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The Hedley Gazette May 25, 1916

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Array \.i.  Number 19.  ���������     J-iOrai-jan ' .r���������  K&ST  HEDLEY, B.C., THURSDAY, MAY 25,  1916.  c^op  1 New Stock 1  -OF- |  its and Shoes I  ft?  fccially Reduced    g  if  st  ������  a?  n"  it  K  ti  K  X  tV  ma  Fruits and g  Vegetables ������  n v  fcenes,  i'   N FHON'IS SEYMOUR "Ul'J  l-.Sl'HUX CANADA  lell Laird & Co. Ltd.  Steel Manufacturers  i'      Sheffield, Eng. c  Vid Warehouse, S17-03 13ontty Street  !     Vancouver, B. C.  f>  A. F. & A. M.  TVRGUTjAB. monthly meetings of  Hediey Lodge No. 13, A. If. & A. M.,  arc held on blio second  Friday in  Jiiii fc'r-filoi-nily hull. Hcdloy. "Visilins  iii-o cordially invited to attend.  HQULE, S. E. HAMILTON  1       \V. M ��������� Secretary  L. O. L.  Thc Regular    meetings o������  Hcdloy Lodge 1711 arc held on  the fli-bt and third Monday in  every month iu tho Orange Hall  Ladies meet 2nd and 1, Jlondayo  brothurn are cordially invited  W. LOMSDALK "W. M.  ;H. K. HANSON, Sco't.  .  F������.  BROWN  ,' British Columbia Land Surveyor  Iu No. 27  P. O.'Dkawkk ICO  IkNTICTON,  B. C.  P.JW. GREGORY  I;;ivil i;nginkeii and.bj.utisii  columbia land surveyor  I'Star Building       -       Princeton  krER CLAYTON C.   E.   HASKINR  IGLiWTOil & MSKINS  Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.  MONEY'TO  LOAN  PENTICTON, -      . B. C.  plGij Opera House  n. I. JONES, Manaoer  large,   commodious  hall for  lincos or other entertainraont.  E'������^to"U"������-<<l'U^rt^1l5<t''������^^<������^������S8rt^������������*li-l*"  .1  Grand Union *  Hotel  HEDLEY,   British Columbia  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  p-  ���������      "���������     ���������     ������  w ���������.    %  X  X  n  x  X of Liquor and Cigars ������%  5 X  - - ' ���������        X  X  X  X  I "X ���������*  Rates���������Si.50 a Day and Up  First-Class Accommodation.  Bar Stocked with Best Brands  of Liquor and Cigars  A.   WINKLER,      Proprietor.  All kinds of fresh mid  cured meats always on  hand. Fresh Fish on  sale   every   Thursday.  R. J. EDMOND, Pro  I  TOWN AND DISTRICT  )  Princeton will celebrate Dominion  day.  Tho health of Hediey this week is of  Lho best brand.  0  Passenger traffic is increasing on  Lhe Great Northern.  Although the weather has been cold  vegetation is doing nicely.  B. D. Carre and G. Davidson, Salt  Lake, weie in town Saturday.  II. Din-fee, Coalmont, was in town  last week consulting a physician.  A. B. S. Stanley, who enlisted in the  172nd, left Monday for Kamloops.     ,  A dunce will be held at the Nickel  Plate boarding house tomorrow night.  Yesterday u large number of Hediey ites Look in Lhe sports aL Keremeos.  Five deer and three fawn were seen  near Lho Grove hotel Sunday morning.  Miss Lillie Beale, assistant in the  postoffice, ' is visiting friends . aL  Keremeos.  VegeLables are bobbing up serenly  from below in Lhe Clunk garden near  Lhe depot.  Empire day passed off very quietly  in Hediey. But wait until Labor Day,  September -1.  Gr. E. Lyall, the. Princeton druggist, was having a Louch of Hediey  life Saturday.  W. A. TuiOMlalo. vepresenting B. C.  Financial Times, Vancouver, was a  visitor Mondav.  The .Similkameen river has taken a  tumble. The high water- mark is a  thing of Lhe past.  George Riddle of Lhe Palace garage  was kept bu-y on thc 24Lb. taking passengers Lo Kei emeos.  Mrs. (Dr.) Whillans of Viceoria is  renewing old acquaintances, and is  the guest of Mrs. W. A. McLean.  Thomas Bradsbaw has made many  improvements,on his place and has a  large acreage under cultivation this  year. - (  Constable fiprou'e has almost recovered from the injuries received  when thrown fiom a bucking motorcycle.  Mis. James Crawshaw of Vernon,  who has been visiting her brothers,  F. H. and G. French, returned home  Sunday. - _ * -v-   ������������������.  Neil Houston, the Princeton horse  buyer, was in Hediey Satuiday and  Sunday to see what a real live town-  looked like.  Homer Mclean of the 103rd Battalion, C. K. F., headquarters Victoria,  is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs.  W. A. McLean.  George Brady,  the   Irishman who'  travels for Scotch   whisky,   was  telling   the   boys   Monday    night   "prohibition is siue coming."  "Will sell lot 5, block 7, Scott avenue,  Hediey, Assessed at $200. What  oft'eis? Highest offer gets it. AVrite  R. W. Norlhey.Keremens Center, B.C.  No bear have been killed near the  Nickel Plate boarding house lately.  The la-t one assassinated nearly broke  off the peace relations between England and Sweden.  Charlie Simacnni, the dethroned  Indian chief, was fined by Justice'  Thomas ef Princeton, last Friday, $15  and costs for being drunk in Hediey.  The tin'- was paid.  Episode No. 1 of the universalserial,  '���������The Broken Coin," commenced at  Lhe Stiir theater last night and will be  shown again tonight. It.is well worth  the price"if admission, two bits.  N. Brown, u-lievirig manager of the  Bank of Montreal, Mis. Brown, and  A. S. Black, barrister, of Princeton,  were in town yesterday on their way  from tlie celebration aL Keremeos.  Ln>-t Thursday evening the store of  James Stewart was entered and the  till rubbed of about $12. Constable  Sprotile ln-lieves he has the guilty person in custody, and is getting evidence.  Pi-ivati- R. H. Jerrison, of the Canadian enuincers, has been recommended  for the Di-tingviished Conduct Medal.  Jorrisnu i- a painter and at one time  lived in tbis valley. Ho enlisted from  Merritt.  Ton-   Si.iUei-y,   known    throughout  W. Lonsdale has recovered from a  short illness.  Some of the boys are talking of organizing a baseball team.  Crickets are out, but so far cricket-  ters have not put in an appearance.  G. P. Jones, manager of the Hediey  Gold Mining company,,went over to  Princeton Monday.  No work has been done on the provincial automobile road this season.  Work will likely be commenced, next  season.  I. MeTavish, the ColemonL merchant, was in town yesterday, ,11c reports business good, and the camp  picking up.  Jas. W. Gi-ier has bought the Hediey Gazette and moved his plant from  Slocan to that town. Hediey needed  a tonic.���������Phoenix Pioneer.  A Kootenay friend wants to know  what are the chief products'of 1 ledley  district. Gold bricks, vegetables, fitiil,  cattle, horses, rattle snakes, dogs,  whites, bohunks and politicians.  Frank \V. Evans, representing John  D. Rockefeller, was in town this week  demonstrating the feasibility of cooking flapjacks aud other savory dishes  on an oil stove. His headquarters are  Vancouver.  there wore a large number of members of the Ladies' 0'"anrj*o society mid  L. O. L. in the Orange hall Monday  evening at the farewell to Mrs. Bowerman, who is leaving for Spokane in a  few days. The program e'onsisted of  an address and presentation, speeches,  vocal, and instrumental music. 'Refreshments were served.  Registered at the hotels this week:  Mr and Mrs Tezona,, Spokane; B D  Cairo. G Davidson, SalL Lake; Bob  Barmlee, G G Lyall, AS Black, Princeton; H Dingee, I McTavish, Coahnont;  n W Angus, E Shanahan, C C Rause,  G T Spi ing, W Packhurst, C Cline, W  Truesdale, F W Evans, Tom SlaLLory,  Vancouver; B K Sledding, 'Winnipeg;  J E Mackin. Kamloops; S J Brady,  Victoria; Mr and .Mrs N Brown, Merritt; W P Gieeves, Rossland.  Satuiday evening Jack Edmond was  seriously injured -by being thrown  from a bucking horse. After some  difficulty in catching the horse previous- to bhe accident, the animal was  tied to one of the veiandah posts  while '"dtnond went into Lhe butcher  shop. Both were excited. -When he  returned thc horse pulled back, taking  the. post with him, and lMinoncl catching tire reins, the horse threw  him down and got away. When  again caught the horse was vicious  and the man determined to conquer  him. After a short bucking Spell Edmond was thrown, lighting on his  head and shoulders. It will he some  time befoie he is able to attend to  business.  {    CONCENTRATES    i  Granby stock is quoted at $91.87'-.  Greenwood smelter is  treating 1450  tens of ore daily.  Lead   quotations;     Montreal   9.10,  New York 7.27.J.  Spokane men will build a smelter at  or near Princeton.  This   summer   will   probably see  lead stack in Greenwood.  a  in  British ' ���������  on hi- ��������� '*.������  authovi y  ordei - fr  bacon a  ���������hiiubia as "Slat-," came in  11  auto  Monday.    He is  an  011 tin- hog. and secured  hi local merchant:- for hams,  aid.  (iMi- ye.-terday the Princent ion of hall t'ssf'S shoved  the  dump and  the   Keremeos  a   good   team.  At ii  ton iu  t he 01 ��������� >^ i e nine over  then easily defeated  nine. Princeton has  It, came by parcel posi  Dates of Fall Fairs  The department of agriculture has  issued the following fall fair dates for  season 1916:  circuit 3  Chilliwark   Aldeigrove   Matsqui   Langley   Richmond   Richmond   BurqiiiLlam   CJRCDIT 4  Barrieie   Hcfiey Creek...   ���������Pritohard   Kamloops   Salmon Attn '���������.-...  Kelowna   Armstrong    ,  Eagle River (Ma.lakw.-i)'.  ntttCUiT 5  Gateway   Cr.-iubi-ook   Windermere   Golden   PruiLvale..-    Trail   Nelson   Boswell.        Grand Forks.   Greenwood   ...SepL.   13-15   Sept. 15   Sept  1G   SepL 19   Sept 19   Sept 20   Sept 21   Sept 13  ... Sept14 15  .....S.ept 19  ....Sept 20 22  ....Sept 22-23  ....Sept 20-26  ....Sept 28-29   Oct. 3    Septo  .... .Sept (5-7  ....Sept, 12-13    Sept 15   Sept 18  ....Sept  19-20   20 22   S-'pl 22  ....Sept 25 20   Sept 27  CIRCUIT 0  Revelstoke   Rohson   Slocan City     New Den vet   Burton   Needles.   Ann'.'' Lake (Nakusp). . .  Creston   CiKCUlT 7  Nicola       Pent id 011   Suimnerland   Kalam.-ilka (Oyama)   .Sept 21 22  . Sept 25  ....Sept 20  SepL 27-2S  ...Sept 30  .... Oct 3-4  ....Oct 4 5   Oct 7   Oct (i  . .Oct 9-10  ..O."   11-12   O.t   14  Over  12.000   men   are employed  mining in British Columbia.  Zinc from Slocan minus is being  shipped to Dewar, Oklahoma.  Silver is higher than it has been for  21 years. Yesterday it wu������ quoted  at 71f.  Granby mines at Anyox employ 900  men. The payroll is $100,090 per  inonLh.  British Columbia contributes 31 percent of the total mineral production  of Canada,  If metal prices keep on soaring, says  an expert, iron might supplant the  silver dollar.  There's so much money in the Slocan that miners', muckers and prospectors want a bunk at Sandon.  The Lucky Todd Mining Co., operating seven miles from Tulameen, are  shipping copper ore to the Greenwood  smelter.  The Lucky Jim mine in Lhe Slocan  hos paid inLo court $15,000 of tho indebtedness since A. G. Larson was appointed receiver.  , Nelson is arranging- a big mining  convention to meet iu that city some  time in July. Ore from all parts of  the province will be on exhibition.  Princeton has all the ear marks of  being a bii'-y camp this summer.  Freighteis are hauling machinery  and supplies to the Copper  mountain.  The mineral wealth of the Tulameen  is attracting outside capitalists. Mining men from the coast and Spokane  a re inspecting several properties hear  Tulameen 'City.  The real demand for silver by the  leading governments of Europe will  not materialize until peace has been  declared and the effort is made lo return to normal conditions.  ��������� The Golden Sovereign copper pro-  rie/i't-y,- Aspen Giove camp, is showing  up well, and " wink" will be contir.'c-od  all summer, says the Merritt HenUd.  R. J. Armstiong of Keremeos Is the  owner.  On June 10, the Standard Silver-  Lead Mining company of Silverton  will pay the regular monthly dividend  of 2A- cents per share, or $50,000. This  will make the payments for the cm-  l-ent year $500,000, and will increase  the grand total to $2,100,000, making  $2.05 the share distributed to stockholders since Apiil, 1M12, or 5 cents per-  share more than the entire capitalization of the em pora tion, which is $2,-  000,000,divided into 2,000,000,all issued.  9%y  Slocan Star Report  Shai eholders in the Slocan Star  company have just received a report  from Miuiiiiti-i' Oscar While regarding  operations at the mine since the mill  re.-umed operation on May 7.  Dining the 10-day period ended May  17 the mill produced 130 tons of silver-  lead couceni rates and 150 tons of zinc  concentrate-. The silver lead concentrates will lie, shipped without waiting  for the completion of the tr-itnway  now under ���������������������������instruction from the mill  to the railr ad at Sandon and are expected lonei approximately $14,000.  The zinc ��������� "iicentrail's will net the  company ah'lit $35 the inn, or- more  than $5h)0.  it  ���������<i  The ������-it iv. ns of Elioll ha.vc .-. nt J.  R. .l.-iftioii. tkoinember- for ('leenwood  riding, a club to be used on ballot box  stuffier*. The population of the flourishing city of Eholt is about four, possibly four- and a half.  Copper Coin Above Par  Gold     -oi   -    have   fiequently    been  eirnla     I      1    a   premium, but   until  i;j   probable    that   no one  i' copper coins being worth  r.    But -neb  is the cast-  land of rice and mystery,  of   the   minor coins aie  copper.    These   are   cir-  v.-iliu- In low   what they  per   pound   in the open  i-vei     adrt     Japan-  ready    p irc-.biised    large  the   i-'in-   and shipped  liina.    'I lie Chinese gov-  nilly    aw akeniiig   to  Lhe.  f the situation, perceived  nakr   a   hand ome  profit  the copper   pieces, melt-  nd   recnii 1 in-,.-,    them  into  recent';  ever ll  more 1 I  in ('Ili 1  \v 111 ��������� 1 e  minted  culal i'  w.iu'd  m:>i !���������;���������  e.-e   h  quant i  them ���������  erniiM  pissihi  a chali  bs- bii\ ���������  ing    II-  pennies.  If metal 1  knows   luii  !������������������  II  ices keep on soaring, who  what the ������������������'iron men"  spoken of b\ the sltmgi-l may become  an eventuality and supplant the silver  dollar.  Mining Conditions in B. C.  In a recent issue of the Mining Record appears an ably-written article  by Alexarder Sharp, Vancouver, uu  der the heading of "Mining Conditions  in British Columbia." The writer is a  well known consulting mining engineer and has visited this district on several occasions. The following quotation should be of interest to our  readers:  British Columbia has a total area of  about 3S2,000 square miles, of which  285,000 square miles are practically unexplored. Four ranges of mountains  traverse the entire length of the Province in a northwesterly direction.  Between he beautiful well watered  valleys of varying width suitable for  farming. The mountain ranges are  part of the great Coidilleran system of  mountains, more generally known as  the Rocky Mountains, or mineral belt  that extends from far south Cape  Horn, north through South America,  Mexico, Western United States of  America. British Columbia, Yukon,  part of Western Alberta, and Alaska.  In Canada it lias a length of nearly  1000 miles, and a width of fully 400  miles; includes all British Columbia,  Yukon Territory, part of Western  Alberta���������approximately 700,000 square  miles. Fully half' of that area is  within the province of British Columbia.  Gold and other precious metals are  distributed over the province. In almost every river and creek of importance gold is found in some quantity,  while in the major pat t of the mountains explored, veins of gold, copper,  silver, lead, nine and iron ores have  been discovered. In addition, there  are mountains of building stone,  granite, marbles and clays. Enormous, resources of coal of excellent  quality, vaiying from lignite to anthracite, are conveniently distributed  over the province.- Deposit-, of sulphur and salt exist; al.-o pronounced  indications that there exist subterranean reservoirs of petroleum oil and  natural gas A party asked  me the other day where I thought the  next great mining boom would be.  I said "Biilish Columbia." He shook  his head, but before we parted-he  he admitted there was no place  on earth so full of mining hopefulness as British Columbia. ] made  my convert by explaining to him the  richness of the great Cordillera n  mineral belt] have been telling you  about, and how right here in -British  Columbia there, was a greater unpros-  pected, unexplored ai 0:1 tham'the area  of the. statui- of Colorado and Monla::,a  combined, fiom which approximately  $123,000,000 in precious metals are  produced eveiy year. British Columbia is on Lhe same Rocky Mountain  Coidilleran mineral belt as these  slates. It is the opinion of geologists  and mining engineers that the mineral  possibilities of the. one areaare as good  as the other. The climate is more  nnpiopitious in British Columbia than  the states mentioned.  You may ask, why all this unexplored lei ritory, with possibilities so  great? Wb.-iL of the prospectors,  that they are not stampeding inLo  that new country? My answer is, the  prospector is a shrewd, level-headed  bu-iness man. He knows no international boundary line, in so far as  prospecting is concerned. He prospects in countries wheie he has the  best chance of working his property  or st'llim; it. His chance for doing so,  to his mind, is in the country south of  us. Prospecting is the initial stage of  mining. The prospector has got to be  encouraged. ���������Offer him a bonus for  real mines discovered; give him souie  assurance that the ore from his mine  will be milled or ^melted, at reasonable  freight and treatment charges, and  you will find this 2S5.000 square, miles  of ���������unprospected country run over  with prospectors."  Smithers, on the  G  laund 1 y.  Rossland has the repiit.iiion/jo^ha^;. ^\W������-i-?H!{  ing the filthiest streets inC urV-i i> *"*������-'j^y** '''^ " V/ffl  Less than 80 tods of ti itk wpilfl if *������, *!"' _ 1W  nk lite G. N. and C: P. R ii.tcles. ttv *- b> ** "��������� v^/fiji  lid way. J ��������� r-v   % "-&$>.      *Z*t&  ���������*          . *���������* - , *   */"* VW-aJ-i". V.M  li  Mid  str  Mm icetown  Twenty-five years agq;->e"u,h ^11) ol,   _    ,  teacher in Victoi ia tauglit? m ltyi   a j  of 59 pupils.  *;  ���������    Villi.  Jo'e M.n-tin hud nothing^' I 1    * th  the alleged ballot box st"irfi 1 11)'    n  sloppv Slope.                      ti,$k -v        u  Thousands of British soli 1 il  i'g  the Fiench front havi'^mii 1 1     in 1  the loi-ces landed.  A skunk 'farm   has Hetfii    t 11    i\ it  Cm lew,   Wash.     It   ongli 1 t    1  strong enterprise. '        '!,**r;   ������ v  '      ?.vJ        -     ,   '  w iul.  I  Tin- spring has beenVeivys 1  but theie's no kick  in',tfii|'>i  n i) nil  It has helped fruit trees'^ l  Eighteen years ago.lasfc^\\    ln^��������� In  Admiral Dewey playe^Yei bin  >  Do with the Spanish'fleejll  '^f'^J * *  Late election news 'frV^rnl r f  Prnvitiei.il (mictions will^r^ I    bl\ t rki*  place in July, and pro'h(i^Ij  Billy Mac Adams, at-iiqaei     u      pu'>  lishir   of   the  Sandor^j||\  tTiV    is_  president of the SkeenaJasS."    1   (   >pn 1"  company. ������ ,t#^!  .   imm       ���������*    '  There's a demand for|^l    1 if,   w Id  paper -md old   riibliei|vpB* N-.^ 11  lht*-1-  coa-^t are making big^crifi      1 u^Ju g^ r    .,1.  the junk. \A:W������& '���������������������������������������-*  A new substitute -fori  ������1  lint   hns   *  been   sold   for   $2.0dgp^  L'nii/  ~t  manufactured for nri^ifi^riiiilf ������   nts.  a gallon. 4*"^^^  "  lh.-ie is a deinandion*StiS    ^n t   J  r  good     horses 'at -^o^^PJi ���������������        V  Shaky would I'Xclabq^iiMj H   11^,I u  for a horse."   '   , ^;^,\        '   ������  ton  week it passed a resniifci^^t     >-r ihli h"**  a dog district.' -'-"���������SvSM^^as&S'Jjs: .i .J  Poi- the -first' ;Hft>^$S������^ '1- '"Pi i{( "  1'-board  of tVad'^M^^sv   %Tr^   *  '^$mm  Some Fly Dope  To kill Hies in the house mix two  tablespoons (one ounce) of 40 per cent  formalin with on. pint (10 ounces) of  equal parts-of milk and water. Expose in shallow plates, with a piece of  bread placed in the center on which  the flies alight and feed.  Waste Materials  Begin at home. The larger portion  of salaries .1 till wages is spent 011 the  home���������fond, fuel, lifc'hl, clothing. Are  any of these things being wasted?  Twenty dollars a, year saved from  waste in every home in Canada will  more than pay lhe interest, on a war  debt of $.*>00,000,000.  The woman who locks the cradle  cannot intelligently put a piece ..f  paper in 11 tin box, is the belief of the  majority of the wiseacres in the legi-  lature at Victoria. Woman suffrage  was def.-aied in the house last week.  ���������*      (iaj''  son isallrmid to takSjJjL  trout per di> iiomhajfee^,  streams. ^*fA  As if the soldiers at thefr  having it h ud cnoughY,  at Vietori 1 h is  shoveti'S  agony on���������bv    iskmgf^E  The. bill h is hi t n mtro*clili  Senator Loiurheed^oft  been tnadi ill iiiman*ATf{  created economic cmnam!  ada, who will "tiuiglfLiB!  ditioiis     t 111 fn o-lir>nl-.'T!������+lS5:,  * ���������>%��������� *������ ',  cli.i-.s   th.o, Rhont^t^tolll^  The   senate,    knowfeM|c������|^|  farming    ,s   a   f.oK4W&2flS^K  duceis and dividnici  to sav from loin fcOuiu'v,  iii the Cobdi area,* 233,  had been pioductid U*>*"-t4*P^^^^fei*^������^  lhe year, md frofn t)JleVs-|Mt������m>^l  of ci.ngl. .IHLI Itl ,kt.i WU^CT^ffi^Jj!|6l������ *,' ���������x    -*>  $67,127,389 1, id b. en ^ft^M^^  T-,   ���������ar,phrase   ,^J^^^������f^  J son,  '1 he Ala^^/n������^������^^������^^  a. 11  her camp tha*!! dobaltj|t'':fei  no-, v������������������': -     1 tV '<K-y<Sa*{^!*KS  M'  ,���������-���������   1  i1^5f*" ������*    , '  WwVcliVi  '    '1    S  Q  \ ^  Ji- ���������, t -  .^IL*  ������h,ir*  1! ,-t  iiSji ���������;  ��������� "���������' ir&'-'-^M',. ,'."'"';- ,: :���������'������������������: r': -::.; ���������������������������������������������: ;r-j :.  '".- '������������������^SW^.r "  .   *;,   ,'--;���������      v'.-.J        Ai* ':,. ���������     SL-;  ���������       tel. ' fi?^j_.;ill*' ���������������**������'���������       il ���������    'j'tf  ���������^fS'---:������v.fi!i:!''W ;^i|.. % .'Mr-^-^e'-vS ;.^g  @^i^^"-.^P^;.  THE      GAZETTE,  .���������..'  ���������.'-,'   "-,-' ,-     ' -   ill-*?:'*       '���������        ���������fi:f:ttt!d*-VU'.i+H~~ti'-      '.