167 pearls and 122 rubies. The diamonds  on each corner, which are almost hidden in  their golden eetting.and the orange-colored  lacouer with which they are fastened, are  each worth about $5,000, The book itelf  is on parchment, entirely written by hand.  It is valupd ats $125,000. There is said  to have been over 100,000 visitors present  in Jsnan-Ruza the day the holy relic was  enshrined.  Guileless Youth.  She���������Do you know anything about thiB  new came of progressive courtship ?  He~(guilelefcsly)���������No; what is" it ?  She (nopelesaly)���������Ob, nothing; thought  you didn't.  Action may not always bring happiness  hut there is uo happiness without action.���������  Disiaeli.  Get Up and scratch.  Said one little chick, with a funny little'squirm,  "I wish I could find a nice, fat worm."  Said another little chicken, with n queer little  shrusr, '     '  "I wish 1 could find a nice, f.it hug."  Said a third little chick, with a strange little  squeal,  "I wish I could find some nice, yellow meaL"  Now, look here,'" =aid  the mother, from the  green g.irden patch,  ,If you want.iny breaktast you must got up  and scratch."  Jack's Bear Hunt.  ,   ."Where are you gome, Caleb ?"  Jack had coin? into the warm form kitchen to find Caleb tinkering  with a gun.  "Golii" on a bit of a hunt."    ,  "Oh, I wish I could go." '      ���������������  f'Why couldn tyou?" ', '  "Oh ! Will you let me ? Say, molher,"  as she entered the room, "Caleb says I may  go hunting with him.'    May I ?'  "Where to, Caleb ?" asked mother, "and  hunting what for ?"  "Why," said Caleb, "I heard tell' of a  deer or two been seen 'round up in Plum"  mei'a Holler, sol thought I'd go and try  for 'em. Like enough I'll only bring home  somesquirrels.    Squirrels is good,though."  "Deer 1" exclaimed .lack, in great excitement. "Oh mother���������I could go back and  tell tho boys I'd beendeer hunting."  Mother smiled avthe eager face, willing  to a'low him tbe pleasure, yet anxious for  his safety. She had biought the boy into  the Minnesota woods in quest of health for  him, and had remained late in the season to  give him a taste of invigorating frost'. His  round, cheeks and beaming eyes attested  the wisdom of her re3ort to Mother Nature's  kindly aids.        * .    ' b      - .  "If I was sure there could be no .danger,,  she began.  ."I'll take the best'kind o'care of him,"  said Caleb: "And if you're feared o' tirin'  him with too. much walking I can just as  well hitch up the spring wagon and drive  to the holler. Have an errand out that  way anyhow, where I can leave the  wagon."       .       -i,  . Mother smiled her consent., Twenty  minutes lateif the two were driving away  in the sharp, crisp, morning air. Jack, a  bright boy of twelve, did not feel that the  hunt had begun until the wagon had been  left behindhand the two were making their  way omong'the bare brush, logs and boulders of Plumbers'Hollow.  "You'll 'let me take a shot at squirrel  sometime to-day, won't you?" he'asked  of Caleb, and after receiving tho desired  promise was well content to lapse into  hunters' silence. As they penetrated  deeper both became more careful in keepiDg  ,their movements quiet, Caleb occisionally  motioning to Jack his convictions,based on  small signB familiar to a sportsman, that  deer could not be far off.  . At length he paused, lifting his hand in  warning. Something was near,, beyond  doubt, by the sounds just ahead of them.  They had been gradually working their  way upward until now very near the head  of the hollow. J ust here it was filled with  a denao growth of brush mingled with the  remains of fallen trees. ' Iii the midst of  all this arose two or three rocks. '  >  ,*"Hsh I���������if there ain't a deer behind them  I wa'n't never baptized Caleb," said Caleb,  iu the lowest possible whiBper. " You  keep back whiUt I peep .'round here."  But Jack gould not keep back. ��������� Close at  Caleb's heels he followed as with1 au,unavoidable crackling of the brittle brush he  skirted the rocks. And then Caleb gave a  cry of dismay.   But it was not for himself.  " Back, back," he shouted, as 'directly  before him, angry and threatening, with  flashing eyes, enorts 'and' growls, arose a  a large black bear. Caleb was a good shot,  and had he been by himself would not have  been disconcerted by the sudden surprise.  But the heavy responsibility resting upon  him upset him. With a nervous grasp he  leveled his gun and fired���������to -wound the  bear which, now doubly enraged, made a  mad rush toward its foes. - ��������� ���������  "Up there," shrieked Caleb, " Up that  tree���������quick !"  "How'cau I? I can't reach those bare  brunches," said Tack,' reaching helplessly  above his head. ��������� -  "Here!" Droppiugt-his gun, with one  toss Caleb raised the boy to his shoulder.  Jack seized the'limrjs above his head and  swung himself up.' Caleb tried to regain  hie gun but the beat was upon him.  "Get up farther," he cried to Jack.  Jack did so and Caleb was soon beside  him. , .  . ,  " Can't bears 'climb trees ?" whispered  Jack. " _ ,  "They can when they're feelin' good.  But sho can't���������poor creeter. Don't it  make a fellow feel guilty to see that?"  *  Mad with the pain of its wound the bear  was pawing the ground, tearing at trees  and branchee, biting whatever was nearest.  "I must get down and get that gun���������  now I've,got'my breath, and my wits,"  said Caleb.  " Caleb, you can't," said Jack, in terror  at the violent movements of the great  brute. " It will be as good as your life's  worth to go down there."  Caleb looked in the boy's face, recalling  wilh the clearness of strongly suppressed  excitement, his mother's face as she decided  to trust this oui son of hers to his promised  good cire, on his assurance that no harm  could possibly come to him.  " You hold on tight," he said, gruffly.  ',' And," he added, wilh an attempt at a  iighi. tone, ',' if that old lady down there  should get one o'-lhem heavy paws V  hern on me,���������you'll undeistnud our best  hold is io wait right here. They knew  where we was eoiriin'.'   You hold on good."  "sS'op, Caleb," cried the boy, in terror  at the pussibilties suggested in the words.  " Don't   go   down.    Perhaps     she'll    go  away���������"  Whether the move made half voluntarily  by Jack caused hi in to lose his balance can  never he told, but the next moment Caleb,  carefully turning on the almoslbnre branch  with view to making his way to the side  of the tree farthest from the enemy, lost-  hiB hold and went down���������to alight exactly  on the bear's buck.  A situation to bring outall tho nervo of a  true hunter.1" Jack could never afterwards  recall without a shudder that fight for dear  life, in which Caleb, with only hisjackknife  and sturdy fist dealt blow after blow until  the poor animal, blinded by tho flow of  blood staggered and fell over, giving Caleb  opportunity to reach hia gun.  "She's done," he said quietly, after the  echo of the shot had died away among  the  hills.  ������        #       *  " Luckly I brought the spring wagon,"  said Caleb, when hours later having called  upon neighbors for help in securing hi*  prize, ho placed in it the bear skin and a  supply of the msttt.- "And now, boy,': ho  said 'o Jack, in   a voice which   betrayed a  good deal of feeling under the light words,  " I'm lakin' you back to your mother safe  and sound, thanks be lo the Lord, and Fm  ready j,o say the next time I go b'ar huntin'  I'll go alone."  " 1 haven't so much ad a squirrel/' eaid  Jack .to'his mother. ���������" Have'n't even had a  shot.'   But I've been in a bear hunt."  .EXCITING BALLOON ADVENTURE.  Rallctn   Fired nf   a French   Aeronaut   by  German fuslimi HoiitC Ofli'-cri  The Paris correspondent of the London  Standard quotes from the Petit Bourguignon  an account of an exciting balloon' adventure. ' ������  M. Chesnay,a well known aeronaut, went  up in the car of a large rballoon on Sunday  and came to the ground the same evening  at Fallon. On Monday morning he filled  his balloon with the gas he had brought with  him in a small balloon, and ascended once  moie." "He passed successfully over Pontc  de Roide and Deily, and saw clearly the  little corner of Switzerland which separates  France from Alsace-Lorraine, Suddenly,  when just above the frontier'of Alsace, he  heard tho report of firearms, and then the  hissing of a bullet, '.The shots were, he  says, fired at hia balloon by tho German  Custom Ifouse*inen. Being anxious to get  beyond tho range of' their rifles as quickly  as po-sible, M. Chesnay threw a Back of  ballast out of the car, and in a few minutes  found himself at an altitude of about four  thousand nietreB. ' His .balloon, however,  descended again, and he saw Mulhouse,  Basle, and the Rhine. In a short time tho  balloon'wns floating over the lenitory of  the Grand Duchy of Baden.' Wishing to  ascertain'exactly where lie was, M. Chesnay  descended rather too close to tire earth, for  the car of rhis,balloon struck a hill. Fortunately lie was not hurt, but a sack of  ballast and the barometer being jerked out  of the car.Hhe balloon once more shot up  hich. The wind was very strong, and  soon it became impossible to.maintain the  balloon any longer in the air.,   -  The violence of the gale prevented the  anchor from fixing itself in the ground.  The persons who, tried to' help could not  keep up with the balloon, which was  dragging the car on the ground and bounding up into the air ata~furious rate, l^ele-'  graph wires were broken like thread, telegraph posts knocked'down like ninepins,  and canals were crossed with M. Chet*nay  at the. bottom of the car. At length, ofter  the car,had been dragged in the water of a  canal, the'aeronaut c'ambered out and fell  on the grouud senseless. , When he recovered consciousness he found himself (Surrounded by a crowd of people, but none of  them could speak a word of Freuch'i ,and  he knew no German. ' After endless trouble 'he succeeded in reaching the nearest  town,'which was Singen, and took train  for Basle and France. He returned to  Dijon on Tuesday evening.  As for his balloon, it naturally shot up  into the air when M. Chesnay threw himself out of the car, and it has not yet been  heard of.    '  GREECE HAS TOO MANY CURRANTS.  The Xew Danger Threatenlni; a   Land He-  set by Many Ills nnd lti������n<lvantage*.  - The people of the kingdom of Greece  auf!er from many ilis^ and disadvantages  which do not beset nationalities vIess distinguished than, the descendants of the  ancient Hellenes. They have ah occasional  earthquake, droughts are not uncommon,  volcanic eruptions rattle them. Turkish  marauders make murderous' onslaughts on  them,'and occasional notices are served on  them by English, French, German, and  Russian bondholder that the quarterly  interest on euudry mortgages is past due  and must bs paid .without further delay or  evasion. But recently the people of Greece  have Buffered from a new difficulty ; the  currant or raisin crop is. too generous.  There ia too much ot it. The laud has  proved too fertile and, in consequence of  this, the Greek husbandmen ate threatened  with .serious financial difficulties such as  overtake the husbaudmeu of other agricultural lands when the crop runs ahorr.  Corn is not produce I in Greece in sufficient quantities to supply the inhabitants,  and a certain amount has to be importod  every year from Russia. The most favored  and best cultivated crop is the currant.  Immense districts are planted with currants  in various parts of the kingdom,"particularly along ihe s'nores of the Gulf of Corinth,  between the towns of Corinth and Patras  and on the islands of Zante and Cephalonia.  The chief nir.rket for Greek currantB is  England, which takes from 159,000,000 to  510,' OO.C'OO worth in ii year. They are exported to other countries, but not to the  same extent as to linclaud, where the  popularity of plum pudding and mince pies  keeps up a steady market forZuue currant', aj they ure oftou called, in the trade.  The United States have very little commerce with Greece���������next to, none at all,  in fact.  The farmers of Greece, or more properly  of ihec.iriaut-rai&inj' diatriot of Greece,  are apprehensive that with the large crop  now on hand prices will so far decline as  to make the crop an nnremuiierativo one,  and as currants nre the agricultural staple  of Greece it may bo readily seen that an  injury of this kind would be a very serious  one to a country which staggers under an  unduly heavy "load of debt. The prc:ent  national indebtedness of Greece is $110,-  000,000, or at the rate of about S50 a head.  The'couiiti-y is a poor one, and much of tho  land is unproductive. The sources of public  revenue are few, and a large shaie of the  debt is held abroad. Unless there is a lively  and increased demand for Greek ourrunts  pretty soon the fear is expressed by somo  political economists in the land of Socrates  that it will be noooMiiry for the Greek  Goverment to borrow some more money.   ���������������>   STUB ENDS OF THOUGHT.  Opportunity is not the kind of thing that  stands around waiting to be embraced.  A woman can't be in love and in politics  at the  same time.  The wators of oblivion sometimes quench  tho thirst for glory.  A woman thiiiics her heart is empty until  she gets in it what she wants there.  A man knows he is old long before ho  confesseu it.  Very few men can make money and  frienda at the samo time.  Reason is instmot endowed with the  power of speech.  An ounce of thought may prevent a ton  of rogret.  MILITARY   MANNERS.  Some Slr.iuxt irnlcs and C'c.iloins Adopted  In Time  of War*  - Vattel declares that in war all vines,  fruit trees, and growing crops should be  spaied.   ,, ' .  , In the English army a soldier ia drummed  to church just ,as he is to drill or dres's  parade.  Mediaeval knights often took a voluntary '  oath'that they  would never   spare the life  of an enemy.  Exchange or prisoners    was practised in  very   eatly times by both the GreekB and .  the Romans. .  When thc/'fignting Bishop of Norwich,'  in 13S3, stormed the town of Gravalines,he  maesacred its entire population. ,  Helvetius declared  in hia articles of war  hat   Soldiers- ought   to be   made to feat  their own officers   more   thau they do the  enemy.      ��������� ', 0  Tho Koran forbids true believers to  destroy the vines, palm trees, fruit trees,  corn and cattle, even of their worst enemies. '        '  Bombardment of the ' residence portioni  of towue.now foibidden by the laws of war,  has   been repeatedly practised in spite  of,  this prohibition.  In mediaeval'times not only were living  prisoners ransomed by their friends, but a  rauEpm was 'demanded oven for the bodies  of those slain in action.  During the days whan armor was heavfeat  the cavalry was the slow moving army of  the service, all movements requiring celerity being executed by infantry, ,     ���������      '  Hot shot as well as chain and grape shot,  .wlien first employed, were declared to be  inventions of the devil, aud not to be sane-'  tioned among civilized nations.  JIn the fourteenth century the slaughter  of women and children aftor a town or  castle had been taken by storm.,was one of  the most common occurrences of war.   n  During the war between Richard I. .of  England and Philip Augustus of France,  prisoners on both sides wore blinded as a  means of intimidating the besieged party.  The" Chevalier   Bayatd   made    by   his  ransoms during the cour������e of hia military *  career more than ������'1000 aBum equivalent to  nearly ten times that amount nowadays. '   ,  At Gibraltar, during the most famous of  its sieges, the French commandor, learning  that Elliot's men wore sutTering'from acur.  vy,,sent them as a present a boat load 'of  carrots. . ,        .  By the rules of chivalry all persons, male  and female, old and young, in'a town taken  by assault, were liable to be put to death,  aud tho men and boys seldom escaped the  brutality of the victors.  At the storm of Madgoburg by Tilly, in  1631, this noted authority'on the art of war  laid down the geueral maxim that after a  successful assault the soldiers ought to  have three hours of pillage. '  . When Meaux was surrendered to Henry  IV. clemency was promised to the popula.  tion if six of the leading,,defenders were'  ',' given up to justice." These six were surrendered and four of them were beheaded.  . At Sebastopol the opposing commanders  exchanged civil courtesies,' Sir Edmond  Lyons sent Admiral Machinoff'tho present  of a fat bucki -aud tho Russian Admiral  returned the compliment with a largo  eheeee. t -  The use of oannon and bombs at '* their-  first introduction was pronou'ucod^diabolicil  by the Church authorities, .and from one  end s-.f Europe to the "other the pulpit  orators thundered against these weapons of  the Evil,One.  At the siege of Jerusalem by Titustho  captive Jews wero crucified by tho Romans  in such numbers that, as JosuphuB says,'  there was no longer wood of whioh to make  the cruises nor space for them to stand.  During the Middle, Ages reprisals were,  common.    The vengeance taken for a bravo  defenae of a town or castle was generally  the'hanging of the most prominent officers ,  and men among the defenders. .  When Kichard I., with sthe other crusa- ,  ders, took Messina, nil the noble and good,  looking women of the town wore carried ti  off.     Some    were    afterwards   ransomed,"  while the greater part were held as slaves  by their captors.  When the Emperor Henry iu 1194 captured Salerno he ordered the wives and  daughters of the leading citizens to bo put  up at auction and sold, and all these unhappy ladies'-were thus disposed of to a'  brutal soldiery."  When Edward 'I. made a prisoner of the  Countess of Buchan' he decided not to put  her to death,���������bulinstead ordered a largo  iron cage to be made in which she was  exposed, as a prisoner, of 'war, to the  execrations and abuse of the English  rabble. ' ,  In ancient times prisoners were subjected  to the mo it cruel tortures and terrible forms  of death. The'monuments aud records of  Nebuchadnezzar tell with great unction  how many thousands of his enemies he be-  headed, impaled and flayed alive.  The bayonet was invented in 1323 by a  woman of Bayonne, and tho use 'of tin's  weapon was at lirst strongly reprobated by  military authorities. The first battle ip  which a bayonet charge decided the fate ol  tlie day was at Ncerwiiiden, in 1603.  Gustavus AdolphtiB, of Sweden, was, i������  is said, Lhe first to dispense with the re  gular declaration ' of war. Frederick th<i  (.real made no declaration of war before  hia inv.ii-.ioii of Silesia, the act of aggression  which bioiighion the Seven Years' War.  In tho fourteenth and fifteenth centuries,  even when France and England were at  war, fishermen of lhe two nations remained  at peace, aud without iiiiimos-ity bought  from and sol.l to each other and exchanged  their fish just, as in times oi profouudeat  peace.  Explosive bullets were first used in  India for hunting tigers and elephant?.  They were brougnt into ueoin Europe by  their introduction into tho Rus-sinn army  in 1863. In I������(JS an international Convention declared their-employment in war to  be inhuman and unnecessary.  Tho destruction of life in modern wariare ,  is homethuig frightful. In the FrRnco-  Prussion war fiom August -J, 1S70, to  August-hS, 100,000 Germans and French  were killed outright, to say nothing of the  many thousands more who afterwards died  in the hospitals from their   wounds.   I1M  Of Some Uso.  A curious use for a husband is reported  from Cierkcnwell, near London, where a  Mr. Lamb and his wife keep a small shop.  For 14 years the firm has avoided payine  taxes by the wife'B fending the husband to  jail to serve out the l-.'gal tiri.e for unpaid  taxes, while she remains at the store attending to business.  Bnruum sV Bailey's circus receipts at  Kingston were $7,000. > I.  2  THE   KOOTENAY,  MAIL.  THE. CLEVER WIDOW  CHAPTER VI. .(CovrixuKDi.  " I really do not know," she said,  ���������    ' "She is iiot engaged?" ,  "Not that,I know of."  " You speak hesitatingly.  " Because I  am not sure.'    But he may  ask.    She cannot but be flattered."  "Quite bo.    L-iell him that   it is   the.  most'practical  compliment   which a man  can -pay to a woman.    He is   a little shy,  'but  when he sets himself to do it, he will  do it.    He is very much in love wilh her, I  assure , you.    These   littlo,   lively people  always do attract the slow and heavy ones,  which is   nature's device fpr the neutralisation of   bores.    But they   arc all. going,  in. ' 1 tdink, if  you will allow me, that I  will jubt take   ihe opportunity to tell him  that, as far as you know,  theio.is no positive obstacle in the wuv." ' '  '" As far as  I know," Clara repeated, as  the  widow   moved   away   to    where   the  players  were  grouped around  the | net or  sauntering slowly   toward the house.    She  roae to   follow her, but her  head'was  in  a  whirl   with new  thoughts, and  she sat  down   agoin.    \Vhich  would be tho better  for Ida, Harold or Charles ?    She thought  it over with as much tolicitude as a mother  wno plans for her only child.    Harold had  seemed   to   her   to be-in   many  ways the  noblest and  the beRt young man whom she  . had known.    If ever she was to iove a man  it would   be  such a man as that.    But she  '   must not think of herself.    Sho had reason  to  believe that  both these men loved  her  iistcr.    Which would be the better for her?  'Bui perhaps the'matter wns already settled.  /She could nol.forget ihe scrap of conversation which sho had heard the night, before,  nor tlie seciet which her sister had refused  to, confide  to   her.    If Ida would not rtell  her,   there was -but one person w'no could.  She raised her eyes, and there was Harold  Denver standing before her. ' '  ,    " You weie lost in your thoughts,"   said  he,   smiling.    "I   hope ' that   they   were  pleasant ones."  "Oh, I was planning,"'said  she, rising.  "It1 scorns rather a waste of time,as a rule,  for things have  a   way of. working   themselves out just as you least expect."  "What are you planning,'then ?*    <  "Ihe future."  "Whose ?"  "Oh, my own and Ida's."  '"'      "And was 1  included in  your joint  fu-  .,   tures?",    .  ' '    "I hope all our friends were included."  , "Don't co in," suid he, as she began to  1 move slowly toward the house. "I wanted  to have a word with you. Let ub stroll up  aud down the lawn. Perhaps you are  cold. If yon are, 1 could bring you out a  shawl. ,'  "Oh, no ; I am not cold."  "I waa speaking to your sister Ida last  night." She noti.ed that there was a  BligHt quiver in his voice, and, glancing up  at his cleur-uut face, she'saw that he was  very crave. She felt that it was settled,  thai he had come to ask her for her sister's  hand. ���������  "She is a charming girl," said he, aftor'a  pause. ' *    '  "Indeed she is,"cried<  Clara, warmly.  ��������� " And no one who has not  lived with bar  and knows her   intimately   can'tell   how  charming and good she is.    She   is like   a  sunbeam iu the house."  " No one whc was not. good could be so  absolutely happy as she* seems io be.  Heaven's lusi gift, I think, is a mind so  pure and a spirit so high lhat it is unable  even to see what is impure and evil in lhe  world around ub. For as long as we can see  it, how can we be truly happy ?''  " She has a deeper side   also.    She does  not turn ii to' tha   world, and    it   is    not  '���������natural that she should, for   she   is'  very  t young. But she thinks, and has aspirations  of her own."  " You cannot admire her more than I do.  Indeed, Miss Walker) 1   only , ask  to   be  brought into nearer relationship with   her  ��������� and to feel that there is <i nernmuent bond  between us."'  it had come at last. For a moment her,  heart was was numbed within her, and  then a" flood of sisterly love earned all  before it. Down with mat dark thought  .which would still try to raise its unhallowed head ! She turned to Harold with  sparkling eyes and words oi pleasure  ' upon her lips. , '   ,  " I should wish to be near and dear to  both of you," said he, as he took her by  the hand. " I should wish Ida to be my  sislcr, and you���������my wife."  She said nothing. She only stood look-  , Ing at him with parted hpB aud great, dark,  questioning eyes. The lawn had vanisned  away, the sloping gardens, the brick villas,  the darkening sky with half a pule moon  beginning to show over the ehhnuey-iops.  Ail was gone, and she was only conscious  of a dark, earnest, pleading face, and of a  voice, far iway, disconnected from herself,  the voice of a man telling a woman how he  loved her. He was uuhr.ppy, said the voice ;  hi-i life was a void; there was but one thiiif?  thai cculii save him ; he had come to the  parting of the wave ; hero lay happiness  and honor, ind all that was hich ami noble;  there lay the soul-killing round, the loi.eiy  life, tlie bate pursuit of money, the sordid,  asln-'ii aim1*. He needed but tii*> hand ot  the woman thai, iv; loved to lc<ul him into  lhe hriter path. And how he loved ner  hie l.Ie would mow. He loved n<;r lor  her H������"ee:nt-?s, for her wnimnltiKvs,  for her strength He h.i i r-of-d ot rw-r.  Would i no not crime to him' And then  o: a sudden, uh ehe listened, it r,ime hoinu  to hei that lhe man was Haro'd Uenivr  and that she was the worn in, ,ind thit uli  God's wr.rk was very hi-aiitiftil ���������the cre'-n-  swArii benenthher li-'-t, the rustling leaven,  the long orange s!auhes in Lhe'wslern sky.  Sue -poke;, she scarce knew wh.it 'he  broken word" were, hut she saw the light  of joy shine out on ni- fc.ee, (������.r.d her hand  was still in his <*..- thry wandered amid tho  ty.*il:ght. They paid no more now, hut only  winuered and felt each other's presence.  All was fre->h around them, familiar and  yet new, tinged with the beauty if their  aew.round linppineHH.  "Did yon not know it before ?" he ap "iced.  "I did not dare to think it,"  "What a m>Bk o; it:e I must wear !   How  could a man feel as  I have done without  showing it ?    Your sister at least know."  "Ida"!"  "It v.-a? last night. She began to prn.i=o  you ; 1 said what S felt, and then in an  niFtdnt it was nil out."  "iJut whit could you���������whiit, could you  ������ee in me ? Oh, I do pray that you may  uot'eviut it I"    The gentle hoarl wa'i ruf  fled amid its joy hy the thought'of its own  unworlhiness. ,  " Repent it ! 1 feel that 1 am a saved  man. You do not know how degrading  this city life is, how debasing, and yet  how absorbing. -Money forever clinks in  your ear.' You can think of nothing else.  From the bottom of my heart I hue it,  and yet how can I draw b'ick without bringing grief to my dear old father ? There ������ as  but one way .in'which I could defy the  taint, and that was by having a home influence so pure and so high that it may  brace me up against all that draws me down.  I have felt that influence already. 1 know  that wheu I am talking toyou 1 am a better  man. It is you who must .go with me  through life, or I must walk forever alone."  " O'h, Harold, I am so h'appy !" Still  they wandered amid the darkening  shadows, -while ,oue by one the stars  peeped out in tho blue-black s-ky above  them. At last a chill night wind blew up  from tho east and brought them back to  the realities of life.  "You must go in.    You will be cold."  "My   father will wonder where I   am.  Shall I say anything lo him ?"       '  "If you lik'e, my darling;' Or I will in  the .morning. I must tell my mother tonight. 1 know how delighted she will  be."-  "I do hope so." '     ���������  .  "Let mo take you up .the garden path.  It is bo dark. Your lamp is not lighted yet.  Theie is the window. Till to-morrow,then,  dearest " ' ' '  . "Till to-morrow, Harold."  "My own darling !" He. stooped and  their lips met for the fir3t time, ' Then, as  she pushed open the folding window, she  heatd hia quick,firm atep as it paused down  the graveled path. A lamp waa lighted as  she entered the room/ and there was Ida,  dancing about like a mischievous little fairy  in front of her. ' '  "And have you anything to tell mo ?"  she asked, with a Bolemn face.' Then,  suddenly throwing her arms round ^her  sisier.'s neck.- , "Oh, you dear, dear, old  Clara !    I am so pleased ���������    I am to pleas-  it���������would it inconvenience you much, Ida,  to come out there with me V,'  Ida nearly fell off her porch in her  amazement. The only words of which she  could think were " My goodness me !" so  she said them.  " If it would not upset your plans or  change your arrangements iu any way."  