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The Independent Jun 29, 1901

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 ftViW  JVEW YORK LIFE INSURAS���E.CO  i  The oldest and largest international company ln the world.  Supervised by 82 governments,  Fred Cockburn ��� District Mgr.  Flack Block, Vancouveb.  II. C. PEBMMEKT LOAN Alt��  SAYINGS CO.  Authorized Capital  -    (10,000,000  Subscribed Capital   -   -    1,500,000  Assets over   -    -    -    -     300,000  Head Office 821 Cambie Street, Van  couver, li. C.  VOL. 3.  VANCOUVER, B. C, SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 1901.  NO. 14.  THE TRACKMM'S TRACK.  Another week has passed and still  the strike of the Trackmen on the  C. P. R. continues. When,tho strike  " -was llrst Inaugurated 'the people in  this section were led to believe by the  erroneous and biased leports in the  dally press that it was a mere flush  in the pan and would be of short duration. According to them, the Justice  ���was all on one side. Lying despatches  from Montreal and Toronto told that  the men were rushing back to work,  sorry that ithey had ever" left their  princely salaiies of $1.10 per day. All  this rubbish was freely served to the  public by our subservient daily contemporaries. But last week's Independent put a different complexion on  affairs. The true story of the strikers'  trouble was told and after that the  local reports tamed down 'a bit.  Until the end of the strike, The In-  dependent would offer the following  .suggestions.  Accept with reserve telegraphic despatches appearing in any of the dally  papers. Nine-tenths of those that  Slave alieady appeared are proven to  have ibeen manufactured out of .whole  cloth. ,     ,  Accept with equal reserve all letters  ' Appearing  In   the  local   papers  from  6upt.    Marpole'e    office.     They    are  making the best of a poor case.  Reliable railroad men state that the  roadbed Is not up to the standard at  ���which it .is usually kept.  The trackmen    on  the Western di  vision have grievances.' They ask that  their wages be advanced .to something  nearer a living rate.        /  The trackmen have the sympathy  ot their fellow workmen on the railroad, besides the sympathy of nine-  tenths of all other classes of "people.  ' Tho foregoing* are facts, the reports  in the daily papers to the' contrary  notwithstanding.  If evidence wero wanted that the  trackmen have the best of the right It  is shown by the Irregularity with  which ,tho Imperial limited arrived  heie during the past week. There  .- weie no thiough trains Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, and no mall. If  one were to believe the excuses made  that this was caused entirely on account of washouts he would be far  from the facts of the case. The truth  of the matter is under present conditions the passenger trains will not  jnaice full time over the mountain  ���sections of the load. To do so would  be to unnecessarily endanger the Uves  of the cievv and passengers.  In Thuisday evening's edition of the  World an' Interview , appeared purporting to come from nn engineer, In  which .he Is quoted as saying most  emphatically that there wus no truth  in the rumor that the B. of L. E.  would go out on Saturday. This is  correct. But ttiS interview does not  convey all the 'meaning of the attitude of ithe engineers and other employees on the load. What the trackmen desiie lis that the engineers, firemen and trainmen simply perforin  lhelr ordinary work. This It can be  depended on they will do. When the  road Ibecomes dangerous to travel over  then will the other employees be heard  from. With' the alternating days of  -rain and hot'-sunshine" the road  through the mountains will -become  very dangerous, and It would be a  foolhardy employee or passenger who  would j'isk Wis life because of the obstinacy of a railroad in refusing to  ���J>ny_lts_emi>loyees_a_llving_wage.���^  During the past week the local committee have irecelved despatches from  the main points along the line, all of  ���which report the men standing firm.  Thisis hardly in line with the reports  published by the officials of the road.  The former may be relied on though  as being the most reliable.  The following letter will give somewhat of an Idea whether the men are  ��� faltering nnd also what they think of  that moribund affair nt Victoria called a government:  nnd when they refused to work, one  drew a revolver and frightened the  men Into cutting the tree off the track  and when 'the foreman came forward  and told the men to stop, he (the policeman) turned and threatened him  also, but being a good, determined man  did not inind him, 'but told him that  he would see to him. The foreman  informed the lodge, and they had him  dismissed, iby going to the gold commissioner.  I would like to say that the provincial police -were not necesasry at all.  Had vve been    lawless   citizens,  then  there would have been an excuse for  it.    We have seen   clearly how that  very government that claims to be the  people's friend, has proved to be" their  enemy, and is doing all in its power  to  help the corporation  out,  and    to  crush the wonklngman.    But, sir,  its  day of reckoning is not very far distant, when .we,    the    taxpayers, will  cause it  to reflect upon  its past i e-  cord by sweeping it from power.   To  think that a government    \\*ho  were  eleoted iby the people should so lower  itself. , This will not be.forgotten by  the working men for a long time^to  come, When It comes to see'k the suffrages of the peoplejts day is doomed.  It Is the most discreditable thing ever  penpetralted  by any    government,- vve  believe, on the   continent.    We,    the  strikers, have our own committees out  Protecting the  piopeity of  the company, for no other   purpose   than to  ikeep men who would, perhaps, like to  get a dispute with some*of the men  that the company might bring* in, but  Providence has blessed us so far, that  all new comeis  haive gone out along  with our men and aie likely to stay-  out till the strike is-over.  I, must say every tiling is .going on  nicely on our division, and so far east  as Winnipeg. >  Hoping that all things may turn out  for the best.  Signed by order of committee, Division B. K. T. of A.  Revelstoke, June 21, 1901.  traoks. The next thing that will happen will be that the government will  undertake to supply trackmen, etc.  The trackmen nre all out .on the St.  Ouen's section. The company ha-s sent  two street car men out to watch the  load and this Incensed the neighborhood. The two men in question oould  'not get anything to eat at St. Ouen's  as? all the people adjoining the track  sent them off their premises qulakly.  The street car men protested that they  were not scabs but simply detectives.  This 'is where the joke ���> comes In, as  while some of the men engaged them  in conversation others stole their satchels and blanlcetss, and they had .to  ���patrol the track last night, as no one  would let them in their 'houses. To  odd insult to injury 'tlhey were told  'that they sfl.ould 'haive brought another  policeman with them to 'help them  lock after ithelr own property first,  then ithe C.  P. R.'s.  *"8  tr  ii.  To the Editor of 'I'm: Ini�� i-psiibst.  Sir,���Will you kindly Insert Jn your  columns the following:  Having seen reports in some of the  'papers which are published In your  city about the strike on the C. P. It.,  it was resolved at our last meeting to  write .something in reply.  Now. Jt has been falsely represented  by those papeis, especially In reference to Revelstoke, wheie thoy said  that the strikers were doing all sorts  of destruction, which is a falsehood.  We are all laiw-abiding citizens. The  only law breakers thus far has been  the government special police, who  Jiave been ordering out the strlkeis to  clear some trees off the right of way,  As we stated before the press,of the  province have been very unfair toward the men. But there.,are_a few-  honorable exceptions. The following  fiom the Inland Sentinel ibreathes a  spirit of independence of the "gigantic  octopus' that is raie indeed in this  province: '  "The trackmens' strike still continues. All reports that the men at different points aie returning to wort,  may be discredited. Whatever action  Is taken will Ibe genernil from end to  end of the system. The men aie fighting for a living wage. They know they  have asjgood a right to demand fair  remunei ation for their labor as the  company have to fix the price at  Wihlch they will transport passengers  and freight. Moreover, they know-  that the Canadian people as a whole  sympathize with them in their efforts  to secure a decent wlage, and they  aro further encouraged by the fact  that'organized labor from end to end  of the' Dominion will rally to their  support If necessary. It is to be regretted that the press of this province  generally can find apace for biased  despatches emanating from the company's press bureau. There are two  sides to every case, and even if the  papers prefer to support the company's  side, they should be independent  enough to represent the situation as  It really exists. The publication of  misleading reports may temporarily  deceive the public, but no good purpose  will be served: Jn_faot,_the_contrnry  To the Editor ot The I_.dei-E-.dext:  Sir,���During t'he last ten days of the  strike on the C. P. R. the company  haive been telling the public daily  through the press that everything was  woi'klng smooth and that they had all  the men they required to keep the  road up to its proper standard. I see  by the papers tha't the company has  cancelled the excursion of the B. C.  E. R. company employees to Sumas.  Now, if they cannot1 make a trip like  th*at there must be a screw loose somewhere and things are not as represented. When wo see .the laws of our  country openly violated day after day  and aliens brought in through misrepresentation and iiraud, and the members we elect to protect and look after  our interest stand back and do nothing, we must say, "Great is the C.  P. R." Ever since its, Inception it has  been one continued grab game with  them, and it seems to make no difference which party is in power. All  what Is more, they cannot get new ones  but when we ask for our just rights  vve are not listened to and are called  a lot of fools and know nothings.  With all the help of their inspired  press and other souices they have'not  got_ one of_theli;,old_.hands_bacik,.and.  wat is more, they oannot get new ones  without using brute foi re. The following letter explains itself.  Vancouver, June 27, 1001.  Sir,���I was hired in Portland, Oregon to work for the C. P. R. by G. C.  Clark, at the irate of $2 a day and expenses. After working nine days and  seeing the conditions I quit. I was  offered then a further inducement of  $3 and expenses.     J. E. SAMPSON.  In our last article commenting on  the testlmohy 'taken berore the Royal  commission on Mongolian Immigration  recently, we concluded with the deposition of the Rev. Canon Beanlands,  of Victoria. We do not wish our readers to understand that the reverend  gentleman 'voices the sentiments of the  clergy cf.thait city, but'aather that  his views aie exceptional to .that held  by 99 per cent, of those ot his profession, not alone ot Victoria, but of the  whole province. Rev. Mr. McBeth, of  Vancouver, Presbyterian minister,  sworn stated: "I am opposed to Mongolian immigration because it lb compelling our people to abandon then-  native land, rand is bringing about conditions) In t'he labor market, under  which it is neither .possible nor desirable that our people should be compelled to compete."  Rev. Mr. Grant, Vancouver, sworn,  stated: "The effects of exclusion in  the States have benefited both whites  and OMinese. I .believe the same results would follow similar legislation  here. House servants, we are^told, are  scarce. There are 600,0110 more, women  in England than men. If a little of  the money at present expended by the  immigration department was devoted  to bringing ithese women .here, the domestic seivant question would soon be  settled, Portland, 20 years ago, had  a population of 20,000 people, with 6,000  Chinese. To-day she has a .population  of MO.OOU people, with but 5,000 Chinese  and the people seem to be well satisfied."  Veiy prominent space was given In  the daily papers to a report of the  arrest of strikers for "alleged" intimidation, which read: "J. Clark and J  E. Gordon, two of the Canadian Pacific striking section foremen at Winnipeg, have been arrested and convicted for throwing atones at and intimidating imen Who were working on the  track. J. E. Goidon is chairman of the  local committee of striking trackmen."  But heie is a despatch i kept in the  daiik:  ���Kamloops, iB. C, June 27.���Detective  Jones, of the C. P. R., and six special  constables, have been arrested at  Basque station for intimidating Italians by covering them with fire-arms  and forcing them to work.    f.v  IN A GOOD  CAUSE.  The following communincation  has  been sent to Ralph Smith, M. P., Nanaimo; .George  Bartley,     Vancouver;  is the case, as It only serves to embitter the participants In the strike. The  men are demanding a fair wage. That  Js their right, and there can be no justification for the publication' of the  manufactured stories being sent out  from Montreal and Toronto to the effect that a. majority of the men have |  returned to work, and that everything  I.s runnlng^along smoothly. The men  ure all out, to remain out, and unless  reasonable conccisions bo' made . In  short order, the probabilities are that  the whole system will be tledup. There  is no good to be gnlncd In Ignoring  Iho facts. This Is a fight for'u living  wage and the light to organize, and it  affects overy man In the employ of  tho rallioad company directly, and Indirectly overy member of a tabor organization In the Dominion. The true  friends ot the Canadian Pacific Railway Company are those who insist  upon the immediate settlement of the  strike by the payment of a fair wuge  to the trackmen, and the full recognition of the Brotherhood of Railroad  Tr.ioTimeii."  Considerable Indignation has been  caused by the action of our fi-ea.lt provincial government in sending out special constables to guard the' company's  Tohn Xppletbn", WihnipegT-~Hen ry"  Obenneyer, Hamilton; XV. J. Reid,  Brantford; AVJUIam Henderson, Toronto; Urbain Lafontalne, Montreal; J.  S. Fltzpatrick, Montreal; John C.  Scott, Quebec; David MdManus, Monc-  ton, and W. H. Coates, St. John, N. Tt.;  "Dear Sir,���You were appointed on  j a special committee, by resolution at  tho last annual session of the Con-  grass, for the purpose or soliciting subscriptions with a view of presenting  Mr, Geo. W. Dower, ex-secretary, with  a suitable testimonial. May I nsTc you  to be good enough to forvvaid to me all  subscriptions received on or before  Sntmdiiy, August 31st next.  It Is the Intention to make  the presentation to, the ex-secretary nt the convention In  Brantford In September next, and It Is  desirable that each one of us shoul 1  exert ourselves to the utmost in order  that It may be of a substantial natuie.  Yours fraternally,  "F. M. DRAPER, Treasurer."  These   statements  voice   the   sentiments of 95 per cent, of the cleigy of  British Columbia, who are in a position   to iknow  wlha't  they are talking  about, and our clencal friends in the  east would do well to pause and reflect  upon tills fact before condemning us  as ranting agitators���the people 'who  agitate   exclusion. "The   general   consensus of testimony taken would-indicate that fully 90 per cent, of the domestics in our cities  and  towns are  Mongols.   Nearly  the same conditions  apply* foVmaiiy"oi!"thV ill.teient trades"  and  callings,  such  as  laundry  work,  factory v-oilv and,  to a lesser extent,  dress-malclng, tailoring and other like  callings.   In this way the different avenues  through which our girls  formerly found employment are being closed,  and,  in accordance  with the economic 'condition outlined by the Rev.  Canon Beanlands'they aie being elevated to a higher sphere of life: are,  in fact,  being fitted for the oultured  companionship of their fatheis, brothers and sJsters,  who are rapidly becoming gentlemen of lelsuie���known as  tramps.   What a simple and practical  solution of this much vexed question.  Mr.   Fletcher,   B. C.   loyal   marine,  sworn, stated:   "I earn my living by  sawing wood on the streets.   I served  22 years In her majesty's, service as a  royal marine.   I i ecelved an honorable  discharge at Esquimau 15 years ago,  and obtained employment "in a bank,  tut broke my leg and could not get  around  fast enough  to  hold  my job,  and was compelled to quit It.   