-'       -'��������� ���������' ���������    '   " .' ���������   :".-.-���������",v.  ���������'.'���������-: :'':������������������':.'   '������������������������������������.'  ,��������� *V--fe "W ���������- .Mil1  ���������-.'-���������^-:v-i#������.',:.r:'.'' ���������;.;'-',v':;. :;;:/. v:v.:'V  :*tgp*%:l#''������  1 Sunlight^ Soap is madefor the  housewife's profit! for only  thereby can the makers hope  to profit. : Sunlight Soap makes  your work lighter, your clothes  whiter, your home brighter.���������[ It  is mild and pure and^ does not  harm  either hands or fabric.  ;; ,-:..", .,-''���������   v.,'.,,-   v ���������������������������:...������������������: ."n't   ��������� t{r=145.;.  mmimaijmBgjmaniaiuni.'wiiuMM.,  p*Bagia*a>:*'������a3i^  ��������� HO  foE*������ evenly *  ���������Kim-d i  s  Worn Ijj*" ever? member  c& the tatnily  SQW BY ALL GOOP S8S0E DEALERS  It will clean more  silverware in lest  time, with less expense, than any  oth e r preparation  made. "Ideal" 10  not an electro-plat-  it'g preparationi  removes nothinjr  but the dirt, leav-  ins: the silvenvaie  like new:- Put up  in eijrht and eijrh-  teen-ounce bottlcj,  packed .three dozen  in case.  At All Jewellers  cheapness of  the  labor  available  to  manufacture there, the industry seems  to  have made  remarkable    progress.  I hey are exporting at a low price and  'ifive   already   got   into     touch   with  Canadian users.   This Quebec supply  touches   the   glass   industry,   too,   for  tho by-product is a pure" silica-sand,  which is suitable for the manufacture  of glass and sandpaper, and is utiliz-  ible a3 moulding sand and for other  purposes.  Kaolin is supposed to be decomposed feldspar, and occurs in pockets or  fissures of varying depths.  The color  ranges  from  a  faint  yellow   to  pure  white, the latter being the more valuable. Its fieedom from quartz, mica,  and  other particles,  is  also  a faclor.  The deposit rendered accessible by  the Canadian Northern is supposed to  be many thousands of feet in depth,  and is pure white in shade, and experts consider that the higher  grades of porcelain and pottery may  be manufactured, and of course, insulators as well. Success in the burning of the clay into the various products of a high grade, depends  greatly upon the character of the  fuel. As firewood is abundant and  cheap in Northern Quebec, the Canadian deposit appears to have been  placed in. the best environment.  The Canadians who are interested  in this development have received  fiom the Hon.' Mr. Pellitior, agent  general for the province of Quebec in  London, England, a report made for  him by Dr. Bigot of Paris, on the  ceramic possibilities of the Kaolin or  China Clay found in the province of  Quebec; one by Mr. Jos. Keele, director of the Bureau of Ceramics of the  Dominion Geological Survey, one by  Edward Orton. Jr., Professor of Cera-1 order that he may see in their right  ������������������v'J. -i-i. ���������    .;._��������������������������� ,a J;  *^:  ���������),What!; .'Fafrhers   Need' ''More1 "Frequent���������  ,. ;Contact wifh~ Fellow Me'n'to'--���������, ;vr  Stimulate. Mental  Action  ..'..Just, now there are' a1!! 'soft's'of/the"b'-->  ries put: forth i'a's'. -to :the meed., of; ., the  farmer-^agitation  on   the subject    of,  fanri - Credits, K increased k marketing-  facilities, more and better co-opera'ion.  along the lines, of production of farm  pro'ducts/ tHeir' sale '"'and  proper.-, prep  paratiori. for the consumer.    All .these,  and; many,  more worthy, subjects are  being rp'ress'ed'' iipoir the'������������������ attention,; of.  ,the farmer.    And yet progress;is:-.veryj  'slow.    Why?. For .the reason that "the  one  first' a'iid 'greatest' need ;ofuthe  farmer's  must  be met'*,'before ,v,these,  other things can. follow.'   What is tliat:  need?    A   broader  cultivation' of  the  mind, so that we as farmers can successfully grasp these problems of the  farm!   We do not realize as we should  that the isolation   of'our   farm   life  breeds   a mental  sloth   and  indifference, makes us dull and-unresponsive  to mental 'action.    As a consequence  all these good things that are put before us  for adoption  are imperfectly  comprehended.,  We must comprehend  better than we do the true philosophy  and effect upon our minds of the kind  of a life we are living.    We must see  that it is not our .toil -that makes us  what we are so much as a lack of contact  with  one  another  and  the  outside world.   The cities and villages rre  the great centres of mental  activity.  Why? Not because  the  people there  toil Jess,   but rather 'that they  have  greater and more    frequent    contact  with each other.  The old Bible" was ' right when it  said, "as iron sharpenethdron so does  the countenance of a man that of his  friend." Larger contact makes the  city and village people' more keenly  alive to what they need as a class.  Hence they co-operate together more,  readily to obtain what they need in  the way of education of their children^  the building of good streets, sewerage, electric lighting, and the agitation of public questions that effect the  welfare of all. T  Of course the concentration of life in  these centres brings with it certain  evils. Any form of life has ��������� its own  evil, farm life as well as all others.  But the great fact remains that close  contact among men promotes mental  activity and a lack of that contact  promotes mental dullness. Now right  at this point occurs the supreme need  of every farmer's life. He must take  extra eirort 10 arouse - his powers of  mind, to increase his .'intelligence in  The  w  aici Air'Terror1  V.3  jj     Established   a   Reputation      ���������-���������-:  v^Nayei're'is' one of-trie' na;ti6ri'al''riames!  of France and a wholesome!terror;,to,  'the''aviators.of;'Germany'.' A few weeks  ago he bfought'*"d6w'n''three1 machines  of the enemy 'iil'ithef clouds 'above the  sectors' occupied by ��������� the Huns in the  Verdun-'.battle'"a-re1^ -That-made'eight  iii all. sihce'i'he' took'^tovfljdngva ;tew;  months ; after  the   war .begaiv.bnof.' ;  ;;'AVhenj-'he, had finished his triple  yjctor*'.. at' "Vor/d uri|,'' he''-complained���������'��������� of'  the breakfast,'/ that'.'-'-was' ��������� given/n< him;-  cursed i,his/fate;n-that;,-,��������� he rihad,r,rnot  ,\Yrbught'havoc upon four of the"Gef-  rhari air craft, and uttered a dissent  against having to go to bed. Which'  simply ,means that ,Naverr,e, ,'jias a  temperament. 'He can be angry, 'too';  when out of sight in the heavens:     ;  His observer on one occasion made,  him intensely wroth. , When only,  about a hundred feet away from' a  German' machine' 'his' companion; fired  at the aeroplane,.and.'missed,.Naverre  immediately flew home, .descended  and opened a fire ot vituperation upon his unfortunate ��������� second. "Give me  a chance,?', said the obseryer,,"and I  will 're-establish-myself in1 your estimation." Naverre at first reluctantly  and then "generously consented.- The'  chance came in'two days' after; 1 .when  sailing through space Naverre spotted  an aviatik. "Whirling up'into the sky  'to get a proper' height, he "peaked  himself,'/ in, the flying language. That  is, he made a nose-on charge.  This time the^bseryer's^erve stood  tlie test. He took the fire of the' German .without a quiver. When he was  within 30 metres���������Naverre's favorite  fete���������he,opened upon the enemy.'Both  Germans were wounded and the engine was "shot full of holes: Naverre.  circled about ''the iplane after it landed  and patted his observer on the back.  ;'.���������.>;ni---.. i..'���������'"''''-"���������:" "������������������":''('-:"-''-^'"'---.'.''>---.^'---.--,7'v,..-^'-r:...^.:��������� ,-w-s ��������� /.  .;/sppts^rqni,'.,sujch  things>  ^'^as-oil-cioth^t  , An Oil That is Famous.���������Though  Canada .was riot the birthplace of Dr.  Thomas' Eclectric Oil, it is the home  of that famous compound. From here  its good name was spread to Central  and South America, the West Indies,  Australia- and1 Mew Zealand. That is  for afield enough to attest its excellence, for in all these countries it is  on sale and in demand.  No March on Berlin  Germany has, we believe, shot her  bolt on land 'whatever she mayi do.by  piracv in the' effort to. open ,the door  of the seas. But that does not mean  that she is not still a formidable toe.  Put upon the 'defensive her power of  resistance" will be still little short, of  her maximum and no one at this' stage  of the war is likely to cultivate the old  dreams 'of a march on Berlin. Ihe  war will not end in that way. It could  only end in that way by an unthinkable sacrifice of life. It is much more  likely to.end when Germany realizes  that she is (beaten. Already she is  realizing that she cannot win  Tailor how., many pockets in youj  trousers?*.   ''*'<    >-.^i.j"-,j '..r^-i;'  Customer���������Only one, 1 please;, rmj  wife is a*busy woman,''a'nd^r.want ti  save her time, when she goes throu-fM  them.i  J' *'*" "  ���������'��������������� -''J  Valuable Clay Deposits  C.N.R.  Building a Spur  Line in Quebec That Will Opan op Extensive  Kaoiin  Beds  The ousting of German and Austrian porcelain wares from the Canadian market in favor of "Made in  Canada" products..lias been brought  appreciably closerl by the construction of a spur lin"e, by the Canadian  Northern Railway fiom its Montfort  branch, to an extensive deposit of  Kaolin near Huberdeau, in Quebec.  It is from similar deposits of that  natural resource that manufacturers  in the Teutonic empires have produced the supplies of china-wares that  have been marketed to homes in all  parts of the world, -md: the prevalence  of the "Made in ������������������G<*rrnany"..im*'-Hn-  lion on the underside of .cups, saucers, a tid plates in tli'ej; average bomc  in Ciint-clfc alone, furnishes an indication of tlie widespread character and  ���������"alue  of  the  business.  But it is not in the manufacture of  table "wares alone that Kaolin is important. Large quantities' are utilized in the production. of the finer  grades of printing paper,, and in thc  making of insulators for high power  electric transmission Tines. Austrian  makers had developed an international trade of considerable magnitude in  the latter product before the outbreak of the war. Since the seas  have been closed against the Austrian supplies the' Japanese have gone  Into the business of making these, es-  5-mtials,  and,, largely  because  of  the  WOMEN OF CANADA.  rcrt.C'oulonge, Quebec���������"I am happy  to tell you that your medicine did me  wonderful   good.  I   was   troubled  with weakness and  I tried winea and  other   things   but  received very little  benefit.    I    was  young at the time  and knew very little about medicines  till   a   lady  friend  came  to me with  a   bottle   of   Dr.  Pierce's     Favorite  Prescription.    I   became   strong   and   a  year   afterward   had   twins."���������Mas.   J  Beady, Fort Coulongc, Quebec.  Thousands " of ���������'' women   right   here   in  ...   Canada who' are now blessed with robust  ���������  health cannot understand why thousands  ���������.-.,. of other women continue to worry and  .  Buffer when they can obtain for a trifling  sum Dr.  Pierce's Favorite Prescription,  .*���������  which will surely and quickly banish all  -   pain, distress and misery and restore'the  1, - uromajily health.  Young   mothers  who  preserve the  '"..' charms of face and figure in spite of an  ������������������*' increaaing family and the care of growing  ;���������'   children are always to be envied.    Favor-  .  . ite Prescription    gives the strength and  "sealth   upon   which   happy  motherhood  iepends.    It enables the mother to nottr-  ���������   iah the infant life depending on her, and  , enjoy the happiness of watching the development of a perfectly healthy child.  A   GREAT   BOOK   THAT EVERY  WOMAN   SHOULD   HAVE.  Over   a   million   copies   of  thc   "The  :. People's Common Sense Medical Adviser"  Dure now in the hands of the people.    It is  a book that everyone should have and read  In cose of accident or sickness.  Send fifty cents (or stamps) for mailing  charges to Dr.  Pierce's Invalids' Hotel,  Buffalo, N. Y., arid enclose this notice  md you will receive by return mail, all  .'larges and customs duty prepaid, this  ioable book.  mics of the Ohio State College, and  one from McGill University, Montreal. These documents demonstrate  that the Canadian clay, in additiion  to its high ceramic value, possesses  all the characteristics necessary for  the manufacture of highest grades of  paper, and also the qualities which  suit it for the manufacture of paint  pigments and of manj- toilet articles  by the manufacturing chemists. The  expectation is that porcelains equal  to those of the finest French manufacture may be made in Canada as  it has been found by tests made in  Limoges, France, that the Canadian  clays are equally suitable as the  French   Kaolin.  The market is wide, for the supplies of Kaolin on the North American continent have not sufficed to  meet domestic requirements. A revival  of immigration will produce, automatically, a keen demand for, table  wares, and electricity is merely on  the threshold of development. The  Canadian pioneers in this new potential industry, undoubtedly, will have  the keenest of competitors to face, but  the purity and abundance of the supply and the incidentals to manufacture, with the possible exception of  labor, are factors in their favor. At  present, the consensus of opinion  among the experts concerned, appears  to be that with a little "mothering,"  the industry can be established, and  that Canada has, in this deposit of  china clay, an opportunity to extend  its industrial independence of the  outside world.  light the problems that confront him  To this end he must become his own  schoolmaster; supply himself with  that class of reading that will stimulate his power to think and exercise  good judgment.  The Mesopotamian valley, up which  the British , expedition iiom the the  Persian Gulf has made' its way, is,  according to tradition, man's ��������� first���������  and last paradise. But Tommy Atkins, toiling through the sand under a  blazing sun;'fighting fleas and flies as  well as Turks and Arabs, did not find  the country Edenic. One night when  I the troops were trying to sleep    one  ther:  of  Eden, I wonder what Adam 'and Eve  did with -these 'ere mosquitoes a-buz-  zin| around 'em?"���������New York Independent.  First Traveller���������So you ' have returned from Africa? Had any narrow  escapes  Second X.���������Only one���������a regular  prize-winner, I should think.  First T.���������Let me heai   it.'  Second T ���������Well, I was chased by  a big lion, and, having no cartridges  left. I threw away my rifle and faced  the brute; but as ho sprang at me I  caught him by the lower jaw wih one  hand and by the nose with the other.  And there T stood and held his mouth  open wide until he starved to death.  A narrow escape, eh.  An Always Ready Pill.���������To those of  regular habit medicine is of little concern, but the great majority of men  are not of regular, habit. The worry and cares; of business prevent it,  and out of the irregularity of life  comes dyspepsia .indigestion, liver  and kidney troublesas a protest., The  run-down system demands a corrective and: there is none better than  Parmele'e's Vegetable Pills. They ire  simple in their composition and can  be taken by the most delicately constituted.      ; -  If All Played Out,  Try This Prescription  When that overpowering weariness  and a never-rested feeling comes over  you, *it ��������� shows some serious disorder  is undermining your health. The cure  is simple. Build up the system and  nourish the body back to health by  pure wholesome blood.  The one sure means of doing this  is with -Dr. Hamilton's Pills. They  aie a marvellous aid to appetite���������eon-  vert all you eat into nutriment and  tissue-building,material. Thus a weak'  body is supplied with new nerve fibre,  hardy muscle and firm flesh. Lasting  good health is sure to 10 How. If you  really want to -get well and stay well,  use Dr. Hamilton's Pills, 25c per box  at all dealers.     ���������.'���������''.'.  Out in Wisconsin the game warden,1?.0!^/ ������������ *f S^'+L^r^w  in making his rounds, came upon a-->ie- Bl11* lf thls ls the Gaiden  youthtul fisherman., To, make sure  that the boy was not disobeying the  bass-fishing law, the warden took his  string of fish out of the water and  found only catfish. perch\and suckers  on the line.    ,1 ,   _        ,  A few feet farther down the stream,  however, he found "a large black bass  wiggling on a string' weighted down  with a stone. Naturally, the warden  made inquiry of tho boy as to what  he was doing with that fish.  , "Well, 'you-see," explained the lad,  "he's been taking my bait all the  morning, and so I just tied him up  there until I get through fishing. '  Some Canadians were recently digging a new line of trenches behind  their line in France, writes an officer,  when a jar was found in which were  200 silver crowns. The coins, which  were in fine state of preservation, bore  dates between 1745 and 1747���������a period  in which- heavy fighting was taking  place over the same ground in Flanders. Each member of he working  party was given one of the coins as a  souvenir.  T'cured ja. horse" of .the Mange witlj  MLNARD'S LINIMENT."''^    "'-  ,    ,    CHltlBTOPHEE -SAUNDERS:-  Dalhousie. - -   '.',,,,, ;.--  -~ ��������� ���������'      ������������������.*,, /."/  I  cured  a  horse -jbadly   torn  by  pitch  fork,  with    M-INAKD'S " LINI|  XUENT.  -.St. Peter's. C B? EDW. LINLIEFl  ���������I cured a horse'of a bad swelling bj  MINARD'S .LINIMENT.      " '  '���������  Bathurst, N.B. THOS., W. PAYNBl  ���������  "In  this  war  with  Germany  wha<|  do  you  propose doing?" '-.  "The   Government,    if  I _ could  gel  a big supply contract."  Pat was very fond oi stiong tea.'JHal  always praised a housekeeper accord-f  ing to the strength of the'tea she!  made. Recently the woman of thai  house where Pat worked was pouring!  out the tea for his breakfast. It waal  coming out very slowly" ,and the" gbodJ  woman asked-Pat", to,excuse the^tea-J  pot ,as it had a bad spout. Pat (not!  liking the look of the tea) said, sadly :|  "Oh, begon-ah, m'a'ani"; don't-blam'ol  the taypot, because' anything --weak]  miust go aisy." - ���������-      He serves a bad .master who serv������������i|  the multitude.���������Ex.  Long in the Making  The Prussia of today, with its cursed rule and cursed principles, has  been long in the making, and what  an unshapen, ungodly mass it is! It  has been described as the last remaining hulk of materialistic barbarism. The wonder is that when worshipping at the shrine of mere force,  students from our country and other  countries were so hopelessly blinded  to what was going on around them.���������  Winnipeg Tribune.  Keep  house. :.':  Minard's    Liniment    In    the  First Editor���������Here's one of the most  learned men in the country���������Professor  Skiirimerton���������just passed away. What,  shall I say about him?  Second Editor���������You might refer to  him as a finished scholar.  No child should be allowed to suffer  an hour from worms when prompt relief can be got in a simple but strong  remedy���������Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator.  There is hope for the conscientious  objector. Colonial Sir William Dunn  in a recent speech, said that Mr.  Lloyd-George was of opinion that they  might be employed in repairing  barbed  wire  at the front I  CHILDHOOD AILMENTS  A vivid account of the manner in  which supplies are brought up to Verdun, was recently published in a Paris  newspaper. The road is exploited like  a line of railway, on which a continuous succession of motor lorries  circulate on a circuit oi 140 kilometres.  The lorries follow each other every  twenty seconds, and their regular  march, guided at night by searchlights  at fixed intervals, is one of the most  curious spectacles imaginable.  "What do you think of his nerve?"  exclaimed the old man, who was  notoriously' tricky in business. "He  called me a barefaced robber!!"  "Oh, well." replied the man who  knew him, "probably in his excitement he didn't notice your moustache."  Bchool Teacher���������I'm sorry to say,  Mr. Jones, that your boy is very backward in his studies.  The ailments of childhood are many  but most of them are caused by some  I derangement of the stomach and bowels. Therefore to banish these troubles the stomach must be kept sweet  and the bowels regular. To do this  nothing can equal Baby's Own Tablets. Thousands of mothers have  proved this. Among them is Mrs.  Thomas Holmes, Blissfield, N. B., who  writes. "Every mother in this locality  uses Baby's Own Tablets as we all  consider them the very best medicine  for childhood ailments." The Tablets  are sold by medicine dealers or by  mail at 25 cents a box from the Dr.  Williams' Medicine Co., Brockville,  Out.  , "National hatred is a singular thing.  You will find it. strongest arid most  violent where there is the lowest degree of culture." Thus spoke the German poet Goethe, but that was Borne  years ago.  "So you were at Jack and Nellie's  wedding, were you? How did. Jack  look during the ceremony?'  ;-,','. Everything is good in -its /place.-i .The;.bi]e/*wMchV':pQder certain ,c6ndi-  .tions, causes so much distfessj,lis/Of the greatest -value as;ian;antisep,tic and  cathartic when it'is properly handled by the liver. :'; ^   ' ' ���������.' .  :.������������������������������������������������������ The chief function.: of the liver seems to."be the filtering of bile from the  blood)'���������where it acts as a poison, an(i pouring it into the intestines/ where it  hastens the course of the food mass through the .alimentary canal, and by  its antiseptic influence1 prevents fermentation of the food.     i-J. ;.: ���������    ^^  "WTien you suffer from.;biIiousness and indigestion and have]' a coated tongue, bitter  taste in tlie mouth, headaches and loss of appetite, you will do -well to look to the condition of the liver. Other symptoms are wind on the stomach,: which' causes'belching;.and.  the formation of gaa, which gives rise to dizziness and pains about the heart.  