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The Orchard City Record Aug 4, 1910

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 Advertise
And   the   world   is
with you;   Quit and
you stand alone.
Circulation Highest,
Rates Lowest.
fob Printing
Special Facilities for
Executin g" High-
Class Half-Tone and
General Letterpress
Work.
Vol. ii. no. 36.
KELOWNA, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1910.
$1.50 Per Annurn.
'..I
A:
v.
*y
Meeting of City Council
Estimates for the Year   -.   Rate of Taxation Fixed at Twenty-
three Mills - Total Assessment $1,1 J 4,738
Monday morning's meeting of
the city council was a very brief
session, owing to the Court of Revision, which had to be held the
same morning. The minutes of the
last meeting were read and adopted, when the council adjourned to
meet at 8 o'plock in the evening.
80 70
266 05
153 25
The council met again Monday
evening, the mayor, Aid. Harvey,
Cox and Leckie being present. The
minutes of the morning's meeting
and of the Court of Revision were
read and accepted.
A letter was read from the
secretary of the Union of B. C.
Municipalities, stating that the
annual   convention  of  the  Union
> will  be  held  about the ~ 15 th  of
November,    and   requesting    the
.council to forward the membership
fee for 1910. The communication
was filed and the subscription of
$10.00 ordered to be sent.
The following accounts were referred to the finance committee, to
be paid if found correct :__
R. Draper, work on" streets/etc.'.'.."--$ 50 00
; North West Electric Co., 20 gallbna -
transformer oil '. '    1100
Kelowna Courier, advt. and ping. /152 75
Dr. Huycke, medical attendance... ..-5 00
J.  R.  Campbell,   refund  cost  of   '7
water connection   ."..:.     11 95
Collett Bros., supplying 497 yards
of shale for Water street/. ,..     74 55
G. H. Dunn.salary and petty cash 124 46
P. A. Gorman,   assistant  clerk's
> salary -.      50 00
D. Mills, scavenger's salary July...    150 00
Dr. Keller, rent     15 00
Ian MacRae, constable's salary     80 00
S. D. Colquette,-1st'engiiper^iwl.- '40 00
H. BUkebrough. 2nd      "     Y"     104 00
E. Fowler, lineman's salary.r      88 00
C. P. R. express ,<..      6 23
Water works extension pay roll....   160 00
A motion Was passed that the
assessment on Lot 8, block 37,
map 73;' amounting to $14.85,
which had been charged a second
time fox the year 1909, be struck
out, and that' this property be
left oS the tax sale list. '
The question of appointing delegates to attend the Irrigation Convention at Kamloops came up for
consideration, and it was decided
to appoint Aid. Harvey and Dr. C.
< W. Dickson to attend on behalf of
the city.
The years' estimates prepared 'by
the various committees were then
taken up.
Aid. Harvey submitted following estimates of expenditure of the
board of works for the year 1910:
Work oo streets:
Ethel street, $ 168.24; Glen ave.
u!5s40^Harve«»ve^ !.00. Richter
8treetr24.54, Water street, 781.74,
Bernard avenue, 629.70, Pendozi
street, 541.14, Ellis street, 6.38,
Abbott street, 4.88, Cawston ave.,
7.00; Shiith avenue, 26.00, opening streets and general work, $500
total for streets, $2732.02.
Sidewalk repairs, $ 168.
Street lighting, $1,250.
Aid. Leckie submitted estimates
of revenue and expenditure in connection with operating the city
water and light plants for 1910.
LIGHT
Expenditure for 6 months
"    to June 30th 3688 30
Estimated for 6 months to
*    Pec. 31st  .....4000 00
Estimated surplus...... .2911 70
_, •    <   '       v  Total 10,600 00
Revenue for 6 months to
June 30th   ...5030 90
Estimated for 6 months to
Dec. 31st ......5,562 10
TotaM 0,600 00
WATErT.A;;7::; A
Expenditure for 6 months 77 .
to June 30th .....664 33
Estimated fpr  6  months  '•■'■"'■
to Dec. 31st    847 37
Estimated surplus ..-..'   738 30
Total. 2,250 00
Revenue for 6 months to
June 30^    445„75
Estimated for 6 months
to Dec. 3Ut ...'.I. . 1804 25
Total, 2,250,00
•Aid. Cox, on behalf Fire Committee* submitted   the  followihr
estimated expenditure for theyear:
Cost of new equipment to
June 30th    	
General expense, June 30
Estimated general expense to Dec. 31st............
Total, 500 00
Aid. Cox also submitted the estimated cost of maintaining the public parks, which was placed at $500.
As chairman of the'Health Committee Aid. Cox submitted the following estimate of receipts and
expenditure:
Receipts to June 30   .!   ...543 20
Est. rec. July I to Dec. 31 ...875 00
Amt. to be raisfed by tax ...292 47
Total, 1,710 67
Estimated expenditure, including
scavengers    salary,    rent   of
nuisance ground, and sundries
to Dec. 31.V. ^.,.7.1,710 67
Owing -to the indisposition of
Aid. Stirling the Finance Committee's estimates were presented by
the mayor:
Revenue
LIGHT AND WATER .
Ligbt .   9350'00 -
Water     - .       3,250 00
etin
Is Mr. J. Ci Metcalfe's Advice
to Growers  7,
Street Lighting
1,250 00
12.850 00
HEALTH, special rate
1,419 00
POLICE FINES
500 00
SUNDRY REVENUE
Trade licenses
1,500 00
Hotel licenses
900 00
v \
Pound Tax
120 00
Dog Tax        .  ;
125 00
Sot
_ Road Tax
50 00
2,695 00
TAXATION,   Debenture,   l?J
mills, Schools, 4J mills, Gen-
''i6_al, 6 mills
[ revenue!
21.3ft) 00
Total estimatec
S38.833 00
Expenditure
General Expense
9.200 00
Debenture
4.918 00
14.118 00
SCHOOLS
General expense
4,000 00
Debenture,..;..;..'...;'
.1,504 00
5,504 00
PARK, Maintenance .
.500 00
i" >-r • • '  ■
Debenture.............
.3.352 00
3,852.00.
STREETS    -      A
General work..........
.2,732 00
Sidewalk repairs..;..
.168 00
.1,250 00
Debenture....	
.1,648 00
5.798 00
HEALTH.......	
.1.710 00
FIRE PROTECTION
Supplies, etc	
. 500 00
Debenture.......:	
. 376 00
876 00
POLICE
."
Salaries,^ tc,....	
.1,400 00
Magistrate's salary ..
. 500 00
1.900 00
GENERAL EXPENDITURE
Legal	
.270 00
Office	
: 1.825 00
. 30000
Int. and Exchange....
. 575 00
Printing	
7 500 00
Debenture flotations
.  150 00
__ G—nerjd. _sncnsc .-;...
__DQn
Donations,	
. 930 00
Contingent	
. 325 00
5,075 00
Total estimated expenditure, $38,833 00
Following motion was passed :
" That this council, as a body,
desires to. express regret at the indisposition which causes the . absence of Aid. Stirling, and to express hope that he- may soon be
able to be with us again to the
mutual advantage of this council
and city."
By-law No. 80, fixing the rate of
taxation for the year, was then introduced. The by-law stated that
the amount required for the general
expenses of the city for the year
1910 was $38,833; for interest and
sinking funds, $11,798; and for
school purposes, $4,250. The
assessment on real property and
improvements for the year amounted to $1,114,738.7 .',;;..
The rate of taxation was fixed at
6 mills for general purposes; 4j
inills for school purposes and I2_
mills for debentures; a total of 23
mills.        yy- yAA' t   7 -A,
A rebate of one-sixth off is to be
allowed if paid before September
20th, and one-tenth if paid before
November 1st.
The by-law received its first and
second reading.
The meeting
until Monday,
8 p.m.
Mr. J. C; Metcalfe this week
sends the following report:
Strathcona, July 18th. Fruit
dealers'here report small;fruits of
all kinds to date arriving in good
condition from B. G, with the exception of one or two shipments of
raspberries;arriving a little "soft, but
much better than in former seasons.
Prices have been well maintained*
but supply of-all small fruits has
been very short and unable to meet
the demand. Cherries seem to be
lessening in quantity arriving this
point and Edmonton       7
"' Edmonton, July 19th.-', Jobbers
report this date having no quotations ftoiri B. C. shippers, with the
exception of one, and so high they
would riot consider in comparison
with quotations from the American
side; A117/report prices being
quoted by., California shippers on
peaches, Hales, Early and Triumph,
35c. per Case, from Wenatchee 40c
per case. I watched the handling
of raspberries at Strathcona from
express cars to express wagons and
must state that the handling was
very rough on the part of the
drivers of express wagons... It
certainly could be handled with
greater care and lessen the risk, of
its arrival at Edmonton in a poor
condition. Fruit by express Jilas
to be carted over two miles at present time from Strathcona to Edmonton, bridge not yet beingbuilt,
and therefore rather a difficult
point to reach with raspberries.