I then  secured  work   piling    lumber   at   the  Hastings saw mill for 90 cents a day.  The Japs were getting from 50 cents  to $1.10.   I  could  not get ahead any.  Consequently   quit    and     have   since  been engaged in sawing wood on the  streets,, but  the  Chinese are  outtlng  the prices, and I will 'have to aban-  don ithat -avocation, as I cannot com-  NEW SCHOOL OPEN.  The new schools will be open to the  public on Monday, July 1st. The Sov-  mour from S a. m. to 12 m., and tlie  Lord Roberts fiom I to 4 p. tn. Everyone welcome.  pete with them."  Our country's defenders should profit  by this lesson. Here we have a man  who .has devoted 22 years of His best  manhood In the services of his country, who now in his old age is being  driven from this humble occupation  by competition with a Chinaman.  What an inspiration Is this to develop  patriotism In the minds of the backbone of this nation���the working man.  Lead on, gallant Kitchener, and wo  will follow thee or die.  John Joid.in, manager Royal City  .mills. New* Westminster, swoiu, staled: "Our market fo> lumber and  shingles Is largely In Ontario, Quebec  and Manitoba. The employment ot  Chinese ihns enabled us to reach thnt  market. If wc were prut of the States  our property would be worth 60 per  ���cent, more than It is to-dny." Here  we have a new* phase of the  Situation. If the employment of a few  Chinese enables those people to reach  the eastern market the employment,  after they become expert, of all Chinese will make times kind of interesting for the eastern mill men. Again,  the government should take into serious consideration the advisability of  opening -negotiations vv Ith Uncle Sam,  looiklng to tihe removal of the boun-  daiy line to the north of Burraid Inlet for the benefit of the British Columbia saw milling and canning Industries, for these ate the people who  propose to elevate the white laborer  by the Impoitatlon of Mongols. Today Mongolians are pushing Canadian  labor over the American line, and filling this land with -.in alien race whose  system of existence is such as will  enj-blcithe employer later on to poak.-t  the difference between the $1.75 or ?2  -i.d.iy now paid wMtes and the o to  10 cents a day which the CUiinese have  teen accustomed to at home. This  fact beautifully illustrates the noble  spirit of self-sacrifice, prompting our  employers In their endeavor to elevate  the white laboi er to a higher sphere.  Mr.  Mar.pole,  superintendent Pacific  division, C. P. R., sworn, stated:  "We  give constant employment to about 90  Chinese and 70 Japs.   That number Is  increased   at certain  seasqns   by  ,10ft,  when vve are doing surfacing work or  shovelling snow or slides off the track.  We could    not   operate   our division  without .Mongols.   Of course  I  would  not say  that  the C.  P.  R.  would  be  compelled to go out of business if we  employed whites."   Here is a concern  built   by   the  Canadian   people,    and  handed over to this company, who, in  addition  to  receiving  bonuses  nearly  equivalent   to   $100,000,000,   and  to-day  aie  drawing a 'large  bonus    on   the  steamship  line,  depending    upon  the  Canadian people   for patronage,   who  are displacing the people from whom  they received these favors by an alien  race, to whom they owe nothing.   The  base ingratitude here displayed  could  have its origin only in a soulless corporation.   But   the   excuse   is  offeied  that Mamger Hill, of the Great Northern,  employs  2,500  Mongols,  and  the  Northern Pacific 4,000,  and  Is adver-  ' Using for 5,000  more.   Each   of  these  companies appear to be watching the  other and are, gradually substituting  Mongol for white labor.  Mi. Little, Union mines, Wellington,  V. I., sworn, stated: "We employ from  900 ,to 1000 men, about $00 Mongols and  from 130 to 200 whites. We have lun  some of .our mines, entirely, by Chinese.  We cannot compete in foreign markets  without Mongol labor. We expoit 4o  per cent, of the total output to foi-  eign markets, and 53 per cent, is consumed at home."  Mr. Robins, manager of the Nanalmo coal mines, sworn, said: "We employ $-10 whites and 60 Chinese, all  above ground. We expoit SO per cent.'  of produot to foreign maikots, and but  20 per cent, is consumed at home."  Now the situation is like this: Mr.  Little expoiits 55 per cent, of the total product and employs In the neigh-  horhood of SO. .pei cent. Mongolian labor, whilst Mr. Robins exports to foreign countries SO per cent, of total product, and employs about 1'5 per cent.  Mongol labor, and still Mr. Little says  that 'he must lnuve Mongols to enable  Jiim to successfully compete In foreign  markets. Now who speaks the truth?  Mr. Gill, "orlckyaid foreman, Vancouver, sworn, stated: "Tluee years  ago our firm .let a contract to do a  ceitadn amount of work, to a Chinese  contractor, he to furnish men and  complete   the   work   within   a   given  THE BY-LAWS.  time.   He  opened   a  store,  furnished  his men with previsions, fitted up a  gambling den, Imported a Chinese  prostitute, lost .$300 on dhe contract  and came out $100 ahead of the game."  Here we have a pointer in the con-  hact line Canadians might well profit  by.- This7is "the-game- the~CaitadIah  laborer Is up against.  Mr. J. H. Watson, boiler maker,  sworn, stated: "The C. P. R. steamers  make Hong iKong ithelr home port, because they get work done there more  cheaply than here. If this work was  done in Vancouver it would give  steady employment to 100 men, which,  if,In addition were Chinese on the  steamers replaced by whites, would  ���mean an expenditure in Vancouver of  ���$12,000 a month or $141,000 per annum."  This, coipoi.itloii, receiving, ns it does,  a large annual subsidy from 'the government refuses to nia'ke Vancouver  a home port, or give employment to  the people from whose pockets the  subsidy is drawn. Would It not life  advisable to call the attention of our  law makers to this fact?  iMr. Bell-Irving, canner. sworn stated: "A class of ehoalp laboi, coolie or  otherwise. Is essentially necessary to  develop the resources of this country,  and I believe such a -system, if continued, will not alone benefit the employer, but will In addition push the  white laborer up to a higher sphere  In the Industrial system, enabling him  to become a mechanic or a boss."   But  On the 6th of next month, i. e., this  day week, the ratepayers of this city  are called upon to give their instructions to the city council regarding several  Important matters.   Some of the  by-laws deal with moral questions and  others  with efficient protection  from  tire  and   the   proper,, housing   of   the  firemen, and the healtill and security of  offenders against the law.   These bylaws, I do not propose ito discuss, although they are exceedingly import-'  ant.   The other matters deal with the  question of municipal ownership and  aie  woithy of  more   than a  passing  notice.   You are asked to consent  to  the extension of the water works system and  this should certainly be approved of, ithe more especially so, as  the by-law authorizing the sale of the  property  now occupied iby  the water  works' 'blacksmith  shop, on  Hastings  street, will  permit of an extension of  t'he work and the employment of additional men.  Possibly the most important by-law  before the people 'is that forcithe purchase of the stone quari-y. Although  the money as agked for to purchase  this qTiarry, it is well known that the  city will be able to repay, the whole t  cost and Interest 'in Jess than eight  years and will then obtain all the  necessary metal for the streets for  just what it will cost to work the  quarry.  Voters  will   now haive an  oppontu- '  nity of voting once more for "municipal   owneiship"   or,   in  other    words,  giving such instructions as will bring,,  about the purchase of the quarries for  themselves.  Instead of one 'individual being benefitted, as it now. is, the profits will '  belong to every taxpayer in the city.  1 do not mean that the city council  will actually declare dividends in the  ordinary acceptance of the term, but  just the same the city will have nthe  profit formerly made by the present .  owner. This profit'will be made by a  reduction in the cost of the material  used and it 'is an universally admitted  axiom' that money saved is monoy  gained'."   *"**���        -r     '-.���-"*  I hope the time will soon come when  our railways will be owned by the  people, when our street railways will  be ours,,to be run for and by the people, and I earnestly request eveiy  iight-thliiktng 'man, whether he has a  vote or not, to mse his influence to secure ithese quarries.  Winnipeg has good cause for congratulation over her electric light  plant, owned by the city. Manchester  (Eng.) irejoices and commemorates the  day when she took over her tramway-  system. Australia will never cease to  be proud of her possessions in the  vanous railways, street railways, elee-,  tlio telegraph, etc���all owned iby and  worked for the advantage and benefit  of the people and not for absentee  shareholder. Voters do your duty on  the 6th of July. Insist on your friends  voting and then you will be able to  look ibaclk a few* years hence and say:  "I worked as a man* to secure to the  city the Quarries you ,n6jVV so much ad-'  mire." SOUTHERN CROSS.  (Continued on Pace Three.'  FISHERMEN MEET.  There was a large turn-out at Wednesday night's mass meeting, when  shout speeches were made by a number  of fishermen and their friends, after  which a resolution was proposed by  Capt. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Zet-  jtimnan.J<^the_j>ffe_ot_that_ln_the_opin^_  ion of the meeting, the fishermen  should ' not go on' the river until" a  settlement has been effected between  the union and the canners' association.   Carried unanimously.       '(  The chairman was H. E. Dusenbury,  who must be congratulated upon his  very orderly gathering. The speakers  wore: Capt. Anderson, S. H. Brown,  W. Cartwright, F. Rogers, Robt. Macpherson, ex-M. P. P., T. S. Baxter,  president of tho Liberal association,'  Capt. McCarthy, Chief Jimmy Harry,  Mr. Portor, Geo. Bruce and A. Zetter-  man. The white and Indian fishermen  will stand finn for 12 1-2 cents.  .'I  - H  < '?!  ���-ti  il  _1  If you want n really good ryo whisky  nt n low price, our 50c rye is it. Gold  Seal Liquor Coin]*ni_y, 740 Pender street.  XV. Workman, an old Vancouver typo, Is over from Nanalmo to spend  tho holidays. Being a native son,  "Billy" holds that the idiosyncrasies  of a rotten civilization should be set  aside on the 1st of July in commom-  orotion of the birth of our, world-fa- ���'  mous Dominion, and that the newspapers should give the public a rest.  He thinks that the subscribers could  even spare the prosy News-Advertiser  on" this great occasion.  ���t  I  \-M    *'    -*  -V?*;.'  1.711. HI., _m_ iim ii        ii TIIE INDEPENDENT.  SATURDAY..... JUNE _>2, 1901.  SAIMG1DI.  A Song of Toil.  1 tnke the little kiss she gives when I go forth  at xuorn,  1 tnke the little farewell wish upon the breezes  borne; "  1 take her little arms'caress aud in the morn*  ing light  Go out into tho world of toil, the battle for the  right.  ltitig, anvils, Willi your clangor I  Hum, (urges, fierce aud larl  The night shall bring the world of homo,  Where love aud gouduchs are I  1 lean to little lips she lifts to my rough lips of  love,  1 read the mother hope that shines in eyes that  gleam above;  I hear the roaring city call, aud unto it 1 go,  Ughl.lieartcri for the stress because a child  heart loves me su.  Swing, hammers, wilh your clatter!  ���?WUirl, wheels, and shaft and beam I  The light of love shall guide mc home  >'roin oui this shroud of steam.  1 take the Utile rose she holds aud pin it on my  breast,  1 take the tender memory of her word that  clieered and blest;  Ifaco tho aigeutpuri.ovcsof tho labor lhat Is  mine,  Filled with her trust and patience, her youth  and faith divine.  Plunge, cities, with your thunder  Of trultiC'Shout aud roar!  1 lake the task aud *4o the deed,  While she waits at the door!  1 take the task, 1 lace the toil, Idceiu it sweet  to be  Bound io the labor that is lore for lore's fine  liberty;  From  morning  until eventide, remembering  her I go,  Under tho bending wheel that glides forward  to and ho.  bing, mills, your cluttering chorus,  Down where thu millions sweat!  I bare my arms and give my strength  Ami joy iu what 1 gel!  I give and take, and give again, and unto dark  bunt  Beueatu  the burden of the  task  for which  sweel lite i.s spent;  But, ah! the wage  so dear to have, ihe little  lips that wait,  Ihe hearts thai ring,  the arms that cling,  when I unlatch ihe gate.  Clang with your mighty revel!  ltoar, cities, witli youi strife!  And tied be piaised lor stieugth lo toil  For wage 01 lo\ e and hie 1  ���l-'olger McKuisey, in Baltimore News.  an attachment to signal an undertaker  without making any noise and attracting attention.  If average people knew as many mean  things about themselves as they do  about their nei'dibors they would be  ashamed to look at themselves in a looking-glass.  Jinx���Did you say she's a line conversationalist V  Joe���1 should think sho was. Why,  shu's the crack whist player of the West  lCnd.  There arc organists and other organists. The organist of a church on the  lull was a guest oi littlo Dot's mamma.  At dinner she asKodtho visitor: "Do you  play an organ ? "  " Yes, dear."  "Thon," gravely inquired the little  miss, "where's your monkey ? "  .Matches for John Bull.  More matches are used in the United  Kingdom than in any other country in  the world. It has been estimated that  the Knglish people use an average of  eight matches each person a day, and  annually over 1,700,000,000,000 are  burned.  One head is belter than two���for a boil.  If you would polish a fool, apply  varnish of ilatterv.  An ounce of  oi "sav."  'do" is worth a pound  Some people hulp others,  themselves.  Others help  The man who indulges in self praise  adds nothing to his reputation.  O  lurst Tramp���Do you remember that  dog's teeth ? .  Second Tramp���1 do. They made  quite a deep impression on mu.  Patience���You say the first car which  came along stopped at the crossing ?  Patrice���Yes, the motorman didn't  happen to see me.  A little fellow of 5 was quite sick and  his mother said, " Here, Willie, take  this powder tlie doctor left for you."  " Powder," exclaimed tho small  invalid, "why, mamma, I'm notagun!"  Ah!  He���Ci^sie, I've heard it said that a  kiss without a moustache is like an egg  without salt.   Is that so V  She���Well, really, I don't know. I  can't tell, for, you see, I've never���  He���Ah, now!  She���Never eaten an egg without  salt.���h.x.  What " Queers" the Coffee.  Not one cook in a hundred is careful  enough not to allow coffee to boil, and  boiling will queer the best coffee on  earth. It must come just to the verge  of boiling and stay there for a few minutes, but never go beyond, for boiling  brings out the tannic acid and not only  injures the flavor and aroma, but makes  the stuff positively injurious, says an expert.  Also a copy of the architects report  on the Seymour school which reads as  fallows:  i Vancouver B. C, March 7, l'.xu. ���  J; J. Woods, Esq., Seeielary ��� Hoard of School  Trustees, Vancouver, H. C:  DK.vu Sik,���After going over the Inspector's  report, which I hare dono most carefully, I am  satisfied lhat helms done his duly faithfully'  and that the Seymour school could not be reproduced for less money than it has cost.  Before taking tenders last August, I was  asked by some of tlio Hoard my opinion on day  labor and contract, nnd I then stated that  luuipcoulracl was ihe cheapest, and that It  produced the worst ipialily of work. Separate  contracts for each trade produced belter work,  but cost more; and that day labor produced the  best results, but was the most costly. And if  the board will lake tiuality lulo consideration  and compare the Seymour school with any  building built by contract, I feel satisiled that  the Seymour school building will prove my  statement correct, and that while the total  cost seems henry, there are some items, such  as the septic tank, heavy blasting, etc., whlcli  were not in Ihe contiai'L, but which by reason  of the position of tlie site, were absolutely  necessary, will in the future prove economical'  and show that in buildings good work and  material aie tlie cheapest lu the end. Yours  truly,  (Signed.) E. A. WHITEHEAD,  Architect.  And we believe it would be a good  Idea lif the school 'board would throw  these two sohools open lor inspection  to the ipublic during the Dominion day-  holidays.  