Because the liver has failed, the food in the alimentary canal is fermenting instead  of being digested, looseness and constipation of the bowels alternate,'the. whole, diges--,  tive system is thrown out of order and the blood is poisoned. .'.- ������������������:;  -  Bv immediately awakening the action of the liver and bowels,:Dr.'! Chase's Kidncy-  Liver Pills affords relief for this condition most  promptly.     On  this account'.'."they ;-'.are,  generally recognized aa the most effective cure for biliousness, liver complaint, indigestion, constipation, and the pains and aches which arise from poisons in the blood.     The  benefits are lasting "because this medicine removes the, cause of trouble.      One pill a- dose, 25 cents a box, all dealers, or Edmanson, Bates & CoM Limited, Toronto.  Do not be talked into accepting a substitute.   Imitations disappoint.  ')   I  W. N. U.  1107  I    Jonos���������That's   otrangol At home In      "He looked awfully solemn.   But I  I conversation   with  me  he   seem*    10 I suppose that was only natural, seeing I  /know it ail. 'that he was ringing his own Nell.''  Br. CSi.aoe's Beetoe Book, LdDOO selected MCtae*. sent free if vaa. nwa&on this niaj-wm THE      GAZETTE;     HEDLEY, ,   B.      C.  ,.     \-    '   " ''v'  ** f  -A   ". . 2     *  ���������*?*$  I     \. , -  '    '   -*  ���������, '    -v'1���������'ivj  ..<-.'''-*-3  TROUBLE BREWING IN IRELAND  OVER PUNISHMENT OF REBELS  I JOHN DILLON'S BITTER ATTACK ON GOVERNMENT  [Premier Asquith Visits  Ireland  for the  Purpose  of Making a  Personal Investigation of the Situation, and Will Consult  With the Authorities on  Important Matters    o   London.���������The most dangerous factor  kn Ireland's situation, which had been  recognized since the recent uprising  flashed in the pan, was that, the punishment of the rebels would cause a  Veaction of sympathy among the  frarm-hearted  and    emotional people.  'his threatened danger appears to be  ist materializing.  John Dillon, who is one of the most  Jespected.of the .Nationalists; but of-  i3ii one of the' bitterest antagonists of  plritish rule, attacked the government  the House of Commons in a speech  finch, for bitter denunciation, has not  leen surpassed at Westminster since  I'arnell days.  Premier Asquith has personally  Stepped into the breach, and is taking  lhe unprecedented course of journeying to Dublin to investigate the situation on (the spot and doubtless to  five instructions to Gen. Sir .lohn  [laxwell regarding the'policy which  pie military government must pursue,  iince the chief "civil administrators,  Lord Wimborne, Augustine'Birrell and  Tjir.Matthew Nathan have retired from  (���������ftice.  Mr. Asquih once before took the  Jeins in his���������own hands at a crisis by  Itssuming the secretaryship of war,  Ivhen the threatened Ulster revolt in'  T914 caused the resignation of Colonel  |5eely.  The prime minister's first powers  have. been displayed in playing the  liart of a conciliator, and he now has  Ii task which is likely to demand their  litmost exercise. . He announced that  fie was going to consult with the  Jiuthorities in order to arrive at some  lirrangements satisfactory to Irishmen  J'f'all parties, and no statesman ever  ittempted a harder .achievement. He  ilrankly declared that^the present situation could not continue.  Many of the newspapers, particularity the -Liberal organs, call- upon the  llrisir factions to seize the present opportunity for settling their .long-stand-  ling differences.  The Marquis of Lansdowne intimat-  fed to the House of Lords that the disarmament of all Ireland will be un-  Iclertak'-m- -This would mean the disarmament of the Ulster and National-  list volunteer*, and whether that can  Jbe done depends on Sir Edward Carlson and John Redmond more-than on  [any other individuals.  The House of Commons negatived,  [without division, Mr. Dillon's motion  ��������� demanding that the government  [should immediately declare its intentions. The House of Lords adopted  [without division Lord Loreburn's motion expressing dissatislaction- with  t the government's management of Ire-  'land.  Premier Asquith urged the Irish to  InVaintain their sense of proportion,  | and hot let sympathy for the misled  insurgents cause them to forget the  'deaths of soldiers and civilians, and  'promised that in the future courts-  I martial on murder charges should be  held in  public.  The chief cause of attack on the  'government in the House of Commons  was the revelation that another execution had occurred���������that-of a Fer-  moy man named Kent���������which was the  ,first military1"- execution outside of  Dublin. It was charged by one of the  members that many of the seventeen  hundred persons deported to England  had no connection with the uprising in  Ireland .. ���������-. :  The summary shooting of the Irish  editor^F. Slieehy Skeffington, has  aroused increased protest as. the details have become known.  Pension for Soldiers  of  Rank   and   File   to   Get   The   Sum  $480  Per Year  Ottawa.���������The following are the pensions for the soldiers and sailors of  the Canadian expeditionary forces recommended'by the committee, which,  under the chairmanship of Hon. J. D.  Hazen, have been considered for several-weeks, and which has now made  a report: Rank and file, $480 per  year; squadron' sergeant-major and  quartermaster - sergeant $510; regimental sergeant-major, master gunner and regimental quartermaster-sergeant, $620; warrant officer, *3680;.  lieutenant, $720; captain, $1,000; major, $1,260; lieutenant-colonel, $1,560;,  colonel, $1,890; brigadier - general,  $2,700. '     ',  The conditions'of those who are to  receive pensions -'.will be graded in a  certain class, according to the seriousness of the case. ' There ure si* classes. Those who are carded to be totally ,  disabled will be given the full amount  of the pension and will be placed in  class 1. Examples of total disability  are given a? follows: Loss of both  eyes, both, hands or all fingers and  thumbs, incurable tuberculosis, loss of  ,both legs, insanity and permanent ex-  treme leakage of valves of the heart.  A soldiers wiio"loses both a hand and.  a foot will be placed in class 2' and  will be given 80 per cent, of the full  pension. An instance of class 3 would  be a soldier who lost .one hand and he  would get 60 per cent. Class- 4 in-'  eludes a soldier who lost one eye and  would receive 40 per cent The loss  of one thumb" would place a soldier in  class 5 and he would receive 20 per  cent.  Further grants will be made to those  totally helpless. The amount will be  $250 each year for all ranks up to  that of lieutenant, and with an increasing scale for higher ranks.  Allowances for children of soldiers  of all ranks up to that of lieutenant  will be $6 per.month for each child,  with a varying scale up to the rank  of brigadier-general, whose children  will receive $10 each, rensions for  children will continue until the boys  are 16 years old and for girls until  they'are 17, unless they are mentally  or physically inrirm, when the pensions will continue until they are 21  or  marry, before  that.  When a soldier has been killed, his  widow will be entitled to a pension  equivalent to class 2, which is 80 per  cent. If she remarries she will receive one year's pension in a lump  sum. Her children will receive the  regular'pensions. The children of disabled soldiers who are widowers will  receive $12 per month e'acb.  The administration of -all military  and naval pensions will be placed in  the hands of a commission of three  who will have full authority and from  theirdecisions there will be no appeal.  All pensions are to be determined by  disability without reference to occupation prior to enlistment. No deduction will be made from any pension  because the pensioner may have perfected himself in some trade or occupation.  The Sunday School  LESSON VIII.���������SECOND   QUARTER,  FOR   MAY 21,   1916  Text of the Lesson, Acts xiv, 8-20  Memory Verses, 8-10���������Golden Text,  Isa. xl, 29���������Commentary Prepared  by Rev. D. M. Stearns.  , Irish Heart Beats for Allies  Montreal.���������**Thei great' warm Irish  heart in Ireland and throughout the  empire beats true to the cause of the  allies, because it realizes that the  cause of Belgium, Serbia, Poland arid  Montenegro is practically the cause  of Ireland, the sacred rights of small  people," was a statement made by  Dr. Michael Clark, M. P., for Red  Defer, AJta., in an address given in  the'interests of the Irish Rangers at  the Arena. Dr. CJark was introduced  by Lieut.-Col. Trihey,-of'the Irish  Canadian Rangers, during an intermission in the Creatore band concert.  Hughes  Would  Use American   Legion  Toronto.���������A  special dispatch    from  Ottawa says:  The protest of the U. S. government  over use of the words "American Legion" on the 97th battalion military  badges is not likely to result in the  elimination of the words if the. attitude of Sir Sam Hughes is any guide.  When the general was asked if the  words "American Legion"-were to be  eliminated, he replied: "Why should  they take it off? Isn't an American  universal? Are they not our boys just  as much as any others?"  "Some time ago the U. S. government protested to the British war  office against the use of the words."  ,  U. S. to Make Inquiries  Want: to   Know   What     Punishment  Was  Inflicted  on  Man  Who  Sank the Sussex  Washington.���������Secretary Lansing indicated that the U. S." might make enquiries of the German government regarding the punishment imposed upon  the ' commander of the submarine  which sank the steamer Sussex.  It was not. disclosed how the enquiry would be made. State department officials : were notv prepared  today to say whether the department would insist upon any specific  degree of punishment being inflicted  upon the commander.  There are numerous precedents for  making such an enquiry. Germany  during the trouble in China, insisted  upon the execution of certain persons  in the presence of a German officer.  Secretary Lansing also indicated  that the U. S. might make enquiry regarding the punishment inflicted upon  the submarine commander that sent  the Italian steamer Ancona and the  British steamer Arabic to the bottom.  This chapter completes the story of  Paul's first s evangelistic missionary  tour to Jews and gentiles, and is  spoken of in verse 26 as "the work  which they fulfilled." Being driven  from Antioch, they came to Iconium;  persecuted there they fled to Lystra;  their persecutors followed them, and  at Lystra Paul was stoned to death,  but the Lord revived -him, and then  they went on to Derbe, everywhere  preaching the gospel, telling the glad  tidings and suffering for it, but'winning souls and thus adding to the  Lord the members of His body. From  Derbe they returned through all the  places wttere they had been, and  from Attalia sailed to Antioch," -in  Syria, from whence they had set  forth, and - there rehearsed to the  brethren all that God had done with  them, opening the door of faith to the  gentiles.  , After preaching the gospel in every  place, when, they returned they confirmed the souls of the disciples ,en-  couraging them to continue in the  faith, ordaining elders, praying with  them and commending them to' the  Lord on whom they believed. . One  thing they insisted on was ',that the.  believers must not count suffering  a strange thing, for only by the way  of tribulation can we enter the kingdom (verses 21-23). t When 'we receive  the Lord Jesus we.' become children  of God and heirs of the kingdom, but  then the.'conflict with the world, the  flesh, the devil begins and will continue while we stay on earth. Even  our'Lord said. "In the world ye shall  have tribulation." But He also said,  "Let not your heart be troubled,"  ."See that ye be not .troubled" (John  xvi, 33; xiv, 1, 11; Matt. xxiv.    ).  Our Lord '. told Ananias that He,  would show Saul how great 'things  he must suffer for His name's sake  (Acts ix, 16), and on this first tour  Saul certainly had quite a taste of the  sufferings he enumerates more fully  in II Cor. xi. 23-28. '-All that will live  godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer  persecution" (II Tim. iii. 12). and if  we were more godly in our daily life  we would have more fellowship with  our Lord in this matter, according to  Phil, i, 29. At Iconium they, spake  so boldly in the Lord, and the Lord  was so manifestly with them, working  signs and wonders .by their hands,  that a .great multitude, both of Jews  and Greeks, believed, and they abode  long time there preaching the Lord  Jesus (verses 1-6).  Persecution sent them on to Lystra,  and there they preached the" gospel.  In Paul's estimation there was nothing else worth doing, for this he  counted all else as dross and determined to know nothing but Jesus Christ  crucified, risen, ascended and returning.  The healing of the lame man at/Lys-  tra, who had been born, lame, reminds  us^of.the healing through Peter in  chapter iii of another man who had  been born lame. We also think of the  man in John ix, who was born blind,  and remember the Saviour's reason  why. May -we see in all difficulties  an opportunity fbr God to work and  be-.wiiling.-to- be th'e material. When  the people saw the miracle wrought  through Paul and Barnabas they were  ready to worship them and could  scarcely be restrained ,even after Paul  scarcely them that they were only men  of like passions with themselves and  that the healing of this nian was by  the power of the living God,, who was  -thus seeking to draw them to Himself  and away from all the lying vanities  of their idolatry. Note how the Thes-  salonians turned to God from idols to  serve the living and true God and to  wait for    His  Son    from    heaven -(I  Thess. i, 3.' 10).  So fickle are people that those who  were ready to worship these two'men  of God, being persuaded by the persecutors from Antioch and Iconium, are  equally ready to kill them, and they  actually stoned Paul and drew him  out of the city, supposing him to be  dead, but while the disciples stood  round about him he rose up and came  into the city and the next day was  able to start for Derbe with Barnabas  (verses 19, 20). It is possible that as  Paul was being stoned he thought of  the "day when he stood by and saw  Stephen stoned, but if we are right in  the supposition that II Cor. xii, 1-4  describes his experience while he  seemed to be dead, then he had further fellowship with Stephen and soon  forgot the stones and the persecutors  in the bliss of the paradise, the third  heaven, to which he was taken and  .saw and heard things he could not  describe in words.  It must be a fine thing to be killed  or to be taken out of the body in any  way when it transfers one to such  blissful realities: Such,' no doubt, is  the experience of all who die-in Christ,  and precious in the sight of the Lord  is the death of His saints. In II Cor.  xii, 7-10. there is a suggestion that  Paul's thorn in the flesh was a .result, of his being stoned at Lystra,  but although he was not delivered  from it he was able to .rejoice in it  and glorify God. May the grace of  God enable us to finish the work to  which His Spirit, enabling us to speak  boldly in the Lord and give testimony  to the word of His grace and making  it manifest that Christ is at home in  us. .    " '  GERMANY STARTS NEW CAMPAIGN  TO SECURE PEACE ARRANGEMENTS  LATEST PROPAGANDA LAUNCHED BY THE HUNS  ?3  Germany is Trying to Break Up the Alliance of Her'Enemies by  Inducing One of Them to  Conclude  a Separate Peace*,   ,  Having United States to Act as Meditator   . . 0    Uniform Grade of Butter  Important   Dairy  Conference   Held  at  Regina���������Many Samples Were Used  Regina.���������An important dairy conference, - the first of the kind held in  Canada, took place in Regina May 10  for the purpose of getting together representatives to compare the methods  of grading creamery butter in the  three prairie provinces and adopt a  uniform scale of grading. The purpose  was fully realized. Samples was fully  realized. Samples of butter from  Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and  Montreal were used for-'scoring purposes and the scores of the graders  when compared were remarkably uniform. Differences in viewpoints were  thoroughly discussed, and it was found  quite possible to harmonize them, one  standard and scale adopted being for  all three provinces. ,  Minimum scores will be as follows:  First grade���������Flavor, 39 p'oints out of  45; total-.score, 92 out of 100 points.  Second grade ��������� Thirty-seven for  flavor and 85 for total.  The conference was. ��������� composed of  Dominion and provincial representatives as follows: Geo. P. Barr, chief  dairy commissioner; F. C. Logan,  Marker, dairy commissioner; H. S.  Pearson and J. Flann, produce graders, Saskatchewan���������W. A. Wilson,  dairy commissioner; F. C. Logan," deputy commissioner; J. R. Crowe and  Prof. McKay, produce graders. Manitoba���������J. W. Mitchell, dairy commissioner; L. A. Gibson, dairy produce  grader.  The day1 was a very husy^'one, 25  samples of butter being used in securing comparison, and the discussion  of scores resulted in the adjustment  of minor differences. The result will  mean that, graders' certificates from  the three provinces will be practically  uniform.  East African Germans  Secure Reinforcements and Advancing  Against British Lines,  F������3ports  Gen. Smuts  London.���������The German forces in German East Africa, after retiring fiom  the Kondos-lrangi district, received  reinforcements and are again advancing toward the British lines, according to an official announcement made  tonight. The statement says:  ' "Telegraphing late on May 9, Lieut.  Gen. Smuts reports that the enemy  in the ivondos-lrangi area, after our  occupation of that centre, fell back a  considerable distance along the roads  leading to the central" railway at  Dodona and Kilimatinde. There they  received reinforcements and again  approached the Ivondos-lrangi district, where our forces are quite sufficient to deal with them.  "An aeroplane despatched to reconnoitre the line of the Usambra railway failed to return. ���������  "The rains are abating. The Belgian  advances into.Raunda, both north and  south of Lake Kivu have progressed  satisfactory despite the natural difficulties of the country, increased by  the recent rainfall."  Grain Commission to Report on Operations of Act  Ottawa.���������Hon. Arthur Meighen stated that the Board of Grain Commissioners has been appointed a commission to examine into and report upon  the operations of the Grain Act, and  what defects, if any, have been found  in it. Also as to whether any improvements are necessary.. The commission will also report to the'govern-  ment upon the general course of transport of grain from the west, and what  are the causes which hinder a greater  portion of Canadian Grain going  through Canadian ports, etc. .  Apparently the grain board has  simply been instituted a commission  of inquiry into these matters, and  there is no enlargement of the general  powers of the board.'  Killed in German Riots^  London.���������A Geneva despatch tothe  Daily Express says 300 civilians are  reported killed and wounded -'in .-the  recent riots in Strassburg and Mannheim. ���������  Considers  Note a Hint at Peace  The Hague.���������The Netherland Anti-  War Council has cabled Hamilton  Holt, of New York, that it considers  Germany's reference to peace in her  submarine note to the United States  inasmuch as she twice declared her  readiness for peace is a fresh inducement for united neutral mediatory action. ..The council suggests the. cooperation of the American peace societies m urging President Wilson to  promote a neutral conference to offer  mediation.  Sank  Lnemy Transport  Paris.���������A French submarine sank an  enemy transport laden with twar material in the lower Adriatic sea, says  a Havas dispatch from Rome.  Asquith  States  Victory  Certain  London.���������Premier Asquith, addressing a delegation of members of the  Russian  Duma visiting London  said:  "The allies know that victory is  certain. We will stand together, no  matter how long and severe the test  of endurance, until we have beaten  to the ground the 'orces which have  withstood us, and can begin in peace  to. rebuild the shaken fabric of European civilization."  Alberta Town Opens Cottage Hospital  Edmonton.���������The first cottage hospital in Canada, supported by a municipality was opened at Beverly a small  town lying east of -Edmonton and adjoining this city. The hospital is  sustained by means of town assessment and has an attendant physician  and nurse. Among those present at  the official opening was T. B. Kidner.  vocational secretary of the military  hospital commission, Ottawa, who  spoke in laudatory terms of the action taken by Beverly which, he said,  is put in a, unique position in the Dominion.  Bow of Destroyer in Drydock  London.���������Unusual     importance    is  attached    in Berlin to the   fact, that  Ambassador    Gerard    sent   Secretary  .  Gie.w t.������  Copenhagen  to  teleurapli    a  '<V���������''���������{J report to  Wash-iv.-ton re-rar.Jiiiu  oS*;. ambassador's    recent   conference  rifti, Emperor    Wilhelm,   Chancellor  'on .Bethrnann-hlollweg   and Foreign  "*inister   vbhJagow, says the Amster-  Jam (���������orre^ppndent of the Daily Express. ���������:'. ���������' ���������'���������!%$������������������������,'.���������*��������� .'���������"���������', ���������:���������-,-:.  ���������y ,;,-,:\*#^>V������.. -  Six Days in Open Boat  Liverpool.���������Nine members of the  crew of the French fishing vessel  Bernadotte were landed here. They  were six days in an open boat after  their vessel was sunk by a submarine  160. miles from land, and when bound  for the Grand Banks of Newfoundland  for fish.  Turks Grand Council    Out  For Peace  London.���������A Saloniki despatch to the |  Morning Post from Constantinople!  says that a grand council was held  in the Sultan's palace at Dolma Bag-  tche to consider peace terms. Preachers in the principal mosques are urging the people to "prepare for liberation." A select committee is forming,  and grave events are anticipated.  