He had slowed down, aud let go of the  cteering handle, so that the great machine  trawled aimlessly about from one side -of  she road to the other. " I know very well  that I am not clever or anything ot that  sort, but still 1 would do all 1 can to make  you very happy. Don't you think . lhat in  time you might come to like me a little  bit?"  '*  Ida gave a cry of fright. " I won't like  you if you run me against a brick wall,"  she said, as the machine rasped up against  tho curb.    Do attend to the" steering." .'  " Yes, I will. But tell me,Ida, whether  you will come with me."'  "Oh, I don't know. It's too absurd !  How can we talk about sucli things when  I cannot see you ? You speak to the nape  of my neck, and then I Imve to twist my  head u-o-jnu to answer."  " I know. That was why 1 put ' You  in front' upon my letter. 1 thought that  would maise it easier. But if you would  prefer it I will,slop the machine, and then  you can sit around and talk about it."  "Good gracious !"cried Ida. "Fancy  our sitting face to face on a motionless  tricycle in the middle of the road, and ail  the people looking out ot their windows at  ed !"  ',       CHAPTER VII.  " YENIT  TANDEM    I'KLICITAS."  It was just three days after,the doctor  and the Admiral had congratulated each  other upon the closer tie which was to  unite their t.wo families and to turn  their friendship into something even  dearer and moie intimate, that Miss Ida  Walker received a letter which caused  her fome eurpriEe aud considerable  amusement.. It was dated fiom next  door, and was.handed in by the red-headed  page after breakfast.  1 " Dear Miss Ida," began tins curious  document, and then relapsed suddenly into  the ihii'd person. Mr. Charles Westmacott  hopes that I e' may have the extremis  pleasure of a ride with Mies Ida Walker  upon his tandem tricycle. Mr. Charles  Westmacott will bring it round in half an  hour!, Vou in front. .Yours very truly,  Charles Westmacott." The whole' ,was  written iu , a largo, loose-jointed und  schoolboyish hand, very thin on the upstrokes and thiek0ou the down, as though  care and pains had gone to the fashioning  of it.  Strange as was the form, the meaning  was clear enough ; so Ida hastened to  her room, and had hardly slipped on  her light gray cycling dress when she  saw tne tandem with its large occupant  at the door. He handed her up to her  saddle with a more solemn and thoughtful face than was usual with him, and a  few moments later they were flying along  the beautiful, smooth, suburban roods in  the direction of Forest Hill. The great  limbs of the athlete made the heavy machine  spring and quiver with every stroke ;  while the niignou gray figure with the  laughing face, the golden curls blowing  from under tne little pinkhanded .straw  hat, simply held firmly to her perch, aud  let the treadles whirl round beneath her  feet..' Mile after mile they flew/the wind  beating in her face, the trees dancing past  in two long ranks on either ?ide, until they  had passed round Croydon and' were ap-  proaoniug Norwood ouce more from the  Hither side.  " Areu't von tried ?"    she asked,  clanc-  " It would look' rather funny, wouldn't  it ?      Well, then^'suppose we boih get oii  and push the tandem along in front of us?"  " Oh, no; this is better than that." ���������  " Or i could carry the thing."   (  Ida burst out laughing.      " That would  be more absurd mill."      ' ' '  " Then  we will go quietly,  and   I will  look out for   the steering.      I won't talk  about' it  atoll  if you would  rather  not.  But I really do love  you  very much, aud  you would mate me happy if youcame to  Texas with me, and' I think that perhaps  after a tune I could make you happy, too."  '.' But your aunt 5"  " Uh, sho would like it very much. I  can understand that your father might not  like to lose you. I'm sure I wouldn't  either if I weie he. But, alter all, America is not very far oil nowadays, aiid is not  so very wild. We would tako a grand  piano and���������and���������a copy of Browning.  And Denver and his wife would corne over  tJ see us. .We should be quite a family  party.    It would be jolly."  Ida sat listening to the stumbling words  and awkward phrases which were whispered from the back of her, but there waa  something in Charles We-itmacott'a clumsiness of speech which'was more moving than  the words of the most eloquent of pleaders.  He paused, he stammered, he caught his  breath between the words, and he blurted  out in little biiint phrases all the hopes of  his heart. If love had not come to her yet,  there were at least pity and sympathy,  which are nearly akin to it.- Wonder there  was also that one so weak and frail as she  should shake this, strong man so, should  have the whole course of his life waiting for  her decision. Her left hand was. on the  cushion at her side. He leaned forward  and took itgently'in his own. She did not  try to draw it back from him.  "May 1 have it," said he, " for life ?"  "Oh,.do attend   to your steering," said  she,  smiling around  at  him,  "and don't  pay any more   about this   to-day.    Please  don't. f .. ��������� ,   ,,  "When shall I know, then ?"  "Oh,io-night--to-niorrow���������1 don't know,  must ask Clara,    Talk sibout something  else."  And they did talk about something else,  but her left hand was still enclosed m his,  and he knew, without asking again, that  all was well.      . , '  " She was with Cnarles Westmacott on  the lawn not very long ago. He seems  very fond of her. He is not very blight,  but I think he will make her a good husband." '    '  ," I am sure of it, papa. He is very  manly and reliable."  '��������� Yes, I should think that he is not the  sort of man who goes wrong. There is  nothing hidden about h'.m. As to his  brightness. It really does not matter, for  his aunt, Mrs. Westnidcott, is very rich,  much richer than you would think from  her style of living, and she has mado him  a handsome provision." '' (  " 1 am glad of that."  " It   is  between ourselves.      -  am her  trustee, and so  I  know  something  of her  arrangements.    And  when are you  going  to marry, Clara t"  " Oh, papa, not for some time yet. We  have not thought of a date."  ���������| Well, really. I don't know that there  is any reason for delay. He lias a competence aud it increases yearly. As long as  you ure quite  certain   that^ your  mind  is  made up"   " Oh, papa !"  " iVoll, then, I really do not know why  theie should be any delay. And Ida, too,  must be married within the next few  months. Now, what I want to know is  what J am lo do when my two little companions run away -fiom me." He,,spoke  lightly, but his eyes were grave fas he  looked qucstioningly at his daughter.  " lle.ir papa, you shall not be alone. It  wili bo years before Harold nnd I think of  marrying, and when'we do you must come  and live with ub.!'  "Xo, no, dear.    I know'that you mean  what you say, but I have  seen'something  of the world,   and  1 know   that  such ar-.  raugements never answer.    There'cannot  be t'wo masteis in a house, and yet at my  age my freedom is very necessary to me."  -'Bul-you would be completely free." ,  " No, dear, you cannot be that if you are  a guest in another man's  house.    Can you  suggest no other alternative?"  ," That we remain with you."   .  " No, no. ' That ,is but of  the question:.  Mrs. Westmacott  hei self  says that a woman's first  duty is  to marry.     Marriage,  however, should be an equal partnership,  as she points out.    I should like a suggestion from jou Clara,   as lo  what I should  do." - ., " ,     .  " But"there is no huiry, papa. Let.'ns  wail.    I do not intend to marry yet."  Dr, Walker looked disappointed. "Well,  Clara, if you can suggest nothing, 1 suppose tiiat I must take the initiative myself,"  said he. ' '-  FD1ELICAHDIAIIBWS  INTERESTING   ITEMS   ABOUT   OUB  OWN COUNTRY.  fiallicre.I   from Vnrimis E'oints   from Hie  ,,       Ati-tnllc lo the l'uclUc.  Ottawa has 25 Chinamen. i  Sarnia is annoyed by a gang of thieves.  Bread in Belleville is ten ceuts a loaf.  Vancouver's   Labor   Day   is "September I  2nd. j  The funded debt of Halifax is ' ������2,915,   !  910." . |  rate  of  taxation   is  20   1-2  THE P.'O. SAVINGS BANK.  flu'V *re lcry i'oiml.ir  rf.'ih the H'cople  ami Have llonc ������ Great Ileal of (iivotf.  .    The pobi, office savings b.-ink is one of the  best managed and successful of the departments of the Canadian Government.   From  the first it has been popul-i;, and without  question it has done much good in affording  a. f-afe place  of deposit for  small itiiiib and'  so  encouraging   a spirit  of   thrift  among  wage earners and people  of small means.   ,  Started in 18o8, at the close of the fiscal,  year, .Tune 30, it has received 3,2-17 deposits  totalling .3212,507.    Since then the growth  by quinquennial   periods  has bees as follows: :���������  flowers   are    stolen    from  advocating , a new   oil   ox-  Belleville's  mills.  In    Guoiph  gruves.  Pettolia  is  change.  The debenture debt of Watford is ������22,-  973.24.  August 27th   will   ha  Stratford's   Civic i |gfig  holiday. 'A ' I  Chaihum is talking electric  radial t.iil-1    ,Since.the 1st October, ISsS'J,  the rate   of  way, " j interest   allowed "has   been ,'U   per cent.  'Cape   Vincent's  water-works   will   cost I Before   that date  it was 4 percent.'   The  S23 OOi)     . ' CI'eut' on l"'-������  deposits ol the reduction did  not.  Inst long.    The drop in the  total,was  1870,  IS75.  1SS0.  lb'tsTi.  1S90'.  accounts.  ...12,178.  ...21,29-1.  . ..31,3(i.r).  ...73,322  .:l 12,321.  .120,028.  Amount  deposited.  ..SI. 347,901..  . 1.;m2,3IG..  . 2,720,2113..  . .,,'7,098,45'.)..  .. G,5!-9,S9()f.  ..  7,4SS,023..  Total of  deposits.'  ,S 1.58S.S48  . 2,920,030  . S.lM^.GGfl  . 15,090,540  , 21,990,0,53  . 20,803,542  " Then what do,you propose, papa V  She braced herself as one who 8ec3 th  blow which is about to fall.  (to mi: C0NTiNtn:n.)  THE K0HIN00R.  ,     , CHAPTER VIII.  SHADOWS   liEFORE. *  Mrs. Westmacott s great meeting for the.  enfranchisement   of   women    had    passed  over, and it had been a triumphant success.    All the  maids and   matrons of the  southern suburbs   had rallied at her summons,    'I here was an influential platform,  with Dr.   Balthazar  Walker   in ihe chair  and 'Adnmal  Hay Denver among his more  prominent     supporters.    One    benighted  male nad  come m from" the outside dark-  neia and had jeered   from the further end  o: the hall, but he had been called to order  by . the  Chair,    petrified   by  . indignant  aHU ,. j������������������ ........ ,     co ���������-n...,.,  u.-us.- gUnces.  from   the  unenfranchised* around  inc over ner shoulder ami turning toward i mm, and finally ' escorted to the door by  hiin "A little pink car, a fluiFy golden curi, "Ch.iries Westmacott. Fiery resolutions  an'd-one blue eye-twiukiing from ihe very j were popped, to be forwarded .to a large  corner of its lid. ' !number   of   leading   statesmen,   and    the  " Not a   bit.    I   am   just   getting   my  swing.  " Isn't it   wonderful to1 be strong?  always remini me ol" a f team-engine.':  "Why a" steam-enu'ine ?'" .  Well,   because  l: is- jo powerful  meeting   broke   up   with   the "com iction  that a  shrewd blow   had been  struck for  You  the can-e of woman.  But  ihere  was one woman   it  least  to  whom   thi*  meeting and all ���������hat was  con-  ������nd'necisfd   with it had   brought anything but  reliable and unreasoning.    We':!,   I  di<lh';|pk-asure.    Clara "Walker watched   with a  mean that l^st, you know,  but���������but���������yon j heavy i.eart lhe friendship and close in tim-  know what I mean.    What  is the  maiter|aey   wi.ich   ha.i sprung up   between 'her  with you 1 j father and the widow.  From week to week  "Why?" ' j't I'M  incroM-eii until-no day ever paaped  "Because you   have something   on  your j without, their veing together.     Tne coming  mind.    You have not laugr.ed once,  He broke into a grewsotne laugh.  quite'jolly," said he  riiKiand's (ireat Illniuonil   lliii  u Some���������  , Mliat Tirdglc History,  Nearly all of, the great diamonds of the  world have . had romantic histories, but  none of them approaches in thistespect the  Kohinoor, now among ihe Royal jewels in  England. It,is known to have been the  property of the Rajahs of Maiwa nearly  1,000 years 'ago. In 130,4 the Sultan  Aladdin���������himself the ��������� original . of tho  ''Arabian Nights" hero���������overcame tho then  rajah in battle, and captured the gem:  y Subsequently,^however, he restored it to  the Rajah,'in the hands of whose decend-  anls it remained until the rise of the  Mogul dynasty.  , Mohammed Shah, of that dynasty, was  ou the throne of Hindostan when his country was invaded, and his capital city,Delhi  was taken by the Persian, Nadir Shah.  The conqueror confiscated all the jewels in  the Delhi treasury, but the already famous  Kohiuoor was missing.      ' ������������������  A woman of Mohammed's harem gave  information that'' the Emperor wore the  stone concealed in his turban, and Nadir  finally secured it by a clever ruse, olleriug  to exchange turbans with Mohammed. At  the deatn of Nadir tbe gem became the  property of his son aud successor, Shah  Rokh,who was soon after overthrown by a  usurper, Aga Mohammed.  Aga Mohammed put Shah Rokh to the  tortuie, to make him give up,the. stone,  but Shah Rokh would not, even when his  eyes were put*out with knives. Finally  Aga Mohammed ordered his victim's head  to be shaved and encircled within a diadem  of paste, thus making a'roceptucle, into  which boiling oii waa poured.  But even this did not induce Shah  Rokh to give up the Kohinoor. He died  soon after hia injuries, and gave the stone  to Ahmed Shah, founder of the Afghan  Empire, who had come to hiaasisstance.  Tne Kohiuoor descended from Ahmed  Shah to his grandson, Shah Zaman. The  hitter was deposed from the throne and had  his eyes put out by his brotlier.Shah Shuju.  Shah  Ziman'wiis   shut  up   in   a solitary  jmee'mc   had  heen   the  excuse   for   there  .prison cell for many years, where he  con-  I Am [continual   interviews, but now the meeting ! coaled the gem in the plaster of the   wall.  wan over, and   still the doctor   vould refer      ,By   an   accident an ollicer of the guard  'Oh,   no,   you   arc not.    And  why did'.every point which roi-e to the judgulent oi   scratched his hand ou onr. of the angles ot  f-,u   wntf me such e. dreadfully  dtitf let  ter i  " There, now ! he cried, ���������' 1  ii wa-i ?tiff. I said it wa������  purl"."'  "Then why wr.te.it ?" ,  "Ji, w,trn!t my own composition.  "Wi.ose then?    Your aunt'-������ ?'  "Oil, no, it was a p* r-on of the  Si.irtery.",  Who is ne 1 '  vould   come out.  You've heard of  was sure  absurdly  name o!  I ...  his neighbor.    He would talk,,too,   to his   the    diamond,    which    projected    iilmost  two daujihi*r������ of her strengtn of character, ��������� imperceptibly,'and this led to its disoftvtry.  her decisive mind, and   of tne necessity of' So Shah Shuja got, the stone,   but  pretty  t'r.pir cultivating her example, until at ladt   soon he hlinselt" was deposed, and ins eyes  'Goodness  "I know :t would come out. I felt  that it would. You've heard of Slattery  the manor V  "Never."  " He is wonderful at expressing himself.  He wrote a book called JTfie Secret Solved;  nr, Letter Writing M.ide Kiwy.' It given  you models of all t"or:������ of Ifters."   '  1 da hur-a out laughing. " So you actually  copifd one ?"  " It waa to invite a you,ng lndy to ���������������  picnic, but I ae*. to woik and soon got itj  changed so that it vfoukl do very weil.  Siatiery seems never to nave asked anyi  one lo ride a tandem. But when 1 had j  written it, its-eemed bo dreadfully stiff that  I had to pnr n. htile beginning and end of  my own which seemed to brighten it np a.  good den]."  " I though", there was something funny  ii>K<ufc the beginning and end,"  " Did you ? Faucr your noticing the  dilffi'fnce in style. How quick you arc!  I am very slow at tningi like that. I  ought to have been a woodman or gamekeeper, or ?oirirUiing. I was mado on  tho<*e lines. But I'have found something  now."    '.  "Wh������t h tn?.t, then ?"  " Hunching. J have a chum in Texw.s  iinri hp fays it. it a rn.ro life. I am to buyn  share in !.is hmini"������. H is all in the open  air���������.shooting and riding and sport.   Would  it, had   become his mo-it common   topic  of  convrn'ion.  All irns night h.id parsed a*l merely tne  natural tilenmire which an ������.id-,rly v.\,u\  miirht inkt* in the  vo-jit-ly oi an intelligent,  were put out  by  hi.s  next biother, Shah  \fiihinud.  He withdrew to the court of Ruujit  ���������Singh for protection, but .Ruujit, wanted  the Kohinoor, and  psrseouted  Siinja  and  and liAndromr1 wonjan, but, there were otner   dturved Shuj i'h wife until he got it.     Run  jit had il set in n bracelet.  It wan confiscate 1 by the Hritish at tho  close of tne great Indian ^mutiny, and was  Kent lo Engund. It weighed ISO carats,  and wa" reduced to 10(5 eat at s by cutting.  Though not of lhe very finest wal<'r,h<iving  a .slightly gr.iyiih tinge, it is valued at  ���������?000,COOV  poinN whicn *��������� uinod lo Clara to yivi- it, a  ik'<*j.er mean.eg. Stj������* could not forgt-t ti-at  wh^n-f'hnrles WrKtn-icutl.hhd pp'-ici-:, lo her  ���������>n<- insr.l in* uid hilodpii to the p j-niidniy  o: h-s aunt niirrying :.j,s.'.n. He mtiift nave  ���������Known or noticed sometruus: before lie  wiiuld itpeils- upon -urn a .<ubj>;cr. And  then again .\ir.-i. Westmacott h&d in-r-������;)i  sniH iti\tMii- Moped u> ('ti.iriL'F- her <jryio of  living shortly t.nd lake over completely  rifW dutii-t. Wn-tf could tnairae-m exept  ilia' sho t'xpecied to msrry ? And wi.om ?  Sh" He'-mpd to so'-- h'-r friend.-* outride of  tne*.r Mil little circle. She miut 1,&vh  iiiiuded to her fatner. It was a nateful  thougnt, and yet it must be faced.���������  One evening i>'.e rioc:or hi i been r-������irer  late at hi> 7)"!gfiix>r's. He ua������d lo i/o ,n'.o  t're Admiral's after dinner, ?.nd now r.e  turned more freqaently in ���������.-".<��������� o'nt-r direction. When he r������*.un ed Ci&r-i.wuF --.t'lil^  n)o"B in t'.e dravir.g rcorri r������a<'ir,;/ a  mng.i/inc ^ne "pruns? up is h% rnifcr'-il,  puenfu forward hi������ chair, ind r.m to f������sU.b  ms slipper?.  "Yon are loo'-cing a litule p������l", do-ir," lie  rom'ii k.'d.  "Oh, no, papa ; I am vr-ry well,"  "Aii well'wiih Harold ? '  "Yo������. His partner, Mr. r'cnr������ori,in ttiil  away, nnd po is doipp .ill the v. r/rk,"  "Well d'ui". He !������������������ sure to si<(Oa<.il.  Wh������ro is Jr'.'i ?"  "In nor loom, 1 think."  Bridge   Forty-One Miles in Length.  A gigantic iiii'leiliiking, the bridging  over of I'flk'a Strait., bopaniting lhe island of Ceylon trorn tho rrminlaiid of India,  in -i'-nouHly proposed by ihe Ceylon gov-  errirrient. Tho strait is forty-on*-, in;ie������  broad at its nirrownsi point, double tlio  width of ���������h'3 Koglisn Oi uiiiul, i.ut IB very  ��������� riAlIow, in rrwiriy pl.icos only hix leet deep.  The lidarrli-j reefn, and chiniiifdn in ll imvi-  i,scn rt;c;ntiy snrvyed, and the c-obi of  tiorki), 'jxl'jiidiiig ov������r -ixty-oic miles,  including the fVuh-un Cnrii.rn-l nnd tne  Adr-io'-- l''rt'l%K r<-ef, in ii'tmu.-c/] at -JS,*  OOO.GOO rupo--. TIi'ipii.Ih will he connected  by I \'i .ii.1',b 'il r-iiiion.il witti Colombo, ti>o  gif-.it h'lri-oi of Ceylon, on th>' on*: aid'-,  and by ninety un im of road wi'h M i-iur-i,  tho ncirisl, p' int of th" Indian r,iilr������������-]  system, on the other. _ i: mitinw I'lugi; :b  ii-iud, thin-an be done for ! 1,' 0'i,ii!,0 r.iptca  ii.ore.  A number 'of  beara infest  the Innerkip  swamps. ���������  Goiierich is to have a new skating and  curling, rink.    ' ',       '  vThe Belleville electric railway is now in  operation.' ,     , ,  The nursing staff of  the Berlin,Hospital  hue been increased.  Kiugbton's dry goods stores close at noon  during August. ,  ���������Bush fires on the Manitoulin have caused  great damage. * , "  Si., John, N.  B.,   is purchasing   a new  park for itself.  Whiskey   Island is the namo of a   resort  in Southampton.  The   young man ied men of   Algonquin  have a football team. *    . '    .  Henpall has   the two fastest  flax pullei-n  in Huron County.     "*  Mrs,   Robert Cameron, of   St, Thomas,  recently attempted suicide,    '   ��������� '    ,  Typhoid fever is prevailing in the  western part of Ontario. (       ' ���������  "  The Quebec Government) will soon remove  tho "business   tax." ���������  ?"       The school buildings of Portage la Piaino  are beinu .enlarged. "   ,  A wealthy citizen of Berliu .will erect  a  Y. M. U. A. building there.  ..There was  a  burglary iu   the   Catholic  church of Sarnia last  week.  ,     '  1 Tho oil well at Verona is   attracting the  attention of capitalists. ���������=��������� ,���������  ���������    A woman has been  appointed   assistant  city treasurer of Bangor, Me.  Many Chinese' are passing through  Canada in bond bound for  Cuba.      ;     '  The lierlin Water, Company has struuk  an excellent well at 130 feet. ,  '  A branch of the Nova Scotia Bank i3 to  be opened at Calais, N. B. >  The corner stone of Quebec's new Cilyi  Hall was laid tho other day, ^     \       ' ������  Miss'Annie McKenzie, of Lucknovw, will  go to Chilians a missionary.  The Biodulph Agricultural,, Society ������*.ill  hold its show Octobei'lst.  Fishing about Killaruey is a failure, on  account of poaching by nets.  The catch of Canadian seals this year-i."  far below that of last year.        ,  Rev. Carl Smith, .Lindsay, is the new  curate at St. John's Port Hope.  The C. P. R. shops at SaultSte. Marie  will probably bo .opened iu the fall.  A 12-pound channel catfish was caught;  in the Thames near Byron lately.  A well-known .educationist, Hcnkle  Cougdon, of Halifax,has just died, aged fi!).  > Stiatford lias, a 24-year-old midget ,'{  feet. 9 inches high, weighing 45 pounds.  Forty-one prisoners havo just been released from the Kingston penitentiary.  A Listowel firm last week shipped 810,-  000 worth of wool to the United States.  "Babies reduced to ������2 a dozen" is on a  photographer's sign in N<ua Scotia.  A Kaslo by-law collecting ������50 license  'from each barber is likely to   be quashed,  The Vancouver Public   school   teachers  have hud their salaries raised Sj a mouth.  The corner stone of  tho Queen's  aveiuiu  Methodist church, Loudon, has been   laid.  A new flax barn wat- raised near Hensall  recently measuring 100 x 43 feet.  ���������  Rev. Mr. I>est, Baptist minisl'er at New,  Westminster, has been called to London,'  Out.  The Ontario travelling dairy will visit a  nun.her of places in Prescott next month.  1 Ono day last week 1,000 men gathered  at the Montreal Labour,Bureau looking for  work. '      *        ,   ���������  Vessels with 0,000 lotal tonnage hnv������  boon chartered' to lake canned salmon to  Great Britain. '  Point Comfort is the nnnie of.a new posi-  ollice near Thiity-ono' Mile Luke, on the  Oatiiieau.  The G. N. W. Telegraph Company is  appealing against the assessment- of their  poles at Port Stanley.  A Montreal paper urces the construction  of a canal to join the upper laltes with the'  Ottawa valley.  London's Mayor h.is been enjoined not  to sign the contract with the Bulialo Barker  Asphalt Company. '     ' ,  The balance to credit of depositors m  the Dominion (.iovcrnnient.savings bank on  July I was S?17,0-14.9.").  John -\. MoOm thy, Lhe eldest policeman  in Ontario, colebralod his eighty-fourth  birthday recently at Stratford.  Uime County's rainfall in Juno wa������oniy '  th-eo-qiiarLera of un inch, while the general I  avciiige there is four inolies.  The other day an American linn   b.iughi ,  $200,0(0 worth of logs from Halo & Booth,  loan taken from the Spanish river section,  Bridgetown, N. S., baa a lady resident  aged S3 veins who lin.fi ono hundred and  ihiity descendants living j nine own children," coventy-i-Gveii grandchildren and'  forty-four greatgrandchildren.  At tne Tyendinaga Reserve there arc at  present 2-1 white women who have inarriu]  Indians and become full membeis oi Un  band, while twe.vo Indian women bavin,  mauled out according to the Indian Act,  lose all the rights but the annuities of th,  Wild.  from 823,011,422 in 1SS9  to $21,990,053 in  1890,   since   which   latter year there ' hat  been  a steady   inoieaso up   to the figurf  given in the table above.    Since   1SSS the  Government has peen closing the   indepen- ..  dent savings banks' maintained in some of  the   Maritime   provinces   by   the Fimiuce '  department and transferring the accounts"  to tlie post ollice,'the safety and cheapness  of administration of'which may bo iuferred  from Lhe fact that in ttansactions of over a  a hundred ,aiid   twenty millions ol dollarB  Hies total losses fiom every cause have heou  ,  iiiuier<eleveu   thousand-dollars,   ������0,120 of  wnich occurred in ono year (1S(5S) through  tho frauds of an employe.   ���������The total  '  COST OF ilANAOBMBNT, '    ,  including salaries,   compensation to postmasters-",   inspection,   printing,   etc.,   war  last year ������37,116, the cost of each deposit  or withdrawal 1 eiug undor one-quurter of  one cent,   and the precentago of  cost' of  management to the balance due to depositors eleven-fiftieths of   one    per com. per  annum..   There ia no loan to ��������� the Go\eminent whicli costs less for management, and  it is to be remembeied that, unlike bonds,  posl office deposits are liable to no discount  when the money  is paid"in.    It has been   *  said   that buaiuesB   men and   people  with r  money to invent use thecposb ollice instead  of an ordinary   bank, because the rate oi  inteiest allowed is slightly higher than iu  tho case of lending joint stock institutions.  Up lo the piesent, if this has been the cuso,  no great haim can be said lo have ensued.  The Government bus obtained tho money '  nt about what a bonded loan   would cost,  und it is only in late years that loans have  been successfully put at 'I per'cent.    It is,  doubtful, huwevei, if there is much foundation for the charge.    The amount received  fro'ni ft'n'y one depositor, is by rule limited  to Si,000, and the average amount at credit  of depositors   is   only   *?2*2'2, 'the,, average  depositor contributing to the total during  ast year jtut ������52.    The inference from the  .moderateness of   ihese figures  is that tho  post office ia'really a wage  earuer'a bunk,  und its   success is an evidence of general  thrift/and prosperi'y.  . .HORSES ANd'hORSE^RACING."    '   ���������'   '    P       :     *     '  Interpretation of. ������ .Much Vexed  Oliiuse-.  i:iciiii'iil*i   That SIkiII   l'nier   Into   the,  .liHlxiiH'iit   or  Horses  -it   Agricultural  '  Slioivs���������S|ti'������<l .Vol to lie llie .*(������!<* Mci-Il.  The following circular has. been,issued  by the Ontario Department of' Agriculture:  Several applications having been made'**  to this department by various agricultural  societies for an interpretation of section 29  of the Agricultuie und Arts Act,'JS95, the _  following decision is given to tho officers  and 'directors for their guidance as being  the evident intention of tho legislature  when passing the Act: ���������'  By section 9 of the said Act, .the objeo  of such societies, as relating to live slock  is confined to ,two things: (u).the purchase  or importation of valuable animals; and (b)  awarded upreniiuins^ for excellence in the  raising of stock, etc. Sub-section ,'i of thi8  section declares thutnone of the funds shall  bo expended for any purpose inconsistent  with the above.  The opinion of  tho  Legislature,  as  expressed in soctiou 29,   was thsii   horse racing, i's ordinalily conducted,  is inconsistent with the objects above set forth.    It is  presumed therefore in awarding premiums  for  light'horses' of  any  class'that   'orm,  *  soundness, and style shu.ll always   bo con- s  uidered as well as bpei'd, and lhat no horse  shall be placed first for speed alone.    If in  the judgmeni'uf tho oliic-ers-or judges it is  deemed desirable  to tesl the speed of the     ,  contesting lioites,   it, is competent under  this clause ������.o do  so, but the prizes must  in eveiy case  be awaided ou  geneial ex  celleuce, nj poiseshing the above cluirauier  idles.    Neither is it intended   that purses     ,  hjiall be prepared of ofl'erings  from owners  of  contesting   bori.es,   but that premiums  shall le olleieil in the ordinary way.  Ii. is hoped that ihe operation of this  clause will do away ' with the profeaaioiia'  race hotse at our agncultutal shows, and  tend to promote the development nnd  encourage ihe breeding of sound, sljlish, .  right-stepping boises, so much in dimant?-  in the great horse markets of ihei world,  ,1no. DllYllKS',  Minister of Agriculture.       -s  Noi for Her.  I never yet nave kn>������ed n girl,  He Bdid with voice that yearned.  Tuen   you    may    ho,    and    don't  v-k,  She crkd. till you have learned  Dogs Can Read Charaerer.  Wonderful tales have bepn lold of lhe  miAi vellous instinctive intelligence of do"?,  but tlie idea of consulting a canine oracle,  wlicn.a iiiu.il is contemplating matrimony is  a new one. A French writer, however,  says that before cc'mnutting himself a man ���������  'should note carefully how she whom he  loves conducts herself towards her parents  and friends, and, above all, how she treats  ordinary domestic animals. "Beware of a  pirsou whom children and dogs dislike,"  he says. "Dog3 may be our iuferiore, but  their instincts"rarely deceive them,, and a  pronounced antipathy on their part may  well be considered as a danger signal. No  compassion should be felt for him who  marries- a girl whom dogs snarl at and dis-  hke.for he has had fair warning of domestio  elornis."  m^M  ���������C&"',jii-M  ���������������iKV'").M:?  HtSfiCttv;/  WkJA&-,.  I������epv.i'''  <-9a  HPf's.t'rA''-., ���������  Hii'S?4-''  -  m$& '  gr  BE '^s>? .i"  m  th  S'^-'-r-.  ���������in.  W$8l<  ar  m%  fa  W$8f  in  ���������hsA.j;**  -o������  w-Mi*  w  S"tafe'- "'  g  aflff-v ,    t-  c.  ���������p*  fi  ii  ������  fri'lh  fl<  EfjVrft*.  w-4* ���������  t  K'ir.  i  Rr's"'*-  fflv;.  t  Key-*"  d  m$r'"  tm  H  m ���������  ^^r  3t0,  t  ' V  pi  a  a  a  Pi ' '  , a  fei-r  s  W -!  t  ItfSs'  te"  ii  a  i.  e  0  0  c  e  b  ���������?  I  conic Thi head has tbe most beautiful aipear-  ancc, ns well as the li'ghent e'.niii-f in t  hufrun tiguic.������������������ A-I'iiiou n...  JKiCjr- iV,  E^������uS^' J*7I*  e i'&f"-.','  te ���������  V-*V' -  a-1-'-?.  Wifi-lf*-  tei/'  THE   KOOTENAY    MAIL.  3  CURRENT   NOTES.  m  SOUTH SEA CAMIBALS,  ' A few years ago  theie   was  room for a  'great deal   of criticism upon  the management of county and local fairs throughout  the country. There has been great lmprove-  -ment, -however, within ten years, and we  are glad to say that  most of  our annual  fairs   are   now   free   from   the    immoral  influences which made so many unworthy  -of  the aupport of all honest men..   Some,  we are sorry to say, still continue to license  gambling   concerns,  immoral  shows,,and  catchpenny    fakes,   caring  more   for  tho  financial  buccess of tho fair  than for the  ' influence  it exerts upon the  patrons and  =pon .society.,    Such  fairs  should bo let  severely alone by all good oitizens.    If the  managers cater  to   the worst  elements of  society," let thoee elements be iu, patrons.  *  An agricultural fair is designed, primarily,  to    promote    agricultural   and    kindred  interests, and their moral influence should  be pure and elevating.    Nothing that is of  doubtful   character, let alone   positively  ..degrading     or     demoralizing    influence,  should be admitted within the gates.  'This doeB not mean that we are'opposed  to -amusements. . On the contrary, we advocate wholesomeand harmless amusements  at fairs, most heartily. . W������ would secure  and advertise attractions'.that would  attract and amusementB that would amuse,  ��������� and at the same time have' them free from  suspicion, and of undoubted healthy moral  tone and infiueno6. Tnere is,nothing wrong  in a roller-coaster, a Ferris wheel, a balloon  ascension, a parachute jump, a panorama  exhibition, or.a'fair ond square lestof speed  on the track. They relieve the. monotony  of the fair< ground, and infuse the air of  energy and life into what would otherwise  becompaiatively tame and listless to a large  part of the attendants, if not all.  THEY HAVE EATEN ,ALL  WHITE MEN IN REACH.  THE  It'must be rememberedthat the financial  success of tho fair is of primary importance,  and in order to secure the largest attendance possible, a ' variety of attractions,  aside from'the show of farm products aud  live stock, is absolutely essential. There"  are many who' will go to see a good race,  but care nothing for the agricultural features, And so with'other attractions. If  they are harmless they are legitimate, even  ,if not so very instructive. The fairs should  be educutors, surely, but to make them  such-they must be popular, attractive, full  of life, but  free   from  immoral practices  j and influences that deerade-  '    The moral tone o.'society throughout the  . ,country, and especially on the farm, will  not now support a fair that admits gambling devices, licenses swindlers, or allows  the sale of liquors, and managers who pursue this policy under the belief that they  " will build up a paying institution, make a  grievous mistake.    They may achieve tern-  ��������� porary success, but. utter failure cannot  long be delayed,, All good citizens should  turn their fscee resolutely against this class  of fairs. Don't attend them, and if you  value' the good' moral character of you  boys and girls, keep them away. A fair  that builds a daoce platform advertises the  fact that it invites the lowest and. vilest  characters to patronize it. Promiscuous  dances have always been regarded as dan-  ' gerous in the extreme, aud a fair ground  dancing platform is one of the worst forms  ^of this evil. The very air is tainted, and  your boys and girls cannot, approach it  s-.losely without infection. Shun it as you  would the smallpox or yellow fever.    ���������  Itrilisli .Ships Will Shell the Gannlhal  Villages���������The InlesI Victim* or, lhe  Bloodthirsty Savages lhe   Crew  of an  ' Australian Trading: Ship���������Tho Settler*  Fleeing from the Island In Terror of  Their lives. ;  News has just (been received-in this  country that the cannibal inhabitants of  the Solomon. Islands havo returned once  more to their- barbarous practice of headhunting and man-eating. '.The despatches  state that the white settlers in the neighborhood, who, after a year's bessation from  these bloodthirsty pursuits on the part of  the natives, had begun to feel somewhat  secure, have been stricken with terror and  are fleeing to Australia on every available  vessel. They are accompanied in . their  flight by numbers of missionaries, who are  well awiire that the South Sea Island cannibal has a strong partiality for. white flesh,  aud that he will go' to the extent of slaying  even these good and harmless clergymen  when once his appetite for human flesh has  been thoroughly excited.  In all of the adjoining islands the white  settlers have applied to the British Admiral, Sir A. G. Bridge, for 'protection.  The Admiral has displayed commendable  energy in his effort to punish the'horrible  offenders, nnd according to the lastest  reports, has embarked on board the first-  class cruiser Orland, with the purpose of  shelling the sayage hamlets and dwellings  along the coast. It is doubtful, however,  whether much will be accomplished by  his line of procedure, aa the savages are  accustomed to retreat to the interior while  the finug is going on, and, by the deftness  and treachery of their movements they  have o'ften beeu known to.seize  s*.   GOOD JOB WELL DONE.  Steamer Taken Out of the   ttrnveynrd or  the  Aliunde.  Sable   Isliiu,!   Sand*..   ,  After,being embedded for ten months iu  the sands of Sable Island,the " graveyard  ������f the Atlantic," the British freight steamship Neriio was taken to New York on  ilouday under her own steam, preceded  and partly guided by the Merritt wrecking  *leamer J. D. Jones. Save for a few  damaged plates near lhe keel, her hull waa  iu good condition. She had been btripped  of all her joiner work, including the doors  of every room except the lavatory,,by the  beachcombers of' the islaud. .All of her  brass fittings and every pane of glass had  .���������  been carried away.  The Neriio went aground in a fog iu  September last, > Her crew abandoned her  and were taken to Halifax ou the steamship  Lunenburg. The British steamship New-  fields eamoaiong and stripped her of chain,  c.ible, hawsers, and canvas.  Her owner collected the insurance from  the British Lloyds, whoso agents decided  to save her, as she was worth about *?25U,-  000, and was only three years old. They  employed the Merrill Wrecking Company  to haul her off.  Tne steamer I. J. Merritt went to the  island in October last, but was prevented  by foul weather from doing effective work.  In June last the J. D. Jones, in command  of Capt. Fred. Sharpe, wilh a crew of  forty men including engineers aud stokers,  to man the Nerito, went to her and found  that she had been forced across two bars by  the winter stormsand was fast on tho beach  of the island. Canals were dredged through  the two bars: and anchors, attached to four  fifteen-inch manilla hawsets were dropped  astern of the Nerito. Steam winches, to  which the. inboard ends of the hawsers  were made fast, were aet going on the  Nerito, and, inch, by inch the ship mude  sternway down the canals though tho inner,  and outer bars, The Merritt assisted in  the work by pulling on a heavy hawser  midc fast to i big bitt on the Nerito.  Twenty-one days woro spent preparing for  lhe job rf hauling und towing the ship into  deep water. The actual work of moving  the ship'was finished in ton days. Sho  was damaged about iJoO 000. There are  neirly 500 ions of cnal in her bunkers. The  Merritt Company did the job for ������20,000.  largest of the group, sent to the Spanish  navigator a present of a quarter of a boy,  with the hand and arm. The Admiral,  horrified at receiving so gruesome a gift,  ordered its instant burial, a proceeding  which .both angered and perplexed the well-  meaning chief, who did not think that such  a choice morsel as a boy's flesh should be so  recklessly disposed of.  'The Solomon Islanders are eoaddicted to  the ' habit of man-eating that they regard  with disgust the habit oi a number of  neighboring tribes of nourishing the ��������� body  by means of roots, herbs and nuta. The  teatimony of visitors to thiB region ia to  the effect that the man-eaters are by far a  more vigorous and  WELL-FORMED RACE,    .',  and though they are cannibalB, they are by  no meana of an inferior, order of intelligence  as savages go.. The men are, as a rule,well  formed, and the women, in their youth,are  handsome and attractive, though they soon  become bent and disfigured hy the toil to  whiph they are subjected. The Solomon  Island women, as is ��������� generally the 0caae  among savages, is the slave of her husband,  and even her life is in hie hands. ' They  are usually treated with great cruelty, and  disobedience ia punished by instant death.  The body is subsequently devoured by the  hutband and hib remaining wives. It  would be considered a waste to bury it.  The chiefs are especially given to man-  eating', and in a raid of the kind which has  just beeu reported,all of the tenderest flesh  is submitted to them. Each chief is provided with a butcher, whose, 'duty it ia to  put to death the captives and prepare their  bodies for feasting. It is, perhaps, advisable to bear in mind that the altitude of  these butchers towards lhe captives is1 not  one of hostility or vengeance, but ��������� merely  the. professional attitude of one who has a  certain piece of work toperfoim,and whose  sole desire is to perform it with excellence.  The prevailing notion tliat the human food  of cannibals is prepared by boiliue the  whole body in a pot,is, of course erroneous.  Aside from the absence of pots, the human  flesh is of a chaiacter thai is best prepared,  not by boiling, hilt by bunging up in a  shady Bpot for a day or two and then roasting like pork. ,  The taste 'is aaid to resemble that of  awine very closely. In faot, the Biblical  injunction against the eating of swine is  said to be founded on this resemblance.      '  , STRAGGLING   BOATLOADS 1  of the whites as they visited the shore and  to make off with them in triumph. 'Very  few of these unfortunate captives have  ever been seen again. ^ According to the  usual practice of the Solomon Islanders,  tney are immediately, put to death.,and  their bodies carefully quartered by' the  chief's butcher. The pieces are then hung  lip-on the branches., of shady trees and  allowed to acquire the .proper degree of  seasoning. .  Tho latest white victims of the savages  were the Bhip'e company of the Sydney  trading schooner Amelia, Copt'. D. Kerr,  his mate, Samuel Smith, and ei|>ht or ten  men.- They sailed in the Bchooner Amelia,  from Rubiana in the middle of last April  and havo since been missing under circumstances that leave no question as to their  fate. .The British naval officers in the  vicinity are 'naturally 'enraged over the  miserable destruction of these sailors, and  it is probable that swift vengeance .will be  taken upon the cannibals if they fall-'into  the clutches of the whites. When the  sailors failed to return to Rubiana in May,  one Nathaniel .Wheatley, of that place,  organized a search^for them and succeeded  in picking up the deck-house, the hatches  and other part3'of the Amelia, but every  one of,the men had disappeared.  THK   CANNIBAL ISLES.  '���������'  There is about nf. much  go-id man lost, as there is  saved-  lojoiemg over a  over n  bad one  The group of islands called the Solomon  Islands by early navigators, who vaguely  supposed that they were the original  "depositoiy of Solomon's gold, extend from  the northwest to the southeast in latitude  5 to 11 degrees south and 154 to 103 degrees  east, at a distance of about S0O miles  northeast of Australia, " They are the  largest of the numerous groups of islands  in the Pacific Ocean, and were discovered  by Alverdo ds Mendaua in lo67. Vet  though they were* thus among the earlieBt  known islands in this region, our information in regard to theirtopography, resources  and inhabitants has always remained very  meagre, owing to the uuamiuble character  of the natives..       '     "        <���������  The Solomon Islanders are of a mixed  race, varying between, an almoBt pure  Malay type and the' dark-skiuned Polynesian. .Though savage iu their habils,  ihey are nevertheless intelligent, - crafty,  thievish and revengeful, and they are said,  when domesticated, to make excellent and  faithful servants. The men wear uo  clothing but a loin band, and lhe women  wear a small skirt. They are mostly small  of stature snd their,, hair and sktn are  intensely black, tho former being closely  frizzled. Some 'visitors have described  these people as the moBtaavage, brutal and,  degraded race on oarth, but tnis opinion is  perhaps too severe. Although cannibals,  they are by uo means degraded as compared with othor savage races. They had  acquired iu the process of their development  aud before coming in contact with Europeans a knowledge of various simple arts,  soveral of which they practised " with  remarkable skill. They are aingularly  clever in surgery, settinii' arms and legs  with bamboo ��������� aplinlB. They have also  obtoined ' some knowledge of dentistry,-  though their treatment, of a patient ia  somewhat of a heroic character.  A protectorate waa established over the  entire group in 1S93. Tho British Govet u-  ment thus acquired a total area of soven or  eight thousand square miles and a population ot about 30,000 savages, the greater  part of whom wore cannibals. At the time  of the establishment of the protectorate the  chief of the island of San Christova, one of  the mobt cannibalistic of the lot, waa one  Taki, a converted man-eater.  STILL LIKli WHITE TLESII.  Contrary to ihe general impression, the  practice of cannibalism has by no means  been extinguished. It has been supposed  that the increasing intercourse between the  whites and savages and the presence of a  largo number of devout misuonaries in the  South Sea Islands had put an end to man-  eating as a general practice, but this is not  the case. The inhabitantsof many of these  islands, and of tho Solomon Islands in  particular, hove always been "anthrop-  hagoi," or cannibals, ever since their  existence first became known to white men  in the sixteenth century. And there is  nothing in the presenceof the missionaries or  in the soothing influences of intercourse  with white traders that would tend to make  these savages abandon the custom. Among  them tho practice of devouring their  follow-creatures in oider to satisfy the  pangs of hunger is regarded as entirely  natural and even praiseworthy, At the  lime of tho second visit of the discoverer of  these islands, Alverdo do Mendana, the-  chief  of the island  of   Vsubel, one   of   the  '     HOW,HUMAM"  FLESH  TASTES.  The fieah of a white man is peculiarly  agreeable to the taste of a cannibal. Dm*-"  ing the uprisings of the Solomon Islaud  "'head hunters" no person is safe, be he  white or black, so great is lhe frenzy of  these fearful creature's for, human blood.  But if a white man should be encountered  the occasion is celebrated by a banquet or  feast of unusual ceremouy.. Capt. William  T. Wawn, an Englishman, who spent years  in the Queensland labor trade and who was  quite familiar with the character and habits  of,the Solomon Islander, relates the following experience, illustrating this peculiar  cub torn l ������ ������.  - " On Nov. 9 the natives had captured  a recruiting boat belonging to the Mystery  labor schooner, They had killed her crew���������  four native boatmen���������and two white men  ���������Thomas Muir, male, and John 'Renton,  0. A. ' / ,  "The motive for these murders was not  revenge," but simply cannibilism. A great  feast had been arranged to take place, to  'which all the surrounding Iribes had been  invited. The chief of the tribe that gave  it desired to show hospitality on a' grand  scale, and accordingly provided the rare  dainty of while man's flesh'to do honor to  his guests on the occasion." ,  , The natives not only employ the flesh of  their captives, but they also make excellent  use of other portions of the body.  ,,'"       '1 HE LARGER BOXES,  sucu aa the femur or thigh bone and the  large arm bones, are used in making spear  points, and in various other crude arts.  The skulls are chiefly employed iu decorating the houses and sepulchres. One of the  favorite architectural . eiiecta appears to  consist in arranging a ' aeries " of akulls  along the edge of the thatched roof. The  skulls are also placed around the base of the  square stone mounds, which are built to  contain' the bones of dead natives. The  skulls on the exterior, however, are those  of captiveB, as may be easily known by  observing the gaps or clefts where'they  have received the death blow, in most  cases, from the hand of the professional  butcher. - . .  The suggestive name of "head hunting"  is eiveu to the_ practice, common among  these people, of going abroad, either singly  or in bands, and scouring, the neighboring  territory in the search for these horrible  trophies. Head hunting is carried on to  scme extentiu connection with cannibalisms  but much more from the desire of tbe chief,  simply to accumulate shulls, as a token of  political power, physical prowess,', or for  the purpose of decoration There are some  contigenciesin the social life of the Solomon  Islanders on the happening of which it is  quite necessary,according to the established  custom, that a head should be provided.  Among the principal of these may bs  mentioned : Tne death of a chief ; the  launching of a new war canoe ; the completion of a lambco-house. The tamboo,  or ��������� tainbu-house, is a building erected  to contain tne bones of some departed  savage. The bones bo treated are generally  those of chiefs or men of importance.  A Holy Relic  The only gold aud silver bound,diamond-  incrusted book in tae world was lately  enshrined in the holy Mohammedan city of  isnan-Rnza,Persia. Tbe book is,of course,  a copy of the Alkorau, and is a gift from  Abd-ur-Rahman, Emir of Afghanistan.  The covers of this unique volume,the sides  of which are nine and one-half by four  nches.are of solid gold plates oue*eighth of  an inch iu thickness, lined with silver  sheets of the same thickneBS. The centrepiece, aa well as the corners are symbolic  designs, wrought in diamonds, rubies and  pearls. The centre figure is acrescent, with  a star between its points, the whole design  being composed of 109 small diamonds,  167 pearle and 122 rubies'. The diamonds  on each corner, which are almost hidden in  their golden set ting,and the orange-colored  lscouer wilh which they are fastened, are  each worth about S5.C00. The book itelf  is on parchment, entirely written by hand.  It is valued at 8125,000. There is said  to have been over 100,000 visitors present  in Isnan-Ruza the day the holy relic was  enshrined.  Guileless Youth.  She���������Do you know anything about this  new game of progressive courtship ?  He (guilelessly)���������No; what is" it ?  She (hopelessly)���������Oh, nothing ; thought  you didn't.  Action ma}' not always bring happiness :  but there is no happiness without action.���������  Disraeli.  Get Up and aerateh.  Said one little chick, wilh afunny little squirm,  "I wish I could find a nice, fat worm."  Said another little chicken, with a queer little  shrug,  "I wish I could find a nice, f.it but'."  Said a third little chick, with a strange little  pqucal. ,  "I wish I coula find some nice, yellow meaL"  Now, look here," said   the mother, from the  green garden patch.  If you want any breaklast you must Ret up  and scratch."      "  Jack's Bear Hunt.  ."Where are you gome, Caleb ?"  ,  Jaok had, come into the warm farm  kitchen to find Caleb tinkering   with a gun.  ' "Gobi* on a bit of a hunt."  "Oh, I wish I could'go." i  ''"Why couldn t you?"  , "Oh ! Wilj ynu-.let me ? Say, mother,"  as she entered the room, "Caleb says I may  go hunting with him.    May I ?"  "Where to, Calsb '!" asked mother, "and  hunting what for ?"  ' "Why," said Caleb,'"I heard -tell" of a  deer or two heen seen 'round up in Plum"  mer's Holler, so I thought I'd go,and try  for 'em. Like enough I'll only bring home  some Equirrels.    Sq uirrels' is good, though."  "Deer !" exclaimed Jack, in great excitement. "Oh mother���������I could go back and  tell tho boys I'd been deer hunting."  ' Mother smiled at the eager face, willing  to a'low him the pleasure, yet anxious for  his safety. ' She had brought the boy into  the Minnesota, woods in quest of health for  him', and had remained late in the season to  give him a taste of invigorotmg frost. His  round cheeks and beaming eyes attested  the wisdom of her rc3ort to M other Nature's  kindly aids. ������r < .(  ' "If I was sure there could be no danger,'  she began. *' ,  "I'll take the best kind o' care of him,  said Caleb. "And if you're feared o' tirin'  him With too much walkin" 1^ can just as  wellhitoh up the spring wagon and drive  to the holler. Havo an errand out that  way - anyhow, where I can leave the  wagon."  r-Mother smiled her consent. Twenty  minute8(later,the two were driving away  in the sharil/crisp, morning air. Jack, a  bright boy of twelve, did not feel that the  hunt had begun until the wagon had been  left behind and the two were making their  way among the bare brush, logs and bould-  eis of Plumbers' Hollow,  "You'll let me take a shot at squirrel  sometime to-day; won't you." he asked  of Caleb, and after receiving the desired  promise was well content' to lapBe> into  hunters' silence. Aa they penetrated  deeper both became more careful in keeping  their movements quiet, Caleb occiaionally  motioning to Jack his convictions.baaed on  small' signs familiar to a sportsman, that  deer could not be far off.  " At length he paused, liftine his hand in  warning. Something was' near, beyond  doubt, by the sounds just ahead of them.  Ti-!*y had ;been* gradually working their  way upward until now very near the head  of the hollow. - Just here it was filled with  a dense growth of brush mingled with the  remains of fallen trees. In the. midst of  all this arose two or three rocks.   -    ���������     '  "Hsh I���������if there ain't a deer behind them  I wa'n't never baptized.Caleb," said Caleb,  iu the lowest, possible whisper. " You  keep back whilst I peep 'round here."  ,  But Jack could not keep back. Close at  Caleb's heels he followed as with an un-  avoidable crackling of the brittle brush he  skirted the rocks. ��������� And then'Caleb gave a  cry of dismay.'   But it was not for himself.  " Back, back," he shouted, as directly  before him, angry and threatening, with  flashing oyes, snorts ond growls, arose a  a large black bear. Caleb was a good shot;  and had he been by himself would not have  been disconcerted by the sudden surprise.  But the heavy . responsibility resting upon  'him upset him. With a nervous grasp he  leveled his gun and firod���������to wound the  bear which, now doubly enraged, made a  mail rush toward its foes. *  " Up there," shrieked Caleb, " Up that  tree���������quick !" * ��������� <  "How can I? I can't reach those bare  brunches," said Tack, reaching helplessly  above his head.     ��������� .  "Here!" Dropping his gun, with one  toss Caleb raised tbe boy lo'his shoulder.  Jack aeized the limbs above his head and  swung himself up. Caleb tried to regain  his gun but the beat was upon him.  "(Jet up farther," he cried to''Jack.  Jiick   did   so and  Caleb was soon beafde  him. ,  ���������  " Can't .bears "climb trees ?     whispered  Jack.  "They can'when they're feelin' good.  But sho can't���������poor creeier. Don't it  make a fellow feel guilty to see that?"  Mad with the pain of its wound the bear  was pawing the ground, tearing at trees  and branches, biting whatever was nearest.  " I must get down and get that gun���������  now I've got my breath, and my wits,"  said Caleb.  " Caleb, you can't," said Jack, in terror  at the violent movements of the great  brute. "It will be as good as your life's  worth to go down there."  Caleb lq'oked in the boy's face, recalling  with the'clearness of strongly suppressed  excitement, hi3 mother'sface asshedecided  to trust this one son of hers to his promised  good care, on his assurance that no harm  could possibly come to him.  " You hold .on tight," he said, gruffly.  "And," he added,' with an attempt at a  iight tone, " if that old lady down there  should get ono o' them heavy paws o'  hern on me,���������you'll undeistaud our best  hold ie to wait right here. They know  where we waa coinin'.    You hold on good."  "Siop, Caleb," cried the boy, in terror  at the pussibilties suggested iu the words.  " Don't    go   down.    Perhaps     she'll    go  away���������  Whether the move made half voluntarily  by Jack caused him to lose his balance can  never he told^ but the next moment Caleb,  carefully turning on the almost bare branch  with view to making his way to tho side  of the tree farthest from the enemy, lost  his hold and went down���������to alight exactly  on the bear's back.  ��������� A situation to bring outall tho nerve of a  truo hunter. Jack could never afterwards  recall without a shudder that fight for dear  life, in which Caleb,with only hisjaokknife  and sturdy fist dealt blow after blow until  the poor animal, blinded by tho flow of  blood staggered and fell over, giving Caleb  opportunity to reach his gun.  "She's done," he Baid quietly, after the  echo of tho shot had died away among  the  hills.  ���������        *        ������ U  " Luckly I brought the spring wagon,"  said Caleb, when hours later having called  upon neighbors for help in securing hia-  prize, he placed in it the bear skin and a  supply of the nisat.- " And now, boy," he  Bald'o Jack, in   a voice which   betrayod a  good deal of feeling under the light wordn,  " I'm takin' you back to your mother safe  and sound, thanks be to the Lord, and Pm  ready to say the next time I go b'ar huntin'  I'll go alone."  " I haven't so much as a squirrel," said  Jack to his mother. " Have'n't even had a  shot.    But I've been in a bear hunt."  EXCITING BALLOON ADVENTURE.  Bnllcls   Fired nt   a French   Aeronaut   bj  , Rerinan <"u������t<nu llou^c Offi-crs  The Paris correspondent of the London  Standard quotes from the Petit Bourguignon  cn account of an exciting balloon adventure."  , M. Chesnay.a well known'oeronaut, went  up in the car of a large balloon on Sunday  and came to the ground the same evening  at Fallon.' On Monday morning he filled  his balloon wiih the gas iie had brough t with  him in a small balloon, and ascended once  more. He passed successfully over Ponte  de Roide and Delly, and saw clearly the  \ittle corner of Switzerland which separates  France,, from Alsace-Lorraine. Suddenly,  when just above the frontier of Alsace, he  heard tho report of .firearms, and then the  hissing of'a bulletff The shots, were, he  sayB, fired at his balloon by the German  Custom House men. Being anxious to"get  beyond the range of' their rifles aB quickly  as po-sible, Al. Chesnay threw a'sack of  ballast.out of the car, and in a few minutea  found liimaelf at an oltitude of about four  thousand metres. His balloon, however,  descended again, and he' saw Mulhouse,  Basle, and the Rhine. In a short time the  balloon was floating over the territory of  ihe Grand Duehy of Baden. Wishing to  ascertain exactly where he w<is, Al. Chesnay  descended rather too close to the earth, for  the car of hiB balloon struck a hill. Fortunately he .was not hurt, but,a sack of  balla'st and the barometer being jerked out  of the 'car, the balloon once more shot up  high. The. wind was very strong, aud  soon it became impossible to maintain the  balloon any longer in the air.  