All of which Is respectfully submitted by your committee.  The Mint  Is the new saloon at the ' corner  of Carrall and Hastings streets. Case  goods are tho best, and the prices O. K.  Seattle Rainier beer, 5 cents.  You'll not find fault with any quality you  get at the People's Popular Price Pharmacy.  Quality is of supreme importance.  You'll not find fault wlth.the prices���thoy  are always fair and lower than other store's  prices.  OUR PRICES NOT CONTROLLtD BT  ANT  COMBINE.  Cnstnrla, Regular Price 85c, our pi ice  23c  larler's I'lils, "       "    25c,   "     ���      ISc  Dr. Gibson's Kidney Cure, Itegular Price  fl.SU, our price    $1  SPONGES AN'D SOAPS AT HALF PRICE.  I'ltESCltlPTlOKS : CO per cent, lower than  other STORES.  Gerald Deyell   druggists  VY.D.Wylle  Successors to J. A. L. McAlphlne.  t Want a New Bike?  ���'������-���?..  �� Come in and let us tell you about our new  ^ Easy Payment Plan.   You'll own a -high-grade'  ^ wheel before you realize it is costing you anything.  ��� :J ASM ABOUT IT." ''/'*..  '��� Wm.   HAi i>ii        Bicycle Store  ^ J? Ill*   K/%L.I*||     24 Cordova St.  ��� SOLE AGENT  |     CLEVELAND AND TRIBUNE BICYLES.  ���  t  Mason &> Riscb  Xot Worth the Oil.  " If," says Sir Kobert Ball, discoursing on the subject oi signalling to Mars,  "the whole extent of Lake Superior was  covered with petroleum, and ii that  petroleum was set on lire, then I think  vve may admit that an inhabitant'of  Mars who was furnished with a telescope as good as that which Mr. l'er-  cival Lowell uses at Flagstaff might be  able to see that something had happened." The prospect for social reformers who have been hoping to get a  few tips from Mars is not exactly  encouraging.  "Did you say your schoolteacher  chased you to-day, Johnnie?"  " Yes, sir." L.,  " Did he catch you V "  " Yes, indeed, he did, and he had a  rod the best of me."  that  Mamma���Remember,   my  son,  activity sharpens the faculties.  Willie���Is that what makes the busy  bee so sharp at one end, mamma ?  Johnny���Tommy    Smith's    mother  -Makes-him go-to -Stmday-school-every  Sunday.  Johnny's Mamma-  she makes him go ?  Johnny���'Cause he goes.  Why do you say  The first menu card was in the form  of a blackboard, on which tlie order of  the courses was chalked up. It was  used oy Duke Henry of Brunswick in  1000.  A foreigner has invented a tobacco  pipe which has a whistle in the stem to  enable him to whistle for his dog without taking the pipe from his mouth.  What we need now is a cigarette with  His Itemized Bill.  An artist employed in decorating the  properties of an old church in Belgium,  being refused payment in a lump sum,  was asked for details and sent his bill as  follows:  Corrected the Ten Commandments;  embellished Pontius l'ilate and put a  ribbon iu his bonnet; put a new tail on  the rooster of St. Peter and mended his  comb; replumod and gilded the left  wing of the Guardian Angel; washed  the servant of the High Priest, and put  carmine on his cheek; renewed heaven;  adjusted two slurs iind cleaned the  moon; revived the Haines of hull, put a  new tail on the devil, mended his left  hoof and did several jobs for the  damned; rebordered the robe of Herod  and adjusted his wig; put new spotted  sash on the son of Tobius and dressing  in his sack; cleaned the ears of Balaam's ass and shod him; put earrings in  the ears of Sarah; put a new stone in  David's sling; enlarged the head of Goliath and extended his legs; decorating  Noah's ark; mended the shirt of Joseph  and cleaned his ears.  Trv a bottle of Eisen Port, the sun  shine of California, 50c bottle, at Gold  Seal Liquor Co., 746 Pender street.  When you want to hire a. first-class  horse and bung-y, go to the Palace  livery stables.  Telephone 126.  Drink Red Cross Beer, the beer that's  Sure, 75c pints, $1.50 do/., quarts. Gold  peal Liquor Co., 74ii Pender street.  FDTNT'S BROMO G1UPPE CURE.  neve.* falls to completely cure a coU  within 24 hours. Gives Instant relief���  euaranix-ed, your money back. 25c.  box ut McDowell, Atklna, Watson Co.  The Tool Sliarptners ie,)orted in favor  of the proposed 5u-cont assessment for  Labor Pay. Tlie Fishermen will report  later. The Amalgamated Carpenters  subscribed $5.50. Then the question of  the Labor Day celebration was deferred.  Nominations of oilieers were made as  follows, to be opened again at the next  meeting:  President���,7. Crow, J. Morton, J. II.  Watson, R. Macpherson.  Vice-president���W. .7. Lamerick, E.  Crush, il. Todd, J. C. Marshall.  Secretary���Mr. Cross.  Treasurer���.1. Pearey, J. II. Watson.  Financial Secretary���W. Beer.  Statistician���,7. C. Marshall.  Sergeant-at-arms���A. Zettennan.  Executive (two to be elected to act  with the oflicers)���It. Todd, J. B. Mc-  Callum, A. Paton.  The Retail Clerks wrote regarding the  council adopting an uniform budge or  button for the members of the unions.  Messrs. Lamerick and Watson will report on tlie matter.  J. Miller wrote requesting tlie council  to appoint representatives on a committee re an exhibition to be held on or  about 1U03. Messrs. Watson, Cross and  Todd were appointed.  The Tanners' and Curriers' Union,  of Berlin, Out., explained its present  dilliuulty with the Lung Tanning Company. The secretary was instructed to  write the ditferenl local leather dealers  regarding same.  A committee was appointed to interview the agent for certain non-union  cigars now being sold in this citv to the  detriment of the local cigarmakers.  A delegate of the Barbers slatcd'"thal  they had now a case against Lambert  pending for violating the Sunday closing by-law.  C. P. R. STRIKE.  Attention wus called to the sweariiii;  in of Provincial 'police who are doing  trackmen's duty on the C.P.R. In a  forcible manner il was pointed out to the  council by delegates from the Trackmen's  Union the injustice of such a course and  a committee was appointed to investigate the matter with full power to act.  Other delegates furnished evidence in  regard to this matter, and it was clearly  shown how certain specials had openl'v  boasted on Hastings street that thev hail  been sworn in to do this duty, and 'were  receiving two dollars and a half a dnv,  besides showing lire arms with which  they had been provided.   '-  The following resolution was passed  unanimously:  ' Whereas���The trackmen on the C. P.  R. are at present engaged in a struggle  with that corporation for a more equitable wage;and  Whereas���The members of this council consider the trackmen are entitled to  a living wage, and that $1.25 is not a  living wage lor any man in. this western  country, some of whom have large families to support; and  Whereas���This council lias considered  both sides of the question; therefore  be it  Resolved���That this council extend its  sympathy to tlie trackmen in tlieir  struggle for better conditions, and .wish  teem success in their just demands) and  hove that every striker will bear in mind  the words of Longfellow who says:  In the world's bioud Held of battle,  111 tliu blYOUiic uf lite,   Bu not like dumb driven futile���~" =   But bu ubera in the -.true.  May be bought by monthly instalments from  Gideon Hicks & Co.  23 Hnstinc street,  Vancouver,  3 Government st.  Victoria.  CREDIT:  Times are hard and cash is scarce, and  ���Is likely to ho till after the Ashing season. On the other hand we are placing  our students Into positions so fast (39 In  seven vveeeks) that we will be short of  graduates for the fall 'business. For this  reason vve are prepared to make arrangements (with responsible parties) for a full  commercial course in such a way that the  full fee is not payable till the end of the  six months' course. Offer open till June  lcth, laoi.  The I1.1U. Yogel Commercial College  P. O. Box 3-17.  Vancouver, B. C.  BUCHANAN & WHITE  HOUSE PAINTERS  72S Hastings St.      Union Labor Only  ICE CREAM 2     ICED DRINKS!  G. B. Chocolates,  English snd Canadian Confectionery  MONTREAL  BAKERY  W]_ST.MI.NST_:H  AVENUE.  ALIEN LAW BROKEN.  TIL.  Best  Thing in the Market  McLennan,  Mcfecly ���� Co*  ���WHOLESALE AND  RETAIL DEALERS 'IN  SJ"^ Hardware  MAIL  ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT AT*BEN*__ION.  KELLY, DOUGLAS ��> CO.  WHOLESALE GROCERS',  Cordova and Water Streets,   -   Vancouver, B. C.  [RSIf3 Headquarters for  Domestic and Imported Cityars and Smoking Sundries.  Is now on.   All goods at Half Price for  ONE WEEK.  Solid Copper Ton and Coffee Pots   '  Tea Kettles in all Sizes  (Nlckle l'lateil)  These goods will last a life time.  No scouring to keep clean  Always look bright  R. G. BUCHANAN & CO.  Crockery and llousefurnishings,  406 and  40S  Westminster Avenue, Vancouver  for  Get in line for your Summer Duds.  j Bathing Suits, Flannel Suits, Alpaca Coats,  Lustre Coats, Light Weight Underclothing,  Negligee Shirts, Linen and Straw Hats, Etc'  A splendid big stock to choose from.  JOHNSTON, KEREOOT & CO.  Vancouver's Big Clothiers,  flatters and Mens's Furnishers,  104-6 CORDOVA STREET,  VANCOUVER.  A. M. TYSON,  WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN  Fish, Game, Fruit,  and  vegetables.  112 Cordova St.  Thome 442  Telephone 651-  Western Cartage Co  XV.  Rovelstoke, B. C, June 20, 1901.  G. R. Maxwell. SI. P.,  Vancouver, B. C:  Information received that provincial  government  aro   bringing:  scabs   from  Seatlle swearing tliem Jn as provincial  police contrary to alien act.  ���Kindly attend to lt .at onco.  T.  J.   GRAHAM,.  Sec. 11. R. T. A.  CHINA   HALL.  Evcrbrite  .MJCT.Uj POLISH hns no ctinal lor  clcuninc briLKK, copper, nickel, etc.  Large slue bottle, -10 cents.  Cu|js, Saucers and Plates  English Semi - Porcelain; floral  wreath decoration; blue iu color.  Cups and Saucers $1.25 doz  Tea Plates  l.OOdoz  Breakfast Plates  1.10 doz  Teapots  English let Rockliigliiinnvnre, fancy  tloral deeoratloiih.  Medium sire, 15c each.  Glass Butler  Dishes  Imitation cut glass pattern, clear  crybtal, Amerlcuu lead glass, 13c  each.  FREDERICK BUSCOMBE & CO.  China Hall, 319 Hastings Street.  "Billy" Armstrong, tlio vetcrnn typo  of ilhe northwest, has Just returned after touring Washington state. While  abroad he studied Pniisinn French.  He ds nlso very enthusiastic about the  gooil roads movement over there, and  Is brim full ot new ideas on this great  question. He soya that In all probability lie -will ina'ice Vancouver his  home for the "next century." Vancouver is the best city on the const.  Don'.t forget the sermon on Labor nt  Theatre Royal to-morrow (Sunday),  at 7.30 p. m.   Everybody welcome.  Flint's Dyspepsia Tablets ore guaranteed to restore falling appetite and  correct any kind of stomach trouble.  SO c. box. McDowell, Atkins, Watson  Co.  . A. McDonald  T_.___.f_c      fl_.__t/c_ ______    Fvn.ac-         ��� ��� I uvnSf���if, 0^3- Gnu-a-/**!*, %.3����   Wagons for  all  Purposes.  ORDERS TAKEN TOR WOOD AND COAL  Office: 314 Cambie Street.  Applications for Licenses.  Rodgers Table and Pocket  Cutlery at  Tisdall's Qani Store 53,s��ett.Ms  Better Than Ever  Gratifying indeed to hear praises sounded throughout the  Dominion. FIT-REFORM patterns, gatiiered from the various  quarters of the globe, are receiving undivided attention from  nobby dressers.  .I'hat's why makers of Fit-Reform are taxed to- their utmost  capacity in this the spring of 1901.  _r��.^ ..    - ww i      ....__! ���_   ��� *\  <i <i  r jt-ifeTorm wardroom  334 Ha&tinqs St.  Vancouver, B. C~  Hail orders promptly attended to.  Self measurement blanks and sample.1!  scut on application. >  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN* THAT AT  tho next regular sitting of tlie Board  of license Commissioners for the City of  Vancouvor, vve shall apply for a renewal  of the Saloon Liccnso for the promises  situated on Granville street, Known as the  Criterion Saloon 1n the said City of Van  couver.  (Slimed) KENT & MAGNL'S.  NOTICE IS HISRERY GIVEN THAT AT  the next rctrular slliliiK of the Hoard of  License Commissioners for the City nf  Vancouver, I shall apply for a Hotel  Liconcc for the promises situated on Lots  8-10, Mock 2A, Subdivision of District Lot  511, known as llie Ferguson Hlock, in the  said Oity ot Vnncouvcr,  (Sinned) ALEX. SMITH.  NOTICE IS HI5REI3Y GIVEN THAT AT  tlio next regular sitting of the Hoard of  License Commissioners for the City of  Vancouver, I shall apply for a renewal of  the Hotel License for the premises situated on Lots 1-2, Blook 113, Subdivision of  ���District Lot Ml, known ns the Colonial  Hotel, in the (said City of Vancouver.  (Stened), T.   G.   BLIGH.  A recent cough or cold that " BIG  4 COUGH CURE" will not cure is not  worth curing.  Massey - Harris and Stearns  ALL STYLES  BICYCLES) ALL PRICES  KENDALL'S, 328 Cordova St  The best place ln B. C. to hare your  Blcyclo repaired.  fOB_  Good Milk and Cream  ROSE BANK DAIRY  HAS NO EQUAL.   Terms Reasonable*-  I. S. MILLER, Prop.    1130 Hornby St. flEff YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO  i  The oldest and largest International company ln the world.  Supervised by 82 governments.  Fred Cockburn - District Mgr.  Fuck Block, Vincouvkb.  i  'b. c. permanent imam  SAVINS CO.  Authorized Capital  -    }10,000,000  Subscribed Capital   ���   -    1,500,000  Aaietaovcr    ....      J00.00O  Head Cflko 321 Cambie 8treet, Van  couver, B. C.  VOL. 3.  VANCOUVEB, B. C, SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 1901.  NO. 14.  THE TRACKiWS TIM.  Another week has passed and still  (lie strike of the Trackmen on the  C. P. It. continues. When the strike  ���was llrst inaugurated 'the people in  this section were led to believe by the  erroneous and biased repot ts in the  daily press that it was a meie flash  In the pan and would be of short duration. According to them, the Justice  ���was all on one side. Lying despatches  from Montreal and Toronto told that  the men were rushing back to work,  sorry that ithey had ever left their  princely salaries of $1.11) per dny. All  tills rubbish was 'fieely served to the  public by our subservient dally contemporaries. But last week's Independent put a. different complexion on  affairs. The time story of the strlkere'  trouble was told and after that the  local reports tamed dovv n 'a bit.  Until the end of the sti like, TheTin^  dependent  would offer  the  following  ' suggestions:  Accept with reserve telegraphic despatches appearing in any of the dally  papers. Nine-tenths of those that  Slave already appeared are proven to  ha/ve been manufactured out of .whole  doth. -  Accept with equal reserve all letters  ' Appearing In the local papers from  Supt. Marpole's office. They are  maMng the best of a poor case.  Reliable railroad men stajte that the  roadbed Is not up to the standaid at  tv-hich it Is usually kept..  The trackmen on the Western division have grievances.' They ask that  their wages be advanced .to something  nearer a living rate.  The traokmen have the sympathy  of their fellow workmen on the railroad, besides the sympathy of nine-  tenths of all other classes of people.  The foregoing aie facts, the reports  ln the dally papers to the contrary  notwithstanding.  If evidence were wanted that tlie  trackmen have the best of the light it  Is shown by the irregulai Ity with  which the Imperial limited arrived  here during the 'past week. There  ���were no through trains Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, and no mail. If  one were to believe the excuses made  that this woq" caused entirely on account of washouts he would be far  from the facts of the case. The truth  of tiie matter Is under present conditions the passenger trains will not  make full time over tlie mountain,  sections of the load. To do so would  be to unnecessarily endanger the lives  of the ciew ���ind passengers.  In Thursday evening's edition of the  World an " Interview appealed purporting to come from an engineer, ln  which .he is quoted" as saying most  emphatically that there was no truth  In the rumor that the B. ot L. E.  ���would go out on Saturday. This Is  correct.** But tin?* Interview does not  convey all the meaning of the attitude of the engineers and. other employees on the road. What tlie tradk-  men deshe lis that,the engineers, tire-  men and trainmen simply perform  iheir ordinary work. This It can be  depended on they will do. When the  road Ibecomes dangerous to travel over  then will the other employees be heard  from. With the alternating days of  rain and hot sunshine the load  through the mountains .will -become  very dangerous, and It would be a  foolhardy employee or passenger who  would risk his life because or the obstinacy of a railroad dn refusing to  pay Its employees a living wage.  nnd when' they refused to work, one  drew a revolver and (frightened the  men -Into cutting the tree off the truck  and when the foreman came forward  and told the men to Btop, he (the policeman) turned and threatened him  also, but being a good, determined man  did not mind him! but told him that  he would see to him. The foreman  informed the lodge, and they had him  dismissed, iby going to the gold commissioner.  