Will Help Married Soldiers  London.���������The long awaited government plan for assisting married soldiers to meet their household expenses  while in the army will soon be made  public. According to the morning  newspapers any single or married man  will be permitted to apply,for grants  to enable him to meet such liabilities  as mortgage interest, building ,or furniture instalments,^ rent, taxes, insurance and in the case of married men,  the expense of educating children. The  assistance granted will in.no case exceed two pounds.  Lloyd's Rates on   German U. S. Break  London.���������Rates of fifty and sixty  per cent, are quoted by Lloyds for insurance covering the risk of disturbance of the existing peaceful relations  between the United States and Germany. Sixty per cent, is quoted  against the risk of breaking off of  diplomatic relations within three  months, and fifty per cent against the  risk of a declaration of war.      -  ^*V...Z-:  Wilson Note a Masterpiece  Rome.���������The Tribune commenting on  the German-American situation says  The note of the President-professor of  the United States is a masterpiece  compared with the too philosophical  and ponderous note of thc government  of the German Empire. The Tribune  adds that the Teutonic militarist pride  must bow its head before the clear  warning of President Wilson.  30  Unarmed,  22  Neutral  Vessels Torpedoed   in   Year  .London.���������Thirty unarmed British  merchantment and 22 neutral vessels  were torpedoed without warning between May 7, 1915, and May 7, 2916.  Thos. J. McNamara, financial secretary to the admiralty said in thc  House of Commons today. He added  that he understood these figures were  known to the American government.  British Defending Ninety Miles of The  Western Front  London.���������British troops are now  holding ninety miles of the western  front, it is announced. The British  lines extend from a point north of  Ypres to a point hear the Somme.  When the French concentrated at  Verdun the British took over additional territory.  Rebellion Damage is Enormous  London.���������A deputation of residents  of Dublin which will wait on Premier  Asquith shortly, to urge that the government make a grant for restoring  Dublin, estimates that the total damage there will exceed ������3,000,000. It is  expected that John Redmond will head  tl-"5 delegation.  London.���������There is no doubt whatever, says the Daily Telegraph, that  during the last few dayB a definite  attempt has been made by the,- German government to impress neutrals  with its strong desira'for peace with  a view to inducing them to come forward as mediators and' break up the  alliance of its enemies by getting one  of them to conclude a separate peace.  For the rresent it would not serve  any uselul purpose to disclose tlie  facts m their entirety, but it can be  said that the .Kaiser ha0 personally  sent a letter to President Wilson.  v\ ashmgton ���������Officials continue to  to deny.that any formal movement on  behalf of a general peace in Europe  had been inaugurated so far as lhe  U. S. was aware. They said they  knew of no dnect'bid from any of tho  belligerent powers for the exercise of  Piesident Wilson's good oi'ices. It  is known that in the letter fiom Pope  Benedict, delivered ,to "President Wilson his holiness expressed the hope  that the V. S would not, become involved in Hostilities with Germany,  but so far as can be a&co-tavieJ,  Piesident Wilson lias not confirmed  to any official the'report that lhe Pope  proposed that this so^ornment sha I  undertake the role of medntor at once.  But in spite of, their assertions that  no movement toward peace has been  .  made that involves the XL* S . officials "  are convinced 'that' a propaganda has  been started with a view to strengthening the suggestion "���������of an ending of the  wai.   That the propaganda is of Ger-  manufacture  is  not  doubted,  and it  is expected    to soon    become'   widespread.   With the presentation "of this  note the submarine controversy is' regarded here as practically\closed and  negotiations  so  far/as  they t concern  the past virtually-concluded.' ' ,'.    '   ��������� 1-*,'   i *  Brilliant Charge     ~  By the;ITeomaitryV-  In Face of Machine  Guns They Won. V^l^'i  Position of the Turks''in Fight    :^v &?$������.  at  Aggia   **   *   ���������*''C^M[  London.���������In an official communiquft.Vv^tBi  issued in Cairo relating to the light v* ?#������l'  at Agagia, mention 'is made offJ.he^^  "'brilliant and effective chaigo-**bf ^het^Ml  Doisetshire Yeomanry." >��������� **r^f|!  The following ->details- aie nowto'^S^i  hand: s t *   "  "The British* force which left la-  tru on the morning *of February 20  had a long and trying marcli across  desert sands for live days, ' before  they were enabled "to engageJ the- en-  cm v. It was early m the morning  of February 26 that they set out from  Unzeildh to attack him. The position  of the enemy was, as already stated,'  a strong one Nun Bey had assembled  his followers on a dominating ridge at  Agagia, about 15 miles southeast of  Baicini. Somewhat m front of the  main body Gaafar Pasha had established his machine gunners. He had  plenty of time to examine the ground  and choose the most suitable and  screened position fox- three machine  guns, which he made ready to meet  the British onslaught. But he never  bargained for one tnmg, the "madness' as he terms it of our yeomanry.  .Never did I calculate." tie said,  "that your yeomanry would do such  an unwarlike thing as to charge my  machine guns. It was magnificent,  but it was not war."  The Dorsets swept across the open  towards  Gaarfar  Pasha and his machine   ffuns.     Ooncentiated   fne   was  immediately brought to bear on    the  advancing  troops,  and   Gaarfar  waited   calmly  to   see  tfiem  melt    away  and waver and retreat.    Bui  not so.  On  they  came  like   the   wind,  as  H  such a thing as a machine gun    did  not  exist.    Men  were  tailing,  it    Is  true,   but not a head  looked  to    the  right or left to take stock of the loss.  .Nearer   and   nearer   they   came   and.  as he spurred on his gunners Gaafar  stood  amazed  at  the    intrepidity    of  these   British    yeomanry        On   they  swept like an irresistible force, while  the machine guns sent out their deadly missies;  but Ihe enemy's fire was  becoming unsteady as the courage of  the gunners  wavered.      Still    Gaafar  looked    for   a   waver     *n   the   British  ranks,   butm  vain.     The  fire,of  bis  gunners  became more  and   more unsteady as the yeomanry got closer and  closer.    Then their hands  seemed  lo  become paralyzed and like a cyclone  thc Dorsets swept over them, and m  the next minute Gaafar, with a sword  cut across his arm, lay on the ground  with   his  followers  dead  or  wounded  beside him.    It was a great sight, m  the words of the Arab commander himself, it was bravery unparalleled."  4%  ,-i!  To Enforce Prohibition Law in Manitoba  Winnipeg.-- Rev. J. E. MacLean,  secretary of the Social Service Council has been appointed prohibition  commissioner for Manitoba. He will  have a staff of inspectors under him.  The license department at present existing goes automatically out of existence on June 1 and Mr. MacLean  will take over his new duties on thai  date. He has resigned his position  with the Social Service.  Photos   copyright    by   American  Association and  Muller.  JPresa  Claim  Bombs on   Port Said  Berlin.���������An official    Turkish    communication    dated  May  io  says thut  two     Turkish     aeroplanes      droppeil  bombs   successfully   on   April  25     On  Danes tc  England to  Get Concession   the  drydocks  and  oil  tanks   at  Port  Copenhagen.���������A delegation of infill-1 Said,  ential Danes representing commerce,  agriculture and shipping js going to  England to begin negotiations to  facilitate castbound shipmavn!". especially of coal and foodstuffs *h$ scar-  I citv of wluch u* causuuz anxiety.  Will  Try   Liebknecht  Berlin.���������The business committee of  the Reichstag has declined to consider  a motion to postpone the trial of Lieb-  I knocht oi suspend his arrest.       k,  r<vsa  -&������&%&  ^W''*  Mx  lA,j",j  !<>���������  Jii i,':' ,S'������ _,  - A-eH*      if,-;, >'  V'-'l  ' ��������� J " ���������*-*"���������*��������� V        v������,I /  V---1  .. <-f3'n^*t*    Vl-^^-  "S?**-)'"^"*  S /f"  ������-' (!  ft ft.-  M1,    ���������'..is-sr  ->$  i  4'>  THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      B.      C  - "-'Oi  f1      V'.  '���������' -f       'li-.-)  i'     -L,^ vtvw (__ for-  1  If  *'l I  rb.  *���������: .vyi-v ���������  Sunlight Soap is made for the  housewife's profit, for only  thereby can the makers hope  to profit. Sunlight Soap makes  your work lighter, your clothes  whiter, your home brighter. It  is mild and pure and does not  harm  either hands or fabric.  ,     H5  Bmsx^r^^a^e^^sxiass^sxaeiEai  rfo> evea������y SPORT  and RECREATION  Kin t met. *-i:*jmmt*n������*imm*maB*Ge-S3Ut*^xttntmmMmtm^*m  "Wovn hy every member  of the family  50LD BV ALL GOOD SHOE DEALERS  "S*fJ-ffl"*-a23JEBS"*"f2-"***-^^  e������  Silver  ream  C  It will clean more  sIKerware In les������  time, \nth less expense, than nny  other preparation  made, "ideal" is  not an electro-plat-  lag preparation)  removes nothing  but the dirt, leaving: the silverwaie  like new. Put up  in eight and ciirh-  teen-ounce bottles,  packed three dozen  in case.  At All Jewellers  Valuable Clay Deposits  C.N.R.  Building a Spur  Line in Quebec That Will Op2n up Extensive  Kaolin  Beds  g  The ousting of German and Austrian poicelam wares fiom the Canadian tnaiket in favm- of "Made in  Canada" products has been brought  appieciabiy closer by the construction of a spui line, by the Canadian  Northern Railway fiom its Montfort  branch, to an extensive deposit of  Kaolin near Hubeidc.ui, in Quebec  It is from similar deposits of that  natuial tesource that manufacturers  in the Teutonic empires have produced the supplies of china-wares that  have been marketed to homes in all  paits ol Ihe world, md the prevalence  of the "Made in G'-rrnanv" t-iwin-  lion on the underside of cups, saucers, aud plates in the a\ ei asje hjiiie  in Ctintdfi alone, furnishes an indication of the widespread character and  value of the  business.  But it is not in the manufacture of  table wares alone that Kaolin is important. Latge quantities are utilized in the production of the finer  grades of printing paper, and in the  making of insulators for high power  electtic transmission lines. AusTrian  makers had developed an international tiado of considerable magnitude in  the latter product before the outbreak of the war Since the seas  have been closed against tho Austrian supplies the Japanese have gone  into the business of making these, es-  ?-mtials,  and,  largely  because of the  WOMEN OF CANADA.  Fort Coulonge, Quebec���������-"I am happy  to tell you that your medicine did me  wonderful good.  I was troubled  with weakness and  I tried wines and  other things but  received very little  benefit. I was  young at the time  and knew very little about medicines  till a lady friend  came to me with  a bottle of Dr.  Pierce's Favorite  Prescription. I became strong and a  year afterward had twins."���������Mas. J  Bradt, Fort Coulonge, Quebec.  Thousands   of ; women   right   here   id  Canada who are now blessed with robust  health cannot understand why thousands  .v of other women continue^ to worry _ and  .   suffer when they can obtain for a trifling  'sum  Dr.  Pierce's Favorite Prescription,  '".which will surely and quickly banish ali  rrpain, distress and misery and restore'the  , womanly health.  Young   mothers   who  preserve  the  oharms of face and figure in spite of an  ������������������' increasing family and the care of growing  . children are always to be envied. "Favorite Prescription    gives the strength and  health   upon  which  happy motherhood  Jepends.    It enables the mother to nourish the infant life depending on her, and  enjoy the happiness of watching the development of a perfectly healthy child.  A   GREAT   BOOK  THAT EVERY  WOMAN   SHOULD   HAVE.  Over a million copies of the "The  People's Common Sense Medical Adviser"  are now in the hands of the people. It is  x book that everyone should have and read  In case of accident or sickness.  Send fifty cents (or stamps) for mailing  charges to Dr.  Pierce's Invalids' Hotel,  Buffalo, N. Y.,  and enclose this notice  ind you will receive bv return mail, all  !-.arges and customs duty prepaid, thin  luable book.  cheapness of the labor available to  manufactme theie, the industry seems  to have made remarkable progress.  1 hey aie exporting at a low price and  'i.ive already got into touch with  Canadian users. This Quebec supply  touches the glass industry, 'too, for  the by-product is a pure silica-sand,  which is suitable for the manufacture  of glass and sandpaper, and is utiliz-  ible as moulding sand and for other  purposes.  Kaolin is supposed to be decomposed feldspar, and occurs in pockets or  fissures of varying depths. The color  ranges fiom a faint yellow to pure  white, the latter being the more valuable Its fieedom from quartz, mica,  and othei particles, is also a factor.  The deposit rendered accessible by  the Canadian Northern is supposed to  be many thousands of feet in depth,  and is pure white in shade, and experts consider that the higher  grades of porcelain and pottery may  be manufactured, and of couise, insulators as well. Success in the burning of the clay into the various products of a high grade, depends  greatly upon the character of the  fuel. As firewood is abundant and  cheap in Northern Quebec, the Canadian deposit appeais to have been  placed in the best environment.  The Canadians who are interested  in this development have received  fiom the Hon. Mr. Pelhtier, agent  general foi the province of Quebec in  London, England, a report made for  him by Dr. .Bigot of Paris, on the  ceramic possibilities of the Kaolin or  China Clay found in the province of  Quebec; one by Mr. Jos. Keele, director of the Bureau of Ceramics of the  Dominion Geological Survey, one by  Edward Orton. Jr., Professor of Ceramics of the Ohio State College, and  one from McGill University, Montreal These documents demonstrate  that the Canadian clay, in additiion  to its high ceramic value, possesses  all the characteristics necessary for  the manufacture of highest grades of  paper, and also the qualities which  suit it for the manufacture of paint  pigments and of many toilet articles  by the manufacturing chemists. The  expectation is that porcelains equal  to those of the finest French manufacture may be made in Canada as  it has been found by tests made in  Limoges, France, that the Canadian  clays are equally suitable as the  French   Kaolin  The market is wide, for the supplies of Kaolin on the Noith American continent have not sufficed to  meet domestic requirements A revival  of immigration will pioduce, automatically, a keen demand for table  wares, and electricity is merely on  the threshold of development. The  Canadian pioneers in this new potential industry, undoubtedly, will have  the keenest of competitors to face, but  the punty and abundance of the supply and the incidentals to manufacture, with the possible exception of  labor, are factors in their favor. At  present, the consensus of opinion  among the experts concerned, appears  to be that with a little "mothering,"  the industry can be established, and  that Canada has, in this deposit of  china clay, an opportunity to extend  its industrial independence of the  outside world.  What We Need as_JFarmefs  .What /Farmers   Need 'rVTore' Frequent  Contact with Fellow Men to  ~     ���������  Stimulate   Mental   Action  Just now theie are all Vorts of theories put foith as to the need of    the  fanner���������agitation   on   the  subject    of  faim    credits,    mci eased     marketing,  facilities, more and better co-operai/ion  along the lines or pioduction of farm  products,  their'sale  and  pioper  preparation foi the coribiirnei     All these  and many   moie worthy   subjects me  hemg pressed' upon  tlie  attention of  ��������� the faimer     And yet piogiess is very  slow.    Why? For the reason that the  one   first   and  greatest   need   of   the  farmers  must  be  met    befoiei those  other things can follow.    What is that  need?    A   broader  cultivation  of the  mind, so that we as farmers can successfully grasp these problems of the  farm.   We do not realize as we should  that the isolation    of our   farm   life  breeds   a  mental   sloth   and  indifference, makes us dull and umesponsive  to mental action     As a consequence  all these good things that aie put he-  fore  us  for  adoption  are  imperfectly  comprehended.   We must comprehend  better than we do the true philosophy  and effect upon our minds of the kind  of a life we are living.    We must see  that it is not our toil .that makes us  what we aie so much as a lack of contact  with one  another  and  the  outside world.   The cities and villages i re  the great centres of mental activity.  Why? Not because  the  people there  toil  less,  but lather that they  have  greater and more    frequent    contact  with each other. t  The old Bible' was right when it  said, "as iron sharpeneth iron so does  the countenance of a man that of his  fnend." Larger contact makes the  city and village people more" keenly  alive to what they need as a class.  Hence they co-operate together more  readily to obtain what they need in  the way of education of their children,  the building of good streets, sewerage, electric lighting, 'and the agitation of public questions that effect the  welfaie of all.      '   i   .'  Of couise the concentration of ]ife in  these centres brings with it certain  evils. Any form of life has its own  evil, farm life as well as all othei s.  But the great fact remains that close  contact among men piomotes mental  activity and a lack of that contact  promotes mental dullness. Now right  at this point occurs the supreme need  of every farmer's life. He must take  extra effort, to arouse his powers of  mind, to increase his 'intelligence m  order that he may see in their right  light the problems that confront him.  To this end he must become his own  schoolmaster; supply himself with  that class of reading that will stimulate his power to think and exercise  good judgment  The French Air Terror' :  - ---.-^.,...,,���������_j���������_  Naverre,    the  French'1' Aviator, "--'Has  < Established   a  Reputation  ,, Naverre is1 one of'tlie national names,  of France and a wholesome 'terror ,to  the aviators of Germany. A few weeks  ago he brought down three1 machines  of the enemy in'-the clouds rabove the  sectors occupied by the Huns in tho  Verdun battle atea.J That made eight  in all since he'took''to flying a lew  months  after   the   war   began.',,���������,?������������������ ,,  'Vhen he had finished his triple  victory at'VeidunV he'complained of1  the breakfast 'that1 was given/ i.him,  cursed his /fate ������> that he-rfhad., ,not  wiought havoc upon four of the German air craft, and utteied a dissent  against having to go'to bed. Which  simply means that Naverre,, has a  temperament. 'He can be angry, too,  when out of sight in the heavens: '  His observer on one occasion made  him intensely, wroth. When only  about a hundred feet away from' a  Geiman 'machine' his'companion' fired  at the aeroplane/ and'missed, .Naveire  immediately flew home, descended  and opened a fire ol vituperation upon his unfortunate > second. ','Give me  a chance,?').said the observer, "and I  will 're-establish myself m' your esti-'  mation." Navene at first reluctantly  and then 'gencrous'y consented. The  chance came in'two days' after, .when  sailing through space Na-verre spotted  iu jAiatik. Wh'irling up into the sky  'to get a proper1 height, he "peaked  himself," mjthe flying language. That  is, he made i a nose-;on charge.  ��������� ' /      I  This time.theiobsorver's^erve stood  the test. He took the fire of the German without' a quiver. When he was  within 30 meties���������Naveire's favorite  fete���������he, opened ,upon the enemy. Both  Germans were wounded and the engine was "shot full of,holes. Naverre  circled about 'the (plane after it landed  and patted his observer on the back.  An Oil That is Famous.���������Though  Canada was not the birthplace of Dr.  Thomas' Eclectric Oil, it is the home  of that famous compound. From here  its good name was spread to Central  and South America, the West Indies,  Australia- and' New Zealand. That is  for aheld enough to attest its excellence, for in all these, countries it is  on sale and in demand:  (1  'l.i   ;  ;������it,  spotSjirqm, such  things-  ,as oil-clotn  table tops,  No   March   on   Berlin  Germany has, we believe, shot her  bolt on land whatever she may do by  piracv m the effort to.open,the door  of the seas. But that does not mean  that she is not still a foimidable toe.  Put upon the 'defensive her power of  resistance* will be still little short, of  her maximum and no one at this stage  of the war is likely to cultivate the old  dreams of a march on Berlin. Ihe  war will mot end in that jWay. It could  only, end in that way by an unthinkable sacrifice of life. It is much more  likely to end when Germany realizes  that she is beaten. Already she is  realizing that she cannot win '  i   t  The Mesopotamian valley, up which  the British expedition horn the the  Persian Gulf has made its' way, is,  according to tradition, man's i first���������  and last paradise. But Tommy Atkins, toiling through the sand under a  blazing sun,''fighting fleas and flies as  well as Turks and Arabs, did not find  the country Edenic. One night when  the tioops were trying to sleep    one  First Traveller���������So you have returned from Africa? Had any narrow  escapes  Second 1'.���������Only one���������a regular  prize-winner, I should think.  First X.���������Let me heai  it.  Second X���������Well, I was chased by  a big lion, and, having no cartridges  left, 1 threw away my rifle and faced  the br,ute; but as ho sprang at me I  caught him by the lower jaw wih one  hand and by the nose with the other.  