Jobbing houses here had . apples
from Salmon Arm. B.C., variety
transparent. Were of good size,
well packed, but very green.
Calgary, July 20th. Jobbers arid
retailers report raspberries arid
cherries arriving here good condition generally, but raspberries are
getting a little (soft now. , Cherries
arriving in lesser quantities.;- Raspberries have been arriving in large
quantities at this point, but prices
have; been well, maintained, the
greater percentage coming to the
Vernon Fruit Co. Some of the
best cherries arriving on the market
here this season have been from
the lower mainland as reported by
jobbers and retailers arriving in
excellent condition held up well
and showed no rot as in former
seasons, and prices obtained were
good. A. few blackberries from
Mission and Hammond, B.C. are
on the market here, and sold at
good prices $3.00 per crate to
tailers for two fifth case.
j
._ f_Q__i_;..*^    _.».    __._■*   5.   ;_-;    ..   .
Results of
Examinations
Kelowna Students Make Good
Showing
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
. The results of the urban High
school entrance examinations were
given out last Thursday by the department of education, 7 showing
that out of a total of 1,222 candidates "who had written the midsummer examination in the city
Iiigh school centres of the province,
no fewer than 681—or considerably nore than 50 per cent, were
successful.
.   Examinations were conducted at
the following centres:
No, of
Can.'s     Pass'd
Armstrong...    19     II
Chilliwack.,
Cumberland..
Enderby...'...
Golden ....
Grand Forks
49
16.
13..
9..
II..
32
II
4
5
II
13
4
Farmers' Institute
Meet
Kamloops  28
Kaslo. '.'.     9
Kelowna  25   II
Ladysmith  20.    12
Nanaimo  21........  14
Nelson..  38   18
New Westminster...127  72
Peachland     8...     2
Revelstoke   :   16. ..- 10
Rossland  29   17
Salmon, Arm    17         1
Vancouver  ... 491 242
Vernon.  23„......    4
Victoria; 253... 178
re-
Rutland News.
(From our own correspondent.)
then   adjourned
August   8th,   at
The Kelowna lacrosse boys beat
the Arhvsttong te«tp by 8 to 2.    \
A largely attended meeting of
the fruit {(rowers of the Rutland
district took place on Saturday
evening1 last in the Rutland Hall,
for the purpose of electing a delegate to attend the Irrigation convention et Kamloops this week*.
Mr. J. W. Woolsey was voted to
the chair, arid the petitions which
had been' circulated in the district,
requesting the Government to take
over water rights and systems,
were handed Jri to the meeting.'
Considerably^ ovpr one hundred
names had • y'bejen 7jecured,- and
many more were yet 'to be counted
upon.. An Attempt was made to
discuss-the subject of irrigation, in
regard to «>ei>reient*tate of affairs,
and also in iref«s«snce to the proposed changes A This was objected
tp:ho\vever^by;p_i«5 or two present;
on, the grounds that7the govern-
tnent would. he able, to atten d to
all details, and that what the meeting was most concerned in was
that it wanted the' government to
take control. After a good deal of
wranglirig the time slipped by, and
the following gentlemen were appointed delegates: Dr. Baker, with
Mr. Sutcliffe as alternative for
Rutland?, end Mr. Hereron, with
Dr. Dixoh Alternative for Ellisotv
Total candidates 1,222, total
passed 681. '
The following gives the results
of the examinations in the Kelowna
Centre :t
*   Black   Mountain — Number   of
candidates 4, passed 0.
Ellison—Number of candidates
-3, passed 2. Charles Hereron 651,
Martin J. Conroy 604.
Kelowna—Number of candidates
16, passed 9. Sadie G. Thompson
727, Ida B. Pettigrew 647; Alma S.
Magee 620, Norman G. Kincaid
618, Ruby Elliott 610, Bruce Fletcher 592, Wilfred Philp 580, Bain
Calder 568, Bessie Thompson 563.
Mission Creek—Number of candidate's 2, passed 0.
HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATIONS -
-The results of the High school
examinations were announced last
Monday, the following giving the
successful Kelowna candidates:
: Preliminary course, junior grade;
maximum marks 900; number of
candidates 10 ; passed 10 : Ethel
Hall, 676; Alva H. Green, 627;
Bertha M. Green, 589; Gladvs
Hirisley, 585 ; John G. Carney, 580;
Donald E( McLellan,. 545: Douglas
L. .Thompson, 513; Horace G.
Fraser, 493; Clarence A. Jones,
486; Marguerite A. Pina, 450.
Full course, junior grade; maximum marks, 1200; number of
candidates. 3: passed, I : William
S. Fuller.
Advanced course, junior grade;
maximum marks, 1000; number of
candidates, 4; passed, 4 : Helen E.
Shanks, 636; Marguerite Steele,
609; Harold A. Renwick, 586;
Ra«/C. Ritchie. 554. N
Court of Revision
': A Court of Revision was held
Monday last at 10 a.m., for the
purpose of hearing complaints
against the assessment of property
within the city: A\
The :mayor, Aid. f Leckie, Cox,
and Harvey were preterit, and took
the declarations as metabers of the
court.-' ' A'
Complaints were heard from A,
Francis, Marty Bros., A. G. Markham, S. T, Ellitt, J. Kincaid, W. S.
Fuller, J. Birch, T. C Kerr, Mrs. K.
A.;, Woodnias, W..J. Mantle, John
Carsorso and *he C. P. R. Co.
One or two corrections were
ordered to made, and the assessment reduced in the oases of John
Birch and W. J. Mantle.
-•» ■
St.
tfj.
_-._>;■
.Mr.T. W. Stirling left list week
for <ufew months' visit to the Old,
Country.
Delegates Appointed to Attend
Irrigation Convention
A meeting of the Farmer's Institute was held Monday evening last
a good attendance of members being present.
The minutes of last meeting were
read and adopted and a batch of
correspondence on various matters
read by Mr. H. W. Raymer, who
had been acting as secretary for a
few weeks past.
The president, Mr. T. G. Speers,
announced that a new secretary
was required as Mr. V. D. Wade
had resigned the position. Some
dission aiose respecting certain
claims made by the late secretary
for expenses incurred in carrying
out his duties and a committee was
appointed to settle with him.
Mr. A. R. Muirhead was then
elected secretary.
This business disposed of the
members turned to the real purpose
for which the meeting was called,
namely, the election of delegates
to attend the Irrigation Convention
at Kamloops, to be held Wednesday. Thursday and Friday of this
week.
Mr. Speers said that the question
of irrigation was one which affected
everybody in the district, and if
they were to avoid discontent and
dissatisfaction which had entered
into the water questions lately, it was
necessary to get into shape, and
work together so that the whole
system might be placed in the hands
of the' government.. He said the
government were bringing people
inhere with promises of all kinds bf
water and giving records ori the
V-(rio.us creeks and they should see
to it that the water was delivered.
There was abundant water everybody if it was made proper use of,
and the government should see to
it that the millions of gallons which
were now going to waste was pro-'
perly conserved -for use when; it
was most required. The government, he said should take matters
into their own hands, and build
dams and re.ervoirs to store up
the water which was now allowed
to floods the creeks in spring. They
would thus be able tb supply every
farmer with all the water he needed if not free, then at first cost.
There was also another aspect to
it, if we were able to tell people
who came in here that there was
abundant water, and absolutely no
uncertainty about it the result
would be a large increase in land
sales. He urged that delegates be
sent to the conference wno" would
nut up a strong fight for government
ownership of irrigation systems'
and water supplies.
Mr. Joseph Carsorso spoke in
support of the cause of the ■ old-
timer. He said that thia scheme of
turning over the water to the government was not altogether satisfactory to those pioneers who had
come, in here in the early days and
settled up the land. They had got
the first records on the creeks and
were already getting all the water
they wanted free. If the government took., over the water these
men would' probably have to pay
taxes, which he did not considered fair. They had come in
here first and were entitled to the
advantage they had thus gained.
Mr. Speers did not think the
government wonld interfere with
the records. If every user got as
much water as, he needed, he
would have no ocoasion to worry
whether he held the first record, or
not. The idea was for the government to conserve the water now
going to waste and make it avail-
for those who could get no water
at all.
Mr. M. Hereron said that the
government had their engineers in
the hills at the present time, and
already knew pretty well what water was available. What was wanted waa for the government to take
control of the water, build dams
and reservoirs and then pipe it to
the farmers. Piping was the only'
method of any use." It had been
proved that from flumes and ditches
tl.ere was a loss of fifty  to  eighty
per cent, of the water.