Iowould like to say that the provincial police were not neeesasry at all.  Haid we been   lawless   citizens, then  there would have been an excuse for  it.    We have seen    clearly how that  very government that claims to be the  people's friend, has proved to be their  enemy, and Is doing nil in its power  to help the corporation out, and    to  crush the wonklnginan.     But, sir.  Its  day of reckoning is not very far distant,  when .we,    the    taxpayers, will  cause it  to  reflect upon its past  re-  coid by sweeping It from power.    To  think that a government'  who weie  eleated iby the people should' so lower  itself.    This will not be forgotten by  the working men for a long time,, to  come, When It comes to see!k the suffrages of the peoplejts day Is doomed.  It is the most discreditable thing ever  perpetrated   by any   government,  we  believe, on the   continent.    We,    the  strikers, have our own committees out  protecting the  pioperty of  the company, for no other   purpose   than to  ikeep men who would, perhaps, like to  get a dispute  with some*of the men  that the company might bring in, but  Providence has blessed us so far, that  all new comeis haive gone out" along  with our men and are likely to stay  out till the strike 1s-over.  I must say eveiy thing'Is .going on  nicely on our division, and so far east  as Winnipeg.  Hoping that all 'things may turn out  for the best.  Signed by order of committee, Division B. R. T. of A;  Revelstoke, June 21, 1301.   '  traoks. The next thing thnt will happen will be that the government will  undertake to supply trackmen, etc.  The trackmen are oil out on the St.  Ouen's section.   The company has sent  two streot car men out to watch the  load and this incensed  the 'neighborhood.   The two men In question could  not get anything to eat ut St. Ouen's  as all the people adjoining the track  sent them off their premises quldkly.  The street car men protested that they  were not scabs but simply detectives.  This is where Mio joke comes In, as  while some of the men engaged them  in conversation others stole their satchels and blankets, and they had  lo  ���patrol the track last night, as no one  would  let   them   in   their houses.   To  add  Insult  to injuiy  tihey were  told  that tJhey.sihould 'have brought another  ���policeman   with   them   to  help   them  look after their own    property llrst,  then the C. P. R.'s.  GfllKESE IMillIOHATlOA.  During-thi~past week theloc_-I~com-"  , mlttee have ^received despatches fiom  the main points along the line, all of  which report the men standing _lrm.  This Is hardly in line with the repott?  published by the oillclals of the load.  The former may be relied on though  as being the most reliable.  The following letter will give somewhat of an Idea whether the men ure  faltering and also what they think of  that moribund affair nt Vlotoria called a government:  To tho Editor of Thk Imi.tk.vuks'T.  Sir,���-Will you kindly Insert Jn your  columns the following:  Having seen reports In some of tho  'papers which   are   published In your  city about tho strike on the C. P. It.,  lt was resolved at our last meeting to  write something In reply.  Now, it has been falsely represented  by those papers, especially In reference to Revelstoke, where they said  that the strikers were doing all sorts  of destruction, whlcli is a falsehood.  We tare all law-abiding, citizens. The  only law breaikers thus far has been  the government special police, who  have been ordering out the strikers to  clear some trees off the right of way,  As vve stated before the press of the  iprovince have been very unfair toward the men. But there.are,a,few  honorable exceptions. The following  from the Inland Sentinel breathes a  spirit of independence of the "gigantic  octupus' that Is .rare indeed In this  piovince:  "The ti-ackmens' strike still continues. All reports that the men at different points are returning to vvorik  may be discredited. Whatever action  is taken will ibe general from end to  end of the system. The men aie fighting for a living wage. They know they  have as good a right to demand fair  remuneration for their labor as the  company have to fix the price at  which, they will transport passengers  and freight. Moreover, they know-  that the Canadian people as a whole  sympathize with-them in their efforts  to secure a decent Wage, and they  are further encouraged by the fact  that organized labor from end to end  of the Dominion will rally to their  support if necessary. It is to be regretted that the press of this province  generally can find space for biased  despatches emanating from the company's press bureau. Theie aie two  sides to aveiy case, and even If the  papei s prefer to support the company's  side, they should be independent  enough to represent the situation as  It .really exists. The publication of  misleading reportis may temporarily  deceive the public, hut no good purpose  will be served; ln faot, the contrary  iK-theVise, "as ifohljTserves'to einblt"  ter the participants in tlie strike. The  men are demanding a fair wage. That  i.s their right, and there can be no justification for the publication of the  manufactured stories being sent out  from 'Montreal nnd Toronto to the effect that a majority of the men have  i etui ned to work, and that everything  Is running along smoothly. The men  arc all out, to remain out, and unless  reasonable concessions bo made In  short order, the probabilities are that  the whole system will be Uedup. There  Is no good to be gained 1n Ignoring  tlio facts. This Is a fight for a living  wage and tlie right to organize, and it  affects every man in the employ of  tlio railroad company directly, und indirectly overy member of a. labor organization In tlie Dominion. Tlie true  friends of tlie Canadian Pacific Railway Company are those who insist  upon the immediate settlement of the  strike by the payment or a fair wage  to the trackmen, and the full recognition of the Brotherhood of Railroad  Trnolimen."  Considerable Indignation has ' been  caused by tho action ot our freak pi o-  vlnclal government in* sending out spe-  To the Editor of The I.ndki'endkxt:  Sir,���During t'he last itcn days of the  strike on the C. P. R. the company  haive been telling the public daily  through the press that everything was  working smooth and that they had all  the men they required to keep the  road up to Its proper standard. I see  by the papers that the company has  cancelled the excursion of the B. C.  E. R. company employees to Sumas.  Now, if they cannot make a trip like  that there must be a screw loose somewhere and things are not as represented. When we see .the laws of our  country openly violated day after day  and aliens brought In through misrepresentation and fraud, and the mem:  Lers vve elect to protect and look after  our Interest stand bacik and do nothing, vve must say, "Great is theC.  P. R.'" Ever since its' inception lt has  been one continued grab game with  them, and it seems to make no difference which party Is in power. All  what is more, they cannot get new ones  but when vve ask for our just rights  we are not listened to and are called  a lot ot fools and know nothings.  With all the help of their inspired  press and other souices they have not  got .pjie jjf_thfir, old_hands; batik,, and,  wat Is moi e, they cannot get new ones  without using brute foiee. The following letter explains Itself.  , Vancouver,   June 27,   1901.  Sir,���I*vvas hired In Portland, Oregon to work for the C. P. R. by G. C.  Clark, at the .rate of $2 a day and expenses. After working nine days and  seeing the conditions I quit. I was  offered then a further inducement of  U and expenses.     J. E. SAMPSON.  In our last article commenting on  tlie testimohy 'talten 'before tlie Royal  commission on Mongolian Immigration  recently, we concluded with the deposition of the Rev. Canon Beanlands,  of Victoila. We do not wish our read-  eis to understand that the reverend  gentleman 'voices tlie sen'tlments of Che  cleigy of. that city, but''lather that  his viewsjare exceptional to .that held  by 99 per cent, of those of his profession, not alone of Victoila, but of the  wihole province. Rev. Mr. McBeth, of  Vancouver, Picsbyteiian minister,  sworn stated: "I am opposed to Mongolian Immigration beoaute It Is compelling our people to abandon their  native land, and Is bringing about conditions in the lalbor market, under  which it Is neither possible nor desirable that our people should be compelled to compete."  Rev. Mr. Grant, A'aneouver, sworn,,  stated: '"The effects of exclusion in  the States have benefited both whites  and OWinese. I believe the same results would follow similar "legislation  here. House servants, we are told, are  scarce. There are 600,0ft9 more, women  In England than men. If a little of  the money at .present expended by- the  immigration department was devoted  to bringing ithese women .here, the domestic servant question would soon be  iettled. Portland, 20 years ago, had  a population of 20,000 people, with 6,000  Chinese. To-day she has a. .population  ot 100,000 people, with but 5,000 Chinese  and the people seem to be well satisfied."  Veiy prominent space was given in  the dally 'papers to a report of the  arrest of strikers for "alleged" intimidation, which read: "J. Clark and J.  E. Gordon, two of the Canadian Pacific sulking section foremen at Winnipeg, have been arrested and convict-  'ed for throwing stones at and intimidating imen who were working on the  track. J. E. Gordon is chairman of the  local committee of striking? trackmen."  But here is a despatch kept in the  daiik:  Kamloops, .B. C, June 37.-���Detectiv e  Jones, of the C. P. R��� and six special  consfcaibles, havo been arrested at  Basque station for intimidating Italians by covering them with fire-arms  and forcing them to work.  IN A GOOD CAUSE.  The following communlncation has  been sent to Ralph Smith,' M. P., Nanalmo; .George Bartley, /Vancouvei;  3ohnJ. Apploton,;'���-Winnipeg;- -Henry  Obenneyer, Hamilton; W. J. Reld,  Brantfoid; William Henderson, Toronto; Urbain Lafont.ilne, Montreal; J.  S. Fitzpatrlck, Montieul: John C.  Scott, Quebec; David McManus. Monc-  ton, and W. H. Coates, St. John, N. It..  "Dear Sir,���You were appointed on  a special committee, by resolution, at  tho lust annual session of the Con-  gioss, for the purpose of soliciting subscriptions with a view of presenting  Mr. Geo. W. Dower, ex-secretary, with  a suitable testimonial, May I usic you  to be good enough to forwaid to me all  ���Mibscrlptlnns received on or before  Saturday, August Hist nett.  It is tlie Intention to make  the presentation to, the ex-secretary at tlle convention In  Brantford in September next, und It Is  deshable thn.t each one of us should  exert ourselves to tho utmost in order  that it may be of a substantial nature.  Yours fraternally, it  "F. M. DRAPER, Treasurer."  ilal constables to guard the, company's | one welcome.  " ��  NEW SCHOOL OPEN.  The new schools will be open to the  public on Monday, July 1st.   The Seymour from S a. m.  to 12 m., and tlie  Lord Roberts fiom 1 to 4 p. m.   Every-  These   statements   voice   the   sentiments of 95 per cent, of the clergy of  British Columbia, who are in a position  to 'know what  they are talking  about, and our clencal friends in the  east would do well to pause and reflfct  upon this fact before condemning us  as ranting agitators���the people, who  agitate   exclusion.   The, general   consensus of testimony taken would indicate that fully 90 per cent, of the domestics in  our cities  and  towns are  Mongols.   Nearly  the same conditions  apply" to"maiiy~ot'"the (Ufteient trades'  and callings, such  as  laundry  wonk,  factory vorlc and,  to a lesser extent,  dress-malcing, tailoring and other like  callings.   In this-way the different avenues through which our gnls fonn-  eiiy found employment are being closed, and, iln accordance with the economic condition outlined by the Rev.  Canon Beanlands they are being elevated to a ihigher, sphere of life; are,  in fact, being fitted for the cultured  companionship of their fatheis, brothers and  sisters,  who  are  rapidly(becoming gentlemen of leisure���known as  tramps.   What a simple and practical  solution ot this much vexed question.  Jtfi.   Fletcher,   B. C.   royal   marine,  sworn, stated:   "I earn my living by  savving wood on the streets.   I served  22'years in her majesty's service as a  royal marine.   I received an honorable  discharge at Esquimau 15 years ago,  and obtained employment  In a bank,  lut broke my leg and could not got  around fn_>t enough  to   hold  my job,  and was compelled to quit it.   I then  secured work   piling    lumber  at  the  Hastings saw mill for 90 cents a day.  The Japs  were getting from 50 cents  to $1.10.   I  could  not  got ahead  any.  Consequently   quit     and     have   since  been,engaged in sawing wood on the  streets,   but  the   Chinese  are   outtlng  the prices,  and I  will have to abandon 'that avocation, as I cannot compete with" them " ""  .i i                          i  Our country's^defenders should profit  by this lesson. Here-vve havo a man  who has deioted 22 years of Oils best  manhood in the services of his country, who now in his old age is being  driven fiom this humble occupation  by competition with a Chinaman.  What an inspiration Is this to develop  patriotism in the minds of the backbone of this nation���the working mnn.  Lead on, gallant Kitchener, and wc  will follow thee or die.  John Jordan, manager Royal City  mills, New Westminster, awoin, stated: "Our market fot lumber and  shingles Is largely in Ontario, Quebec  and Manitoba. The employment of  Chinese ihas enabled us to reach that  market. If we were pnrt of the States  our propel ty would be worth 00 per  cent, more than It Is to-day." Here  we have a new phase of the  situation. If the employment of a few-  Chinese enables those people to reach  the eastern market the employment,  after thoy become expert, of all Chinese will make times kind of interesting for the eastern mill men. Again,  the. government should take Into serious consideration the advisability of  opening -negotiations with Uncle Sain,  looking to the removal of the boundary line to the north of Burrard Inlet for the benefit of the British Columbia *avv milling and canning industries, for these are the people who  propose to elevate the white laborer  by the Importation of Mongols. Today Mongolians aie pushing Canadian  labor over the American line, and filling this kind with an alien race who.e  system of existence is such as will  enable the employer later on to poakv-t  the difference between the $1.75 or $2  a day now paid w hltes and the 5 to  10 cents a dny which the Chinese have  teen .loeu.tomed to at home. This  feet beautifully lllustiates the noble  spirit of self-sacrifice, prompting our  employers In tneir endeavor to elevate  the white laborer to a .higher .sphere.  Mr.  Manpole, superintendent Pacific  division, C. P. R., sworn, stated:   "We  give constant employment to about 90  Chinese and 70 Japs.   That number is  increased  at certain seasqns  by .100,  when vve are doing surfacing work or  shovelling snow or slides off the track.  We could    not   operate   our division  without .Mongols.   Of  course  I  would  not say  that  the  C.  P.  R.  would  be  compelled to go out of business if we  employed whites."   Here is a concern  built   by   the  Canadian   people,    and  handed over to this company, who, ln  addition  to  receiving  bonuses  nearly  equivalent   to   $100,(00,000,   and   to-day  aire   drawing  a  large   bonus    on   the  steamship  line,  depending    upon   the  Canadian people   for patronage,   who  are displacing the people from  whom  they received these favors by an alien  lace, to whom they owe nothing.   The  base ingiatltude here displayed could  have its oiigln only in a soulless corporation.   But   the   exouse  is  oifeiod  that Manager Hill, of the Great North-  em,   employs  2,500   Mongols,   and   the  Northern Pacific 4,000,  and  is advertising for  5.0<_0 more.* Each   of  these  companies appear to be watching the  other and are gradually substituting  Mongol for white labor.  Mr. Little, Union mines, Wellington,  V. I., sworn, stated: "We employ fiom  900 to 1000 men, about S00 Mongols and  from 150 to 200 whites. We have lun  .some of .our mines entirely .by Chinese.  