And there T stood and held his mouth  open wide until he starved to death.  A narrow escape, eh.    the tioops were trying to sleep    one  n���������+ ,-~ wico'nn'n, +i��������� ������������������~,���������< .i        soldier was heard to say to another:  Out m Wisconsin the game warden, '.. ,.-���������.������������������   n,ii   ,* +v,,��������� ,��������� +f,��������� r���������.j0��������� ���������*  ir,   mnlnno-    hls   1-m, n ,M     onmo   i,tv,���������    n\ _ >re.   Bl11-   lf   thl?   1S   t]}e   Garden   Of  Tailor how many pockets in you  'trousers?r,    J-~ >   '.-.i-'.   ',      -j, r.  Customer���������Only one, please;, ,m;  wifer is a'busy woman,'"and-*Iiw'ant t<  save her'time when ,she. goes throuel  them, i  -'���������"  ���������---' ",r''"^'  I cured "-a horse of ,the Mange wit!  MLNARD'S LINIMENT."   "-'   >'=>  (JHK1STOPHER   SAUNDERS..-  Dalhousie. *   ���������   . ������,; -  I  cured  a  horse ,badly  torn  by  pitch fork,  with    MINAKD'S    LINI  JUENT.  -St., Peter's. C. B'. EDW. LINLIEP  -     *      ', "  I cured a horse of a bad swelling bj  MLNARD'S LINIMENT.       ' '       -  ,Bathurst, N.B. THOSt/ W. PAYNB  If All Played Cut,  Try This Prescription  An Always Ready Pill.���������To those of  regular habit medicine is of little concern, but the great majonty of men  are not of. regular habit. The worry and.' cares;.of business prevent "it,  and out of. the irregularity of life  comes 'dyspepsia .indigestion, liver,  and kidney troubles as a protest., The  run-down system demands a corrective and there is none better, than  Parmelee's Vegetable Pillsl They arc  simple in their composition and can  be taken by the most delicately constituted.'   '���������;'���������'"'-,'.  Long in the Making  The Prussia of today, with its cursed rule and cursed principles, has  been long .-in'the making, and what  an unshapen, ungodly mass it is! It  has been described as the last remaining hulk of materialistic barbarism. The wonder is that when worshipping at the shrine of mere force;  students from bur'country and other  countries were so hopelessly blinded  to what was going on around them.���������  Winnipeg Tribune.  When that overpowering weariness  and a never-iested feeling comes over  you, it shows some serious disorder  is undermining your health. The cure  is simple Build up the system and  nourish the body back to health by  pure wholesome blood.  The one sure means of doing this  is with Dr Hamilton's Pills. They  aie a maivellous aid to appetite���������con-  veit all you eat into nutriment and  tissue-building matenal. Thus a weak'  body is supplied with new nerve fibre,  hardy muscle and film flesh. Lasting  good health is sure to iollow. If you  really want to get well and stay well,  use Dr. ��������� Hamilton's Pills, 25c per box  at all dealers. .  in making his rounjs, came upon a  youthful tisheiman. To make sure  that the boy was not disobeying the  bass-fishing law, the warden took his  string of fish out of the water and  found only catfish, perch .and suckers  on the  line. - , , <.  A few feet farther do^n the stream,  however, he found a large black bass  wiggling on a string weighted down  with a stone. Naturally, the warden  made inquiry of th^ boy as to what  he was doing with that fish.  "Well, you see," explained the lad,  "he's been taking my bait all the  morning, and so I just tied him up  there until I get through fishing. '  Eden, I wonder what Adam 'and Eve  did with -these 'ere mosquitoes a-buz-  zin| around 'em?"���������New York Independent  ''In this war with Germany whal  do you propose doing'"  "The Government, if I could gel  a big supply contract."      '        *    ,   ���������  Some Canadians were recently digging a new line of trenches behind  their line in France, writes an officer,  when a jar was found in which were  230 silver crowns. Tlie coins, which  were in fine state of preservation, bore  dates between 1745 and 1747���������a period  in which heavy fighting was taking  place over the same ground in Flanders Each member of he working  party was given one of the coins as a  souvenir.  Pat was very fond ol strong tea.iila  always praised a housekeeper according to the strength of the 'tea she  made. Recently the woman, of the  house where Pat worked was pouring  out the tea for his breakfast. It was  coming out very, slowly .and the" good  woman asked Pat to;excuse the -teapot ,as it had a bad spout. Pat '(not,  liking the look of the tea) said, sadly t  "Oh, bego'i^iti," fria'ani",- don't'-blamo  the taypot, because anything weak  ���������must go aisy." - -   - ���������  He serves_a.bad_master who serve#l|  the multitude.���������Ex. " -----    .  First Editpr���������Here's one of the most'  learned men in the country���������Professor  Skimmerton���������just passed away. What,  shall I say-about him?  Second Editor���������You might refer to  him as a.finished scholar.  Keep  house. '  Minard's    Liniment    In    the  A vivid account of the manner in  which supplies are brought up to Verdun, was recently published in a Paris  newspaper. The road is exploited like  a line of railway, on which a continuous succession of motor lorries  circulate on a circuit of 140 kilometres.  The lorries follow each other every  twenty seconds, and their regular  march, guided at night by searchlights  at fixe'd intervals, is one of the most  curious spectacles imaginable.  No child should be allowed to suffer  an hour from worms when prompt relief can be got in a simple but strong  remedy���������Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator.  There is hope for-the conscientious  objector. Colonial Sir William Dunn  in a recent speech, said that Mr.  Lloyd-George was of opinion that they  might be employed in repairing  barbed wire at the fiont I  "What do you think of his nerve?"  exclaimed the old man, who was  notoriously tricky in business. "He  called me a barefaced robber!!"  "Oh, well," replied the man who  knew him, "probably in his excitement he didn't notice your mous-  tache."  W. N. U. 1107  School Teacher���������I'm sorry to say,  Mr. Jones, that your boy is very backward in his studies.  I Jonas���������That's strange I At home in  j conversation with me he seem* to  J know it .ail.  CHILDHOOD AILMENTS  The ailments of childhood are many  but most of them are caused by some  derangement of the stomach and bowels, Therefore to banish these troubles the stomach must be kept sweet  and the bowels regular. To do this  nothing can equal Baby's Own Tablets. Thousands of mothers have  proved this. Among them is Mrs.  Thomas Holmes, Blissfield, N. B., who  writes. "Every mother in this locality  uses Baby's Own Tablets aa we all  consider them the very best medicine  for childhood ailments." The Tablets  are sold by medicine dealers or by  mail at 25 cents a box from the Dr.  Williams' Medicine Co., Brockville,  Ont.  "National hatred is a singular thing.  You will find it strongest arid most  violent where there is the lowest de-.  gree of culture." Thus spoke the German poet Goethe, but that was some  years ago.  "So you were at Jack and Nellie's  wedding, were you? How did Jack  look during the ceremony f"  "He looked awfully solemn. But I  suppose that was only natural, seeing  that he waj ringing hi- own Nell.''  _ '^   EverTthing is good in4ts:,place.������������������': "THe'bilej'' which, |inder ceift^in ������ondi-  ,Moji8, causes so, much distress^ is; of the greatest value as-,jan.;^^e.i?itic,- and  cathartic when it is properly; handled by the liver. n   ?  ��������� :���������-..... The chief function; of the liver seems to he the filtering of bile from the  ..: blood,; where it acts as a poison,, anji^pouring it into the intestines,: where it  hastens, the course of the food mass through the   alimentary; 'canal, and' by  its antiseptic influence prevents fermentation of the food.      ������������������^���������X'-'^v.^r"-'''  When you suffer from:biliousness and indigestion  and have? a coated tongue,  bitter  taste in the mouth, headaches and loss of appetite, you will do well to look to the condition of the liver.    Other symptoms are wind on the stomach, which���������"-causes helchingj.aad,.  the formation of gas, which gives rise to dizziness and pains about the heart.  Because the liver has failed,.the food in the alimentary canal is fermenting instead  of being digested, looseness and constipation of the bowels alternate, the whole digestive system is thrown out of order and the blood is poisoned.  By immediately awakening the'action of the liver and bowels, Dr. Chase's Kidney-  . Liver Pills affords relief for this condition most  promptly.    On  this account  they saro  generally recognized as the most effective cure for biliousness,: liver complaint, indigestion, constipation, and the pains and aches which arise from poisons in the blood.     The  benefits are lasting because this medicine removes the cause: of trouble.  ...    One pill a- dose, 25 cents a box, all dealers, or "Edmanson, Bates & Co., "Limited, Toronto.  Do not be talked Into accepting a substitute.   Imitations disappoint.  M  I  v>f  5f*  ',������  n:i-:;i  ? >  I  *"V-  ''ft  Skr. XSutse'u Bet-foe Book. 1.1000 aeZected -redoes, sent ������roo iSvou -me-ation taia smtm. A<- ���������*������������������'.-������  THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      B.      C.  w   -i  TROUBLE BREWING IN IRELAND  OVER PUNISHMENT OF REBELS  [JOHN DILLON'S BITTER ATTACK ON GOVERNMENT  {Premier Asquith Visits  Ireland  for' the  Purpose  of  Making a  Personal Investigation of the Situation, and Will Consult  With the Authorities on  Important Matters    o :   London.���������The most dangerous factor  |n Ireland's situation, which had been  recognized since the ' recent uprising  flashed in the pa'n, was that, the punishment of the rebels would cause a  Jeaction of sympathy among the  Ivrarm-hearted and emotional people.  |'his threatened danger appears to be  ist materializing.  John Dillon, who is one of the most  lespected of the .Nationalists, but .of-  Jsii one of the bitterest antagonists of  British rule,-attacked the government  |ri the House of Commons in a speech  vhich, for bitter denunciation, has not  Jeen surpassed at Westminster since  j'arnell days.  Premier Asquith has" personally  Itepped into the breach, and is taking  ihe unprecedented course of journeying to Dublin to investigate the situation on the spot and' doubtless to  five instructions to Gen. Sir .lohn  ilaxwell regarding th'e policy which  fie'military government must pursue,  [tnce the chief civil administrators,  fiord -Wimborne, Augustine Birrell and  Kir Matthew Nathan have retired from  ftfice., ' ���������"    '  Mr. Asquih once before took*" the  jeins-in his own hands at a crisis by  Assuming the secretaryship of war,  Ivhen the threatened Ulster revolt in  1914 caused the resignation of Colonel  J'eely.  The prime minister's first powers  [lave . been displayed in playing the  liart of a conciliator, and he now has  it task which is likely to demand their  litmost exercise. He announced that  lie was going to consult with the  Jiuthorities in 'order to arrive at some  lirrangements satisfactory to Irishmen  l)f all parties, and no statesman ever  jittempted a harder achievement. He  frankly declared that the present situ-  lation could not continue.  Many of the newspapers, particularity the Liberal organs, call- upon the  ���������Irish* factions to seize the present opportunity for settling their long-standing differences.  The Marquis of Jjansdowne intimat-  fe.d to the House of Lords that the disarmament of all Ireland will be undertaken. ' This would mean the dis-  irinamerit of the Ulster and National-  list volunteer*, and whether that can  {be done depends on Sir Edward Carlson and John Eedmond more than on  [any other individuals.  The House of Commons negatived,  [without division, Mr. Dillon's motion  [demanding that the government  [should immediately declare its inten-  Itions. The House of Lords adopted  [without division Lord Loreburn's mo-  It.ion expressing dissatisfaction with  [the government's management of Ire-  Sland.  Premier Asquith urged the Irish to  [maintain their sense of proportion,  and not let sympathy for the misled  jinsurgents cause them to forget the  }deaths of soldiers and civilians, and  'promised that in the future courts-  I martial on murder charges should be  held  in public  The chief cause of attack on the  1 government in the House of Commons  was the revelation that another execution had occurred���������that "of a Fer-  moy man named Kenf���������which was the  .first military execution outside of  Dublin. It was charged by one of the  members that many of the seventeen  hundred persons deported to England  had no connection with the uprising in  Ireland .  The summary shooting of the Irish  edito^ F. Srieehy Skeffington, has  aroused increased protest as the details have become known.  Irish  Heart  Beats for Allies  Montreal.���������"The. great warm Irish  heart in Ireland and throughout the  empire beats true to the cause of the  allies, because it realizes that the  cause of Belgium, Serbia, Poland and  Montenegro is practically the cause  of Ireland, the sacred rights of small  people," was a statement made by  Dr. Michael Clark, M. P.; for Red  Deer, Alta., in an address given in  the'interests of the Irish Rangers at  the Arena. Dr. Clark'-was introduced  by Lieut.-Col. Trihey, of the Irish  Canadian Rangers, during an intermission in the C'reatore  band concert.  Pension for Soldiers  Kank   and- File   to   Get   The   Sum   of  $480  Per Year  Ottawa.���������The following are the pensions lor the soldiers and sailors of  the Canadian expeditionary forces recommended by the committee, which,  under the chairmanship of Hon. J. D.  Hazen, have been considered for several-weeks, and which has now made  a report: Kank and file, $480 per  year; squadron' sergeant-major and  quartermaster - sergeant $510; regimental sergeant-major, master gunner and regimental quartermaster-sergeant, $620; warrant officer, $680;  lieutenant, $720; captain, $1,000; major, $1,260; lieutenant-colonel, $1,560;  colonel, $1,890;. brigadier - general,  $2,700. ���������   '  The conditions of those who are to  receive pensions will be graded in a  certain class, according to the seriousness of the case. There are six classes. Those who are carded to be totally  disabled will'be given the full amount  of the pension and will be placed in  class 1. Examples of total disability  are given as follows: Loss of both  eyes, both, hands or all fingers and  thumbs, incurable tuberculosis, loss of  hoth legs, insanity and permanent ex-  treme leakage of valves of .the heart.  A soldiers who 'loses both a hand and-  a foot will be placed in class 2 and  will be given 80 per cent, of the full  pension. An instance of class 3 would  be a soldier who lost one hand and he  .would get 60 per cent. Class- 4 includes a soldier who lost one eye and  would receive 40 per cent The loss  of one thumb would place a soldier in  class 5 and he would receive 20 per  cent.  Further grants will be made to those  totally helpless. The amount will be  $250 each year for all ranks up to-  that of lieutenant, and with an increasing scale for higher ranks.  Allowances for children of soldiers  of all ranks up to that of lieutenant  will be $6 per month for each child,  with a varying scale up to the rank  of brigadier-general, whose children  will receive $10 each. Pensions for  children will continue until the boys  are 16 years old and for girls until  they'are 17, unless they are mentally  or physically lniirm, when the pensions will continue until they are 21  or  marry, bet ore  that.  When a soldier has been killed, his  widow will be entitled to a pension  equivalent to class 2, which is 80 per  cent. If she remarries she will receive one year's pension in a lump  sum. Her children will receive the  regular "pensions. The children of disabled soldiers who are widowers will  receive $12 per month each.  The administration of all military  and naval pensions will be placed in  the hands of a commission of three  who will have full authority and from  their decisions there will be no appeal.  All pensions are to be determined by  disaoility without reference to occupation prior to enlistment. No deduction will be made from any pension  because the pensioner may have perfected himself in some trade or occupation.  The Sunday School  LESSON VIII.���������SECOND   QUARTER,  FOR, MAY  21,   1916  Text of the Lesson, Acts xiv, 8-20  Memory Verses, 8-10���������Golden Text,  Isa. xl, 29���������Commentary Prepared  by Rev. D. M. Stearns.  U. S. to Make Inquiries  Hughes  Would   Use  American  Legion  Toronto.���������A   special  dispatch    from  Ottawa says:  The protest of the U. S. government  oyer use of the words "American Legion" on the 97th battalion military  badges' is not likely to result in the  elimination of the words if the attitude of Sir Sam Hughes is any guide.  Wheii the general was asked if the  words "American Legion" were to be  eliminated, he replied: "Why should  they take it off? isn't an American  universal? Are they not our boys just  as much as any others?" :  "Some time ago the U. S. government protested to the British war  office against the use of the words."  .  Want to   Know  What     Punishment  Was  Inflicted on  Man  Who  Sank the Sussex  Washington.���������Secretary Lansing indicated that the U. S. might make enquiries 0.1 the German government regarding the punishment imposed upon  the commander of the submarine  which sank the steamer Sussex.  It was not disclosed how the enquiry would bo made. State department officials were not prepared  today to say whether the department would insist upon any specific  degree of punishment being inflicted  upon the commander.  There are numerous precedents for  making such an enquiry. Germany  during the trouble in China, insisted  upon the execution of certain persons  in the presence of a German officer.  Secretary Lansing also indicated  that the U.'S. might make enquiry regarding the punishment inflicted upon  the submarine commander that sent  the Italian steamer Ancona and the  British steamer Arabic to the bottom.  This chapter completes the story of  Paul's first,, evangelistic missionary  tour to Jews and gentiles, and is  spoken of in* verse 26 as -"the work  which they fulfilled." Being driven  from Antioch, they came to Iconium;  persecuted there they fled to Lystra;  their persecutors followed them, and  at Lystra Paul was stoned to death,  but the Lord revived -him, and then  they went on to Derbe, everywhere  preaching the gospel, telling the glad  tidings and suffering for it, but'winning souls and thus adding, to the  Lord the members of His body. From  Derbe they returned through all the  places wnere they had been, and  from Attalia' sailed to Antioch, in  Syria, from" whence they had set  'forth, and there rehearsed to the  brethren all that God had done with  them, opening the door of faith to the  gentiles.    .  / After preaching the gospel in every  place, when, they returned they confirmed the souls of the disciples .encouraging them to continue in the  faith, ordaining elders, praying with  them t and commending them to the  Lord on whom they believed. One  thing they insisted on was ,that the  believers must not count suffering  a .strange tiling, for only by the way  of tribulation can we enter the kingdom (verses 21-23). When 'we receive  the Lord Jesus we become children  of "God and heirs of the kingdom, but  then the conflict with the world, the  flesh, the devil begins and will continue while we stay on earth. Even  our Lord said. "In the world ye shall  have tribulation." But He also said,  "Let not your heart be .troubled,"  "See that ye be not troubled" (John  xvi, 33; xiv, 1, 27; Matt. xxiv.   ).  Our Lord told Ananias that He  would show Saul how great things  he must suffer for His name's sake  (Acts ix, 16), and on'this first tour  Saul certainly had quite a taste of the  sufferings he enumerates more fully  in II Cor. xi. 23-28. "All that will live  godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer  persecution" (II Tim. iii. 12). and if  we were more godly in our daily life  we would have more fellowship with  our Lord in this matter, according to  Phil, i, 29. At Iconium they spake  so boldly in the Lord, and the Lord  was so manifestly with them, working  signs and wonders by their hands,  that a great multitude, both of Jews  and Greeks, believed, and they abode  long time there preaching the Lord  Jesus (verses 1-6).  Persecution sent them on to Lystra,  and there they preached the gospel.  In Paul's estimation there was nothing else worth doing, for this he  counted all else as dross and determined to know nothing but Jesus Christ  crucified, risen, ascended and returning.  The healing of the lame man at/Lys-  tra, who had been born.lame, reminds  us^-of the healing through Peter in  chapter iii of another man who had  been born lame. We also think of the  man in John ix, who was born blind,  and remember the Saviour's reason  why. May we see in all difficulties  an opportunity for God to work and  be willing-to be th'e material. When  the people saw the miracle wrought  through Paul and Barnabas they were  ready to worship them and could  scarcely be restrained ,even after Paul  scarcely them that they were only men  of like passions with themselves and  that the healing of this man was by  the power of the living God, who was  thus seeking to draw them to Himself  and away from all the lying vanities  of their idolatry. Note how the Thes-  salonians turned to God from idols to  serve the living and true God and to  wait for    Jiis  Son    from    heaven (I  Thess. i, 3. ��������� 10).  