Several speakers took up the discussion. Dr. Baker said that over
on theAmerican side it had already
been clearly demonstrated that a
government could handle the irrigation problem, and jmake a success of it.
The meeting generally  was en-'
thusiastically in favour of government, and the debate was  contin-.
ued until a late hour.
The president, Mr. Speers, the
secretary, Mr. A. R. Muirhead, and
Dr. Baker were eventually elected
delegates, from the farmers Institute;
As the vice-president and several
members of the Agricultural association were present a meeting of
that body was afterwards formed
and three members,Mr. G. Patterson
Mr. M. Hereon and Mir. A. W.
Dalgleish appointed to attend the
convention on theii behalf;
It was well past midnight when
the remnants of the assembly left
the hall for home.
m
X;
utf  .
Nonconformists and the
King's Oath
More and more bitter has grown
the fight over the King's declaration oath. .Last week when / Premier Asquith moved the second
reading of the accession declaration
bill, his Nonconformist folioweis
rose in revolt and forced an amendment that produced an imrnediate
joining of forces in the ranks of
the Churchmen and anti-Roman
Catholic elements.
As the debate proceeded crowds
gathered in Parliament Square' and
demonstrated against the bill.
Protestant societies sent out sandwich , men bearing - placards.' with
di_?Wbrds'"N67Popery" in liirge^
type-upori them;i'"-: ' » -
As disclosed in, the discussion,
the bill substitutes for the statement
that the doctrines of the Roman
Catholic Church are " idolatrous,"
the simple clause—
" I do solemnly and sincerely in'
the presence of God profess, testify,
and declare that I am a faithful
member pf the Protestant Reformed Church by law established in
England, and that I will,' according
to the true intent of the enactments
which secure the Protestant succession to the throne of my Realm,
uphold and maintain the said enactments to the best of my powers
According to law."
The Nonconformists, who hopr
one day to see the Church of
England disestablished, object to
the qualification " as by law established " and their amendment was
directed  to alter the clause so as
'It,
v
\1 -7-
" I.
"I do solemnly and sincerely in
the presence of Cod profess, testify
and declare that I am a faithful
Protestant, and that I will, according to the true intent of the enactments which secure the Protestant
succession to the Throne of my
Realm, uphold and maintain the
said enactments to the best of my
powers according to law."
The premiel,. faced with withdrawal of his staunchest followers,
gave way and accepted the amend* /
ment.. Then the ultra-Protestant
party, which is opposed to, anv
change, came out in force and the
situation was critical for the government. '
Believing that the vote  on the'
second  reading would be a very<'
close one, the whips of both parties
sent out urgent summonses to their
supporters to attend in the housev
And record their votes.   These precautions turned out to be needless,
however, as party line's were obliterated, and the second  reading. "
Which included the Nonconformist
amendment, was carried 4>y 410 ■
votes to 84.
7The bill which now goes to the.
committee stages provides that the
pronouncement    against   Roman
Catholicism shall beelimiriajed arid,
the clause " and declare that'J am
a faithful Protestant" substituted,    .
i It is  believed   that   the   chief
difficulties have now bfcenreJnoVtd.,
and  that the  bill will survive th$ B^
committee stage and be >c6ept44^w »
bjij the House of Lords withoj»l|^4j
farther trouble. <*'   - *'^'^ ., J
<y til
.   4 .
,&.*
otS
4J__*.l!>»M«I««rtW««» 2
the Orchard Gity fttseord
m
Thursday, .Aug, 4
ty____MH_r____IIM_iw/iM_j_«iM«».«^^
The Kelotona Land
and Orchard Co.,
_»_i_ii_-_nj_Luw__rii..mi-_iii nwm_B im-,MBrJnm:_-_u,«
LIMITED.
RESIDENTIAL LOTS
IN THE CITY
Cadder Avenue       Abbott Street
Willow Avenue
FIVE ACRE LOTS
WITHIN ONE MILE OF CITY
LIMITS
On Easy Terms
TEN ACRE LOTS
ON THE BENCH
Under Irrigation and Domestic Systems
CALL OR WRITE
K. L. 0. Co.'s Office, Leon St.
io.._i._.l.m»m»inn»_i
Your Photograph
made at
Grains Photo Studio
can be mounted in the very latest
styles.
NOVEL FOLDERS
ARTISTIC DECKLE EFFECTS
BEST STANDARD MOUNTS
Call and see samples and arrange for a sitting.
Rowcliffe Block.
KELOWNA
SHINE PARLOR
All kinds of Shoes Cleaned
and Polished.
Tan Shoes Dyed Black.
Travelling Bags and other Leather
Goods Cleaned and Dressed.
JOHN BLANAM,
Entrance to Raymer's Building.
/^aA^*_^*
W. C. T. U. Notes.
Conducted by the Ladtca of the ICelcwna branch
of the W.C. T.U.
The W. C. T. U. meet every second Tuesday of the month at the home of one or
other of the members. Visitors are always
welcome.
THE CANADA
TEMPERANCE ACT.
The Canada Temperance Act was passed by the Dominion Parliament a good
many years ago. It gives the people of
the Dominion the right to vote on the
liquor traffic, and is commonly called the
"Scott Act." It has been amended from
time to time during the past twenty years,
and is operated at present in the Maritime
provinces with good effect. So much so,
that the majority of those provinces are
now working under its authority. It is
practically a local option law, because it
gives the option to the people of any locality to settle the question of the' liquor
traffic themselves, instead of having it
settled for them at the instigation of brewers, disti!ier«, or by any political party as
such. The liquor interests of B.C. have
dominated politics, civic life, commerce,
and in some cases religious life, long enough, and spent much money to protect
their business and prevent any restrictions.
That day is passed and we are living in a
period of much greater enlightenment in
in some respects, though not of less effect
to maintain the money making evil' traffic,
and that by persons who would otherwise
have others consider them good citizens.
No man can be properly called a good
sitizen who promotes or sustains a traffic
which brings evil results. It may be argued that it is a legalized trade; but that
does not make it right, or moral, or good.
Slavery, the Inquisition, and other wrongs,
were legalized in other days, so that plea
is only a subterfuge whether presented by
church or state.
The main object of the traffic is to make
money, to make it for the few at the expense of the many, to make it despite all
consequences, and to use, if need be, as a
means, governments, civic bodies, or any
other body which may be bought.
The day will come, even in B.C., when
the liquor maker, the liquor seller, and the
liquor advocate will be discounted, and
will have to take a back seat in all phases
of human life.
We did our best to obtain a local option
law for B.C., from our provincial government, but failed by over 500 votes of the
demand made upon us, although we did
secure a majority of 3,700 in favor therof.
The government thought tt r ght to make
that demand, and we submitted to it, but
did not acquiesce therein. It seemed to us
contrary to all principles of British fair
play. We only asked for a law, and it
was a fair demand that a simple majority
should prevail. With the little time given
us we did our best, and great was the astonishment of many when it was found
that 18 constituencies carried the vote with
nearly 4000 majority, and the other 17
only secured a majority of 500 the other
way. The sentiment of B.C. is undoubted'
in'favor of local option, and this sentiment
is growing all the time. We must keep in
the middle of the road as regards politics.
Our league work is non-partisan, and
though difficult, our one object must be to
promote temperance legislation so that
the whole question of the licensed liquor
traffic may be settled by the people them-
selv. s, We are not afraid to trust the
people. Education, information, and or-
ganization will speedily bring about the
right kiud of legislation, and B.C. will
emerge from the backwoods in respect of
thia legalized business.
Daughter of Vernon Physician Kidnapped
An attempt was made last week
to kidnap one of Dr. William's little
girls. The doctor with a party of
of ladies and two of his children,
the younger a tot of two and a half
year of age, visited the Indian reservation at the head of the lake. The
hill before reaching the reserve is
very steep and the auto refused to
climb it, blowing the fuse. The
ladies undertook to walk the balance of the distance and the doctor followed, leaving the little one
for a few minutes in the car. \
Shortly after leaving the c_»r a
man passed driving furiously, and
on returning to the car only a few
moments later, the little girl had
disappeared, It was learned that
he had drive away with her. The
doctor dispatched a couple of Indians along other roads and speedily fixing up his machine gave
chase. The doctor has a reputation for being a fast driver and he
certainly burned up the miles.oyer-
taking the kidnapper with the
child near Blacktown. He cornered up the man and horse with the
machine and took the child away.
The police have been put on . th,e
track of the kidnapper whom 'the
Indians referred to as a bad
from Kamloops.
.m$n
Dr. Mathison, Dentist, Rowcliffe
Block.   Phone 89.
Town and Country
Services in the Presbyterian
church on Sunday, August 7th,
will be held as usual, morning at
1 1 and in the evening at 7.30.
Ender_v has got ahead Kelowna
in the matter of a public library.