We cannot compete in foreign markets  without Mongol labor. We export 15  per cent, of the total output to foreign markets, and 53 per cent, is consumed at home."  Mr. Robins, manager of tlie Nanalmo coal mines, sworn, said. "We employ S40 whites and CO Chinese, all  above ground. We expoit SO per cent.'  of product to foreign maikets, and but  20 per cent. Is consumed at home."  Now the situation '.is like this: Mr.  Little exports 53 pet cent, of the total product and employs in the neighborhood of SO ,per cent. Mongolian labor, whilst,Mr. Robins expoits to foreign countries SO per cent, of total pre-,  duct, and employs about 15 per cent.  Mongol labor, and still Mr. Little says  that 'he must have Mongols to enable  him to successfully compete .in foreign  markets. Now who speaks the truth?  Mr/ Gill, brickyard foreman, Vancouver, sworn, stated: "Three years  ago our firm let a contract to do a  ceitaln amount of work to a Chinese  contractor, he to furnish men and  complete the work within a given  time. He opened a store.' furnished  his men with provisions, fitted up a  gambling den, Imported a Chinese  1-restitute, lost .$.00 on the contract  and came out $100 ahead of the game."  Here we have a pointer in the contract line Canadians might well profit  by This���ls_ the  game. the..Canadian  laborer is up against.  Mr. J. H. Watson, boiler maker,  sworn, stated: "The C. P. R. steamers  make Hong 'Kong their home port, because they get work done there more  cheaply than here. If this work was  done In Vancouver it would give  steady employment to 100 men, which,  IL/in addition were Chinese on the  steamers replaced by whites, would  mean an expenditure 1n Vancouver of  $12,000 a month or $141,000 per annum."  This corporation, receiving, as It does,  a large annual subsidy from .the government refuses to make Vancouver  a 'home port, or give einploynieiit to  the people from whose pockets the  subsidy i.s drawn. Would It not be  advisable to call the attention of our  law mnkers to 'this- fact?  iMr. Bell-Ir.ving, canner, sworn stated: "A class of cheap labor, coolie or  otherwise, Is essentially nece��sary to  develop the resources of this country,  and I believe .such a system, if continued, will not alone benefit the employer, but will in addition push the  white laborer up to a 'higher sphere  in the Industrial system, enabling him  to become a mechanic or a bos* "   But  THE BY-LAWS.,  On the Sth of next month, 1. e., this  day week, the ratepayers of this city  are called upon to give their instructions to the city council regarding sev-  cial important matters.   Some of the  by-laws deal with moral questions and  others  with efficient  protection  from  ifue  and  the  proper   houjing of   the  firemen, and the health and seem ity of  offendeis against the law.' These bylaws, I do not propose to discuss, although 'they are exceedingly important.   The other matters deal with the,  question  of  municipal ownership and  are  worthy of more  than a  passing  notice.   You are asked ito consent  to  the extension of the water ironies system and this should certainly be approved of, Ithe more especially so as  the by-law authorizing the sale of the  property  now occupied by  the water  works' blacksmith  shop, on  Hastings   ���  street, will permit of an extension of  the work and the employment of additional  men.  Possibly Ithe most Important toy-law  before the people Is that for 'The purchase or the stone quarry. Although  the money Is asked for to purchase  this quarry. It is well known that the  city'will be able to repay the whole .-,  cost and interest In less than eight  years and will then obtain all the  necessary metal for t'he streets for  Just what lt will cost to work the  quarry.  Voters will nowJhaive an opportunity of voting once more for "municipal ownership" or, in other words,  giving such instructions as will bring,  about the purchase of .the quarries for  themselves.   ,  Instead of one Individual being benefitted, as it now is, the profits will  belong to every taxpayer in the city.  I do not mean that the city council  will actually declare dividends In the  ordinary acceptance of the term, but  just the same the city will have the  profit formerly made by the present  owner. This profit will be made by a*  reduction in the cost of the material  used and it is an universally admitted  axiom that money saved Is money -  gained."    -'-���--        ,       t       ^  I hope tiie time will soon come when -  our railways will be owned by the  people, when our street railways will  be oursvto be ran for and by the people, and I earnestly request every  right-thinking man, whether he has a  vote or not, to use his Influence .to secure ithese quarries.  Winnipeg has good  cause for congratulation   over   her    eleotiic     light  .plant, owned by the city.   Manchester  (Eng.) irejoices and commemorates the  day when she took over her tiainway  system.   Australia will never cease to  be  proud  of her  possessions   in   the  vailous railways, street raiKvays, electric telegraph, etc.���all owned by and,  worked for the advantage and benefit  of the people and not   for   absentee  shareholders.   Voters do your duty on  the Sth of July.   Insist on your friends  . ,���  voting and 'then you will   be able  to   '   *  look ibadk a few years hence and say:  ' ���.  "I worked as a man to secure to the  city the quarries you ,n6tw so much' admire." SOUTHERN CROSS.  FISHERMEN MEET.  There was a large turn-out at Wednesday night's mass meeting, when  short speeches were made by a number  of ifishermen and tlieir friends, after  which a 'resolution was proposed by  Capt. Andeison. seconded by Mr. Zet-  teunan, to the effect that in the opinion o't-"the meeting! tlitTTflsliefmeii^  should not go on the river until a  settlement has been effected between  the union and the canners' association.   Carried  unanimously.  The chairman wns II. E. Dusenbury,  wlio must be congratulated upon his  veiy orderly gathering. The speakeis  were: Capt. Anderson, S. H. Brown;  W. Cartwright, F. Rogers, Robt. Macpherson, ex-M. P. P., T. S. Baxter,  president of the Liberal association,'  Capt. McCarthy, Chief Jimmy Harry,  Mr. Poitor, Geo. Bruce and A. Zotter-  man. The white and Indian llsherinen  will stand firm for 12 1-2 cents,  If you want n really good rye whisky  at a low price, our 50c rye is it. Gold  Seal Liquor Company, 740 Ponder i-trcet.  (Continued on Pago Three. 1  W. Workman, an old Vancouver typo, is over from Nanaimo to spend  the holidays. ,Belng a native son,  "Billy" holds that the idiosyncrasies  ot a rotten civilization should be set  aside on the Ist ot July in commemoration of the birth of our world-famous Dominion, and that the newspapers should rive tlio public a rest.  He thinks that the subscribers could  even spare the prosy News-Advertiser  on this great occasion.       *   ,  ���"������'' '������ i\ f ._v.t-Vv" M^. '..������( ������ * i t  ���*'**V. V     ,.v'  *,'ii*i TIIK INDEPENDENT.  SATURDAY JUNE 29, 19(111  THE INDEPENDENT.  3EO. BARTLEY   Editor  HARRY COWAN Business Manager  PUBLISHED   WEEKLY   IN   THE   INTEREST   OF   ORGANISED  LABOR  BY  THE INDEPENDENT PRINTING COMPANY.  AT   S12    HOMER   STREET,   VANCOUVER,   B.  C.  SUBSCRIPTIONS  IN  ADVANCE.  A week, 5 cents; month, 15 cents; three  months, 33 cents; six months, 63 cents;  one year, $1.25.  EXDOHSICD BY TIIE TRADES AND  l.AHOli COCNCIL. THE VANCOUVER LABOR PARTY AND Till:  BUILDING   TRADES COUNCIL.  SATURDAY.  ..JUNE 23,'liKH  The- street railway men's picnic to  Sumas on July 'Mil has lien declared  off, owing lo the .Inability :bf the C. P  It. to-provide an excursion ���train.  Recent.', statistics collected by the  bureau of. labor show that 15.337 out of  17,-127 wiinklngmen. in twenty-two cities  were round) to be unmarried. These  figures suggest a. startling condition or  affair*, and Indiana that there i.s  something radically wronK with the  environments of tlie workers.  Two dollars for: every offence is  what it costs such members of .Minneapolis Typographical Union. No. -12,  'ns.purchase non-union tobacco, cigars  or cigarettes. This regulation was  adopted by the union at its last meeting.. Legislation 'of. tills.-character:' is  a sure way of booming' tlie'litbel.  A press report says Lhat the evangelical , .-lunches of Toledo are in a  "tombino," the object ol" which is to  concentrate forces, economize effort,  nnd present a solid trout against municipal, public and private evils. These  churches have the right idea���"In  union there is strength."  Typographical Union, No. 0. of New-  York, have appointed a sub-committee  to raise subscriptions to erect a monument to the late Rev. Dr. Edward  McGlynn. The memorial contemplated will cost from $7,000 to $10,000. All  printers and others are asked to con-  'tribute.  When one man, fifty years old, who  has worked all his life, is compelled to  beg for a little money to bury his  baby, and another man, fifty years  old, who never did anything useful,  can give $10,000,OCi_ to enable his  daughter to live in luxury and bolster  up a decaying foreign aristocracy, do  you see nothing amiss?���Union Guide.  nail of the story of reported failure  in New Zealand. Were British Columbia to-day like New Zealand, "a land  where there" are no strikes," vve would  not lack capital to develop the mining  industry.  Arbitration will settle the trouble  over wages that threatened to lead to  a strike of 2.100 Iron molders In Chicago. It was decided at a conference  between the moulders and the fouii-  diynien to submit the question to the  National Joint 'Arbitration Board of  the two bodies. This board met  in Chicago, June 21. The union contends for a minimum scale of $3 a day,  the present scale being $2.75.  Somo months ago a New York judge  Slued a striker for making faces at a  scab wlio took .his pla.ee. Now the  New York jurist lias been eclipsed by  one over in New Jersey, .who has enjoined some girl strikers from lnivkliig  faces at the women who are filling  'their situations.'.-The .way of the  workers'is-a hard one when they are  .compelled, by law to regulate . their  countenances.���Typographical  Journal.  According to the United States de-  ���pnitment of labor, it costs the railroads less than one-fifth of a. cent a  mile to haul' their passengers. The  ���people are paying from 2 to "> cents for  the privilege'' ot* riding. Notice the  benefit. Do. you think It Would be a  good Investment foi' the public" to.own  and control the railroads? The profit  Is about, the same in Llie operation of  other .nubile franchises, like the telephone and telegraph, yet the people  seem content, to allow individauls and  corporations'to control .tliem.  The Newest Assortment in  Wash Dress Fabrics  are'here in great array. And it is a  grand sight, for gathered here are the  best and most stylish products of the  looms of England, Scotland, France  and Switzerland. To these are added  the wash goods beauty of our own  land and the United1 States.  . Our long experienced taste has been  exercised In selecting the great stock  that Is here for your inspection. The  demands of fashion have been carefullymet, and our showing is well worthy  of your -attention.  Quality, of course, is the most important point, and it has received our  careful consideration. But beauty of  design and attractiveness of pattern  have also been carefully attended to,  and, as regards the matter of price,  you'll find they are priced as vve price  all our merchandise, with an eye to  your satisfaction. ' .       ,5  Visit our wash goods department  and get..acquainted with the good  things vve are offering.  Tho'arrangements have been.. completed for the annual Dominion Day  celebration,- which takes place on .Monday and Tuesday. AVith queen's  weatliei; the commemoration of confederation will be an event up to the  standard of Vancouver's many fetes.  This yearly festival of fun has bepn  the one sre.it event of the Terminal  City since its inception. Tlie ipro-  grainme for the two days' spoilt contains attractions for Lhose who are Interested .in any kind of sport or  amusement, the horse racing being an  exceptional feature. The citizens' committee deserve tlie thanks of the people for its'untiling efforts, and it will  not be their fault if this year's celebration does not surpass ail others.  There is nothing in the New Zealand system which prevents "conciliation" playing a large part in the settlement of labor disputes, and as a  matter of fact it always does. Nothing could better demonstrate the utter uselessness and Impracticability of  our own act than the railway strike  in .progress at the present time.���Rossland World.  When the swell dinners of the  "smart set" have been interrupted a  few times by strikes of senvant girls  the beauties of compulsory arbitration  will become more apparent, unless, of  course, the set aforesaid are wise in  their generation -like the Fraser river  canners and keep a supply of Chinese  . on hand as a sort of lever to regulate  the conduct of the unreasonable  ���whites.���Victoria Times.  The Reformed Presbyterian Church,  during its recent session in Pittsburg,  passed resolution;) denouncing labor  organizations. One elder termed  trades-unions "the mark of the beast."  and another found fault with them  because they "fix wages and hours for  men employed in their trades." Does  the clergy, which has been much exercised because ot' the inability of the  church to reach the masses, expect  support from those whom it censures?  The church that Is first to recognize  the justice of labor's cause, and take  up Its battle, will.be the church ofthe  'People in the years to come. The  clergy may not now admit it, but the  future will fully demonstrate, even to  Its' members, that many of the evils  now .prevailing will cease to curse the  race when conditions permit working-  men to earn a sufficient sum to give  their .families the comforts, rather  than the bare necessities of life.  J 70 Cordova, Cor. Cambie.  cannot obtain a bit a fish ��� through  being -thoroughly organized, they  Would not get 5 cents were they disorganized.  We have had occasion, to point out  the peculiarity of Mr. Dunsmuir's  make up infills dealings with the nien  of South AVellington when he ma.de a  deliberate attempt "to : lower their  wages, saying it was impossible for  him to. find a market for the coal, but  as a large-minded iphilanithropist he  would .permit a certain, number of  them to go to work at the 25 per cent,  reduction. Wc all remember, too, how  the pleasant waters of Nanaimo harbor were raised a couple of inches by  tlio flood of tears shed by Mr. Duns-  muir from tlie hurricane deck of the  steamer Joan in sight of a multitude  of" .people on the occasion of tlie recent  accident at Cumberland. "Tears, Idle  tears." The Premier's heart.���or is it  only his eyes���are more easily affected than his pocket, for it is notorious  that the widows and orphans of the  men who gaive up their lives Jn his  service are -permitted to live off the  charity of the public, unless they force  the unwilling dollars from his grasp  by a tedious process of law*.���Nanaimo  Herald.  Mis  ���;-;��������� : ��� 46 C&RBOVA STREET;..;���%.���  We make a specialty of 'Union-made.Cigars and-:  Tobaccos;-', consequently, we always give good satisfaction.   Your patronage solicited. -���_":    ��� y'-:-    *?   '"���  Union Directory.  VANCOUVER TRADES AND IiABOB  Council, President. Jos. Dixon; vice-  president, John Crow; secretary, J. C.  Marshall, P. O. Box 159; financial secretary, W. J. Beer; treasurer, J. Pearey;  statistician, G. White; sergeant-at-arms,  C. J. Salter. Parliamentary committee-  Chairman, John Pearey; secretary, J.  Morton. Meeting���First and third Friday  In each month, at 7.30 p. m., In Union  Hall, cor. Dunsmulr and Homer street!.  O UK3, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES'  Union, Local No. 28. President. Chns.  Over; vice-president, W. W. Nelson; recording secretary, Jas. II. Perkins; financial secretary, R. J. Loundcs; treasurer, Wm. Ellender. Meeting every Friday  at S.20 p. m. In Union Hall, corner Homer  and Dunsmulr strcots.  VANCOU'R TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION,  No 226 meet' the last Sunday ln caon  month at Union hall. President, C. 8.  Campbell; vice-president, Ueoi'Rc Wilby;  secretary, S. J. Gothard. P. O. box 63;  treasurer, XV. Brand; seigeant-at-arras,  Andrew Stuart; executive committee, B.  Iv W."!1.1"1- ���*>��� "��� I'ubb, J. II. Ui-ovvuc,  N. \\ lllhuns; delegates to Trailed and  Labor council, J. c. Marshall, Robt. Todd,  J.   II.   Ilrowue."  iiuir ifinut  Union Hats, Union Made Overalls, jumpers arid Suspendes,  also a flrst class Tailoring Department," where ''only Uuion  Labor is employed, -yi ,;"v-:"':   '.,*'. ������'������������.  