So fickle are people that those who  were ready to worship these two" men  of God, being persuaded by the persecutors' from Antioch and Iconium, are  equally ready to kill them, arid they  actually storied Paul and drew him  put of the city, supposing him to be  dead, but while the disciples stood  round about him he rose up and came  into the city and the next day was  able to start for Derbe with Barnabas  (verses 19, 20). It is possible that as  Paul' was being stoned he thought of  the day when he stood by and saw  Stephen stoned, but if we are right in  the supposition that II Cor. xii, 1-4  describes his experience while he  seemed to be dead, then he had further fellowship with Stephen and soon  forgot the stones and the persecutors  in the bliss of the paradise, the third  heaven, to which he was taken and  saw and heard things he could not  describe in words. ' '  It must be a fine thing to be killed  or to be taken out of the body in any  way when it transfers one to such  blissful realities. Such, no doubt, is  the experience of all who die-in Christ,  and precious in the sight of the Lord  is the death of His saints. In II Cor.  xii, 7-10. there is a suggestion that  Paul's thorn in the flesh was a re-  suit of his being stoned at Lystra,  but although he was not delivered  from it he was able to rejoice in it  and glorify God. May the grace of  God enable us to finish the work to  which His Spirit, enabling us to speak  boldly in the Lord-and give testimony  to the word of His grace and making  it manifest that Christ is at home in  us.  GERMANY STARTS NEW CAMPAIGN  TO SECURE PEACE ARRANGEMMTS  ���������^��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ', i     ,i  LATEST PROPAGANDA  LAUNCHED BY THE HUNS  Germany is Trying to Break Up the Alliance of HerpEnemiesby  Inducing One of Them to  Conclude  a Separate JPeace, ������������������'���������,  Having United States to Act as Meditator   : O  :       -' "    -/.  Uniform Grade of Butter  Important   Dairy  Conference   Held  at  Regina���������Many Samples Were Used  Eegina.���������An important dairy conference, the first of the kind held in  Canada, took place in Regina May 10  for the purpose of getting together representatives to compare the methods  of grading creamery butter in the  three prairie provinces and adopt a  uniform scale of grading. The purpose  was fully realized. Samples was fully  realized. Samples of butter from  Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and  Montreal were used for''scoring purposes and the scores of the graders  when compared were remarkably uniform. Differences in viewpoints were  thoroughly discussed, and it was found  quite possible to harmonize them, one  standard and scale adopted being for  all three  provinces.  -Minimum scores will be as follows:  First grade���������Flavor, 39 points out of  45; total .score, 92 out of 100 points  Second    grade ��������� Thirty-seven  flavor and 85 for total.  The conference was . composed of  Dominion and provincial representatives as follows: Geo. P. Barr, chief  dairy commissioner; F. C. Logan,  Marker, dairy 'commissioner; H. S.  Pearson and J. Flann, produce graders, Saskatchewan���������W. A. Wilson,  dairy commissioner; F. C. Logan, deputy commissioner,- J. R. Crowe and  Prof. McKay, produce graders. Manitoba���������J. W. Mitchell, dairy commissioner; L. A. Gibson, dairy produce  grader.  The day'was a very busy-one, 25  samples of butter being used in securing comparison, and the discussion  of scores resulted in the adjustment  of minor differences. The result will  mean that graders' certificates from  the three provinces will be practically  uniform.  East African Germans  Secure Reinforcements and Advancing  Against British Lines, Reports  Gen. Smuts  London.���������The German forces'in German East Airica, after retiring from  the -Kondos-lrangi district, received  reinforcements and are again advancing toward the British lines,' according to an official announcement made  tonight. ' The statement says:  "Telegraphing late on May 9, Lieut.  Gen. Smuts reports that, the enemy  in the Kondos-lraugj area, after our  occupation of that centre, fell back a  considerable distance along the roads  leading to the central railway at  Dodona and Kilimatinde. There they  received reinforcements and again  approached the Kondos-lrangi district, where our forces are quite sufficient to deal with them.  "An aeroplane despatched to reconnoitre the line of the Usambra railway failed to return.'  "The rains are abating. The Belgian  advances into Raunda, both north and  south of Lake Kivu have progressed  satistactory despite the natural difficulties of the country, increased by  the recent rainfall."  Grain Commission to Report on Operations of Act  Ottawa.���������Hon. Arthur Meighen stated that the Board of Grain Commissioners has been appointed a commission to examine into and report upon  the operations of the Grain Act, and  what defects, if any, have been found  in it. Also as to whether any improvements are necessary. The commission will also report to the government upon the general course of transport of grain from the west, and what  are the causes which hinder a greater  portion of Canadian Grain going  through Canadian ports, etc. .  Apparently the gram board has  simply been instituted a commission  of inquiry into these matters, and  there is no enlargement of the general  London.���������There is no doubt whatever, says the "-Daily Telegraph, that'  during the last few days a definite  attempt has been made by the German government to impress neutrals  with its strong desir* for peace with  a view to inducing them to come for-,  ward as mediators and' break up the  alliance of its enemies by getting ona  of them to conclude a separate, peace.  For the preserit it would not serve  any uselul purpose to disclose tlie  facts in their entirety, but it - can be  said that the Kaiser hae personally  sent a letter to President ..Wilson.  Washington.���������Officials   continue   to  to deny that "any formal movement-on '  behalf of a general .peace in  Europe  had  been'' inaugurated , so'- far. as  the  U.   S.  was    aware. ,.'They   said- they  knew of no direct'bid from any of. the  belligerent "powers-'for the 'exercise" of  President- Wilson's^ good- ������olDces.'   Jt  is known that in-"the letter.fidm? Pope  Benedict, delivered to President ..Wilson his  hohness'.expressed  the "hope  that the U. S. would not' become in- >  volved   in   hostilities   with. Germany;  but    so   tar ,as   can   be   ascc-tained,-  President .Wilson "has  not  confirmed :  to any official the report that the Pope '.  proposed  that this  government sha."  undertake the role,of '.nedi-i',or'a^onc"e. -  " But in spite oi their, assertions that  no movement toward peace has been  made that involves1*"the U.' S.". officials "  are convinced "that ."a'propaganda has  been started withja.view to strengthening the suggestion'j'6f>an.ending of the  war.   That the propaganda^ of Ger-.  manufacture .is-, not - doubted, -_and -it  is expected    to .soon **become'; .wide-  spread.   With the; presentation"*of this  note the submarine'controversy ,is re- .  garded here as, practically Inclosed, and  negotiations  so 'far *as  they"', concern  the past virtually-concluded/'"   ','"'1  "*������ .  ��������� *>"  ' v-  I-.,!  for I powers of the board.'  Killed Jn German Riots^  London.���������A Geneva despatch to the  Daily  Express  says 300  civilians  are  reported   killed   and   woundsd   in the  recent riots in Stiassburg and Mann  heim.  Considers Note a Hint at Peace  The Hague.���������The Netherland Anti-  War Council has cabled Hamilton  Holt, of New York, that it considers  Germany's reference to peace in her  submarine note to the United States  inasmuch as she twice declared her  readiness for peace is a fresh inducement for united neutral mediatory action. :"t'he council suggests the cooperation of the American peace societies in urging President Wilson to  promote a neutral conference to offer  mediation.  Sank  Enemy Transport  Paris.���������A French submarine sank an  enemy transport laden with war material in the lower Adriatic sea, says  a Havas dispatch from Rome.  Asquith  States  Victory  Certain  London.���������Premier Asquith, addressing a delegation of members of the  Russian Duma visiting London  said:  "The allies know that victory is  certain. We will stand together, no  matter how long and severe the test  of endurance, until we have beaten  to the: ground the 'orces which have  withstood us, and can begin in peace  to. rebuild the shaken fabric of European civilization."  jf     London.���������Unusual     importance    is  attached    in. Berlin to the    fact, that  Ambassador    Gerard    sent    Secretary  i 'Oiiew to Copenhagen  to  telegraph    a  .  '.'itf- report to  Washington  re-Tar. I inn  vti*G ambassador's    recent    conference  with, Emperor   Wilhelm,   Chancellor  l von Bethmann-Hollweg   and Foreign  {Minister  von J ago w, says the Amster-  1 clam eoiiespondent of the Daily Express.  Alberta Town Opens Cottage Hospital  Edmonton.���������The first cottage hospital in Canada, supported by a municipality was opened at Beverly a small  town lying east of -Edmonton and adjoining this city. The hospital is  sustained by means of town: assessment and has an attendant physician  and nurse. Among those present at  the official opening was T. B. Kidner,  vocational secretary of the military  hospital commission, Ottawa, who  spoke in laudatory terms of the action taken by Beverly which, he said,  is put in a unique position in the Dominion.  Bow of Destroyer in Drydock  Six Days in O.oen Boat  Liverpool.���������A'ine members of the  crew of the French fishing vessel  JtSernadotte were landed here. They  were six days in an open boat after  their vessel was sunk by a submarine  160. miles from land, and when bound  for the Grand Banks of Newfoundland  for fish.  Turks Grand Council    Out For Peace  London.���������A Saloniki despatch to the  Morning Post from Constantinople  says that a grand council was hold  in the Sultan's palace at Dolma Bag-  tche to consider peace terms. Preachers in the principal mosques are urging the people to "prepare for liberation." A select committee is forming,  and grave events are  anticipated.  Will Help Married Soldiers  London.���������The long awaited government plan for assisting married soldiers to meet their household expenses  while in the army will soon be made  public. According to the morning  new spapers any single or married man  will be permitted to apply for grants  to enable him to meet such liabilities  as mortgage interest, building or furniture instalments/rent, taxes, insurance and in the case of married men,  the expense of educating children. The  assistance granted will in.no case exceed two pounds.  Lloyd's Rates on   German U. S. Break  London.���������Rates of fifty and sixty  per cent, are quoted by Lloyds for insurance covering the risk of disturbance of the existing peaceful relations  between the United States and Germany. Sixty per cent, is quoted  against the risk of breaking off of  diplomatic relations within three  months, and fifty per cent against the  risk of a declaration of war.      "  Wilson Note a Masterpiece  Rome.���������The Tribune commenting on  the German-American situation says .-  The note of the President-professor of  the United States is a masterpiece  compared with the too philosophical  and ponderous note of the government  of the German Empire. The Tribune  adds that the Teutonic militarist pride  must bow its head before the clear  warning of President Wilson.  Brilliahfc^har^e  By tKe^eomarLffeSi}!  In  Face of Machine"Guns- They :Won>$^&jM  Position of-the-Turl������s^nVighV1'^\^,!^f^^  . at * Aggia',,- -'���������' -. <'   J* - -���������'>j&^'&m  London.���������In an-official'  issued in Cairo ..relating "U   ������������������ .���������0  at   Agagia,   mention*.is ,made"-of:-4ths^^  "brilliant and eiiective-chame^of -tiiafc"*������***  Dorsetshire Yeomanry.'".  The following >��������� details  hand; ,,.        ��������� *.?> (, ,-���������'' 4:'!f^W^  "The British*'' force which "left'Ma-'vf^  tru on. the "morning''of ?'February "20.';-^|j  had a long and..trying->~marcri\across''^';i;,S  desert sands - for live - days''before ,l,|>t^,  they were enabled to- engage * the" eri- ,'/'s^  emv. it was early in. the morning ' Pv*c  of February 26 that they set out' frbra, / -',M  Unzcilah to attack him. The position < , .'*"������*  of the enemy was, as- already stated,  a strong one. Nun Bey had assembled  his followers on a' dominating ridge at  Agagia, about 15 miles southeast of  Barani. Somewhat m front of the  main body Gaafar Pasha had established his machine gunners. He had  plenty of time to examine the ground1  and choose the most suitable -- and  screened position xfov three machine  guns, which he made ready to meet  the British onslaught. , But he never  bargained for one tnirig, the "madness' as he terms it of our yeomanry.'  ".Never did I calculate." tie, 'said,  "that your yeomanry would do such  an unwarlike thing as' to charge my  machine guns. It was magnificent,  but it was not war." "    '  *> ->/|  -i-li  <.  30 Unarmed, 22 Neutral Vessels Torpedoed in Year  London.���������Thirty unarmed British  merchantment and 22 neutral vessels  were torpedoed without warning between May 7, 1915, and May 7, 1916.  Thos. J. MclNamara, financial secretary to the admiralty said in the  House of Commons today. He added  that he understood these figures were  known to the American government.  British Defending Ninety Miles of The  Western Front  London.���������British troops are now  holding ninety miles of the western  front, it is announced. The British  lines extend from a point north of  Ypres to a point near the Somme.  When the French concentrated at  Verdun the British took over additional territory.  Rebellion Damage is Enormous  London.���������A deputation of residents  of Dublin which will wait on Premier  Asquith shortly, to urge that the government make a grant for restoring  Dublin, estimates that the total damage there will exceed ������3,000,000. It is  expected that John Redmond will head  the delegation.  Photos   copyright   by   American  Association and  Muller.  Fres������  i  Danes  tc  ������>-.g!and  to  Get  Concession  Copenhagen.--A delegation of influential Danes rcp-reeimting commerce,  agriculture and shipping is going to  England to begin negotiations to  facilitate castbound shipmems.. cspeci-  The Dorsets swept across -the open  towards Gaarfar  Pasha and his machine   guns.     Concentrated   fire   was  immediately brought to bear on   the  advancing troops,  and  Gaarfar waited   calrnlj;  to   see  tnem   melt*'' away  and waver and retreat.    But not so.  On  they  came like  the   wind,  as  Jf  such a thing as a machine gun   did,  not  exist.    Men  were . tailing,  it    it-  true,   but not a head looked to    the  right or left to take stock of the loss.  .Nearer   and   nearer   they   came   and.  as he spurred on his gunners Gaafar  stood, amazed at trie- intrepidity    of  these  British   yeomanry.      On  thjey  swept like an irresistible force, while  the machine guns sent but their deadly missies; but the enemy's fire was  becoming unsteady as the courage of  the gunners  wavered.      Still    Gaafar  looked    for  a  waver    jn   the   British  ranks,  but in vain.    The fire-of his  gunners  became more  and   more unsteady as the yeomanry got closer and  closer.    Then their hands seemed  lo  become paralyzed and like a cyclone ���������  the Dorsets swept over them, and m  the next minute Gaafar, with a sword  cut across his arm, lay on the ground  with   his followers  dead  or  wounded  beside him.    It was a great sight, m  the words of the Arab commander himself, it was bravery, unparalleled."  To Enforce Prohibition Law in Manitoba  Winnipeg.��������� Rev. J. E MacLean,  secretary of the Social Service Council has been appointed prohibition  commissioner for Manitoba. He will  have a staff of inspectors under him.  The license department at present existing goes automatically out of existence on June 1 arid Mr. MacLean  will take over his new duties on that  date. He has resigned his position  with the Social Service.  ^4  a������  ���������41  VT'  '-%  I'i  ���������1.  - 1  1  - i  tU  *J  "I  Claim Bombs on Port Said  Berlin.���������An official Turkish communication dated May j.o sayS that  two Turkish' aeroplanes droppec"  bombs successfully on April 25 on  the drydocks and oil tanks at Port  Said.  Will  Try   Liebknecbt  Berlin.���������Tho business committee of  the Reichstag has declined to consider  ��������� tt.l.1y ������i c������al and foodstuffs, *h# scar-1 a motion to postpone the trial of Licb-  I city of wlw-h is causuifi anxiety. 1 knucht m. bUbpend his an est.  \'*  .^AjMftwi ���������i rf-^,fi.ri   ���������  THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      B.      C.  &1  ^���������Vspsw  &���������������������*!  I  Vw  v>.  ;���������- '���������;���������' - ���������{���������$������?���������  '     ���������.     '���������.���������'���������������������������<���������.>.<���������   ��������� /we*.  >-.^- i-tt V .,\*;    '.  ^.*?--**-   "*  ." .  A  *���������"-������������������������������ V"'  J   -  ^  de>  s*\.  *M-jS*"r-  ���������*-..  ���������ji5r������-4/���������  EST- S^MS���������Si^J>>������~  ��������� ��������� ���������*���������-.  ���������V.  *" i-;  ..���������SUBS  S=a>  ������������<$'  ���������to:  ���������.���������������������������������  a-*v:^  *������.i  '<������  ���������.���������������������������������-i  #i  aft  a**  s&  'i i, . .   '���������    , '    <���������     r .   ��������� '      ������ \  ���������.*/���������������" V"*:,������-?.*'-:*- ���������"* -Ok.  -.*������ i  ��������� '-sr; ���������*-  V'   - "'���������5  ���������*s������������  tffr  //;&A"-*.*���������-���������>���������'->������������������-:��������� ���������  ������������3  $?*  ���������.*������������������  m  m  \#i  Jri"**-!  "-?fil  TV  -*S������|-n  ���������jaw*  Hi  TO-  .W-  :���������..">'  W'  e������  ttts>!  ���������WW'  'wt**1  .-;���������*-*.f *,  ���������������������������v."  I"\A-* .  SStfl  *Ci"  ���������      *������������������   *        ���������*���������    ���������   * ^. ---T'   *  v    r^  * ' *       . ��������� ���������.������������������'5;-?' l- >  %   -   ������ ���������..i.SyJl, .-T.ra^..  .-������������������>   f'��������� > '������������������*;.?'&  .   T,  - * v.,--**;--s-.x-*.. -  ."',-"v". yVt^'-ii'." *���������  .".v-5 -vw*a*-������:-'as*-y>  ��������� ���������s^  *--*iVjSw'  7k. ���������������������������  r^:  '&;  a,'.'^, sc.aejji,j������.j&,z  wm  i&vM'  >-.���������>������  *��������� T;1   %.*  WPt*  ^p^1"  -#������*--  ^W.-*,?*! .-*   .V  ^isUM  rsSi*^r-^-^  Ax  *a> : t.--5a  A  K-  |ACH season sees a tentative return of  the ostrich plume,for hat trimming-,  but very often this graceful trimming  iaimost wholly disappears before the season  is very old.' The fortunate possessors of very  handsome ostrich plumage will undoubtedly  give- it an airing each year, but milliners do  hot always smile upon its appearance. With  the. general return of ostrich trimming for  almost every article of dress, even petticoats,  pie- ostrich-trimmed hat will undoubtedly  stay a little longer under Dame Fashion's  *enign wing.  t. Say what you will, it is hard to resist the  iruly; graceful plumage of that foolish desert  )ird. To hiany It might seem a desecration  ;o touch .with artificiality the soft fronds  if the ostrich plumes, yet who could find  mything to criticise in the smart toque of  irown milan with its trimming of the burnt  istrich quills. This close-fitting- hat is a valuable accessory to any wardrobe, as it may  je.worn with tailored and dressy costumes  ilike. The soft roll' at the left side of the  tat will be found becoming to a surprising  umber of women.  ^ If you have a number of small tips, you  rill be.perfectly correct in bunching them  top your .new straw hat. This is an ex-  silent way of adding to the height of a  ball hat, and the addition of a black numidi,  3 in the tip-trimmed hat pictured, is bet-  ir still.  ; Tt is some time since the large single  ume could be called a stylish hat trimming,  it here it is again in a very picturesque ar-  ngement. The hat which uses it is of soft  raw braid underneath and of Georgette  epe to match above. The single plume  rls from the upturned brim over the crown,  lis is a decided dress hat and should not  worn with the tailored suit.  | There is much talk and many examples of  pastel shades this spring. ��������� The two large  [fture hats shown both follow Watteau col-  igs;   Both are a neutral gray straw, the  using ostrich fronds to hide   the  low  |wn and ribbons to match, and the other  ling the  crown  with   small   overlapping  lie tips.    The latter hat   uses   a   curious  langrement of ostrich trimming' underneath  brim.    This is a result of the Watteau  jles, which require underbrim trimming to  '  them high from the coiffure.  Si***-*  &*���������������  \*Sr-������j  ��������� ���������vr-  &  WA  ������������������^s  W  ���������\*������rt")  J3iirj2/- Oj/r/cA fa  ������M  m:  \f*  1 V*.  "%?.*  (S*  <%%  ?^������"  m  ���������:^t-*,  Jv������$  *���������?%:'  ���������*���������:,<��������� &'!  "JPT^'SaiA'WVV?    r*LJ"i*  $&'  x&W  X-1  ?A  &f*  mEa  MM?  ynffSU^tV ���������t.-r-*'  ,v  *s  W^  :rr������������@  '5H*  kl^Zm^  --���������s-s.'.'-;#><'i-,i������!  ���������m  <*3.  i.W������-������i  ���������%"iKiS  ^IMMO  ���������^fe^  *^  '-wl*  4 v y^yff&S!; fiv  %#  ������K  If^^rM^l  *>^S!!**SS*  ^^  >    Si ' * ��������� *    ���������*     r   1     *P'    fj.  i\*-1!^rv������W^  ���������> ���������* if*   -������T-*i-.Sir    '    < ' ii*.   .r ������ ���������* 1?T*  M^*^  *^n  at*  M  'iks>s?i>&  *<!:*ii*<^*t*  i^**'*i"'V/ftV**  ^ * ���������*��������� * i  SfK-  5^^  ���������'<a������  **^'i������(  l!*%'  !tsis  E^J  y*il  ;-������a  4-������S  i*:'.;;:^e' i,--*���������'-"���������* ������������������*' ���������>?*!  'tft.ti: ���������������,*<  *������^i-  >**"-*?*-  ^(f  **-���������*  **> ���������>  H*  , ��������� ������<,**  -w&-*  'iA  iJl*  \  .'*?'**-rf  r^  *Vp<  LVa  &  ;y^  Br-^r  SW^C1, H1  *'.iaari  ?������<*���������?;  ���������iv *-���������''  m  ltr\  ������������������-*1 ^4!  *������ r*     !.'#  *.-���������*..-  ,-!-*\  ;������s  ?-s-;*v  ������.<**  kf'-^CvS  1 ��������� ������,*  ,������������yS?  ���������w^i/'"  ���������*v  t I-'  ���������*ll  I?  <5j f j  ftraS6  7-i  r(>r  *���������!,-<  >f.  r   J  ���������AfJ  V  ������������������.JT'  ���������*������?i*i������.  :h  mpm^m  ^$jm>  *efc  ���������A*  -tiijvj  ������������  H  r-4t' ������. r* *  "V*   **" *  ������'B������  v.