" Have you got a library here ? " is
being constantly asked by newcomers, and we are forced to admit with regret we are without that
sign of civilization. A city of 2000
population and no library to develop the reading instinct of the
rising generation !
Dr. and Mrs. Gaddes left last
Friday for Banff, taking their baby
girl, who has been ill for some time.
It is to be hoped that their stay in
the mountain resort will prove
beneficial tb the health of the little
one.
Mr. Geo. E. Boyer, who is on a
visit to the Old Country, is expected
home about the end pf September.
The funeral service of the late
Levi Charles Jones, father of Mrs.
W. B. M. Calder, took place last
Friday morning. Tbe Rev. A. W.
K. Herdman came up from Peachland to officiate. The coffin was
afterwards taken to the boat to be
shipped to Neepawa, Manitoba,
where the interment was to take
place. Mr. and Mrs. Calder also
left by the same boat to be present
at the funeral.
Mrs. (Capt.) Philp and son left
last Thursday for Peachland, for
a week's stay with friends.
Mrs. H. Verity, of Salmon Arm,
was a visitor in town last week.
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Spedding, of
Vancouver, arrived, in town last
week. Mr. Spedding is an old
timer here He was the founder
of the first journalistic enterprise
here, known as the "Kelowna Clar-
ion.
Mr. F. R. E. DeHart left Saturday for a visit to the coast.
Miss MacKenzie, of Toronto, who
had accepted the positions on the
staff of the public school, has wired
to the secretary that she will be
unable' to fulfil her engagement
with the board owing to ill health.
Miss F. M. Currie, until recently
primary teacher in the Model school
of Vancouver, has been appointed
to fill the "vacancy.
In spite of repeated fines the
owners of bicycles still continue to
ride on the sidewalks. No fewer
than seven person have been fined
during the past two weeks.
A large party left the wharf
Tuesday morning, en route for
Kamloops. Though they were
going for the good, of their country
and some at the public expense,
they could scarcely be classed as
malefactors. They were delegates
sent to attend the Irrigation Convention.
Miss Nettie Tait returned last
weekend from her trip to Pilot
Mound. A number of friends
were on\ the wharf to welcome
her.
The Venon Tennis Club are to
play the Kelowna Club tomorrow,
Friday.  A good game is expected.
The new C. P. R. boat, Kaleden
is a smart little steamer, about the
same length as the York, but much
wider. *
Mr. R. Minns attended the Al-
bdrta Funeral Directors and Em-
balmers Association convention at
Edmonton last week, and secured
his diploma as embalmer. Tins
will be a decided convenience to
the people in the Valley, as bodies
to be shipped should be embalmed.
Mr. Minns reports a good time tendered them by the Board of Trade
at Edmonton.
Edwin Quant, the unfortunate
young steward of the ss. Okanagan,
who was injured last week while
bathing at Penticton, died Friday
in the Vernon Hospital. The
funeral took place at Vemon
Saturday.
Rev. D. J. Welsh was a visitor to
Vernon Tuesday, returning next
day.
Mrs. Lemon leaves tomorrow for
a two months' visit to the coast.
Sti'buying a cough medicine, don't be
aid to get Chamberlain's Cough Remedy.
There is no danger from it, nnd' relief is
sure to follow. Especially , recommended
for coughs, colds and whooping cough.
Sold by all drnggisti,
DALGLEISH & GLE
"The Mighty Reo."
The car with the get-there-and-back
quality.
Wait until you have seen a Reo
before buying your automobile.
ROBIN HOOD FLOUR
IS DIFFERENT. ~
Impress upon  your minds these two special facts:
Robin  Hood Flour must satisfy you in two
fair trials, or you can have your money back.
It is the guaranteed flour.
Robin  Hood Flour« absorbs more moisture
than other flours, therefore add more water
when you use it, and get a larger whiter loaf.
Oats, Bran, Wheat,
Barley and Oat Chop
Fresh Clean Stock, Just In*
CAR OF FINE BUGGIES
Just placed in stock.
DALGLEISH & GLENN,
Dealers in Farm and    ,
Orchard Implements
Pendozi St. and Lawrence Avenue.
PHONE 150
To Housekeepers.
Ensure the best results in Pickling by using,
only the best ingredients.
We have in stock and can recommend
the following:
TURMERIC
MUSTARD SEED
GROUND MUSTARD CINNAMON
GINGER
ALLSPICE
"MAGNET"
CREAM
SEPARATORS
Skims Clean, Turns Easy,
It runs and does perfect work without being,level,
It lessens your work and increases your profits.
It is the busiest bee on the farm—it works every day.
It is the Holdfast machine, others come and go, but the
"Magnet" works on forever, making money.
Sold on Easy Terms. Call and Inspect.
THE MORRISON-THOMPSON
HARDWARE Co., Ltd.
in_____«____a Thursday, Aug,   4
The Orchard City Record,
3
\>
The Biggest Little
Nuisance That
Ever Was.
That is  what one  CORN
CRIPPLE called it.    Might
just as; well have two  good
'   feet to walk on.
If your boots are too small,
and you can't get them
stretched, give them away.
You* Feet are Worth More
Than the Boots.
Then spend a quarter for
a bottle of  _
Penticton and
the Railroad.
Corn
And get relief.
Nyalls "Ease~em" is
a good thing to sprinkle
into new boots.
p. b. wis 1 CO.
DRUGGISTS and
Kelowna.
PHONE 19
STATIONERS
B.C.
J. A. Bigger
BUILDER and CONTRACTOR
Plans and Estimates Furnished
Residence,
10 Lawrence
PHONE 95
Ave.
DAVIES & MATHIE
Ladies' and
Gents* Tailors
PENDOZI STREET
Repairing and Pressing
promptly attended to.
A special meeting of the Penticton council was held last week for
the purpose of discussing with Mr.
Billings, the counsel for the Kettle
Valley railroad, certain clauses of
the agieement which will be drawn
up between the municipality and
the railway company.
The chief clause in dispute was
that which purported to give the
railway company the right to run
tracks along any thoroughfare in
Penticton with the exception of
Main street.
The reeve and council took a firm
stand against this, contending that
it was a much too sweeping clause
and that the municipality had not
intended that any such paragraph
should be inserted in the agreement. '   "  :
Mr. Billings showed commendable fairness in discussing this question. He admitted that the point
was hot badly taken but expressed
himself as of the opinion that it
should have been taken up. before.
After further discussion it was
tentatively decided that, the railway
company should be given permission to use streets west of Winnipeg-street and south of Ekhardt
avenue. This will give the company sufficient clearance to reach
the lakeshbre where a wharf and
depot will be constructed. j
Mr. Billings stated that he would
telegraph to Mr. J. J. Warren, the
president of the' Kettle Valley railroad, the decision of the council.
Another clause; which was discussed' was that which provides for
the establishment here of a railway
divisional point with roundhouses,
machine shops, etc.
Mr. Warren recently acquiesced
to the council's suggestion that the
company would, agree to maintain
a divisional point in Penticton for
a definite period of time. Mr.
Warren agreed to a twenty years
period, and the council thought
that this was sufficiently fair.
Reeve Foley-Bennett said that he
thought a clause should be inserted
in the agreement which would bind
the railway company to carry out
its promises. There was no such
clause, he said, in the agreement
as outlined.
Mr. Billings advised that a remedy for breach of agreement on the
railway's part could be secured
through the courts.
"We do not desire ;any long
costly law-suits," observed his worship. : ._
Finally it was i decided* to have
Municipal Solicitor Gahandrawup
a clause which would be sufficiently binding upon the company. This
was done and met with the approval, of the company's solicitor.
\   PROFESSIONAL AND
j      BUSINESS CARDS
'.'J. F. BURNE
,     Solicitor,
Notary Public,
Conveyancer, etc.
KELOWNA, -:: B.C.
R. BaKERR-
Barrister
and Solicitor,
Notary Public.
MEHTS. v
AT THE OLD STAND.
A. WILSON
SUCCESSOR TO A. R. DAVY
When you toant a choice
cut, gioe us a call,
or ring up 24.
Frank Bawtinhimer, Manager.
KELOWNA.
B.C.
Do You Know
CHAS. HARVEY
B. A. Sc, C. E., D. L.&, B. C. L. S.
CIVIL ENGINEER and LAND
SURVEYOR
Kelowna,    B. C.
W. T. ASHBRIDGE
CIVIL ENGINEER
Amoc, Mem. Can. Soc. C. E        Grndunte Toronto
University
Waterworks and> Sewerage Systems, Pumping and
Lighting Plants, Concrete Con-
i struction, etc.
KELOWNA, :: B.C.
THAT
Westbank
real estate investments are the best in the
Okanagan   in . quality   of   soil,   location,
prices,   etc.,   and   that  they will triple in
value in one year ?   Have you stopped to
consider?     If  not,   just   remember  that
Westbank will be the largest, most industrious, and influential place in the valley.