We guarantee a perfect fit oi' no sale.. ��� ���''-���[-"---[[i '���������''  TELEPHONE.. 702/?'  1C0 CORDOVA STREET.  The best Lunch Counter in town.  '  Short Orders the Rule of the House  .Ml Urn latest delicacies of the season.  Picnic, Fishing, Sliootini; ami Boating  Lunches put up on shortest notice.  All kinds of Shell Fish on hand.  620 Hastings Street West  fi_9rGivo us it call.  Our  Ice Cream  The .Denver Times says that a  gigantic scheme is .pending to .trans-  -ier-the-railroads -of the_Uiiited "Stuites  ito the government. A western financier declared that within a few years  the Rockefeller, Harrlman, Vanderbiit,  Gould and Morgan Interests would  turn over to the government every  line of railroad in the country for  which -the government will pay ten  billion dollars. Strong banks are to  finance the deal.  Tho query is now whether those  who are so much interested In having  t'he corner stone of the proposed new  hospital laid during the ���visit of the  "Dook," would display the same interest If his Royal Highness were not  in sight? Who ever heard of a "citizens' " representative meeting being  held eit 11 a. m. In the Mayor's private office. The average mortal in  B. C. has got something else to do  about that time of day.  New Zealand Is prosperous and her  gold mines are Increasing their output. In May, 1900, the total output  for the month was 29,093 ozs., valued  at ��301,tS0. The ouitput for May, 1901,  according to a Reuter cable, was 3G,-  437 ozs., .valued at ��143,393. The output Itself and the Increase in one  month of ��31,533 gives an emphaitie de-  Judging by the utterances of Eastern papers on the subjects of strikes,  public opinion Is rapidly approaching  a stage that will justify the application of a drastic remedy for this great  modern evil. The C. P. R. .trouble has  created consternation and dislocation  in all lines of business, yet there is no  disposition to make any concessions  for the saike of restoring harmony.  It lis claimed that the company, because it owes something to the community for the franchise it enjoys and  that -the men for the sake of .their  families,���who are-,ihe-<'h1ef sufferers,"  should be prepared to malice concessions to restore tlie cordial relationship wihlch existed previous to the  outbreak. The problem before legislators is to erect legal maehlnery  which will be effective for .the settlement of such 'troubles. Some day the  problem will be solved.���Victoria  Times.  if other companies in .this province  would take a leaf out of the book of  the B. C. Electric Tramway company  the public would nol be hampered In  its  progress  quite   so   much  as   they  are  at    present.   Tlie    B.  C.  Electric  Tra.mvv"ay  company   Is  one  out  of  a  hundred   that 'tries  to  be  fair In  Its  dealings   both   with  4ts   patrons   and  employees.   Its relations witli .the latter  are. of the  best,  and   in  marked  contrast wltih those of 'the C. P. R., the  canners,   the    Dunsmulr    mines   and  others with their men.   Whenever the  grievance committee of .the street railway men wants to consult with the  management  lt is  listened  to    dn  a  proper manner, but can ithe same be  said of the other institutions referred  to.   It may be added that the B. C. E  T. company has done all in Its power  to have all the vacant land along its  line  between   Vancouver   and    New  Westminster,    especially in Bttrnaby,  settled up by small holders, which consist principally of -working men.   The  rates are not excessive considering the  limited .resources from which the company draws Its revenue.   Just as fast  us  this land becomes  occupied,  Just  so soon will the travelling and freight  rates be lowered.   Manager Buntzen,  thoiigh~some_t1mes_vve" disagree- with  him  In tram  matters,  has  the  confidence of his workmen, who swear by  him, which fact cavers a multitude of  sins of big corporations.  is made i*iom the purest, Mvcetcst in-  gredicutH thut were ever put in Ice Cream.  lt ib delectable. '"*  Ics Croiim, perqt., in ciirilbonrd boxes. ...? .10  Ice Creiiin, per qt., packed uml delivered.. - .,"> 0  lee Creum, pcrgul., pncke.1 uud delivered. l.UO  lee Cream, per 5-gullou lots, piicked und  delivered, uitllcin  1.50  Think of this when >ou ure uomlcrliiK whnt  you will huve for u ehiingc of desert.  Baker and  Confectioner, IP*  ���113 Hustings Street. Telephone 307.  BRANCHES: Bench House, No. 1 Arcade.  Hotels.  . , MAKES A 8PKCI.M.TY OF . .  o   > Dewar's special Liqueur, oiso - ���  o    usher's Block Label Liqueur wmsky  -LARGE STOCK OF-  IMPORTK1) AND DOMESTIC  . Cigars.  R. B. Mulligan & Co., Props.  Cobnkr Coiidova and Carrall.  ROYAL   HOTEL  Near to All Steamboat Wharves und  Railway Depots.  130 WATER ST.    -      -     VANCOUVER, B.  C  Everything new and up-to-date. Electric  Light throughout. Rates, .1 to fi a day.  special rates for the week or month.  HOPRIRK, SPBNCB It CO.  .The fishermen .must be congratulated upon their very orderly and gentlemanly conducted mass meeting on  Wednesday night. One Important  thing to be considered Is the canners'  circular, which exacts an agreement  with individual fishermen. This Is  contrary to the principles of unionism which must at all cost be maintained. A workingman to-day without  Ills union is little better than an abject slave. We are pleased to know  that both white and Indian (fishermen  intend to stand together in this contest for their rights. A speaker pointed out that the canners were able to  go to Point Roberts on tho American  side and buy salmon for 13 cents, and  (pay 1-2 cent a pound duty, yo.t refused to pay fishermen on this side IE 1-2  cents. The fishtermen are certainly up  against a hard proposition, and If they  The Mint.  Is located at tlie corner of Carrall and  Hastings streets. The bottled goods are  all first-class and the prices right for  every one.   Seattle Rainier beer, 5 cents  EGGS f OR SALE  for Setting, $1.50 for 13  BLACK LANGSNANS  Stock took First Prize at 1900 Poultry  Show at Vancouver.  BL?gk__?bno^ot   W. D. Jones  Arlington  Hotel  Cordova St. West.  Headquarters for the engineering trada  in Vancouver.  CHOICEST^-*-^=--  Liquors and Cigars  First-class rooms from 50 centB up.  ROBT. HUNTLY,   -   -   PROP  STUEET RAILWAY MEN'S UNION���  Meets second and fourth Wednesday of  each monih, in Sutherland Hall, corner  Westminster avenue and Hastings street  at S \i. in. President, G. Dickie; vice-president, C. Bennett; secretary, A. G.  Perry; treasurer, H. Vondorwiilkcr; conductor, G. Lenfesty; warden, J. Marshall;  sentinel, F. O. O'Brien; delegalea to  Trades and Labor Council: John Pearey,  Jas. Burton, Goo. Lenfesty, G. DieMe and  J.  Howes.  UNITED UKOTlIEItHOOD OP CAR-  PKNTEKS and Joiners���Meets every second and fourth Thursday In Union Hall,  room No. 3 President, Wm. P. McKen-  zie, 1ST Ninth avenue; vice-president,  I-It'irh Wilson: recording seei'ciai'v, A. E.  Collin. TM Nelson street;, ilnancial secretary, II. S. Falconer; tri-iu-urer, George  Walker; conductor, Jas. Forju'-'on; warden, Jos. Dixon; delegates io T. and L.  council, Jos. Dixon, Robt. Macpherson,  II. Wilson.  THU RETAIL CLERKS' INTERNATIONAL PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION  incuts In O'Kilen's Hall, the first and  Third Tuesdays ot each month. T. A.  Phillip, president; Is*. J. Orr, secretary.  2,0__*   Westminster  Avenue.  TEXAuA MINKRS' UNION, No. 113, XV.  F. OI., meets every Saturday at 7.30 P.m.  In Foresters' hall, Van Anda. President,  R. Aitken; vice-president, C. A. Melville;  secretaiy, A. Rapor, Van Anda, B. C;  treasurer, H. V. Price; conductor, P.  Burt;  warden, John Linklatcr.  INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF  MACHINISTS���Beaver Lodge, No. 1S2���  Meets second and fourth Wednesday in  each month in Union I lull. President,  Win. Hocr: corresponding secretary, E.  Ttrr.mlns, 726 Hamilton street; financial  secretary, J. II. MoVoty, 1311 Seymour  street.  JOUR'ENYMRN TAILORS' UNION OF  AMERICA, No. 17S-Mcet_5 alternate  Mondays in room 1, Union Hall. President, F. Williams; vlesj-presldent, Miss  Graham; recording secretary, H. O. Bur-  rltt: financial secretary, Tremalne Best;  treasurer, C. E. Neilson; sergcant-at-  arms, J.  Duoust.  THE VANCOUVER DABOR PARTT  meets every second and fourth Wednesday in each month ln Union Hall. President, Geo. Bartley; first vice-president,  Geo. Wilby; second vice-president, T. H.  Cross; recording secretary, L D. Taylor;  financial secretary, John Poarcy; statistician, II. Williamson.  VANCOUVER FISHERMEN'S UNION,  No. 2. Meets in Labor Hall, Homer  street, every first and third Saturday In  each month nt S p. m. Ernest Burn, president; Chas. Durham, secrotary, S-17 Harris street.  The best Cough Cure is " BIG 4"  have you tried it?  THERE IS  MA.  lit A |   r-'BX*' ttcz-mi **"^s��i  of Fire or Injury to  Health when you use  the  The""^/  ���  Having the Only Up-to-Dato Grill Room  in B.C. which in Itself Is a guaranteo  of a First-Class Hotel and Restaurant. ,  Seymour Streeet,  JOURN'Ey.MEN BAKERS' AND 'CONFECTIONERS' INTERNA'L Union of  America, Local, No. 16; Vancouver, B. C.  President, Jas. Webster; vice-president,  R. F. McDonald; recording secretary,  Wm. H. Barnes; corresponding secretary,  F. Ravvllng, mo Granville street, room 10;  financial secretary, C. J. Salter, 413 Powell  street; treasurer, W. Wood; master-at-  arms, F. Moyles; delegates to Trades and  Labor Council, C. J. Salter and F. Bawling.  AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CARPENTERS & JOINERS, Vancouver, Irt  pranch, meets every alternate Tuesday,  In room No. 2, Labor Hall. President, 3.  Davidson; secretary, J. T. Bruce. 628 Harris   street.  ��������� . ^-*i?RS UNION, NO. 357-  Meets the first Tuesday In each month  In Union hall. President, A. Kochel; vlce-  piesldcnt, C. Crowder; seoretary, Q.  Thomas, Jr., 148 Cordova strset west;  treasurer, S. XV. Johnson; sergeant-at-  arms. J. W. Brat; delegates to Tradeo  and Labor Council, J. Crow, F. Jost, A.  Kochel.  BROTHER/HOOD OF PAKNTERS AND  DECORATORS. Local Union No. 138.  Meets every Thursday in Loibor hall. Preceptor, W. Davis; president, W. Pavier;  vice-president, E. CruBh; recording-secretary, C. Plnder, 1750 Eighth avenue. Fair-  view; financial secretary, W. Halllday,  Elesmcro House; treasurer. H. MoSor-  ley: trustees, C. Irwin, K Cross" and W.  Cole.  Convalescents need Eisen Port���"tlie  builder up of tho weak"���50c bottle.  Gold Seal Liquor Co., 740 Pender street.  Blue Ribbon Tea is packed in Vnncouvcr by white men���are you drinking it ?  Now, gentlemen, here is tlio shop to  get your hair cut to suit you: Corner  Cambie and Cordova.   C. Ellis.  ' Telephone 1���2���5 for a fine livery  turn-out. J. J. Sparrow, Palace livery  stables.  A recent cough or cold that << BIG  4 COUGH CURE" will not cure is not  worth curing.  The price is now  such that almost everybody can afford it.  Once used, always  used. Apply at Office of  LTD.  Cor. Carrall and Hastings  Streets.  Hardie & Thompson  Marine and General ���^  Consulting Mcehanieal Engineers  620 C0HD0VA Er. W.,.Vakccoveb, B. C.-Tel. 76-  Patentces and designers of the Hardle-  Thompeon water tube boiler, new high  speed reversing cuginuB, and special  machinery in light sections lor mines,.  Pbopellebs Designed.  Engines Indicated ind  Adjusted.  Solo agent, ln B. C. and N. W. Territories lor  the United Flexible Metallic Tubing Co., Ltd  London, Eng.  ��AVOY   THEATRE  8am Nksbitt. Managor.  NEXT WEEK  Dee Adelphia  Cow Hoy Magician.  Silvia Puerari  High-Class Operatic Singer.  Smith and -Ellis  ���^i..,.?.-*-011^0 COAST SHINGHJBJ  WEAVERS' UNION meets every third  Sunday in each month at 3 p. m. in Union hall, corner Dunsmulr and Homer  streets. J. Stoney, vice-president: B. J.  Neary, secrotary, Cedar Cove, P. O., Vancouver. Visiting .brethren Invited to attend.  The Kraimers.  AND  OUR   MAMMOTH   COMPANY  OF VAUDEVILLE STARS.  For stomach' trouble of any Wnd talce  Flint's Dyspepsia Tablets. They cure  or you get your money badk. D0o box.  McDowell, Atkins, Watson Co. , ,  From Their Nanalmo, houthflold and  l'roteetlon Island Collieries,  Steam, Qas  and  Blouse Coal  OI the Following Grades:  Double Screened ___ucnp,  Run of the Mine,  Washed Nut and  Screening*.  BAMOEL M. ROBINS, Superintendent.  EVANS, COLEMAN & EVANS, Agents,  Vancouver City, B. C.  Wfiy do you cough when "BIG 4  COUGH CURE " will cure you. ���&  SATURDAY:.............JUNE '29, 19*01  THE INDEPENDENT.  fecial Saturday  GREAT HOLIDAY SALE OF  '5 SUITS!  ��  We have taken all the Suits which are marked up to  $12.50 and consolidated them into one lot and give you  your choice of any suit at  No doubt there are many who havo waited for just such an announcement  ' Well, hero it is. Some lines broken in sizes, but what difference does this make to  you? Broken sizes are not detrimental to the value''of the garment and as our assortment is the newest and best ia the city, you cannot help but get your size and  a perfect fit. No matter what- garment you "select, or how low the price you pay  you will carry away the best bargain of your life if you get one of these suits. ��  Special Holiday Price (Saturday)   -   -   S8.98.  &uq&r to be ���save_ri Away���Saturday Qnly  ���AVe want uvery housekeeper in Vancouver to   try  our   ".���pt-t-i.il   Value"  ORANGE SCENTFD CEYLON PEKOE TEA  AT 50C LB., and m an inducement to every juircliit'-er ... one pound of wiim- wc will give free 2 LBS BtbT CUT  LOAP SUOAK. -Thi- Tea i, in no. iuiy tliiinayud or un.sdwililo or dferetl in this way to' cli-.ir, but is out- 01'our Be<i  value... We liiive other "ratles,, f-omo as liigh as a dullfti- a pound, but wo guarantee you cannot m.itdi this unvivlu-rt-  in tin- i-ity at tliu price named, and tliu nbovo oftor _���_ an indiuvmeiit lor you to try tlie best Tim on tliu murkot'u.'oOc lb  The fircnt  Sloros oj'  Ttic- Great  West  Corner*  Granville and  (icorgta Sis.  iiBE^ii^iTii^  (Contiinicd from Piigo-One.)  vlien told these calling-:;' were already  ���lilled.   ha   replied,   "WELL,   HE  CAN*  GO   ELSEWHERE."   Here   we   have  the time specimen ot the modern property fiend,; ii 'parasite on .-the.economic  '  tody, warning' tho patient of the ne-  , cessity of -a little legislation to allow  iliiin and his associates to exploit the  natural   wealth   of   the,    Fraser,   the  ���common  property  of  the  people,  for  ��� 'their own special benefit, returning little or Jio equivalent for so dolHg, and  refusing  to  give employment  to  the  - people to whom this natural wealth  ���belongs.   This ele\nting process seems  ito ue a well-ridden liobby with such  -people. Now,'we have to-day perhaps  .3,000 mechanics and bosses In this province, and aibout 14,000 Jlongol laborers replacing a 'similar number of  ���whites. Three ' thousand whites already glut the market In the (higher  .spheres   of   labor  .and   14,000  are   re-  ��� placed by a similar number of Mongols, still to be accounted for. If they  (have Ibeen absorbed by the; mercantile,  banking or professional world, where  , did ithey get the money to start with?  And what has become of ithe merchants, ibankers and professional men  tvlioni they have replaced?   But per-  ,.taps we should_ not ask too many  .questions. The witness teils us that  if ithe -pushing up process does  not  .work the white worker can go some-  ���where else. -AAThere?.. Over the line, in  order to inalke  room for .. v? plutocrats,  1 Japanese and Chinese, or does he intend to taloe Greeley's advice and go  ���west? If.so, where is he to earn the  passage money?   If he starts aiboat,  .--because/foot travelling is slightly diffi-  ; .cult between here; and Qhlna, ihe does  . not understand navigation, 'and if he  Should? reach  China the boxers  may  .,get after his scalp.   Or does he mean  - that he shall get off the earth and be  ��� transformed Into food for the Fraser  river salmon colony In mid-Paoiflc, in  ..order, that Mr. Bell-Irving may ln-  . crease his profits as a result? Econ-  . omy -would suggest ithe latter route.  ��� But that is a matter of small moment,  '-it Js urged, so long as the country,is  ���(handed over to Bell-Irving and asso-  ���. ciates.���Again���we--are-~told_ithat "this  ��� is not a matter -to which legislation  maybe properly applied.   Interference  .in ,the ipost has been ruinous  to all  ��� parties concerned. These gentlemen  ,, realise-that modern methods of trans-  ��� iportation, and the numerous nrd rapid  ���lines  of. communlcaltioai -touching'.at  the great centres of population  -throughout tlie world, enable them to  set In -their office and press a button  that will lift the Hood gates of poverty  in China, Japan, Italy, or Slnivonla,  that would wltliln a few weeks inundate, nny district on this continent, In  which trouble may 'arise, with tlie Industrial refuse of 'the somH-civlllzed  world. Hence,With the reins in their  own hands they tine -desirous of settling'Mils matter Jn their own way.  