The violence of the gale prevented the  anchor -from fixing itself in the ground.  The personB who tried to' help could not  keep up with the balloon, which was  dragging"the'car on the ground and bound-  inc up into the air ata furious rate. Telegraph wireB were broken like thread, telegraph postB knocked down like ninepins,  and canala were crossed .with AL Cheenay  at the bottom of the car. At length, after  the car had been dragged ini the water of a  canal,'the aeronaut clambered out and fell  on the groiiud senseless. When he recovered consciousness he' found himself surrounded by a crowd of people, but none of  them could' speak a word of French, and  he knew no German. After endless trouble he succeeded inc reaching the nearest  town, which was' Singen, and took train  for'Basle'and France. He returned-to  Dijon on Tuesday eveniua.  As for hia balloon, it-naturally shot up  into the air when M. Cheanayi threw himself out of the car, and it has not yet beeu  heard of.   , ' ,  GREECE HAS TOO MANY CURRANTS.  The Xew Danger Thrcatctiliiij'n  Lund Be-  set by Many Ills nnil ltKndvantages  s ' The people of the kingdom of Greece  ,sufler 'from many ills and disadvantages  which do not beset nationalities IesB distinguished than the descendants of the  ancient Hellenes. They have an occasional  earthquake, droughts are not uncommon,  volcanic eruptions rattle them. Turkish  marauders make murderous onslaughts on  them, and occasional notices are served on  them by English, Fre'nch, German, and  Russian bondholders that vthe quarterly  interest on euudry mortgages is past due  and must bs paid without further delay or  evasion. But recently the people of Greeco  have euffered from ft .new difficulty ; the  ������urrant' or rsisiu crop is too. generous.  There ' is too much ot it. The land has  proved too fertile and, in consequence of  this, the Greek husbandmen are threatened  with serious financial difficulties such as  overtake the husbandmen.of other agricultural lands when the ci'op runs short.  Corn is not produce 1 in Greece in'sufficient quantities to supply the inhabitants,  and a certain amount has to be imported  every year from Russia. The most favored  and best cultivated crop is the currant.  Immense diatrict8 are planted with currants  in various parts of the' kingdom,.particu*  latly along ihe shores of the Gulf of Corinth,  between the towns of Corinth and Patras  aud on the islands of Zante and Cephalonia.  The chief mr.rket for Greek currants is  England, which takes from ������9,000,000 to  $10,' 00,000 wotth in a year. Thoy are exported to other countries, but not to the  same extent as to Enclau.d, where the  popularity of plum pudding aud mince pies  keeps up a steady market for Zinie currant;, Pit they are often called in lhe trado.  The United States have very little commerce with Greece���������next to none at all,  in fact.  '  The tanners of Greece, or.more properly  of the c.iri ant-raiting dietrict of Greece,  are apprehensive thai with the large crop  now on hand prices will so fur decline 'as  to make the crop sn unremunerative one,  and as currants are lhe agricultural staple  of Greece it may bo readily seen that an  injury of this kind would he a very serious  one to a country which staggers under- an  unduly heavy "load of debt. Tho ,pre:ent  national indebtedness of Greece is i?110,-  000,000, or at the rate of about $30 a head.  The country is a poor one, and much of lhe  land ia unproductive. The sources of public  revenue arc few, and a large share of the  debt is hold abroad. Unless there is a lively  and increased demand for Greek currants  pretty soon the fear is expressed by some  political economists in the land of .Sociates  that it will be ncceps.iry for the Greek  Goverment to borrow eome more money.  STUB ENDS OF THOUGHT.     .  Opportunity ia not tho kind of thing that  stands around waiting to be embraced.  A woman can't be in love and in politics  at the  same time.  The wators of oblivioil sometimes quench  tho thirst for glory.  .  A woman thinKS her heart is empty until  she gets in it what alio wants theie.  A man knows  he is old  long before ho  confesses it.  Very   few men   can   make   money and  friends at the same time.  Reason 'is   instinct endowed  with the  power of speech.  An   ounce of thought may prevent a ton  of rogret.  -���������/S������ttCg3gr*UM_lif J.,  MILITARY   MANNERS.  Some. Sti-nii-jr- Ksiles nnil Ci'.iloms Adopted  In Time  or "IVat  Vattel declared' that in war all vines,  fruit trees,' 6nd growing crops should be  spaied.      =  In tbe English arrny a soldier is drummed  to church just as he is to drill or dreas  parade. , . f  Aledifeval knights often took a voluntary  oath that they would never spare the life  of an enemy.  Exchange of prisoners was practised in  very eaily times by both the Greeks and  the Romans. '      ,  When the "fignting Bishop of Norwich,'  in 1333, stormed the town of Gravelines.he  massacred its entire population.  Relvetius declared  in his articles of war  hat   Soldiers , ought   to be   made to feat  their own officers, more, than they do the    .  enemy. .  Tho   Koran   forbids   true   believers   to  dealroy the   vines, palm trees, fruit trees,   '  corn aud cattle, even   of their   worst enemies.  ,   Bombardment of the   residence portioni.  of towns,now foibidden by the laws of war,  has   been repeatedly practised in epite  ol,  thie prohibition,   y  In mediaeval times not-only were living  prisoners,ransomed by their friends, but a  ransom was demanded even for she bodies  of,those slain in action.  During tho days when armor was heaviest  the cavalry was the slow moving army of  the service, all movements requiring celerity being executed by infantry.  Hot shot as well as chain and grape shot,  when first employed, were declared to be  inventions of tho devil, and not to be sanctioned among civilized nations.       , .  In.the fourteenth century the slaughter  of women and children after a,'town or,  castle had been,taken bytstorm was one of  the most common occurrences of war. ��������� P       j,  During the war  between   Richard, I..'of    '  England and Philip Augustus of  Franco,    (  prisoners on both sides wore  blinded as a  means of intimidating the besieged party.  The   Chevalier   B.iyatd   made    by   his  ransoma during the courae of his .military '  career more than ������4000 asum equivalent to ,.  nearly ten times that, amount nowadays.  At Gibraltar, during the most famous of  its sieges, the Freu'ch commander, learning  that Elliot's men were suffering from *scur������  vy, sent them'as a present a  boat load of.  carrots. <���������  ���������By the rules of chivalry all persons, male  and female, old and young, in a town taken  by assault, were liable  to be put to^death, *  aud'the men and boys seldom escapedthe  brutality of the victors.  At the storm of Madgoburg by Tilly,  in  1631, this'noted authority on the art of war   ���������  laid down the general maxim   that after a  successful   assault   the soldiers' ought to    .  have three hours of pillage./,    f   .  When Meaux waa surrendered to Hen'r.y  IV. clemency was' promised to the population if Bix of the lending defenders,wore  " given up to justice." These six were surrendered and fourof them were beheaded.  At Sebastopol the opposing commanders  ,'  exchanged   civil courtesies,    Sir   Edmond  Lyons sent Admiral MachinolT tho present  -  of a' fat buck,   aud tho  Russian Admiral,  returned   the   compliment   with   a   largo  cheese.' , ' a *  Tho use of  cannon and bombB at .their ���������-  fir6t introduction was pronouucoddiabolical  by the Church  authorities, and  from one   ,  cud s-.f, Europe to the   other   the- pulpit  orators thundered against these weapons of,"  the Evil One.  At the siege of Jerusalem by Titus tho  captive JewB were crucified by the Romans  in such numbers that,  as Josephus says, ,  there wus no longer wood ot whioh to make  the croises nor space for them to stand.  During the Middle Ages reprisals were  common.  (The vengoance taken for a bravo. ���������  defense of a town or' castle was generally  the hanging of the most prominent officers  and men among tho dofonders.  When Richard I., with the other crusaders, took Alessina, all the noblo and good-  looking women of the town were carried  ofl". Some , were afterwards ransomed,  while the greater part were held as slaves  by their captors. *  ��������� When the Emperor Henry in 1194 captured   Salerno he ordered the wives'and    v  daughters of the leading citizens to be put  up at auction and sold, and all. these unhappy ladies were thus diBposed of   to a '  brutal soldiery. '   '  When Edward'I. made a prisoner of the  Countess of Buohan ho decided not to put  her to death, .but. instead ordered a large  iron cage to be made in which she was  exposed, as a prisoner of war, to the  execrations aud abuse of the English  rabble. ,  In ancient times prisoners were subjected ���������  to the moit cruel tortures and terrible forms  of death. The monuments and "records of  Nebuchadnezzir tell with great unction  how many thousands of his enemies he beheaded, impaled and flayed alive.  Tho bayonet was invented in 1323 by a  woman of Bayonne, and tho use of this  weapon was at first strongly reprobated by  military authorities., The first battle ir  which a bayonet charge decided the fate oi ,  the day was at Neerwiuden, in 1693. -  Gustavub Adolphus, of Sweden, ivaa, i*  is a-iid, the first to dispense with the regular declaration of war. " Frederick the '  Groat made no declaration of war before  iiis invasion of Silesia, the act of aggression  whicli brought on the Seven Years' War.  In tho fourteenth andfifleenth centuries,  even when France and England were at t  war, fishermen of the two nations remained  at peace, aud without auimosity bought  from and soli to each other and exchanged  their fish just as in times oi profoundest  peace.  Explosive bullets were first used in  India for hunting tigers and elephant?.  They were  brougnt into ubc in   Europe by  their introduction into the Ru.ssian army  in 1S63. In 1SSS an international Convention declared their employment iu war lo  be inhuman aud unnecessary.  The destruction of lifo in modern warfare  is something frightful. In the Franco-  Prussian war from 'August 4, 1S70, to  August IS, 100,000 Germans and French  were killed outright, to say nothing of the  many thousands more who afterwards died  in the honpitals from their   wounds.  Of Some Use. (  A curious use for a husband is reported  from Clcrkcnwell, near London, where a  Air. Lamb and his wife keep a small shop.  For 14 years the firm haB avoided payme  taxes by the wife's Fending the husband to  jail to serve out the legal time for unpaid  taxee, while the remains at the atore attending to business.  G  Barnum k Bailey's  Kiutrston were 67,000.  circus   receipts   at  ** PAGE 4,  THE KOOTENAY MAIL.  Trail Gets a Smelter.  ,, The Montana Ore Purchasing , Co.,  has entered into a contract "with  Topping ifc Hanna' and Mr. Humphreys to.pujbasmelter.it Trail .whicli  will have the capacity to treat 100  tons,of ore per,day. It will be built  with a view of adding other stacks,  even to_ the extent of 1,000 per day.  It seems that Mr. Humphrey's companies had agreed with Topping and  Hanna to' build a smelter at Trail.  Th������ Montana Ore Purchasing company had contracted for 75,000 tons of  ore "for the Le Roi' company, on tiie  dump, and therefore had to lookout  for transportation. , Rossland, Trail,  Nortliport and Spokane were candid7  ates for the smelter. After a thorough  investigation and consideration of all  the circumstances and conditions, Mr.  Hoinze and Mr. Breen decided in  favor of Trail. Tlie machinery has  been purchased and will be shipped  from Butte, Montana on' the 10th of  next month. The contract for tlie  Wick and stone work, if not now let,  will be in a few days,' and active building will commence. Mr. Humphreys  brought the news ,to Rossland last  Monday, and says that Mr. lleinze  informed him that' his company will'  begin to buy ore by the middle of  October and that the smelter will be  in full operation before ,the' 1st of  January. Under the present 'arrangements it seems that Mr. Humphreys'1  people have concluded not to build a  smelter at . this , time and that the  Montana ��������� Ore .Purchasing company  will handle the ores from the mines ,of  Mr. Humphreys' ,' companies.���������Rossland Record. <  With the Sports.    '  In the baseball game  at   Kamloops  yesterday, Canmore won   from   Kani-  j loops by a score of 17 to 9. ' Two games  are to be played to-day.  The great international   yacht race,  Vbetweeu the English yacht "Valkyrie  III and the American yacht Defender,  which starts to-day, .will be decided by  the best three out of five races over   a  course thirty nautical miles in .length,  with a time limit of six bouts.   ,  Record breaking arid 'making- was  the order of   the   day.  at   the   annual  i    games  of   the- New   Jersey .At.hlutic  Club last Monday.   The running   high  , jump was captured   by Sweeney  who  ��������� cleared the bar at 6 feet oh inches, thus  beating the world's record by ,one-half  inch. Mitchell, in the.oO-pound weight  ���������contest, beat his own and  tho  world's  " records, making a distance . of t35 feet  10J inches. The best event on1 the  card was the special race of one and -a  s half miles. The world's record for this  distance was 0.53 3-5, which was made  by Sid Thonins, of London. There  weive four starters out of five entries.  Those who came to the < mark were  Tommy Conneff and George Orton, of  the New York Athletic-club, Andy  Walsh, of the Xaviers, and C. Bean, of  Boston.   