Now is your opportunity.   Most excellent
bargains.   The lots are cleared, cultivated,
fenced, and have young orchards on them;
well  irrigated,   and   have   good domesti
water.    Prices, $175 to $200 per acre.
Other most valuable land-bargain*
$25 per acre up.
RICHARD Hy PARKINSON       Hitchlier   BrOS.
BRITiSH COLUMBIA LAND
SURVEYOR,
■•     CIVIL ENGINEER
GLENCOE
Westbank    -   British Columbia
Everybody reads our
"Want" ads.
Try one next week.
Character
Is expressed in every
detail of your business
stationery.
.Our study is to improve,
not merely imitate., the
individuality and distinctive character of
your office supplies.
Let us convince you on your
next order.
The Orchard City
Record Job Print
Department.
Synopsis of Game Law.
Blue and willow grouse and ptarmigan may be shot in this portion
of the province between Sept. 1 and
Dec. 1, inclusive.
Prairie chicken . may be shot during October.
Duck, geese and snipe may be
shoton the entire mainland between
Sept. I and Feb. 28, inclusive.
Pheasant shooting is not allowed
in this part of the province.
Quails may not be shot at all in
this part pf the province.
Columbian or Coast deer may be
'shot in this part of the province between Sept. I and Dec. 15 inclusive.
Wapiti may'not be shot in the province.
Coast deer may not be sold in
this part of the province, while
ducks, geese and snipe may be
sold here during October and November only.
P.O. BOX 137
KELOWNA
T. W. STIRLING
Financial Agent.
Money to Loan on reasonable terms
All hinds o. Financial
business transacted.
Office, Leon Avenue.
Phone 58 P.O. box 273
Dr. J. W. Nelson Shepherd
DENTIST
P. 0. Box IUS
'Phono 66
Corner Peneozi Street and
Lawrence Avenue.
If your business is
not worth advertising,
advertise it for sale.
Best Selection of
Local Post Cards
and Views
Largest Studios in the Interior
Portraits by appointment.
Kelowna
P. BURNS & Co., Ltd.
Wholesale arid Retail
MEAT MERCHANTS
Fresh Meat Daily
Full supply of Hams and Bacon
Fresh Fish in season
^%
Pendozi Street
Smith Street
Penticton
W. LUDLOW, Manager
KELOWNA
Phone 135
CLIFTON
NURSING AND MATERNITY
,H0ME
Mrs. LAWRENCE, Graduate Nurse,
Glenn Ave., Kelowna, B.C.
Phone 134
COLLETT BROS.
LIVERY AND DRAY
Horses bought and. sold on commission. Dray meets all CP.R.
boats. All kinds of' heavy team
work. "Phone 20.
Salmon Arm has been busy
lately re-arranging the' fire brigade.
Vernon council is preparing to
borrow $1,500,to extend their arc
light system.
All who went to Kelowna last week
on the Sunday School excursion
returned filled, with admiration for
the metropolitan lake town'and its
hospitable people. Mr. DeHart
was particularly kind in giving so
freely the use of his motor boat to
entertain the young people.—
Enderby Press.    v
TJie indifference of the average
elector to what is going on in his
town is well illustrated by the result
of the voting in Vernon on Mayor
Husband's proposal to ' exempt
improvements from taxations. Out
of between four and five hundred
voters who are vitally interested in
the question, only 124 recorded
their votes—82 in favor and 42
against. The council do not consider the vote sufficiently representative of the popular feeling to take
any decided action in ihe matter.
JOHN CURTS
CONTRACTOR & BUILDER
Plans and Specifications Prepared
and estimates given for publicBuild-
ings,Town and Country Residences
JOHN CURTS, KELOWNA
PHONE No. 93
YOUR OPPORTUNITY
TO   SECURE
AN ORCHARD HOME
Having the advantages of both Town and Country Life. *■
OUR FIRST SUBDIVISION OF
•y-i
MONEY TO LOAN
On improved property also other securities
G. A. FISHER
ROOM . KELLER BLOCK
Fire, Life, and Accident
Insurance.
Miss P. Louise Adams,
A.T.C.M.
Scholarship graduate in Piano and
Teacher's Course of Toronto Conservatory
of Music. Late Teacher in Westminster
College, Toronto.
Will receive  pupil* for pianoforte
tuition at the studio.
Lawrence Avenue,,off Pendozi Street.
Address: P.O., KELOWNA.
THOMAS. P. HILL
BANKHEAD,
Planting, Pruning, Spraying
Etc.
P.O. Bo* 174, Keloicna.
ALFRED HANM0RE
Pipe Fitter, Wells Dug and
Drioen
Pumps,  Windmills, Drains,
etc., repaired and installed.
Haroey Aoenue, East.     «*
IS ON THE MARKET.
You will have to act quickly if you wish to secure a lot in this desirable
sub-division, for it is selling rapidly.   The  location  is  ideal,  half-a-niile
from the town  limits and  one  hundred  feet higher, commanding  a
beautiful view of the Lake, City, and surrounding country.
The soil is a light loam, with slope sufficient for irrigation and drainage.      x
Unimproved land, as desirably situated as ours, is selling  readily  in  the.
fruit sections of Washington and Oregon  for  from  $650  to  $1200  per
acre.   Conditions are changing here; before you realize it, this land will
have doubled in price.
NOW IS THE TIME TO PURCHASE.
We advise you to inspect the property at once, and make your selection.
It is going fast. The property has been little more than a week on the
market, and at the end of the week, May 21st, there were but nineteen
lota remaining unsold. Our town is rapidly growing, and it will not be
long before this property will be practically a part of it, and we feel safe
in saying, the choice residential section.
We might also state that it is the Company's plan to reserve the adjoining
1,000 acres, to be improved and planted out in one  large  orchard  and
retained for itself.
fflCaps ofthe sab-division, together with {reformation regarding prices and terms may be
A had at our office.
The CENTRAL OKANAGAN
KELOWNA, B.C.
Ltd.
v y
; $
'!'<
.1    ^
.   1
•l I, 1
'   Ay a   -
\,
:V_: wpiwinwuigniyii'iiywip.
'  1
The Orchard City Record.
Thursday, Aug. 4
THERE  IS A REASON
and a good one—and a good many good ones—why the automobile
is rapidly gaining in'popularity with the farming portion of the community. It fits in with the needs of the rural life in a wonderful way.
It is quick, cheap, and untiring. Unlike the team, no matter how
hard the motor has been worked during the day, it is always ready
for a flying visit to town, to church, or meeting.
WHAT DO THESE FIGURES MEAN ?
" Out of 10,000 autos in Iowa, 5,000 are owned by farmers.
Kansas farmers spent $3,200,000 for automobiles during 1909, and
$2,750,000 in 1908. In one Nebraska town of 800 population, forty
autos were sold last year to farmers and retired farmers."
They  mean  that the Automobile meets the
Farmer's case to a T
Don't you think you had better investigate the matter, and put yourself in line with the prosperous ones ? You will be surprised not only •
at their low cost, but at the cheapness and ease of manipulation..
McLaughlin ~ Buick
M
c
ars
are the kind we sell, and we sell them because they are the best
all-round ears for your purpose. They are the cars the public have
been waiting waiting for, not toys nor makeshifts, but real motor cars
in every sense of the word, carefully made, strongly proportioned,
durable, and simple.
S.   T.   ELLIOTT    -    Kelowna, B.C.
I
ANGLICAN
St. Michael and All Angels' Church.
Holy Communion, first and third Sundaya in the
month at 8 a.m.; second and fourth Sundays, after
Morning Prayer.
Litany on the first and third Sundaya.
Morning Prayer at 11  o'clock;   Evening Prayer at
7:30.
REV. THOS. GREENE, B. A.. Rector.
PRESBYTERIAN
Knox Preibyterian Church, Kelowna.
Morning Services at II a.m.-.evening aervice«nt7:30
p.m.   Sunday School at 2:30 p.m.
Weekly Prayer Meeting on Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
Benvoulin Presbyterian Church.
Afternoon service at 3 p.m. Sunday School at 2 p.m.
REV. A. W. K. HERDMAN, Pastor.
'    METHODIST
Kelowna Methodist Church.
Sabbath Service at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School at 2:30 p.m.
Midweek service Wednesday at 6 p.m.
REV. J. W.  DAVIDSON   Pastor.
BAPTIST .
Kelowna Baptist Church, Ellice St.
Sabbath Services at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Sabbath School at 10 a.m.   All welcome.
Wed . 7.30. Rev. D. J. Welsh, Pastor.
C.P.R. TIME TABLE.
The sailing schedule of the S.S. Okanagan during the summer months is as follows.