Now,- as we understand It, the basic  principle -of civilized government Is  '���'������to prevent tfhe strong if rom ItrampHrig  upon the weiilk. The -physical gilants  of antiquity appropriated to themselves the fruits of,others' lalbor.   The  ��� modern giants of finance are following ln their footsteps.   The one fac-  -ulty is as much a maituiral gift as the  other. If restraint applied to the fornn-  , er Was been conducive of human happiness, we might be pardoned for be-  . lievlng that similar rights would fol  low restriction as applied to ithe latter. If the cold, cruel law of the survival of the itlttest Is to obtain, if It be  not already a function of government,  as a -result of perpetual war between  labor and capital, then let us again  assume ..the'breech clout? and club of  our 'forefathers, for civilization1 under  such conditions i.s but savagery. JIust  chronic strife be permitted to par-  allze industry, to breed discord, riot  and bloodshed, in order th'at'a few industrial vampires may accumulate  wealth? Or shall justice, controlled  by twentieth century intelligence,  dominate the situation?  In order that our readers may more  fully grasp the situation, we will present a few ilgures, taken from tihe  testimony of the managers of ten different concerns in different localities.  Theie are employed:  t   ��'.  o'   __    *C  re     G     w  A'lctoria brickyards 35 85  Chonialnus  saw nillli 60 10S  Wellington coal mines, Cum-  land 300 500 2U0  Hastings mill, Vancouver..-..164 03  Brunette  mills,  Burrard  Inlet -15 ��  llody\iille -mill; Burrard -Inlet 60 40   10  Spicer's  mill,   Burrard  Inlet 20 St    5  MoNaiir's mill and woods  ..159 27   42  Heaps'   mill,   Burrard    Inlet 56 21  27  Royal  City mills 90 11   00  ���Total  of..i 969 868 437  AVhites,  969.  Mongols,  1,306.  Deduct,- on a fair average estimate, 900 skilled workmen from tlie  total number of -whites working as  sawyers, merchants and factory men  nnd the figures will stand: AVhlte laborers, 09, as against 1,306 Mongols.  These figures, with the 'tendency of the  Mongol to encroach upon tiie; higher  callings, gives: about the? situation.  This statement may be easily verified  -by, the testimony inithe ihands of -the  Royal commission. In the canneries  the contract Is still greater. Forty  ���canneries, employing 200, men each, on  an arvenase,.employ 8,000 men, of whloh  an average of ten to each cannery  would be whites, chiefly sJcilled, leav-  iing~7,600" MongolsrT00~iwi__ltesT~There  are 8,000 more employed as iflshermon,  of which nearly one-half .. are Japs.  These-are the conditions prevailing In  British Columbia In-a nut Bhell, with  the tendency rapidly -growing worse.  In order, that we may more clearly  bring home to our eastern friends a  -realization of the actual conditions  here we will Indulge in a few generalities. Out of a population of probably 1.490 Chinese and 4,000 Japs, or 18,000  common laborers, between the ages of  lSaiid 45, -of whom probably 300 .are  married. They come from a country  where wages average from 5 to 8 cents  a day, mnd living costs 11-2 to 4 cents,  where, according -to a high authority,  men and boys may be seen dally in  the streets fighting for a, bit of fertilizing offnl lying dn the road way,  where economy has reached a stage  incomprehensible to the American  mind, and where the actual truth  seems like a wild dream of imagination. These are ithe people that. Major '������ Dupont, Mr. Bell-Irving': and associates propose to use to prevent organized labor ' -from tyrannizing over  capital and ���watih which' it is proposed  to develop our industries. If any of  our readers Imagine that tfhese statements are exaggerated, -we are -pre  pared to verify them by sworn testimony now in the hands of the Royal  commission.  Domestics,  we are toid, are scarce.  Now,  these Mongols ropre&ent a pbp-  ulailon.  of about  70.100,  according  to  our standaid  of  the  class  of people  from whom our.;dome.stlcs are drawn.  Then -in replacing 1S.000 whites by,that  many -llongcls, we have shut off the  Jountaln  head  of  the stieam, and  it  has   ceased    to   flow���just   what   we  should expect.   AVe have their equivalent to a lots  to  this  province of a  population' of; about 50,000. , Is It any  wonder   that    our    neighbors   tb   the  south   are   forging  aihead   whilst   we  are at a standstill?   Is it any -wonder  -the sturdy    Eastern   Canadians    are  drifting   over  the    line?  Why  settle  iheie when the general  testimony   of  employers    and    employees    coincides  that the wage-earning class must abstain from matrimony in order to successfully compete   for a living.   Replace: tihese people -by a similar number  of whites, with all lt implies, and it  would infuse new life into trade such  ns  this  city  and  province  have    not  known for years.   The increased demand  for real  estate  and    buildings  would enhance its value, put carpenters, masons, painters and decorators  to work, which would in turn create a  demand for 'lumber,'shingles, sash and  doors?which would in turn create a demand ifor .labor : in. these.'  industries,  '.which would In itunn': create _v demand  ���for  more  buildings,   real  estate, and  which would make for our merchants  more mouths 'to feed, backs to clothe,  tind buildings to furnish.   This in turn  -would create a demand for more business.houses, which,would create a demand for iron, brick and stone, which  in turn .would put brictanalkers, stone  cutters and qu&rrymen to work, and  -so on indefinitely.. AVe are.industrially  and commercially a race of Caarniver-  ous beings, feeding upon each other.  The Mongol without a family, sending  his money out of  the    country,  deprives the industrial and commercial  stomachs of the necessary ingredients,  nnd as S. result we are suffering from  economic indigestion.   Viewed from a  ���national standpoint,' the conditions do  not improve any.   AVe Wave'Introduced  here between 15,00ft arid 20,000 people  -wiho will  not asslmilatg,_jayli_g_t,he  "foundation  for  future irace -troubles  They are a menace In war time and a  bone  of  contention  during, times  of  peace, draining  .the ; country, of  ils  wealth,  refusing to leave even their  bones: here to fertilize the soli.   Undei  suoh conditions Is it any wonder 'that  our business men (have the blues and  our .workers  are  stampeding  to the  States.  .How: aro our people to settle  up the land If the opportunity of obtaining employment'Is shut oft?  How  are our..-fisheries. to have a supply of  white   labor   it   the . door'' Is closed  against It?  How are wc to expect a  ipoor man ito come here with or without a family if ho must compete under  conditions  that -even   the   employers  concede would mn/ke the raising of a  family an Impossibility?   AA'ihy a Turkish cunuoh, much less a sturdy Eastern  Canadian,   that  would  not  shun  such a country deserves the fate that  .would await him.  MAINLAND STEAMSHIPMEN'S ASSOCIATION.  At the.last regular meeting of this  pioneer seamen's and firemen's union,  on June 23rd, the following officers  wore elected and installed: President,  C. Thomson; first vice-president, Geo.  J. Smith; second vice-president, Henry Hooper; treasurer, Ilermon Tofts;  guide, Sydney Harris; -firemen's patrolman, Ray Spafford; secrotary, George  Noonan; ! master-at-arms, George  Thurlbeck; delegates to Trades and  Labor Council, George Noonan and  George J. Smith. The lodge by unanimous vote decided to remain affiliated with the Dominion Trades and Lalior; Congress. It was, decided to , observe Sunday/July 2Wt, as decoration  day, and contributions of flowers from  the members and fnlcnds may be left  at The ..Independent office. The deceased members who rest in Vancouver, cemetery are as follows: John Anderson, killed on the Robert Kerr, October 2S, 1S93; James Reardon, died  -May 30, 1S91; John Evans, died April  2.'!, 1901.. Besides these deceased brothers the union: has lost, by the hand of  the grim reaper;, ns' follows: George  Harcourt, drowned in mid-ocean from  the American ship, AV. II. Stai'buck, In  December,-, 1S93; Carl Johnson;'- blown  up in the wreck: of the tug Estelle,  .Marc',,-1894, off Cape Mudge; Daniel Ro-  lona, drowned off Japanese _oast, December, ISt-o.  The union disagreed with the action  ot the Women's Council in tiylngget  the city, hospital located away from  its present site, it being the opinion  of the: lodge that, the Cambie street  grounds; should, be kept for recreation  purposes. Also exception was taken  to having the institution kept up by  public subscriptions, that the city  should maintain It out of the public  treasury. The matter was referred to  the Trades and. Labor Council.  Union men smoke the Earl of Minto Cigar.  Why? Because it is Union Made.  Turner, Beefon if* Co.  Wlioletiulo Agenta  VANCOUVBR, VICTORIA, NELSON, B. C.  P. 0. BOX 290.  'PHONE 179.  W. J. MfcMlBLLAN & Co.,  Wholesale Agents for  TUCKET CIGAR CO. UNION LABEL CIGARS i  Brunei**: ,  MONOGRAM, MARGUEKITA, BOUQUET,  OUR SPECIAL, EL ,7USTILI_0,  EL CONDOR, SAKANTIZADOS, SCHILLER,  Corner Aloximder Streot nnd Colmublii Avcimo, Vancouver, S. C.  The Union Label Scores  Another Success.      ^iGqwsl/  Tho " Kinfr Quality " Shoe hes beou *mat&~A*a* QoJd IM4  ���tha highest award at tlie Paris Exposition. Allgoodf Nami^il *{*H  UNIOft'LABEL. Se sure that " King Quality" ii braiukd on /Mir -*_-**���, wta  means por/ootjiitlsfaotioa ^  Made by THE J. D. KING COM.LImltedj TofOOtB.��� -'  MONOPOLISTIC VS. LEGITIMATE:  ''iy-iyyii INDUSTRIES/ '^,^,.?-'-'--''S::'?  ���?G-o to the ants, you clrones; consider  their; ways, ?:and , think have we any-,  right to pile: tip honey: or. ��� money that's  made'by the;tricks of state.,.���: Had the  C. P..R. installed Its industry as ?com-'  panics the world o'er: do, then: legitimate.:: ibhith : ?of syndicate, :.could? be  claimed most rightful!y. - ?But no���mb���  nopolies are not go'li'orn. They have.  no such1'noble, biith,''but ibacked '-with  blinded,If lipta silenced,; press; gagged- 'by dollars,: or: the?same in kind,  The'ii-ails' remain���but; from necessity-^  ���tliepiaythlng'of therlcli;'-.;.and as .toys  In 'spoilt:children's 'ha_ids._are:*sha,tter-'  :e'a.;:?at|;:"tl_el^/';���l^���lll.,.': Sii:/- thfa^JerranaV'.ln-:  i:d'u^iT..''h^'*:'f'iHen!,'.;t6.;iJe.,'shuttlecc^e4  ���by, so-called ?meri. j- "'Tills? empire Is 'not  (formed of them!" Tlie, empire is British all over.; Its people claliu their le-  jgltimaite -rigilitsV'.Tlie-i,?' ?as free-born  rheh, the. right'"to .freedom is. theirs.  ��� T.hey'.cl not be slaves to .monopolists. '?  liTliey'd 'be'iiisulted!If their king?was  begiiiled. Then: let: tis? treat?'his" heir  ���^'.���ii_ltavihis'''nobleV'.Vinth;'rwhen%e.,i.tep_i  on- our ahores. W As'a ?man 'among men  ?he? has.'a. claini' ��� to ?! oiirj .'loyftil'ty. "���'���  ���yiTaike. notice--The;,-.ijiairi-of the .people  ���looka.to them to :be;ihis :escort: and  'guard ;���. while !��� on .. Canada's .shores. -A  ioyal people.:.?,!;";;.;:;..;;!;,;;H'riy--i-iP. ;F.v.:  ?.?i^'-ancoi_ver,?;June-;2ai*l*91.;\:!!? ? ?;  Greenlecs Brothers,  �� LOHNE, KAHE OLD and  ��. &. LiMEUS? WIIBSKBE^-  Are now asked for in Preference  to ani) other brand.  J.   K.   MECREDY,   Sole   Agent,  Telephone   899. Arcade   Vaults.   Cambie   Street  1867  1901  FROM EGYPT.  Geo, Bartley, Editor Independent.  Dear Sir,���I get your paper regularly,  ilt is   very .interesting.   Keep  sending    it.    Enclosed    subscription.  AVlshing you good luck.' Tours truly,  '      C. AV. ANDERSON-NEART.  Alexandria,  Egypt,  June 3,  1901.  FROM   DAAVSON.  Great preparations are ibelng made  here fo rthc Laurier reception. Several dress suits haive been ordered from  the-outside.  The 'Dominion officers and'rthe.A. C.  company are the only people employing; Japanese. The former employ four  and the latter two. There are any  number of: white cooks Were.  * This is 'a great camp. Every: man  travels around with a poke. Gold dust  is the medium of exchange, and wihat  perfidy is herein predicted. The miners  on the -.'various creeks have organized  themselves Into unions, which Is con-  sUdfered a good step. The 'notion of  some~employers,���in- many"dnstances,~  ���has rendered this move necessary in  order to protect their workmen.  AVages haive been steadily decreasing,  and the end Is not in sight yet, $4.50,  $5 and $9 with board are mt present  nullng. Miners are :paid off , dn, gold  dust at* the rate of. $16 an ounce.  AVhen they come to town this dust  Is accepted at $14.50 to $15, a loss of  ^l.'uO an ounce. In case of litigation  evrythlng comes before the claims of  the miner.���Com.  Dominion Day  ^���^Celebration  At Vancouver, Jl,LYand 2  Championship Lacrosse, Baseball, Bicycle  and   Horse Races.   The Navy Men  will also Participate in the Games.  ...MELD Am AQUATIC SPORTS...  H. M.'s Warships will be present.  Citizen's Ball at Hotel Vancouver, July 2  GOD SAVE THE KING.  MAYOR TOWNLEY, Chairman.      S. J. GOTHARD, Sec.  Hunt & Poster, Hastings street,  A. Murray, AVeatmlneter avenue.  Morgan, The Tailor, Granville street.  Dan StewaTt, Oondova street.  CluUb & Stewart, Cordova street.  W. Murphy, Cordova street.  MoR'ae & MoDonald, Hastings afcreet,  east.  J. B. Sheering, Cambie Btreet.  E. I_arsen, Hastfngs Street.  J. Carreili, Cordova street.  Simon & Do., Cordova street.  ���??;:^-*'PACl;P.ic^  anil  PACIFIC  LANE  World'*  Scenic  Route  LOWEST RATES. BEST SERVICE.  To'all points ln Canada snd tho United Statoa,  THE FASTE8T AND BE8T EQUIPPED TRAIN  CROSSING THE CONTINENT.  SAILINC19 FOB JAFAN AND CHINA.  Empress of China. July 8th  Empress of India.......................July 29th  Empress of Japan ..June 17th.  and every four weeks thereafter.  SAILING FOB HONOLULU AND AUSTRALIA.  Monna  ... May 31st,  MIowera.....'.....,.���;....: .......... .Juno 2Stb.  Aorangi July _Sth  and every four weeks thereafter.  For further particulars, as to timo rates etc.,  apply to >  E. J. COYLE,  * JAME8 SCLATEB,  A. G. P. A. Ticket Agent,  Vancouvor, B. C. 428 Bastings St,  Vancouver, B. 0.  "AT  Woman's Time;  ���In surely worth something. It is  worth too much to throw It away In  doing her own washing. Particularly  when we do all "FLAT GOODS" AT  84c ADOZEN.  Count your timo and soap and fuel  and starch and blueing anil wear and  ��� tear, then seo hon- (ar'J-le will go.  Tablecloths, napkins, sheets, pillowcases, towels and nil goods that can be  put through our bigsleiini mangles aro  termed " lint goods." Hut your bundlo  must ton fair assortment of largo and  small pieces.  PIONEER  Steam Laundry  D. iM. STEWART, Phop.  PnoNB 346. 910 - 014 RicnARDS St.  Tho laundry of tho dark rod wagons.  |:   GEO. HAY  ':  S     Vancouver's   Pioneer    Clothes  Renovator, makes a suit new.  a Dyeing and Repairing.  X   >      21$ Camdie St., Vanoouvbb.  iiliililill^iiij  ilii  ���^Mttfy'Kiig&i. THE INDEPENDENT.  SATURDAY JUNE 29, 1901  SALMAGUM.  This is the whole problem :  circle or a spiral.  Is life a  Life would be easier if it were true  that we get credit for the good we intend to do us well as for the good we do.  Style is inborn distinction; it is not  merely pretentions airs or line garments.  Religious controversysciinetiinesgrows  out of llie fact that peuple like controversy better than they like religion.  It is possible for conventionalities to  be observed in a very unmannerly way.  Indulgence in  for experience.  regret is to pay twice  Energy is dangerous; your little  spurts of it may inspire some weaker  brother to continuous effort which will  give him nervous prostration.  In espousing tlio right be very sure  you are not doing so .merely, to' indulge  your tendency to be disagreeable.  was] the drawling reply. " I never  could form the habit of smoking in my  sleep. I only smoke when I am awake."  And then, after a pause, lie continued  jerkily between vigorous puffs that  seemed to give him inspiration in solemn  drollery:  " You know..I..began smoking at.,  eight..years old. I..used to be a.,  printer's...devil...in a littlo. ..village  where there was a. .tobacconist ...mimed  ..Heegle. This Ileeglc. .said he would  give..us devils, .a. cigar for every exchange, '.paper, .we would give. .him.  Wc kept him well.'.supplied, .withreading matter��� used to give. .him. .about  (ifty..papers a week..in exchange for  . .ns many, .cigars. '  "That's how. ..I learned to..to...  smoke. They were not. the best..cigar  ..I have smoked,, .used, .to call'em..  