The four started oft' at a   fair  ' pace and Oiton won the pole, Conneff  and Walsh next and Bean on the outside. ' Orton .made the ' pace, with  Conneff'close sup. On the second lap  Orton fell back and Walsh took up the  running, until coming to the half-mile  mark,' when Conneif shot   ahead.    FTe  ��������� gradually drew away from   the   other  men, and cheer after cheer went up  a"  his .time at   each   quarter   was   made  "known.    When he had   gone  a   mile  aud a quarter in  5.38 J-5   it   was   seen  that he had beaten'Day's record of 5.4(1,  made in 1S00.    He ran the final quarter  in   1.07 3-5,   finishing  the  distance  in  0.40 2-5, beating the world's  record   by  71-5 seconds.    Bean   was   second   and  Orton third,   half a lap. behind.    The  spectators jumped over the  ropes and  boundary fences when the little runner  broke the tape, and carried him to   his  dressing room.  The'woi-ld'sprofessional and amateur  record for 100 3'ard^dash was hrokt-u  at Brockton, Mass., on Monday, by  Ed. Donovan, of Natick, Mass., who  lowered the\\voiid's record to 0 3-5  seconds. The former iecord was 9 t-5,  both profe-sional and amateur.  Local and Personal Briefs.  Chag. Abrahainson returned from  Trout Lake on Tuesday.  Rev" J. A. Wood goes to Donald to-  ,day and 'will hold service there tomorrow.  J. A. Mara, M.P., and G. McL. Brown  came up on the Nakusp Thursday and  went west. ���������>  Engine No. JOG goes into the shops  at Donald to-day' to be thoroughly  overhauled. o  A. M.' Wilson has gone to' New  Denver to take charge of his .brother's  tailoring business at that-place.  Miss Estella Brown left for the east  on Tuesday and will spend.tlie winter  at school in Ontario.  Seeing is believing, theiefore Tom  Bain laas made an excursion to the  new linds up the Jordan to see for himself.  Geo. Laforme came in on Wednesday and left this morning with IS  packs, carrying about 4,500 pounds of  freight. '    '       o  We are requested to > state that the  English church choir will meet for  practice next Fiiday evening at S  o'clock.  Tom llennessy arrived from French  Creek on Wednesday after travelling  by easy stages. He is going to the  hospital'at Kamloops.  ,' Therdelegates of the Victoria Board  of Trade who are coming to visit West  Kootenay are expected to.arrive here  Monday morning fi om the west. '   <  Herbert Lewis, who was transferred  from the diner here to the run between  Medicine Hat and Regina, has returned home and will resume his old  position.  "There will be a meeting at the school-  house next Saturday at 11 o'clock a.m.  for the purpose of electing a trustee to  take the place of C. II. Temple who  has resigned.  John Boyd arrived down from  Oar nes creek this week, where he has  been doing assessment work for' the  Revelstoke Co. Jle'is on- his ��������� way to  lllecillewaetfto do assessment work on  the Dunvegan.   , '   o      '���������-,.'  Commissioner Graham corralled 4  tramps'at the station on Thursday and  brought them to the jail. After compelling theui to take the necessary  bath he gave them 24 hours to. leave  town.  , * Mr. H. J. Bourne left for the. east, on  Tuesday. Mr. Bourne goes east to  consummate a, life partner-ship.' Miss  Ella Miller, of Luck now. Out., is-the  lndy in question und. the 18th inst. is  the dale fixed for the ceremony.     ^ ���������  Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Hamilton, of  Belleville, Out., who have been on  extended visit to their daughter, Mrs.  (Di-;) McLean, left for the coatst on  Monday. They return to-morrow and  will lie accompanied as far as the  Glacier by Dr. and Mrs.'McLean..  We are indebted to Air. F. Fletcher,'  P.L.S., for a copy of his very excellent  ,i'nap of the Koo.l.enay**. .Several new  discoveries have been made since its  publication-over a year ago, making  fi levidion desirable, hut notwithstanding the.se it is the be.-*t map extant of  this section of the province which is  at once the most important and* the  least undert-tood. Those Who1 u*i.*-h to  acquaint themselves with  geography   of  the  Kooienays si  A Tragedy Near Kamloops.   ,  Seven miles east of Kamloops, on'  Monday morning, an * Indian- named  Felix was run over by a freight train.  When the body was picked up it .was  'cold and' an examination disclosed a  bullet wound in the left breast. It is  supposed that the body was placed on  the tiaek in the hope .of covering up a  murder. The police have made several  arrests. ��������� '   '  "Coin's Einaneial School" Dramatized.  ' A Boston newspaper man, named  Fitzgerald Murphy has dramatized  " Coin's Financial School." The ' play-  will have,its first production on the  stage of the Chicago Opera House  under themanajrement of the Miner  brothers, and is entitled "Silver  Lining." Mr. W. H. Harvey, ' the  author of " Coin's Financial School,"  gave a dinner, to the company at the  Auditorium hotel, Chicago, last Saturday night.. f\Vith the' flowers at the  plate of each guest was, to fasten  them, a'button, half silver, half gold,  the gift of the host, each button,, bearing the inscription "16 to ' 1." Notable among the addresses, was ono by  Mr. Harvey, .in" whicli lie, said the  dinner to the troupe came after bearing them in reliearsel, as n recognition  on,his part of.their sterling merits .'as  actors and as a fitting representative  to represent tlie cause of the people in  a way never before attempted in the  United States. '   ,   ���������  ���������".HALYCON SPRINGS HOTEL +  t Arrow   Lake.  IS now open at these* Celebrated Hot  Springs for tho accommodation of guostfi.  Bates $1.50 to $2.50 a day. Baths 25 cents  each or five for $1. Special rules to families  or by the month can bu nriu'iigcil.  ,  ' Dawson, Craddock & Co.  a  R. H. RAMSEY.     '  - i i*  House Painter and .Decorator.  Grainor, Paperhangcr and Sign Writer.  -jgqggffiijgk  TABLE  Showing the Dates and Places of Courts  ,of Assize, Nisi Prius, Oyer . and Terminer, and General Gaol Delivery for'  . the year 1895.  Fall Assizes..    .,  Clinton ... .Tlmrsdii'v. .20l.li September  Richfield .. .Monday".. .80th Septembei  ln j Kainioops . .Monday... 7(h October  Vernon ... .Mondav.. .14th October  Lytton Friday..'. .Ill h October  New Westminster.. .Wednesday.. .6th  '. November.  Vancouver. .Monday.. .11th November  Victoria Tuesday.. .10th November  N.maiuio... .Tuesday.. .2Gth November  100 '  NOTICE  couU'itipoi-at !<������������������������  the i COURT of A-si/.e and Nisi Prius,  ,A ' 'J\ and Over and Terininei and Gen-  ,m,1<l f ei*4 Gaol Delivery, will beheld under the  possess.-themselves of .-i copy .ind a r |���������-,.,visi<ins of the '* Supreme ' Court  perusal of it-   would   repav   our   coast' Act.''  as  amended   bv  the "Supreme  Court Amendment Act,   lS0l,"at the  Town  of Clinton  on   Wednesday, the  Church Sprvipp? To-n^orrnw l1St,i  l1i,V  of September,   proximo,  in  ,  . ' bv th" <aid Act to  be  held  at the said  ct'"*"'",raK I Towrr on   riie  2'il.h  dav of September,  Catholic < jj-!'.-,.       By Cnimnand.  TAMES BAKER,  wii!  the  Rev. Father Peytavin  mass at. 1U:.T0 a.m. in  chinch: , .  . Service will be held at the Pm-byte-  ria11'Church to-morrow evehincj at 7:3<J  p.m. by Mr. Guthrie Perry; * Sunday  Schciol\it3.      * '  Service-*: will be held in the Methodi'-t  church by Rev. 311*. Knluiis  to-inur-iow  morning and  evening  at   11   and   1:4). ,  Sunday sHioo] ai 'l.'.'M.  Prorincittl Secretary.  Ri'-vineiai KecivtarvV* Oliice,  22 ml Aiuriist. iSOo. 107  ~������*.  ���������.*J>-7*'  Railway Accident Near Spatsum.  Xo. 2 was  delayed  for seven  hours  on Thursday owing to an accident neat  Spatsum, on Wcdne'-day iit'rei-nooii   al.  J{ o'clock.,   A freight train was coming  ca-stand, when rounding a  curve,   r.in |  into a .small slide.    The engine \v.-i-* de- I  raiJ/'d. the depression in    the   ir.ick   at i  tbe riirv*- throwing it toward the bank j  and not   the > river,    Arthur   Randall, j  the engineer, was caught by the failing '  engine and had hi*, left leg broken    be- j  low the knee, and   w.i.s   badly  .vaJded. j  .las.  .Meldrum,   the   fireman,   c.-.';,-iped-|  with a shaking up. from which he will I  Foon recover.    The ot hers of the   train i  crew   escaped   injury.     The   forward I  cars of  the  train    weie   derailed   and j  some of   them   broken.    Randall    was  taken to Geo.   Govett'H   hoiw,    Kain  loops.    He is doing fairly well.  '   Double Drowning Near Kamloops. "���������  ' Willio.anrl Lester A-ruiour, thirteen  and ten years of aye respectively, were  drowned vi hil������ li.u bin','in the North  Thompson river on Stind.iv i evening  last, Tlii; bodies were recovered and  buried at Kamloops on Tu  NOTICE.  eso.iy.  BIRTH.  SriAW.- At Revcl-toke. Frld-ry,  (i, the wife of ('. K. Shaw  dauirhier.  Aug.  of     .1  Ilighe.st  Honors ���������World's   K.-ur  Gone to His Reward.  A **pecial despatch from Ottawa lo  the Colmiibuin says: James Fit/.-  eimrnons has been ordeicd to go to  hloi;\ Mountain peiiite.nti,.i y, to ae|  :.-��������� deputy vv;ii-don. This is tlie rc-u!i  of the Premier's visit to New Vv'cst-  iniiisie:-, the latter ordering lli..t hi-*  iiuarters in the penitentiary be laken  from .him. This. the. Minister of  dust ice thinks,, it; the easiest way of  d\ ing il.  )i;fJL|(* N'OTM'K i< hereby given,  under .-.ul bority of I he |>r ovisions  of the "Lutid Ait Amendment Act,  ; I1*'."'." that al! arrears upon pre-  , <��������� mpt'ion*. or pureh.is-e*. out-staiuling ou  i;,e Jl-,1 dav of Fel'i-uary. |XV>, are pay-  1 \ili'e in lis e r'ljiral annual m-dalinent's,'  f l.i"etli������r vvlh h.teie-i, on tin* unpaii^  .   Iiel,lll'-e .11   f be IMI" of ,s|*f |K*|   (etlt.    ||P|-  ,1'iiii.m. Tl'" !ir*l iii**-) iluu'iit, logelher  . till It li.f'-re-si from I lie 21sl, d.ty of Keli-  ' hi ii y. |.V(."������, ic- due .md inii^t, |>e paid on  ,oi befoie I be --SI ��������� t F)��������� ' .'inber. I.s!'."). In  ' itef.i'ill   (if  -neb    ji,..-, ineitt   imiiiedbiie  ������������������tij'-* vvill lie I.ikec for lhe c.iiuell.Ition  oi ,'liv record- or agreement-,   conceri)-  iu:r -''eh l.oi'l-.'  \\'. S. (HHIK,  !>, I'l'ty ('imia, i-.h-h/HTnf Linalh  untl  'Wirl.<.  J 'tir'i ui"!   V.'m-.'.H iJ"j,������ ri mail,  Virltn-'ui, ft ('.. -:/li /iitfjin/ Ih'iA,. J!).It  COURSER  < t , i'  CARRIES FULL LINES OF  Groceries, provisions, flour, feed, miner's supplies, 'stoves,  tinware, granite ware, hardware, paints aiid oils,, boots,,  shoes ; men's, women's and children's furnishings, dress  goods'and millinery. ��������� ���������   ,  Dressmaking* in latest styles.  Our   advice   to   those   about   to , marry,  is  - DONT -  h But   if   you   MUST, marry;   why  GO TO  the   Post   Office store    and    buy    your    outfit    there.  I * L ' '  complete   stock'  of   Gents    Furnishings \always  hand..   Shirts,'   Shoes   and   Suits   a  -specialty.  A  on  VwVO-Af***        ,-ML���������-*.  '   'fit  Mineral Act, "Form F."    '  Certificate of Improvements.  NOTICE.  ABBOTT MIN URAL CLAIM. .Situate in  the Trout. Ijiku Mining 1)1 vNion of Wust  Kootenay District. Wlicru lociilcd : on Tlnihjj-  Creuk.' Take Xnlicu tlmt. I, Ilin-ry- AlilioLt, of  Vnncouvur, U.C., free nlinui-'H ccrbilli-ntc N'n.  .w.l'll, inlend, ���������slvivfluys from tlio date hereof,  t,o uriply to I ho (lolil (JoiniiiiH'-loiinr for a eer-  lllleiileof iniproveriionts-. for the in,n-pnHO of  (iblulniiiK a Crown ki-.miI of the iibov<j elulin.  A nd further lake noilce. Unit mlverse claims  iniiHl he sent to lhe (Jold Coinniiissioiier and  ai-IIon roinirif-nccs'l hefnre lhe insiianoe of Hiieh  corUllcaU* of iiuprovciiiciiU,  Ilafed thiH tenth day of May. I������n������.  !<;-!lt II. AIJIJOTT.  T.  L.  HAIG  NOTARY   PUBLIC   -   -   REVELSTOKE, B:C.  J  Mining and Real Estate Broker and General Commission Agent.  FIRE, LIFE.AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE?  Representative of the Kootenay Smelting & Trading Syndicate.   :o:���������:   AUENT FOR TROUT LAKE CITY, EVANSPORT, KASLO & NAKUSP  " ������������������'  tt  MOST PERFFXT  MADE.  A pure Grape Cream of Tartar Powder.   Free  from Ammonia, Alum or any other adulterant.  40 YEARS THE STANDARD.  COPYRIGHTS  f?AN  I  OnTAfM   A   PATR.S'T?     Por ������  prnirifrf. nns-wf r ar<1 nn horient nMnlon. wrlto (o  .11 (J N'.V \-. <;<������.. who havo hart ri fur ly fifty yenr*'  ������������������Trpfsrlpnoo In thn pntcnt IjuhUicuh, C'oT������rriTiiilf'v.  tlorn strictly- rrmfl'lcndnl.' A IIn nrtliftok of Information eonrnrnlnir I'n rr-nlo nml how to olt-  I i!n tlmm /unit, in;'. Alio ft eatntoaii<i ot ineclian-  ienl jirid HCl.intltlo lioolry ������p������it rrpu.  {'iilcnti l������k(;n tliroiiwh Mnnn ,'/ Co. j-f>ri--1vo  pp".;i,-il nofmo In thn -Iclciillllc A inpi-lcii n, ,-unl  Minis nri) brought, wifloly ljuforo llic public without <io������it to thn Inventor. Thin Kr.l.'iiill.l ruififr  Ifiiicil woijkly. <>t(>i<ant!r lllliHtint'Ml. linn l>yr,ir Mia  l.'iri'UHt rlrt:nl(.(lon of nny rrli>ritlllR word In lliu  wnrl.l.   *tJ:{ a yenr.   Snnipin wiiilfin n<>nt, frco.  HulMlne Kdltlfin, mnnllily, ti.UIn yonr.   Hlnclr  , cotiloii, '������o ������unt,-j.   i5vory ninnlmr nnntnlim Imnn.  tifnl pinion. In colnrn, unci pholflKrniiliM of now  hfiiiHCH. with plann, mirililliiif Inilldnri- tn nlmw Iho  luli'-.l ilr-i-lcn-i -uul HCOiin-conl/nvtii,   A'ldrn.i  MIJ.VN A CO., iiuW VOIHC, KBJ  i":o>.i../ ' .  Tins  BEST AND CHEAPESTROUTE  .    TO   AS'II   J'ltOM  All Eastern Points.  . , .  TIii-mikIi I'lril OliusiHIi.-ciiliiKCftiKiiii'] TourlHl  .SlrcpIriK f 'rn h t'i Ht. J'mil, Mont rciil anil Toronto  wlrbi.nl r.tmn^i-.  REVELSTOKE TIME TABLE.  Alimillc Kxprc-w/irrlvci   IM.'i dully.  I'ni.lllo " "        U',-.U,   -  for full infomii.tii-ii a^ u, rfit<-������. time, etc,  ivpjily to  1. T.   I'ri-wsti'r,  i\ft,ci)t, lU'vclntfil-o.  (lK(t. Md , IlllfilVX.  lli*)lrl<-l I'iu-isoiiki-i- AkciiL, Viuirniivcr. I!. C.  Trunin h-miri;-: ll(!V:lttokf: on Hiiii'lny-..  Momlnv������> nnd Thiir*vluy-> imikc urnim-i thins  with flic I'nlulial Hl.i-iuncrx " Mrinitoha,"  ," AthiiliMM'Mi" (uid " AlberUi," u-lih.-h Icnvo 'Kurt  William for Owun - .Sound ovcry .Sunday and  Tliurifliiy, and for Windsor aiiil Surriia every  tt'rd Wnslny.  GASH  8 STILL IN IT."  -ASK���������  FOR PRICES ON  POTATOES AND HAY BY CARLOAD  OR OTHERWISE AND BE CONVINCED.  He Also Handles  GENERAL GROCERIES - MINERS SUPPLIES  ^V_And Other Articles too Numerous to Mention^A

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