Read up          Daily Except Sundaya Read down
10:45           Okanagan Landing 12:45
8:05             Okanagan Centre 2=25
Short's Point
Nahun
7:15                    Kelowna 3:05
6:45                      Gellatly 3:40
6:15                    Peachland 4:15
Naramata
5:25                 Summerland 4:52
5:00                    Penticton 6:30
KELOWNA HOSPITAL.
Donations of vegetables, fruit, dairy produce, eggs etc. will be gratefully received
at the Kelowna Hospital. If more convenient same may be left at the shop of Messrs.
Crowley  Co ; Ltd.
"HOSPITAL INSURANCE."
The Kelowna Hospital Society have an
Insurance in force which they wish to
bring before the notice of the public.
For the sum of $10 bachelors or married
men may obtain a Hospital Insurance
Ticket which entitles the holder to Free
Hospital Attendance for one year from
date of issue for any sickness or accidents
except contageous or infectious diseases,
which are not be admitted to the hospital.
Applications for tickets or for further information should be -made to the secretary, P.O. Box 69, or >Room 4. Keller Block,
Kelowna, B.C.
If you Want Your Jams to keep> they
_   should be put up with
Cane-Sugar
All B. C. Sugar Refining Company's Products
Consist Solely of Pure CANE SUGAR.
MANUFACTURED AT VANCOUVER, B.C. BY
I^ British Columbia Sugar Refining
Company, Limited.
DONT 1ST YOUR LAND
With us unless you want to sell it.
We don't make a pretence, WE DO SELL LAND.
It is our business.
.We have sold thousands of dollars' worth recently.
If you have anything to sell, list it with us, we know how
to reach the buyers, and are reaching them.
We do an extensive line of advertising, and are receiving
numerous  enquiries  every  mail,  for" just the kind of
property you have.
W. Curtis Hitchener, of the firm, is leaving on an
extensive trip through the prairie provinces and
the east, selling Okanagan Valley fruit lots.
Send  us  detailed  information regarding your property
at once.        WE SELL LAND.
HITCHENER   BROS.
WESTBANK,   B.C.
I_U_U2_
Regatta Sale Week
SENSATIONAL
BARGAINS
We cordially invite all visitors at Kelowna's Big Annual Regatta to visit this store and get acquainted with the
many money-saving opportunities which are presented here. Your dollar will go further than it ever,went before for
with the intention of clearing out Summer goods we've cut prices to the quick.
REAL LIVE WASH GOODS
BARGAINS
We mean to make a speedy clearance, prices cut so ridiculously
low should soon do so.
Dimities, Muslins, Linen
Suitings
Reg. 35c, sale price, 20c; reg. 40c, sale price 25c;
reg. 50c, sale price, 35c
English Ginghams and
Chambrys
reg. 15c, sale 10c
Ginghams,
Duck Chambrys, Muslins,
and Cotton Poplins
i
Reg. 20c, sale price 12£c; reg. 25c, sale price, 15c.
reg. 30c, sale price, 17Jc
Greater Values in Wash
Suits
Prices cut from one third to one half
You will find in this showing
many garments of very special
interest to the baigain seeker.
Prices are such as to effect a
speedy clearance, so don't delay
in making your selection. Sizes
and prices to suit all.
Best English Print
4 reg. 15c, .sale 10c .■'■.,.
Week-end Bargain Specials!     Here they are:
H>_'
Towel Specials
65c for 45c pair
Fine Huck and Turkish, bleached
or unbleached
Women's Cotton Vests
Reg. 30c, special price 20c
Fine cotton vests, short sleeves or
low neck
Sock Specials
Men's Fine Lisle Half Hose, blacks,
tans, and fancys
Reg. 35c, now 5 pairs $1
Stocking Specials
Reg. 40c, 4 pairs $1
Women's Fine Lisle Hose, black and
tan, plain or lace ankle.' Extra
special values
Values Best BIG SPECIALTY BARGAIN STORE Latest Novelties
.->    v
Sunshades;
clearing prices
& Co.
Established 1850.
Women's and
Children's Hats
HALF PRICE
•/:
P.* >
Al-tyife*s'' AAA 7 7. 7,^7AA|_
'Phuradatj, Aug. 4
Orchard Oittj Record
&
WE   HANDLE
Heintzman Pianos
We purchase them direct from the factory and can
save you $/50.    $/50 should be as good to you as
■to a travelling, agent.
.<-..''■■'        Get our prices on these instruments.'
1     We handle other makes and can  give you  a  full
i  size Piano, 1\ octaves, in Mahogany or real Walnut,
guaranteed for ten years, for $275.  -t  y
Kelotona Farniture Co.
If You Want a
GoodMeal *'Any Time
Go to
Goldman's Restaurant
" WATER STREET.
Meal Tickets at Reasonable Price.
Rooms to Rent.
r
We  are   open   to
take  contracts for
Moving Buildings
AND
Pile Driving
ESTIMATES GIVEN7
Clarke ©VByrns
CONTRACTORS
Box 131 . Kelowna
REMEMBER
' ' THAT   V. ■'■:'.'■■■;•.
GLENCOE
Offers the best and only "reasonable real
estate investment", in the Valley. If you
want to pay $1000 for a poorer soil, that's
your business. Glencoe offers the best'
soil in the Okanagan Valley at $50 per
acre.   Quarter down, remainder  in  three ■
y/ears.   5 per cent off on ^racts  of   160  or
over.   5 per cent, off for cash.   Ideal op-
. portunitics fbr dairy and : mixed   farming,.
hay, fruit, berries, and vegetables.
Hitchener Bros.
V       Glencoe,
Westbank, British Columbia.
A want ad in the
Record brings results.
Sutton's Seeds
ORDERS TAKEN NOW FOR
Tomato Plants
Cabbage Plants
Bedding Plants A
Asparagus, Roots
Rose Bushes, etc.
H.LYSONS
Kel
owna..
Greenhouse.
For Sale or Rent
A seven roomed house With
one arid one-quarter; acre of
orchard and garden, situated
ori the Vernon road," 1 '4 milies
frpm Kelowna post office.
For particulars apply
S. BARBER, Box 365,
Kelowna Post Office.
D. W. Crowley Co.
Kel<
lowna
Ltd.
Wholesale & Retail Batchers
Goods delivered to any part of
the City
We give our prompt attention
to mail orders
Phone 12
BOUVEHE'S EXPRESS
AND
f
GENERAL DELIVERY.
Meets all Boats.
Prompt Attention to all Orders.
Phone No. 17.
* ■■ ■■ •—■■■■  ■ '" —  '"" ■ ' —
W. F. BOUVETTE & SON,
PROPRIETORS,
Rear of Elliott s.
.
The body of Norman France,
the two year old son of Thomas
France, of Elkhorn, who disappeared from his home on May 8, was
found in a slough two miles from
the France home last week.
'The Saskatchewan elevator commission spent the rest of the past
week in Winnipeg securing evidence as to the graih trade and then
in all probability proceed to
Minneapolis to continue its investigations.
W. J. White, superintendent of
Canadian immigration agencies,
denies the reports that many
thousand of United States farmers
are going back to their old homes
from Western Canada.
An award has been made in the
dispute between Blackwoods' Ltd.,
and the Canadian Northern railway
in regard to land taken by the
railway company for the Pembina
subway.
The second-reading of Premier
Asquith's bill to amend the accession oath, was carried last week
after a lively debate, by over three
hundred of a majority.
Chicago capitalists are making
enquiries as. to the feasibility of
establishing a pulp industry in the
Lake Winnipeg country and a mill
in Winnipeg. 7
The leaders of the Grand Trunk
strike at Montreal waited on
President Hays of the company
last week, but an agreement was
not reached.'
Canada will be represented by
one of the cabinet ministers at the
opening of the first parliament of
United South Africa.
. While fleeing from a forest fire
near Nelson five men perished in
the tunnel of Lucky Jim mine 'vhich
they had sought out as a place ofj
safety from the flames. They were
smotherd to death by smoke.
' It is reported that China has sent
an offer to Lord Kitchener to become commander-in-chief of the
emperor's army.
. The Manitoba Elevator Com*
mission has to date purchased nine
elevators and a like number is being constructed.
John Alexander Ewan, associated
editor of the Toronto Globe, died
at his home in Toronto^ early last
week  ■... ■
A thirty thousand dollar prize
has been put up for an airship flight
from New York to St. Louis and
return.
Willian J. Bryan, the Nebraskan
Democrat, declines to be governed
by the platform of the state party.
Twenty persons were injured in a
crossing accident at Pittsburg,
when a train collided with a street
car.
. Fred Tacink, a prominent Conservative heeler, was fined in the
Winnipeg police court for assault.
TTL L      •_ ... r      .1
the-->>u8_ucss~ secnon or tne
village of Herried, S. D., was wiped
out by fire' last week.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier was presented with two addresses of welcome
at Prince Albert.