'Beegle's���damnedest.' lint.. .they...  were'good enough, .to. .learn on."���Ex.  bread by working;. Is 1-tjthen not the  duty of the public to see that this concern doe3 not crush its servants 'to a  state of serfdom. The present strike  has shown that education lias enlightened the "strikers ..as to what is just  and fair. But this has little weight  with the C. P. K. The daily press does  not help the strikers Jn the least, but  are printing all the stun; possible to  get hold of against them.  SHYLOCK.  Vaneouveiv. June 2", 1901.. .  The editor of the .Frankfurter Zeitung  is reported to have said that all women  who wear trailing dresses do so to conceal their big feet. That was a cruel  remark, and the female sex ought to  boycott the Zeitung.  An indignant Kansas merchant lias  brought suit against a local paper because he claims that by a curious typographical error iU queered a big clearance sale. The advertisement: read/  " more furniture, bedding and rugs than  tve care to carry in stock." 'The intelligent compositor made it' "bugs," and  now " there's the devil to pay."  There is a good story of a general  ��� whose death .wus announced iu a newspaper by mistake, a circumstance which  ��� annoyed.him very much, lie called on  the editor and demanded that a contra-  1 diction, should be inserted in the next  ���Issue. "That, general," was the editor's reply, "is quite out of the question.  We never apologize and we never withdraw a statement; but I'll tell you what  we'll do for you.; We'll put you in the  'births' next week."���Argonaut. ,?  .'; The -Fisherman,-and the Lie.  -���There was once a lisherman.   And of  course  he went  a-flsh.iiig,; for no one  ??expccts a lisherman ;to go;'ont','shooting  rabbits, "And lie caught two little fish,  and they were so small that he threw  thorn back again.. And he went home  .': yithout.any, and did not stop at the  fishmonger's to buy  large.ones.   And  ; his wite said to .him: ." Where are the.  large llsh?" .-and'he'said: ."There. are  lione.'l' Andshe said: "And-wliere is  ���'*' tbe.lie about tlie twelve-pound trout V ���'  ,:aiid lie said :*���'" I have not .one." Then  Jiisiwifo said:." I do hot believe you  "have been '���fishing at all, but have been  to the races and have lost a lot of money  .and are afraid to tell mo. I think it is  cruel, and I shall go home to mother."  And she wept; lor.-a long time, and was  only persuaded by a diamond ring that  ���ho was .'telling the truth.  ?/ ; Moral.���-A. iisby. lie is: cheaper,: than  the necessary truth.���Ex,,' ......  ??;.;:**;Hard to Choose.? p..  Uncle'Jerry Ardhedd had. two neighbors, both "of, a somewhat controversial  : turn. ? Oiie was. a man who? contended  that nothing could be positively known  that was not ? capable of absolute proof  or a.mathematical demonstration; .the  : other was/disposed to dogmatize, about  -everything.   .���/?;;///���.:./  They met at his house one evening,  and a long argument on things theological iind otherwise ensued between  the two, with the customary result.  Neither of the disputants succeeded in  convincing the other, nor even in shak-  =ingdiis=opinioii:--=^Well,U==Baid=.lFncle-  Jerry, drawing a long breath of relief  after they had gone away, " there isn't  'very much difference, after all, between  an agnostic���and acognostic." It was  a new word, but seems one of legitimate  coinage.���-Youth's Companion.   ?  A Restful Function.  "Deaf and dumb trolley parties lire  the latest."  "What are they?"  " A lot of talkative women ride around  town in the street cars all evening, and  the one, who speaks first pays for the  ride and the ice cream."  A Lost Joy. '...���'���  Ah, icecream soda���as it goes���  Is quite good enough, 'tis true:  But itMoesn't buzz the victim's nose  As the ole kind used to do. ���  The Independent wants a report of  each union medtlng and news concerning the members of, every organization.  Such reports and news will do much to  sustain and create Interest In the organizations. Secretaries are especially  urgttl to send in these reports, but  news from any member of an organization win be received with pleasure.  The Mint  Is the new saloon at the corner  of Carrall and Hastings streets. Case  goods are the best, and! the prices 0. K.  Seattle Rainier beer, a cents.  ��� Try a bottle of Kiseii l'ort, the sunshine of California, 50c bottle, at Gold  Seal Liquor Co., 74G Tender street.  A Lasting Scare.  "Tugby tells mc he never travels at  night on the cars,"  ".Nervous ? "..'���'  . "Well, the last trip ho took he saw  one of thoseWomen who wear their husband's old linen dusters for sleeping car  gowns.  Pity the Clergyman. ."  Owing to a curious trick of the types a  portion of: President Stanley Hall's  thoughtful" address to the Ministerial  League appeared in a Worcester (Mass.)  paper as follows:'-'  " The heart lias ��� pantheistic impulses,  but.-ail these in ah ideal theology are  given due/place: and subordinated to  personality, which is the supreme affirmation of the human soul. Tell  'Mac' to send up tlie circus.tickets."  LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.  Cigars for Exchanges.    '  -    Seeing Mark Twain light a fresh cigar  immediately after  throwing away the  slump of one he had consumed, a bystander inquired:   .. -���;-,���-y ���'.��� ,?',;.  " Do you  smoke  ull   the-time,   Mr.  Clemens ?"   " No, not thewholetiifte,"  To the Editor of The Independent: ;  ���:. Sir,���If one did not iknow better the  News-Advertiser, would; malice believe  ���the; canners were; .the only sufferers in  the .1*2'l-2 ceht price, for iflsli.;' If the  canners told ithe truth the .public would  be. better able . to judge if their side  was the. correct one.. Try and gull the  people "by saying t'hat 12 1-i cents  wauld ..be paid for all flsli caught is  far. from - the truth. Each cannery���  and. there are about -IS in,-all���owns  and operates from 50 to 100 .boats,  which .sire supplied to the Japs and  ���white iftshermen.,. These-fishermen pay  one-tliird, the? flsh -caught to the canners for rent, of .boatiand net. The  canners pay nothing for them. 'The  canners'claim by;'tlie News-Advertiser  tills imorning that about ������13,000,000 'fish  vvpuld be ���catight by 3,000 'fishermen,' ;at  l.OaO.ifish to the boat,'for the Reason.  They: did "not inform,the; public, assuming each cannery haa 50 boats out,  that, out of the /total of 2,400 boaits, to  use theii\.ow*n figures, of -12,000,000 flsh,  that;3,200,000, would not/cost the.earners a cent;" If - the News-Advertiser  and the.'banners' would ���figure this put  they ;,wbuld: ill nd ; that. Mr. Andersons  figures; will, be over the: mark Instead  of. under.' Tlie ���.canners."'will' "tell you  these boats' are ' sold : to fishermen.  ���This, Is only .a .blind.. .If these, boats  were sold to' the men, they 'have never  earned enough to, pay'for them In.-one  year, and;.'99 out of MO never trouble  'about them after,' and^the, canners look  out to hold them till paid for./As for.  the poor Jap. You can'������ rest ��� assured  ^etween-the^boss^'and^the-cannor.ihC;  don't iknow- that the boat he fishes  with Is being paid for by himself. Let  the icanner come out in the open and  show facts ..to the iflshernien," and the  canners will get all the llsh.they want.  -SALMON. '  Vancouvor, B. C, June 27, 1901.    '������'.  The Rustic Restaurant now employs  union waiters and waitresses.  You'll not find fault with any quality you  gel at tliu People's l'opulnr Price I'liarinucy.  t'uulity is of supreme iiuporliiuce.  You'll not iind fault with the prices���they  are always lair and lower ttiau other store's  prices.  OUR   PRICES  NOT CONTROLLID  BY  ANT  CO*iaiNt.  Casioria, Regular Price 35e, our pi ice ' 2Sc  Curler's Pills, "       "   'Joe,   "    ���*      15c  Dr. Uib.ou's Kidncv Cure, Regular Price  $1.50, our price.......    $1  SPONGES AND SOAPS AT II4LP PRICE.  ', PUl_Si;liIl'T10NS :   50 per eem. lower Hum  oilier-.TORES.  Gerald Deyell   druggists  W. D. Wylle  Successors to J.'A. L. "'k'AJiililne.  MJasbb'^'Ri&cb'  ....-   UNION BAKEKTES.  W.'D.'aiu.r, Jlount Pleasant.  i\V. Murray, Prior street.  Montreal Bakery, Westminster avenue.   .  P. Adams,  Scotch Bakery, Hastings  street.        , .  AV. D. Kent, 50 Cordova street.,    :  iJ. Oben, Hastings street.:        ,.-  Mlnchen Co., Granville street.  Barnwell Bros., Granville street.  Largen '& Tupper, Granville street.  xsre^rv  3��_Z-C?_i!?32_3Cr_Cr?>Z_!E  l,tmt37^yt__40ltMvtM'k-^.i.   f,    Union-made Clears.  i daffntilrt. i*����*n.  NK��wt|.',  ���*- -M���tJ.^-  corruaitTTo  THE STRIKE.  Sir,���The C. P. It. nun a (valuable Industry that the people cannot do without. There is not room for any more  ithrough railways yet, consequently!  they are In the position of a dlclotor  over   those   wiho   have  to  earn their  J<\>__ovnlng is a. list of the Union oigar factories in BrlBish OolumlHla wdio  use .ihe'Blue laibel: ...  W. ��� TietJen, No. 1���Division No. 38,  Vancouver.. ���'���  Kurtz & Co. N'o. 2���Division No. 6S,  Vancouver.   ;   ,.  In_a.nd Oigar llanufaictTiiring. Company, No. 3���Diivtlelbn No. 3S, Klamloops.  -B. Wlffiberg & Co., No. 4�����ivJsion No.  3S, New,���AVeetmlnster.,.-���::���  'r.,VS1oxatiook, IN'b. 6���Division No. ,3S,  Vancouver.     ?,      ��� ;__ -":'.:-~: '' ���'���  KetawnaiShlnpers' Union Company,  No. S���Division No.; 38,?Ketowna.       ..  TCitgth1! Bros, No. 9���Division No. 3S,  Kossland.  , ? ":->-:?'.  '������;.'.-���,'      *:. - ;:.?��� ?  Kootenay Oigar ZUJanufaeturlng Company, No.? 10���Division. No. 38,��� Neison..  Mains & Johnson, No. 2���DivisJon No.  37, '.vnotorta.?-'-.'-,':,���':,..,'' i:[yyi['.ii':'"-iiy:i  : M;?.Banltneyy:No.:;6���DlMislph; No. '37,'  Viictorla.:.:.';?:,?? ;' '���:.....y-[.yi-iyy'i      ,??,-"*  ilsil'and Cigar Factory, B. Norman,: No.  6-CViy;t_aon, NO. 37, V'fdtoria..-.,-   '  /CProvilnce Oigar Co.,  No. ,7���^Divoslon  No.:?37,,victcniia.^ ::;;''' ���   :;.?..���./:?...?;?:��� ?;,  :A. ScJlmotar & Sons/'No.: IB���^Dlvlaion  No. 37M Vtotoilia. '*: ������-.' [.'yy'-':'i:'y.-i -; ' ..-;  ? P..Ga.b.e,,INV_. 9���Division No.:37,iNa-  nallmo.���,.?-���;:. iy������������'"������������'' -a-: ?���?,:'���  J. X.-ery, No. U���Div*i*ilon'No.' 37,:VUc-  toria:'-.-.-:--' -;":-'. [.--'iiiiiii ;'iyi-.  *ai..J. Booth, No. M-OivMon No.;37,  Nanalmo;-   , . y.yyilii:,ii[..-l.;iy. -...  ? C.. G, Beihnsen���Division .No. 37, Victoria. ���"���" - . -      ���;.?;?? .  .T.- F. Gold, Capitol Cigar; Factory/  No'ViS,:.Victoria,' B. C.?f:;?;;.;";,"-:��?-:  ?Harris & Stuaa-t.'No.; 5���Division No.  3S,v_Revelstoke.';::   ���": y::i-.:i-''.yi'?���.. ������?  :   J.'.'Martin,   No.: 7���Div-lsion .No. : 3S,  Sandon. . ...':,' ���'. ���  -FJhelln & MoDonouffh,.:No'., 12���Division 3S, Nelson.-;���;?:;:������:.'      :..���������:.���:?:.::?'  May be bought by montlily instalments from  Gideon Hicks & Co.  23 11 listings street,  *-   Vancouver,  S Govomnieut St.  Victoria.  CREDIT:  Times are hard and cash is scarce, and  lis likely to be till after, the fishing season. On the other hand we are placing  our students into positions so fast (39 In  seven tweeeks) that we will be short of  graduates for the fall ibusiness. For this  reason we are prepared to make arrangements (with responsible parties) for a full  commercial course dn such a way that the  full feels not payable till the end of the  six months' course. Offer open till June  IBth, 1901.    :  The Il.iU.Vogel Commercial College  P. b. Box 317. Vancouver, B.C.  BlIGHANAN & WHITE  'v^llOljSE:-PAINTERS":^:  ?25 Hastings'St*.      Union Labor Only  When you want to '"hire .-a first-class  horse and ��� buggy,,? go to the Palace  livery stables.  Telephone, 125.     :,   ���?���  Drink Eed Cross Beer,.the beer that's  Sure, 75c pints,,$1.50 doz. quarts.; Gold  peal Liquor Co., 746 Pender street.,   ,';  Gold Seal Canadian Eye is Seagram's  ,Grand101d?Eyo;==Only,i5(Jfcbottle.=7Goid-  Seal Liquor Company.  .-   ?., '.  Pare  Ice ���re#m  I. ?;4��C':|jer^-'qf^B:r:  ?���   '.' ,   '   ;? AVESTJIlXSTKlt AVENUE.;/.'-  ;ti:l.  Best  ?9tS  Thing in the Market  ��� Solid Copper Tea aiid,Coffee, Pots?.;;  Tea Kettles in all Sizes;'?        ?v-  ;:?'";;::?.- (Niekle Plated):    :  : ���/:/.', .??  : These goods will last,a life"time./.. ;,  "/No'scouring to keep .clean?:���':������  : ? Always? look:l)right: ./���/?:/  R.;feBUGHA^M & CO.  Crockery and Housefurnishings,v;  406 aiid  408 Westminster. Avenue, Vancouver  rm iMmmM  ;,,: WHOLESALE AND^KETAII, DEALEH IS ���"::  ���Fish, Game, Fruit,  aiid  ���;������/;;���    vegetables. / /? >:i ?  112 GoEDovA StZ/Thone 442  Teleplaotie ��sr.  Western Cartage Co  ���i. '"iy--":; 'W^-A.'McDonald ;/.:"/.;���'/;?���  :���>���'/?'     ���! "   ,'���'?.'     ,*  ' ' .'       ''/'.:";", "'::--'-:- '  Trucks,, Drays and Express  _/.;k_Wagons/:for _.all_LPurposes.__.____:_  ORDERS TAKEN EOR WOOD AND COAL  Office: 314 Cambie Street.  CHINA  HAIvL.  Evcrbrllc  METAL I'OI-ISII lifts  no equal for  cieaiiing brass, copper, nickel, etc.  ���  Lnrge size bottle, 10 cents.  Cu(js, Saucers and Plates  English    Semi - Porcelain;    iloral  wreath decoration; blue lu color.  Cups and Saucers......-....:.?1.25 doz  Ten-Plates ......,...;.'. 1.00.don .,  Breakfast Plates..:.-....  1.10 doz-  Teapots  Knglish .Jot RonkhiBlnimwiire, funny ;  Horul (leeortuions.  " .Medium size, -15c onuli.  Glass Bui Icr  Dishes  Imitation cut glass pattern,  clesir-  crystal, American lend   ylass,   15c .  each.*           '"-/���-���  1  FREPBRICK;BUSCOMBE& CO.  .    ",                 'China Hall, 319 Hastikos'Stkeei.? *    : ://    .  ���'-'i:  Wanted  -AT-  GALLOWAYS..  BOOK EXCHANGE,  "14 Arcade  Flint's, Dyspepsia' .Tablets are guaranteed to restore failing appetite aiid  correct any. kind of? stomach trouble.  50 c. box.   McDowell, Atldns, ;*Watson  Co. /.//:-;'v y::ii'.'ii"ywi':,.i[ ������/;:.��� ?���/?"/'������  Claoice ^Pamily  :       Groceries  aiicl Pro visions.  OPPOSITE  THE OLD STORE,  Cor. Westminster'Ave. and Prior.  Pay up.your subsaription to the In-i  dependent, lit. does notcost you much  and you should- not hesitate, about giving your support readily to a labor paper../  FIjINT'S;:.BROMO GRIPPE CUKE.  neve:-'; falls to, completely cure "a cold  within'. 21 hours. ,;Gives; instant relief���;  euai'anteed, .your irioney.,;back. ���.."i 25c.  box: at McDowell, ./Aitkins,' Watson; Co.  ��� Want a New Bike? %  ���.'���.-���'���������' ^  <p . Come in and let us tell you about our new ^  ^ Casij Payment Plan. You'll own a high-grade X  ap wheel before you realize it is costing you anything. A.  ASK ABOUT IT.  Bicycle Store  24 Cordova St.  SOLE AGENT  CLEVELAND AND TRIBUNE BiCYLES.  ���  ���WHOLESALE AND   RETAIL  DEALERS   IN-  Shelf and Ifeavv  MAIL  ORDERS 'RE CEIVE PROJIPT. ATTENTION.  m  n  Is how .on: 'All goods at Half /Price/for  ;ONE^'EEE/;^:/-:���/?r^)-,;^'^?';?:/?  ?-;;(l  i  "i. / ;���':.--,��  "kii'-M  ;i;.?'l  ��� ?������' m  r??ll  B*//?,t*-iusha an as t>a ���/;#;i.  /' /    ;'?;/.-//-,/Gotinline:for ypur?Summer Dtids;.-:/^/://///?/:/i  Bathing;Suits^Flarinel Suits,[Alpaca Coat^/C;: ���/;/���/  :/?/:;;; Liistre; Coats;, Light?Weight ;Underciothing; |://  :,'..//?:??:/:'?':/ ;Aspleiididbig stock .ooliooso. from... ?:/.: ?:://'./*//  /:i;f:://:;j��hNsini)N^  v Vancouver's'Big Clothiers,/   /  104-6 CORDOVA/STREET,  Matlers aridNeris's Furnishers,?/  /���/r--ii  m  *'"���'-'I  52 j I Ha��ting��  xiaiiii Street.;;;//*?;.  ///:/:;;?'V// GratifyhiR indeed to iienr/praises; sounded throughout the'////  '?.:??     Dominipu. /FIT-REFORM patterns, gathered from the various///?/;  ?  r quarters: of the globe,: are receiving undivided;attention*;'from''/'.//-?'_���.  .v/'/'''?;./nobby dressers; ;���..;?';'-,���?.;?;.: ?;,?*;;;//.; ;-'*,.?,:::/.-/?/;*///���;?;;?/;  :'//?.:  That's why makers of. Fit-Reform are taxed ;to their outmost"/���(;///  capacity in this the spring-of 1901.,,;' /";/?/:Z/'::Z//yi'iyiyiyy-'  334 Hastings St. /i;;;.',yabc-ouyer,VBv:C.*-  Mail orders promptly attemlcil to.. Self measurement blanks nnd Etimplcs - .?  *  sent on appiiciiiion.   -,;? ;*::/?; ?,;. :';,/*?;/<?./*;* ���//-,  ./../  gooooopoooooooooobbooooooooooooooooooooooooococ  REMOVAL':  ..TO REDUCE STOCK.  309 Carrall St.  '.":���-���������}. Tel.;'? i ai.?;; ���.?/:.'.  JobC9000(X)COOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOcboC)o6oOOOOOOOOC  Massey ��� Harris aiid Stearns  ALL STYLES  BICYCLES AUPRICfS :'  KENDALL'S; 328 Cordova St  p..The best place Ju;B."C. to linvc your ;?:.:';v  ;C-?///:'//Blcyclo'rbpnli:ed;':;/ //;���?';?';���' ���'  pob_  Good Milk anc!Cr<eani  /"^ROS^lBANK^D^IRrg  ltlAS';NO;EQUAL./:Tei;ms::^asori^  liS. MILLER^ Prdp^sliaiOHtfrnbySt^  y.i  mm  in  11  iimmem

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