Growers Should Get in
Touch With Markets.
Continued from page I
Wheat   and   bread
soaring in France.
prices   are
LAKE SERVICE TO
BE AUGMENTED
The C. P. R. service On the
Okanagan Lake is steadily growing,
being pushed forward by the expansions of business of all kinds
upon our great inland water way.
A new tug is to be built for barge
service, also another of the mamoth
barges will be placed upon the
lake immediately. The heavy crop's
this year will tax the transportation
facilities pretty severely, and the
increased facilities for hauling the
rush of fruit which will soon take
place will be none too much, but at
the same time vill make the
equipment upon the Okanagan
lake the largest and tnost complete
upon the inland waters of the
province.
When the digestion is all right, t e action of the bowels regular, there is a
natural craving and relish for food. When
this is lacking you may know that you need
a dose of Chamberlain's Stomach and
Liver Tablets. They strengthen the
digestive organs, improve the appetite and
regulate the bowels.   Sold by all druggists.
Two cars of mixed fruit came in
last week from California to Plunkett & Savage, and had been consigned. Jobbers expected to net
shippers on peaches 35c per case,
tomatoes, 40c per 201bs. I saw a
car of Ben Davis apples from Colorado consigned same firm, arrived in excellent condition, and weie
selling at $2.25 to $2.50 per box.
Apricots from Wenatchie I saw,
were very poor stock, selling f.o.b.
shipping point, 65c.
Plunkett & Savage, and McPherson Co. showed me quotations
they had received from B.C. shippers, stating therein that they could
not entertain or consider prices
quoted in comparison with prices
quoted from the American side.
As an example : California tomatoes, costing 40c. fob., 84c. laid
down Calgary, and B.C. quoting
$1.50 fob. It certainly is a long
margin of difference, and B.C. shippers cannot expect to ship at that
price, as against the California
quotations.
McLeod, July 21st. Small fruits
mainly Kootenay points, arriving
good condition. There- is a flat
rate of $2 by express from Kootenay points to all points along this
line, and the same rate exists from
Spokane. The express rate from
Calgary is $1.30 per cwt., and 2.55
from thelowei mainland to Mission
Junction, and $2.48 from Okanagan points. The freight rsite from
Nelson to this point on mixed car
of vegetables, is 25c per cwt., mixed fruits, apples and pears, from
Vernon, 70c., straight cars vegetables from Vernon to McLeod,
43c. American strawberriesj raspberries and blackberries and other
small fruits arriving in large quantities here. They use a flat box,
If in. deep, 5J square, for raspberries, and the deep box for straw,
berries and blackberries. They hold
less than our four-fifths, but more
than our two-fifths.
McLeod has one of the worst
platforms I have seen. Raspberries
fell off truck whilst being trucked
from car to express office.
Lethbridge, July 22nd. Agent
and dealers here reporit small fruit
arriving from BC. in good condition this season, at the same time
report that 75 per cent, of the
small fruits sold here, come from
the American' side, also 50 per
cent, of the large fruits. Retail
fruit dealers here buy in mixed cars.
Good, & Co., Kerr & Co.,-retail fruit
dealers, had cars en route containing potatoes, - cabbage, tomatoes,
peas, and other vegetables, also
peaches, apricots, plums, and early
apples. The rates are as follows
on vegetables to--, this", point- from
Spokane: vegetables, 47c per \ 00;
applesand pears, 70c.;- peaches,
plums, prunes, cherries and berries
95 c. Mixed carloads are shipped
at their respective rates for actual
weights of each commodity, minimum carloads 24,000, except that
mixed cars must not contain less
than 10,000 lbs. of fruit, apples or
pears. The following have jobbing
houses here: Plunkett & Savage,
McPherson Fruit Co., Hill, Home,
&Co.'
Medicine Hat, July 23rd. Agent
and .dealers here report small fruits
arriving in excellent condition this
season, but supply far short of demand. Dealers here state they are
buying peaches from jobbing houses in Calgary and Lethbridge f.o.b.
at $1 per case for Triumph, $1.25
for Hales and Early Crawford's.
Only one jobbing house here, Lynd
& Co. Dealers report they obtain
all their small fruits from B.C., the
prices being lower, with less time
in transit Cherries and raspberries
arrive in smaller quantities here.
Calgary, July 23rd.   The following are prices being quoted retailers by jobbers here to-day:
Wenatchie apples, per case, $2.25
California Pears, $3.50
Wenatchie peaches, Triumph, $1,
Crawford and Hales, $1.40
California plums, $1.25 to 1.50
B.C. raspberries, $2.25
B.C. black currants, $3.75
Cherries, lOlbs, 1.25
do.    161bs,$2.75
In   summarizing,   Mr.   Metcalf
advises B.C. shippers to perfect all
arrangements   and be   ready   to
handle their fruit   crops   quickly
and without delay, getting hold x>f
markets here at once through job-
bera and"retailer.    They will need
this in order to market their fruit
in face of the competition of Ame-
ican growers.
Be sure and take a bottle of Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy
with you when starting on your trip this
summer. It cannot be obtained on board
the trains or steamers. Changes of water
nnd climate often cause sudden attacks of
diarrhoea, and it ia best to be prepared.
Sold by all druggists. ■••...-..
VANCOUVER
The Great  City of the Great  West.
FIRST
EDUCATIONAL, INDUSTRIAL, and
AGRICULTURAL
TION
Aug. 15-20, 1910.
$30,000.00 in Prizes.
The Great Spectacular Show,   "Fighting the Flames.
Six Days' Solid Enjoyment under Vancouver's  sunay
skies, on the shores of Burrard Inlet.
Cheap Rates Oi' all railways and steamboats.
Full information from Jas. Roy, Manager,
Vancouver Exhibition,
319, Pender Street, Vancouver.
KELOWNA WEST BANK
STEAM FERRY
Prices Quoted to Any Point
on the Lake
Ferry to Bear Creek every Friday.
L. HAYMAN
Box 66 Kelowna, B.C.
L. C. AVISS
Boat Builder
Launches, .Sail Boats
Skiff's, Canoes and Scotos
Roto Boats and Canoes
for hire.
' KELOWNA, B.C.
'   -is
'4
Cheap Fire Wood
Kelowna Saw-Mill Company, Limited
" will deliver 2(Mnch wood for
$1.50 per Rick
Orders filled in rotation.
' 7-
.'   i"' ■&
?   ,' r$
j • >  '. vn&
S    '    -   <$fh
5 -* »-   '-** w?
C _«*.} i Js
(-" ,     ^M
i *   /'IM
JcA ~**Zy$
< - ' ^"*__
•v \     * Vf.§_
ty. y&i
i4 •" m
\   >  .'»rt*
_   y S . >»ftf
TO-LET.
Furnished Cottage, at South Okanagan, for the summer,
$20 per month.
Two Cottages, on Ellis Street, $12 per month.
Uril/rTOAM    O     _ll xrnrnr r*
ni__TYV-JC.-I ov/n OC MAIN I LU..
•<l_
For the Farm, Garden,
or
Field.
BEE SUPPLIES.
IMPLEMENTS.
4
>••_
«
CATALOGUE
FREE.
as
M.J.HENRY
Offices and Packing Grounds, ^
3123, Westminster Rd., Vancouver,
. A4J
,., -ft
Hl4*
-Jal
WA$ii CSSH___s_____g__
The Orchard City Reeord.
Thursday, Aug. 4
toreo
Headquarters  for all  kinds of
Fancy and Staple Groceries
Remember the Best is none too good.
Give us a trial and convince yourself
that we sell only  the  best goods  at
lowest prices.
Oar Ice Cream
Is known all  through  the  Okanagan
Valley to be pure and good.
Ponder over these facts,
Get the Habit, and get it right,
And patronize
K.F. OXLEY'S
iff in.
ABOUT
A druggist's best customer asked that question,
regarding a patent medicine. The druggist had
sold the medicine for years, but was forced to admit
that he knew nothing more about it than what
appeared on the laber. wrapper and advertising.
The claims made for that particular patent mei'Aine,
were so extravagant that the druggist decided to
find a line of remedies he knew something about.
F___^fcr-
S£t!e»cl,on
are manufactured by a house with a solid reputation of over half a century.
The formulas are exceptionally good ones and are
freely furnished to the Drug Trade. There are no
secrets, simply because they are honest and have
nothing to conceal. If we did not believe in them
we would not recommend them to you.
Phone 35
Phone 35
The Money Saving Store.r
Anything you
buy
with the Name
will give you
entire
satisfaction.
Sold and guaranteed
P. B. WILLITS &TCo.
ai8l
WANTED!
2 Cents per word, first insertion and
1 Cent per word each subsequent
insertion, minimum 25 Cents.
Next
AUCTION
SALE
at Davy's Livery,
On Saturday,
Aug.  20th.
See  next  week's
announcement.
The People's Store
Phones:  Grocery, 214    Dry Goods, 314     Office, 143
Week-End Specials:
*7
SHIRTS
We are showing the
greatest range of Shirts,
reg. $1 to $3.50
Special, $1
HATS
A large table . full of
Hats, regular price from
$1 to $4.50
Special, $1
SUNSHADES
Now is the time to get
one.
Only 50C.
For your choice in the
window.       Reg. prices
from $1.50 to $6
Ladies' Princess Dresses
Rain Coats and
Summer  Coats
Must be cleared regardless of cost, as fall goods
are   now arriving,   and
must have room.
PARISIAN SAGE
CURES DANDRUFF
If it Don't Willit's Will Give
Your Money Back
Yes, Parisian Sage, the most inviujjggraj
hair restorer, cures dandruff and grows
hair. The women of Canada, who have
luxuriant hair, know it does, and that is
why thousands of attractive women
throughout the land are regularly using it.
For years this almost marvelous grower
of lustrous and beautiful hair was confined
to the elite of Europe and New York City,
but about two years ago it was given to a
select list of druggists, and .today can be
obtained in any city or town in America
where society women of refinement dwell.
Parisian Sage is the most delightful hair
tonic in the world. It makes the hair soft,
lustrous and luxuriant in a few days. It is
perfumed most daintily and is not sticky
or greasy. It stops falling hair, cures dan-
dandruff and itching scalp in two weeks or
money back.
P. B. Willits & Co. sell it for 50 cents a
large bottle, and guarantees it, or direct, all
charges prepaid, by Canadian makers,
Giroux Mfg. Co., Fort Erie, Ont.
P. B. WILLITS & Co.
FOR SALE.—Twelve acres of good fruit
land on benches, with water record,
also an 8-roomed house on: Park Ave.,
Kelowna.   Apply P.O. box 175.    13tf
HOUSE TO RENT
Eight-roomed house   (Morden's) opposite
Pridham's   orchard, with   half  acre land,
small fruits, etc.   Apply Geo. E. Boyer.
TO RENT
A large   store   in   Water  Street.     Apply
Campbell, Bros., Kelowna. 18 tf
NOTICE.
E. A. Day will  not  be   responsible   for
any debt contracted in his name and without his written order. 26-38p
THREE ROOMED COTTAGE
To let, with cellarage and stable   at  back.
$10. a month,   situated in Pendozi  Street.
Apply in first instance to  Box  J,  Record
Office. 20tf
FINE PASTURAGE
On old Prather Ranch. If you have any
stock you wish pastured, telephone Cather
Springwood Ranch. The bunch grass is
in abundance, and the 40 acres of meadow
will be at the disposal of stock after first
crop is taken off. Terms, $2 per head per
month. 33tf.
RE-BUILT TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE
at immensely reduced prices. We are
offering all makes of typewriters for sale.
These machines are in perfect condition,
having been rebuilt in our own workshop
by the most expert workmen in the city.
Send for price list. The Oliver Typewriter Agency, 321, Homer st., Vancouver,
B.C. 3-
GIRIp WANTED
For  general    house   work,   Apply   Mrs.
Rembler Paul, P.O. Box 302, Kelowna.
32tf
WORK WANTED
By three men within city limits preferred,
A. Lumbert, Royal Hotel.
WANTED
An ezperienced girl to do general housework.   Duties to begin  Sept. 1st. Apply
to Mrs. Joseph Ball, Kelowna. 34-6
WATER NOTICE
Osoyoos Division Yale District.
Notice is hereby given that an application
will be made under Part 5 of the Water
Act 1909 to obtain a license in the Osoyoos
Division of Yale District.
(a) Name, address, and occupation of
applicant—Daniel McLean, Kelowna, B.C.,
farmer.
(A) 1'he name of the lake, stream, or
source—Dry Creek.
(c) The point of diversion—At Robert
White's headgate, being 317 feet west of
Dry creek bridge.
00 The quantity of water applied for—
1 cubic feet per second.
(e) The character .of the proposed
works—Water to be conveyed through
ditches.
(/) The premises on which the water
is to beused—South half lot 531, group 1.
(g) The purposes for" which water is to
be used—Irrigation and domestic.
(h) If for irrigation, describe the lands
intended to be irrigated, giving acreage—
31 acres of said south half of lot 531,
g.oup I.
(/). Area of crown land intended to be
occupied by proposed works—none.
(k) This notice was posted on the 2nd
day of Aug. 1910, and application will be
made to the Commissioner on the 2nd day
of September, 1910.
(/) Give the names and addresses of
any riparian proprietors or licensees who
or whose lands are likely to be affected
by the proposed works, either above or
below the outlet—None.
DANIEL McLEAN.
Kelowna, B.C.
WANTED
Position   by    experienced    stenographer.
Address P.O. Box 92, 34-6p
HORSE FOR SALE
Good driver and worker, if sold  at .once,
cheap       Apply Record Office.
FEATHERS FOR SALE
Three first-class feather beds.
Apply Mrs. Collins, Glenn Avenue
FOR SALE
Ripe peaches cheap ! At warehouse' of
Vernon Fruit Co. Kelowna cull peaches
in good  order.   Buy  them   now.   Bring
your own boxes.   R. A. Pease.'
35tf
HORSES FOR SALE
One horse, well broken, quiet;  pne horse,
3_ years old, has been driven double.
G. P. Dolsen, Benvoulin. 36tf
WANTED
girl wanted at once to .help, in  restaurant,
good wages paid.    Apply Coldman's Restaurant, Water St., Kelowna. • 36p
• HORSES FOR SALE
Young, general purpose team, quiet and
gentle, good workers, nice drivers, also
double driving harness and buggy.
Apply Wm. Gay, Rutland.        36-9
FOUND
Saturday last in  Kelowna,  a  lady's  umbrella.   Owner may have same by paying
for this ad.   Record Office.
Demand for Taxes.
NOTICE.
, Owing to the enormous increase in the
! price of flour we are compelled to raise
' the price of bread tb 12 loaves for $1.
JOHN SUTHERLAND,.Baker.
.A
ft
*A'
THOMAS LAWSON, Ltd.
Headquarters .or the Economical Buyer
If your liver is sluggish and out of tone,
and you feel dull, bilious, constipated, take
a dose of Chamberlain's Stomach and
Liver Tablets tonight before retiring and
you will feel all right in the morning.
Sold by all druggists.
MONEY   TO
LOAN
From one thousand to
twenty thousand or
more at 8 per cent.
REMBLER PAUL.
The Revenue Tax of $3.00 due by every
male person of 18 years of age and under
60, is due and payable on (he 2nd day of
January in each and every year.
This tax may be paid to
i JOHN TOOTH,
Provincial Constable.
Kelowna, B.C.
Mirk
*A$aya-NeuraD
THE    NEW   REMEDY   FOR
Nervous Exhaustion
The depression experienced by
women duringconvalescence from
childbirth Is never forgotten. The
sense of utter nerve fatigue blots
out interest in everything.'' Asa-
ya-Neuraix '' is Invaluable at
such times. It feeds the nerves,
induces sleep, quickens the appetite, aids digestion, and soon buoyancy of spirits and theSenseof nervous vitality returns* $1.50 a bottle. Obtain from the local agent.
P. B. WILLITS.     ,
Dysentery is a dangerous diseasa but can
be cured. Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera
and Diarrhoea Remedy has been successfully used in nine epidemics of dysentery.
It has never been known to fail. It is
equally valuable for children and adults,
and when reduced with water and sweetened, it i* pleasant to take. Sold by all
druggists.     ■■
Our  big   discount
Sale   has   left
with a lot of
ODDS AND
ENDS
which we are off er-
ing at
Greatly Reduced
Prices to Clear.
REMMANTS
Of
Dress  Goods,
Prints,
Ginghams,
Muslins,
Cottons,
Sheetings,
Towellings,
Table Linens,
Flannelettes
Embroideries,
Laces, etc., etc.
The Kelotona
Store
The Store of the
Stglish Shoe
W.B.M. CALDER
rietor
mVenirs.
Ladles these days tak* great pleasure
in collecting souvenir spoons, either in
the tea or coffee size. Just the'thing to
send away for a present, and are good
souvenirs of our Orchard City, with the
different coats of arms on the handles.
A good, heavy sterling silver spoon for
$J.50, engraved "Kelowna."
Look in the window.
WALTER M. PARKER
WATCHMAKER «e JEWELER
Bernard Avenue.
All work absolutely guaranteed
R. MINNS
Cabinetmaker and
Undertaker.
Certified Embalmen
PENDOZI STREElr,
James Bros. Block.-■'' /:*
Phone 88.
L
yy^ffyyy

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