<  Wzirtcfet? 7/psMkw/bp ttr^fojrw  wmm������L  minitflffll  ir^-1****- ' S.,:i'W^- K&7j!.^.������i>ttX'-i"'VJP'.^''^V^������"^:X������<^.!y^s"K<J"^iMV:>  pg3p";'t*n;jSsllSi?r2S  ���������������^''!*%<^0W:0^  THE ;  (,GAZETTE,;^a:'?HEDL^Yr:Vi'''^r'1"tJ?'  ^'^^J>^;j^  '   h ,  -f j ���������������������������  [What Occupation  Of Verdun Means  [.merican  Writer Gives  Reasons" Why  Verdun Was Chosen as German Objective  J Why did the  Germans .choose  Ver-  lin' as their objective?   In the minds  most casual readers of history and  war news,   Verdun is  accepted  as  ie   bulwark   of   France,   the  gate   to  ���������ins,  and  the  chief  foi tress of  that  leat barrier  which fiom  Luxemburg  1  Switzerland   defended   the   eastern  fcntier of the Republic.    It was, all  lings considered, the strongest forti-  |d place in  Europe    when    the war  lire.    Why,  then,  did the Germans  \-ct to fight here?  Kmo reason    is simple.      The    first  hiths of the  war utterly eliminated  Stresses   from    the reckoning,    lhe  ������d collapse of Liege, Antwerp and  jubeuge demonstrated that the fort  jl failed to keep pace with the gun.  |iat was illustrated in the west in  early days was finally demonstrat-  [in the east last summer, when the  osian fortresses followed the path.of  Belgian   and French.   Accordingly  French   after  the  Marne    simpiy  Imdoned the forts of Verdun as de-  Isive positions.   They took the guns  I, of them j they moved them to new,  licealed    positions,   and     the   forts  |sed to have real  importance.   Ver-  was    only  a  point    in the long  Inch   line  running  fiom  the  North  V. to  Switzerland.    The  forts,  save  jU they provided  protection for  re-  Jvs,  lost all value.      They entered  Jo the system of benches, and Ver-  ri   was   defended   by  men   and   by  lis  and  by ditches, precisely    like  Teims or Arras.  Jn the second place, Verdun was  li most difficult place in the French  |e to supply either with men or mu-  lions. Before* the war two railroad  jes of first importance met at Ver-  |n���������one, a double-track line coming  %t from Pans in the direction of  'tz; the other coming north along  h Meuse valley iiom the Paris-  jlncy line'. When the Germans took  I Mihiel in September, 1914, they  Jt the latter line. In the retreat  f.m the Marne the Germans halted  Varennes and Montfaucon, and  I'm these towns their heavy artillery  Immanded the Paris-Veidun line by  lirect fire aiid it ceased to be avail-  tie.  Ilhere was left to the French, then,  Jly, one   narrow-gauge   line   coming  frtii   from  Bar-lc.-Duc,   a   light   rail-  liy, incapable of bearing heavy traf-  I: because of the grades. Practically,  [en, .Verdiiri was isolated,    so far as  nlroad .communication was concern-  J; and the army defending the  Ver-  fm sector was dependent almost en-'  }-ely upon road transport, upon auto-  (obile trucks, or as the French say,  tmions.     This   transport   was   suffi-  lent as long as Verdun was held, by  ��������� relatively small force and was Gnly  [fraction of thc great front, but would  be sufficient when the main attack  fas   directed   at   this   sector  and   the  lermans massed  two  thousand guns  [id a quarter of a million men on a  irrow front? Could France munition  ���������  supply  an   equal   number  of  men  lid sufficient guns to meet the storm?  lhe Germans believed not.���������Frank H.  limonds, in the Ameiican  Review  of  levicws.  |\.n Opportunity for  The Poultry Raiser  [he Present Outlook Warrants Greatly  Increased    Production    in    1916  From present indications Great Bri-  ini will require all the eggs and poul-  \y Canada can produce during 1016.  ,ast year, as a result of greatly in-  leased production, Canada was able  o ship to Great Britain the largest  uantity of eggs exported since 1902,  nd at the same time reduced her im-  orts for home consumption by near-  a million dozen.  Canadian eggs have found favor on  'lie British market, and the prospects  re that, providing they are available,  inch larger quantities will be shipped this year. The unusually high  irices prevailing at the present time  lire largely due to this anticipated export demand.  Prices" for poultry are also high, and  .vill likely continue so for the rest of  he season.    Last fall  and  winter  all  he   suiplus   Canadian    poultry     was  Exported "at  highly   profitable   prices.  Between  fifty   and   sixty cars of  live  poultry   were   shipped. "from   Western  Jntario  to  the  Eastern States  alone,  'ind  in the  Maritime  Provinces,' par-  icularly     in   Prince   Edward   Island,  .he export demand for canned poultry  [has  greatly   enhanced   prices   to  pro-  'juccrs.  Although some uneasiness has existed on thc part of the trade as retards transportation facilities in view  of the higli freight rates and the shortage of boats, "it is now reasonably  ertain that an even greater demand  for Canadian poultry and eggs will  occur this year. It is important,  therefore, that every poultry producer  takes steps to profit thereby, by  hatching as many chickens as possible  this  spring.  Now is the time, by hatching early,  by hatching everything possible in the  month of May, "to guard against the  marketing of so much small, undersized, poorly finished poultry, which  annually becomes a drag on the market iri the fall of the year. Again it  s o.nly  by hatching now,  and giving  !the chickens every possible chance to  thrive and grow, tfiat a maximum  supply of eggs can be obtained in the  winter time.  Given their proportionate amount of  attention the growing of poultry  brings quick and profitable returns to  the farmer. With the increasing cost  of meats, milk, butter, etc., there is  a constantly increasing demand for  poultry and eggs. The labor problem  lis not critical, as the boys and girls  ������pn the farm can readily take care of  |-,he poultry. The cost of feed is nom-  Vial, prices for poultry and eggs are  iP'-Jh���������the highest in fact for many  gyear'sv It is obvious, therefore, that  ���������'(Canadians' have a patriotic as well as  an economic duty to perform in making the year 1916 the banner year for  poultry, production in Canada.-  Germany Feeling Pinch   . >  British Blockade Likely to Be Decisive  i Factor of the War  The London Daily Chronicle says:  ��������� "All the news from Germany indicates that the British blocade is likely to prove a decisive factor in the  war. The economic pinch has become intolerably severe. The masses  of the' population are half-starved,  particularly m the towns. Middle  classes and rich are suffering greatly.  ������������������Confirmation of tins state of af-  fans is not only to be gleaned from  the German press, despite the censorship, but neutral diplomats in Germany and neutral visitors to that  country all bring back the same story  of an unfed population, stagnant industry, universal war-weariness and  desperate yearning for peace.  "Diplomats in lierlin have begged  to be allowed to import their own  tood. Some of'them have got milk,  for their children especially, from Denmark and Holland.  "Rich women are taking their children to Holland to get enough milk  for them.  "Other signs that the country is in  extremis are: Recent failure of the  Berlin bread rationing; the advance  in the price of potatoes, although the  ration is grotespuely insufficient showing the critical shortage; huge jumps  in the price of beef, veal and mutton;  and, above ail, the approaching exhaustion of all edible tats, including  butter, margarine, lard and every sort  of oil and iat."  A  Parallel        .    ,  About the only parallel in British  history to the surrender of General  Townsend and the British forces at  Kut-el-Amara to the Turks is that of  General Gordon who was slain at  Khartoum by tlie dervishes after defending the place against their attacks ior many .months.  History tells us that Gordon might  have escaped by* flight after the dervish hordes had broken down the defences of the city, but he refused to  do so, trusting to the chivalry and  honor of his foe with what fatal result  to himself we all know. That was  more than thirty years  ago.  Again a British general has surrendered to a Mohammedan leader, but  tins time under different auspices.  Whatever their recoid in the past, the  Turks have-in this war at least tieated  their opponents with far more consideration and 'chivalry than the Germans have. Infidels they may be, but  they have shown their Teutonic allies  that they can honor and respect a  brave foe, which is more than can be  said of the former.  There is no doubt, therefore, but that  General Townsend and his gallant  men will be treated in a manner that  will do justice to their brave fight  against overwhelming numbers.���������  Calgary Herald.  Almost  Choked  A lady was continually accusing her  servant of 'extravagance without any  real cause. The girl bore this accusation patiently for a time, but at last  she rebelled. She informed his mistress that the coal had been consumed.  The lady blurted out:���������"What! Done  already? Why, you surely eat them."  Next day the candles were all done.  "Candles done I" said the mistress.  "Why, I bought half a pound ,orily a  week ago. Where have they all'gone?"  "Well," replied the servant, sarcastically. "I'll tell you where the candles  have gone. It ate them to grease my  throat so that I could swallow the coal  more easily!"  Air tight cases ha-ie ocen patented  for protecting . tennis racquets and  balls from dampness.  Need for Home Production  Statistics recently-' published reveal  a regrettable situation regarding trade  relationship between British Columbia  and the United States. During the  month, of March there' was shipped  to British Columbia from the United  States -through the port of Seattle,  produce valued at over $3,000,000,  while the American city received only  about '1500,000 worth of goods fiom  British Columbia. Of the material exported from Canada a very large part  is made up of copper for refining,  purer and coal, while the Canadian  pi evince receives heavy shipments  of agricultural produce, which it  might grow itself with equal facility.  AppJes, beans, butter, cheese, ejtgs,  dried fruit, meat, wheat ad vegetables  are among the articles which that pio-  vice should be able to export and not  have  to  import.  That something Is radically wrong  in either the production or the marketing or agricultural produce in the  western province is evident. It is  with the object of improving these  conditions that the Domestic Food  Products Committee, inaugurated by  the Victoria Board of Trade, is working.  Mr. A. D. Peterson, president of  the B. C. Stockbreeders' Association,  speaking  at  Victoria  said:  "During the war, it is the duty of  those who remain at home to do  everything in their power to increase  the yield of the fields, flocks and  herds. By so doing, those of us who  must remain at home can serve our  country just as loyally'as by serving  in the trenches. Even suppose this  might entail loss, we should be willing to sacrifice some of our profit  when others are going to the front  and sacrificing their lives for the  Kmpire." ��������� c  The last year has been marked by  an increasing interest in mixed farming in British Columbia. This is  particularly true of some districts  that previously had been looked upon  as almost exclusive fruit lands.  Creameries have been built at Grand  Forks, Kelowna and Salmon Arm,  and all are reporting satisfactory le-  sults. In the district of Kelowna  ulone, fouiteen silos were built during 1915. i  Along he ,line of thc Grand Trunk  Pacific, much live stock is being introduced, and the foundation is' being  laid for more or less mixed farming  communities. In many of the newer  localities advantage has been taken  of the Dominion and Provincial  schemes for supplying pure-bred sires  This stimulates an interest for more,  as well as better live, stock.  The sheep industry has been particularly favored during the year just  passed. Mutton and wool have commanded excellent prices, while the  outlook for the immediate future is>'  promising. From all parts of the  Province there are inquiries for breeding stock, and it is only'the scarcity of  such stock that has prevented more  rapid development. In many districts owners of sheep have suffered  considerable loss from the ravages of  panthers, coyotes, and especially dogs,  and it might be well for this convention to consider the advisability of  asking the Government to pass a law  requiring that all dogs be licensed.  By this means a great many useless  curs would be got rid off.-"-" '  Owing to the high prices for grain  which prevailed a year ago, the hog  industry suffered a set-back. It is  probable that the situation will last  until the war is over, so any immediate removal of the industry can hardly  be expected. But even under present  conditions the hog can be raised quite  profitably by those who can provide  suitable pasture to supplement the  grain ration.  While it is true that certain sections of country are particularly  suited to the production pf one particular crop, it is equally true that  carried on even in tnese communities  to supply local needs. British Columbia should be one of the last provinces in the Dominion to be compelled to import general farm produce. With the Dominion and Provincial Governments giving encouragement to mixed farming, it is to be  hoped that the province will soon be  able to supply not only her own local  needs, but will become an exporter  of the kind of produce which now  come to her own markets through the  port of Seattle.  Shortage of Heavy Horses 'Valuable Clay '  Deposits Opened  Continue  Splendid  Co-operation  The ideal of course, would be for the  allies to adopt the policy of free trade  among themselves, leaving the rest of  the world to follow tho example at its  leisure. That would mark the greatest  advance ever made in world relationships and would be the noblest fruit  of the war. We hope that heroic expedient will be discussed at the conference. But in this absence of such  an achievement, there are many  things to be done. The allies at the  present time are pooling their resources in an unprecedented measure.  We are working together as one firm,  France concentrating on this form of  production, England on that, Russia  on'the other���������all by arrangement, all  for the common benefit. We have  founded great trusts, not for private  advantage, but for the general advantage, and have excluded the exploitation of the middleman from great  areas of trade. Let us organize the  continuance of this splendid co-operation.'- It is saving us in war; it will  bless us in peace.���������London Daily  .News.  A Change in Tune  ' Though we can expect to carry this'  war to a successful issue for our country only by making these sacrifices  with the unanimity and enthusiasm  that we have shown, nevertheless -we  cannot help feeling daily the pain of  it when we think Lhat millions of valuable German lives must be sacrificed  to a barbarous war of annihilation,  which could have been avoided, had  adequate reason, right politics and  wise diplomacy prevailed on our side,  and had international tolerance and  a just appreciation of Germany's demands prevailed on the side of our  opponents.���������Professor Ernest Haekel.  Long'in the Making  The Prussia of today, with its cursed rule and cursed principles, ha������  been long in thc making, and what  an unshapen, ungodly mass it is ! It  has been described as the last re  maining hulk of imaterialistic barbarism. The wonder is that when worshipping 'at the shrine of mere force,  students from our country and other  countries were so hopelessly blinded  to 'what was going on around them.���������  Winnipeg Tribune.  The Way to Tell  "Mike," said Pat, "how do yez tell  the age of a fowl?"  "Oi can always tell by the teeth."  said   Mike.  "By the teeth!" exclaimed Pat.  "But-a fowl ain't goUno teeth." _. Ji,  "JNo," admitted "Mike," but Oi  hov."  Earning Their Honors  The Kaiser is decorating U.boat  commanders. The murders committed  by these brave fellows are undermining the Hohenzollern throne. Viewing the matter that way, they deserve  all the honor that can be heaped upon  them ���������Brooklyn Eagle.  Canadian Market Drained by Demand  For  Heavy Animals   For  War Servic'd  "There is "a great shortage of heavy  horses in Canada, the Canadian market having been drained as a result  of the heavy demand for horses' of  the heavy type for war service. Over  60,000 horses have been taken out of  the Dominion since the war started.  It is now up to the Canadian breeders  to get busy. They must, if a normal  standard is to be maintained after the  war is over."  This statement was made by John  Bright, Dominion Livestock commissioner, at the annual meeting of the  Canadian Livestock Records Association held in Toronto recently. Mr.  Bright stated that in order to cope  with the horse situation in the western provinces, in which a large supply  of horses had been drafted for service  at the front, some 0,000 mares had  been purchased by western farmers  in eastern Canada.  The livestock conimissioner also  strongly advised the Iarmers to pay  particular attention to the breeding  of heavy horses, especially the breeding of mares, in which there had been  a marked falling off last year. In this  connection, he pointed out thai the  breeders were in a position to save  the situation and *hus prevent a  scarcity of heavy horses which are  always in demand.  Mr. Bright also called the attention  of the breeders to the fact that the  cattle, hogs, and sheep situation was  not as bright as it might be. He stated  that since Jan. 1 last over 367,000 hogs  had been imported from .the, United  States, which in itself was an evidence that there should bo a renewed  interest and energy in this hog breeding industry in Canada. He also elaborated ' upon the heavy importations  of beef cattle and sheep from the  United States and emphasized the fact  that the present high prices of wool  should be an incentive to sheep breeders to improve the situation in order  to avoid going elsewnere to purchase  sheep when they are in a position to  supply the requirements of the Canadian markets.  An   Aviation   School  The naval department announces  that the admiralty is calling for a  limited number of trained aviators  from Canada for commissions in the  Royal Naval Air Service and that  with a view to providing training the  Uurtiss Aviation School, will be reopened in Toronto. Canadian aviators  wishing to enter the service are requested to apply to the secretary of  the Department of -Naval Service at  Ottawa. The age limit of candidates  are from 19 to 25 years and only well  educated, athletic and thoroughly fit  men with excellent eye-sight can be  accepted. A gratuity of one hundred  dollars will be paid to those obtaining a pilot's certificate from the Canadian aviation school on condition  that the aviator joins the Royal Naval  Service and undertakes after the war  to become a member of a Canadian  Hying corps should one be organized  in Canada.  Absolutely  Fearless  Elder  to  Beadle���������"Weil,  John how  did you like the strange minister?"  Beadle���������"No, ava, Elder. He's an  awfu' frichtened kin* of a chap, yon  Did ye notice how he aye talked oboot  oor adversaiy, Satan? Oor own meeni-  ster past ca's him plain deevil. He  docna care a dom for him.  Persia's first railroad, running from  the Russian frontier to Tabriz, was  opened in March  First Dirigible Airship  Ready For Prel  For  iminary  mmsmmm  AMERICA'S   FIRST   DIRIGIBLE   IN    HER   SHED.  HE first dirigible airship ever  built tor the United States is  rapidly nearlng com'pletion at  New* Haven, Conn., and will  shortly be given its first trials at Pen-  sacola, Fla. The machine Is 176 feet  long, 50 feet high and 35 feet in dl-  ameten  The same company that built the dirigible has also received a contract  from the United States for a kite balloon. Thousands of this type of balloon are in use in Europe today. At  present there is a great demand, according to United States naval authorities, for these, as the beads of foreign  armies and navies figure that the savins of ammunition from one day's observation will more than pay the cost  of tho kite balloon.  Government exnerts claim that theao  balloons attached to a battleship are of  Immense value, as it makes it possible  to see an enemy many miles away and  in battle direct the fire of shots. Representatives of foreign governments  who are negotiating with the company  say every ship and battery abroad is  being equipped with observation balloons. These take the place of the old  spherical balloons that, owing to their  continual bobbing and swaying, made  correct observation impossible and were  prone to make the operators seasick.  According to the terms of contract  between the navy department and tho  company, the balloon now being built  by this concern must rise at the rate of  eight feet per second.  In speaking of the future use of dirigibles by this government one of the  officials of the company said:  "The war has demonstrated that the  very element in the aeroplane on which  many have depended to annihilate the  airship has proved to bo the aeroplane's greatest weakness.    High speed, i me that a suitable grade of rubberized  ] observations can be taken and missiles  released.  A large vertical rudder and horizontal elevating planes furnish ample  means of controlling the ship. Hydrogen gas will be used to give ascensional power, and, while the speed cannot be ascertained until after the tests,  it is estimated that it would not be far  from fifty miles an hour. Enough fuel  can be carried for a six hour trip under  full load.  "I believe that the B-10 will answer  the requirements of the navy department," an officer said. "If it will not,  such modifications as are necessary will  be made. There is no reason why we  cannot build Just as good dirigibles  here as can be had in Europe.  "A number of others are working on  plans for the airships, and there is no  question but that a suitable type will  be evolved in the United States. After  we have made some tests at "Washington I shall be prepared to say Just what  the machine will do.  "Subjecting, the model to various  pressures in the wind tunnel at the  laboratory will determine exactly what  the head resistance will be on the full  size machine.  "The most difficult problem to solve  Is that of obtaining tho right kind of  fabric. Heretofore most of this material has been imported from France.  But domestic manufacturers have been  experimenting, and ,the samples submitted by five concerns have convinced  instead of making the aeroplane the  formidable foe predicted, acts reversely  at night. The British aviators have  invariably lost the Zeppelins over London. The rapidity of the aeroplane's  flight, its inability to remain in one  spot, defeats the leisurely.inspection demanded for sighting and gauging .the  dirigible.  "Tho lighter than air machine is  bound to be the night owl of the army  and navy."  It is interesting to note that. plans  for the airship were furnished to the  United States government before tha  Zeppelins had forged to the front.  The name of the new type will be  B-10, and, while it is not a copy of any  foreign type, the envelopo resembles  that of a Parseval and the car that of  the Zodiac type. It will be nonrigid,  and the principal load will be carried  at the center of gravity. This will permit the dropping of any quantity of explosive without affecting the balance  of the ship.  The airship is equipped with motors  of about sixty horsepower each and  four propellers. One set ot blades is  forward and the other aft. There is  room for one man in each of the motor  cloth can be manufactured here. Tho  amount necessary is 1,400 yards for  each machine."  WILSON'S    IDEA   OF   A    HERO.  Here is President Wilson's idea of a  hero, expressed in a letter from him to  Secretary Lane:  "The rescuer of the bureau of mines  who braves the poisonous gases and  saves a minor from death, the coast  g-uard who at the peril of his own life  saves passengers of a helpless vessel  from death, the surgeon of the public  health service who stops a dreaded  scourge in its incipiency, the engineer  who succeeds in reducing the hazards  of industry to its men and the man  who brings about better conditions of  living among people I consider all types  of the hero who will be best regarded  in the near future."  C.N.R.  Building a Spur. Line  in  Que*  bee That Will Opsn-up Extensive  Kaolin. Beds <.'\ .'  The  ousting  of, German   and  Aus^  trian porcelain wares from "the Canadian  market  in  ravor or  "Made  in  Canada"   uroducts  has   been   brought -  appreciably    closer  by  the   construe-'  tion of a spur line, by the. Canadian  Northern  Railway   fiom  its   Montfort  branch,   to   an   extensive   deposit   of  Kaolin   near  Huberdeau,  in   Quebec.  It   is  from   similar, deposits   of   that  natural   resource   that   manufacturers  in the Teutonic empires have produced   the   supplies  of  china-wares  that  have been marketed to homes in all  parts of the world,, -vnd the prevalence  of  the  "Made   in  Germany"  inscription on the underside of cups,' saucers, and  plates in the average home*   -  in Cant-da alone, furnishes an jndica-^ '  tion of the widespread character and- -  value of the business.  But it is not in the manufacture ot/  table wares alone that Kaolin is im-'  portant.    Large  quantities  are utilized   in   the   production   of   the   finer  grades of printing 'paper, ard in  the    ,  making of .insulators  for-high power  electric   transmission   lines. 'Austrian  makers had developed an international trade of considerable magnitude in , f  the   latter   product   before .the' out-   >  break   of   the   war.'   Since 'the.'seas    -  have   been   closed   against. the   Aus-   .  trian supplies the Japanese have gone _  into the business of making these essentials,  and,   largely  because  of  thef  cheapness  of  the  labor   available   to    -  manufacture there, the industry seems  to   have  made  remarkable    progress,  i'hey are exporting at a low price and  have   already   got .into     touch   with f ,  Canadian users.   This1 Quebec ^supply ���������  touches   the  glass /industry,   too,   for  the  by-product is" a- pure silica'-saud,  which is suitable for the manufacture  of glass and sandpaper, and is utiliz-  ible as moulding-sand-'and for other  purposes. ','  Kaolin is supposed'to bb decomposed feldspar, and occurs in pockets or  fissures of varying-depths. .The.color  ranges  from   a   faint- ^yellow   to*" pure  white, the latter being the more valu- ;  able.   Its freedom from quartz,- mica, ('  and other particles, is also 'a'factor;  J  The   deposit   rendered'.''accessible   by ''  the Canadian Northern is supposed to1'  bo many thousands-.of feet ���������in"depth,,  and is pure white in shade,' and experts     consider     that     the    ' higher '  grades of porcelain .*and: pottery,'may  be  manufactured,  and  of course,  in-,^<  sulators as well: -Success'in the burn-   "  ing of the clay into the various' pro- ',>  ducts   of   a     high     grade,   -,depends '*_^  greatly   upon   the -character 'r'of   the   \'  fuel.    As  firewood  *is- abundant  and " [ _  cheap in Northern'-Quebec,  the.'Can-     '  adian deposit    appears ^tclhave.been ^<  placed in the best'environment.  The Canadians who are* interested  in this development have ' .received  from the Hon. Mr. Pellitier, agent .  general for the province "of Quebec in  London, England, a'report1 made'for-  him by Dr. Bigot 'of Paris, -on the  ceramic possibilities of the Kaolin or  China Clay found-Jn the^prb'vince of  Quebec; one by Mr. Jos. Keele, director of the Bureau of Ceramics of the  Dominion Geological, Survey, one by  Edward Orton. Jr., Professor of Ceramics of the Ohio State College, and  one from McGill University, Montreal. These documents demonstrate  that the Canadian clay, in additiion  to its high ceramic value, possesses  all the characteristics necessary for  the manufacture of highest grades of  paper, and also the qualities which  suit it for the manufacture of paint  pigments and of many toilet articles  by the manufacturing chemists. The  expectation is that porcelains equal .  to those of the finest French manufacture may be made in Canada as  it has been found by tests made in  Limoges, France, that the Canadian  clays are equally suitable as the  French   Kaolin.  The market is wide, for the supplies of Kaolin on the North American continent have not sufficed to  meet domestic requirements. A revival  of immigration will produce, automatically, a keen demand for table  wares, and electricity is merely on  the threshold of development. The  Canadian pioneers in this new potential industry, undoubtedly, will have  the keenest of competitors to face, but  lhe purity and abundance of the supply and the incidentals to manufacture, with the possible exception of  labor, are factors in their favor. At  present, the consensus, of -opinion  among the experts concerned, appears  to be that with a little "mothering,"  the industry can be established, and  that Canada has, in this deposit of  china clay, an opportunity to extend  its industrial independence of tho  outside world.  /|  HIS HOUSE WAS STOLEN.  Pete Petroniky of Indiana Harbor,  Ind., rented his little cottage to his  friend Andy Sendke. Then he went to  Chicago. "When he came back a month  later he was unable to find his house  Canadian Goods in  Demand  That opportunities for Canadian  wheat, flour, fish, * butter, cheese, biscuits, and other products exist in  South Africa which should be cultivated by Canadian manufacturers ii  the gist of a report received by the  Canadian Department of Trade and  Commerce, from the commissioner,  Mr. W. J. Egan. of Cape Town. Mr.  Egan reports that owing to systematic  demonstration during the past year  Canadian flour is now in demand by  bakers who did not use it previously,  and has gained in reputation. Tt is  possible for Canadian mills to make  up parcels for household consumption,  an increased , trade is sure to follow,  as a demand exists for smaller parcels, weighing 5 lbs. to 10 lbs., and  with 20 and 40 parcels to each stack.  As regards wheat, Mr. Egan says that  there will always be a good demand  for Canadian wheat in South Africa  owing to its special value as a blender  with the tighter South 'African and  other imported wheats.         or any trace of it or the trees around  cockpits, and five more men can be ac-   it.    The Dollce say the house has been  commodated in the main cocksit, where' stolen.  A widow lost a hog. We do not refer to thc death of her husband. Sho  lost a real hog and advertised for it.  The editor says the hog must have  read the paper, for he came hiking  home on the dead run as soon as the  paper left the postoffice. This is not  the first instance where "a hog' has  read a newspaper���������and incidentally  foigot to pay for it.  :.;vC;;ii)-������^,^^| THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      B.  "  ���������Enemy Sub Now  Fires Blindly  Guided   by   Sound   Alone,   Torpedo   is  Launched  at Approaching Ship  William G. Shepherd,'of: the United  "Press, writes: German submarines  "have abandoned the periscope in.most  instances and are shooting without  looking, according to reports current  in Berne. The torpedoes are now  fired by sound alone.  During the past twenty sinkings  in British waters, noone has seen a  submarine, and in Out few cases has  the white wake of the torpedo been  observed. Only the discovery of  bronze bits of torpedoes or the nature  of the explosion has offered proof that  the ships  were submarine victims.  If (he periscopes submarine is a  success, survivors of torpedoed ships  will lmvcr again be able to say: "We  saw the trail of the persiedpe in the  water."  The new periscopeiess submarine, ,  as it is described in Switzerland, has  a great steel disk for an ear, on  either side of the boat. , Telephone  receivers, connected '.with these disks  lead ,to the cars of the officers, and  the approach of a ship is heard with  uiimistakeiible  definiteness.  As the ship approaches the noise  becomes louder in one ear or the  other. ��������� .   : ,  When the submarine commander  hears an equally loud noise in each  ear he knows that the ship is'.straight'  ahead.  "Fire!" he orders and the torpedo  shoots towards the surface at a,carefully calculated angle, hitting the ship  well  below the water line.  The sinking of. Dutch, Norwegian  and Swedish ships would be readily  explained if the Swiss reports are true.  The submarine commander, guided to  his prey by sound alone, would have  no way of fixing the nationality of the  ship attacked.  A BRIGHT TOBACCO OF THE FINEST QUALITY  10 CENTS PER PLUG  Need for Home Production  ������������������ ������������������ ���������     ..'.������..  Trade Relations Between United States  and  British  Columbia on wrong  Side of Ledger  Statistics recently published reveal  a regrettable situation regarding trade  relationship between British Columbia  and the United States. ./During the  month of March there was-shipped  to British Columbia from the United  States through the port of Seattle,  produce valued at over- $3,000,000,  while the American city received only  about '/j00,000 worth of goods from  British Columbia. Of the material oj--  poited from Canada a very large ,:>art  3������ .made up of copper for refinni'*,  r������-I er and coal, while (the Canadian  pi evince receives heavy shipments  of agricultural produce. which it  might grow itself with equal facility,  x'pplcs, beans, butter, cheese, e.'-gs,  dried fruit, meat, wheat ad vegetables  are among the articles which that pro-  vice should be able to export and not  have  to" import.  That something is radically wrong  in either the production "or the marketing or agricultural produce in the  western province is evident. It is  with the object of improving these  conditions that the Domestic Food  Products Committee, inaugurated by  the Victoria Board oi Trade, is working. . :  Mr. A. D. Peterson, president of  the B. C. Stockbreeders' Association,  speaking at Victoria said:  "During the war, it is the duty of  those who remain at home to do  everything in their power to increase  the yield of the fields, flocks and  herds. By so doing, those of us who  i must remain at home can serve uur  country just as loyally as by serving  in .the trenches. Even suppose this  might entail;loss, we should be will-  ting to sacrifice some of our profit  ;;'when others are going to the front  and sacrificing their lives for the  .Empire."  The last year has been, marked by  % an increasing interest in mixed farm-  I; in-r in 'British Columbia. This is  | particularly true of some districts  |; that previously had been looked upon  t as; almost exclusive fruit lands.  Creameries have been built at Grand  | Forks, Kelowna and Salmon Arm,  | and all are reporting satisfactory results. In the district of Kelowna  alone, fourteen silos were built during 1915.  Along he  line of the  Grand Trunk  Pacific,  much live stock is being introduced, and the foundation is being  laid  for more or less mixed  farming  \ communities.    In many of the newer  [localities   advantage   has   been   taken  of   the     Dominion     and     Provincial  schemes for supplying pure-bred sires  This stimulates an interest for more,  as well as better live stock.  \     The sheep    industry has been    particularly favored during the year just  passed.    Mutton and  woolhave commanded   excellent   prices,   while   the  ; outlook   for   the  immediate future  is  promising.       From   all     parts   of  the  ^Province there are inquiries for breeding stock, and it is only the scarcity of  S such   stock   that  has  prevented   more  ��������� rapid   development      In   many   districts  owners  of sheep   have  suffered  considerable loss from the ravages of  ��������� panthers, coyotes, and especially dogs,  iand it might be well for this convention.., to   consider   the   advisability   of  asking the Government to pass a law  ���������requiring   that   all   dogs   be   licensed.  ;By this  means a great many useless  Icurs would be got. rid off.  ;   Owing to  the high prices for grain  which prevailed  a year ago, the  hog  industry  suffered   a  set-back.      It  is  probable  that the  situation   will   last  until the war is over, so any immediate removal of the industry can hardly  fre expected.    But  pelled to import general farm produce. With the Dominion and Provincial Governments giving encouragement to/mixed, farming, it is to be  hoped that the province will soon be  able to supply not only her own local  needs, but will become an exporter  of the kind of produce which now  come to her own markets through the  port of Seattle.  India's Great  Help in War  Presonal     Devotion  to  the     King   accounts   for   Heroic  Sacrifices  "India instead of proving a source  of weaKness to the .Umpire, as Germany fondly believed she would, has  been a tower of strength,'- said  Austen" Chamberlain, Secretary of  State for India, in discussing with  a group of American correspondents  the present state of the Inaian Empire.  The Secretary said:  "Instead of showing, under the encouragement of a great European war,  any uesire to revolt, the people of  India have never been niore loyal  to the British Empire than today. In  this connection "1 would like to t-ay  that loyalty in' India has its own  special color in the form of a personal devotion to the King-Emperor  which I do not think it possible to  exaggerate.  "The personal aspect of loyalty appeals to them perhaps more strongly  than the western mind can conceive.  There are striking manifestations of  this on the King's visits to the front.  Nothing could exceed the profound  satisfaction expressed by Indian officers and soldiers in having actually  come face to face with their ruler.  "I have seen '-this- myself when I  have had the honor of accompanying  the King in visits to the Indian Hospitals. When asked what impressed  them most. the. reply was always the  same. 'We have seen the King-Emperor.' All the sufferings and trials  they had undergone were as nothing.  Nothing else counted. This devotion  to the ruler is actually a part of  their  religion. '  "Whatever agitation there may be  in India for a.: greater share in the  government, there is certainly no lack  of appreciation of the advantage of  the British system of colonial government over the  German.  "As to the military assistance given  by the Indians, I need mention only  two facts, as their efforts on all fronts  are so well known. The first is the  number of military honors won by  the   Indians.  "Before this war the highest military honor, the Victoria Cross, was  not open to the Indian army, but since  War and the  Price of Wheat  In All    Modern    Wars    the    Price of  Wheat Has Been  High  The highest average price of British  wheat during the last;century and a  quarter is quoted as being $3.86 per  bushel, this being the price obtained  in .1812, during the European wars and  our war with the United States. In all  modern wars the price of wheat has  been relatively high and has fluctuated greatly. In many cases the high  level prices has continued for, some  time after the declaration of peace.  The course of prices during the present conflict seems to confirm this general tendency.  During the Napoleonic wars the  price of wheat in Europe fluctuated  between $3.86 and $1.80. In 1822 it had  fallen, to $1.37.'  In 1625 it was quoted  The Country Newspaper  ��������� ���������."   ,��������� f   ,  It is the Local Newspaper that Chronicles the   Items   Dealing with  Intimate  Associations  But the beauty and joy of our papers and their little worlds is that we  who live in the country towns know  our own heroes.. Who knows Murphy  in New York? Only a few. Yet in Emporia we all know Tom O'Connor���������and  love him; Wlio knows Morgan in New  York? One man in a hundred thousand. Yet in Emporia who does rot  knovy George Newhiim, the banker and  merchant prince?. Boston people pick  up their morning papers and read with  shuddering horror of the crimes- of  their daily villian, yet read without  that  fine   thrill   that   we   have   when  Farm Management  Thoroughness of  Work  is One of The  Cardinal Principles of the  Successful  Farmer  We once .heard an excellent farmer,  say:  "It takes an able, brainy man to  so lay out farm work and foilow it.up  as to get the best possible results. We  are alltoo much smitten with the idea  that our profit comes from the amount  of work half done rather than,the  amount well done. When I was a boy  hoeing com, my father used to tell  me that the best hoed hill brought the  largest yield and the best corn. Rushing along and hoeing a lot of hills  poorly, he aaid,' was no way to make  I. think    that  Oil in the Arctic  money  growing  corn  we  hear  that   Al  Ludorph  is   in  jail ' principle   applies   in   all  of  our  farm  again in Emporia.      For we all know   woik.    The  farm   where  the   work   is  Ernpori  Al; we've ridden in his hack a score  of times,    And we take up our paper  with the story of his faults as readers  at $2.07, and in 1835 at $1.19.      The   '"ho  begin  the    narrative    of an old  price how kept fairly steady until 1847,   friends  adventures  the year of the potato famine in Itp  land when it rose to $2.13. In 1840  the repeal of the corn law became effective and there was a decline gradually until 1851 $1.17 was reached. In  1853 began the Crimean war which  ended in 1856. During this period  the prices again rose, reaching in the  last year of the war $2.10. ��������� During  the Italian war of 1859 and the American civil war, 1861���������65 thee price remained fairly steady being in -the  last year of the war $1.27 per bushel.  The last very high priced wheat was  in 1876 and 1877 coincident with the  Turko-Siberian war and the Balkan  wars. However, the prices .were comparatively low to what they were in  the early part of the century, being  only $1.73 as compared with $3.86 during the: former period. In 1886 wheat  was selling at $0.94 per bushel and  only went over the dollar mark UDon  three occasions until the present time.  These were: in 1891, $1.13; in 1898.  $1.03, and in 1909, $1.13. In 1915 it.  rose to $1.61, which was the highest  price asked since 1877.  Manchuria from a Train  this rule was abrogated, five V. C.'s  and twenty-five Military Crosses have  been won by Indian soldiers. The  second is just one instance of their  gallantry  in  action.  "In Gallipoli the 14th Sikhs went  into action with fifteen British officers, fourteen Indian officers and 514  rank and file. The next day there  were three British officers .three Indian officers and 134 rank and fiJe.  I do not think you could ask more of  any army than that it should face  and make sacrifices of this kind."  Objects to Fighting Friends  Bulgarians   Will     Not     Shoot   at   the  Russians  "If the" Russians come, we, the  Bulgarians, will stand aside and let  the Germans and the Turks fight  them. Our soldiers will not tire a  shot at our liberators. This, I can  assure, you, is definitely settled," was  the declaration of a superior Bulgarian officer, to a newspaper correspondent in  Sofia.  "These solemn words were uttered  with great emotion and decision  while our train was standing at Plevna, that historic place where the  army of the Tsar Alexander, the Liberator, won the liberty oi" downtrodden Bulgaria by the blood of thousands of Russian soldiers 37 years ago.  "What the Bulgarian officer declared to me at Plevna I heard and witnessed everywhere during my journey  through Bulgaria. Soldiers and civilians, old and young alike, with an insignificant exception, preserve in the  depths of their heart a great love and  reverence for the Russians."  The correspondent gives it as his  opinion that no reasoning Bulgarian  thinks that the territory gained by  their soldiers can be retained. The  Chief of Police, Georgeieff, is held  in the uinost detestation because of  his brutality, and should the Russians  ever reach Sofia he will be hung in  the   public  square  of  the  capital.  A few people are becoming rich by  the war, such as tlie Minister of Finance, Mr. Tontcheff, who a year ago  was a poor man. but now owns some  12,000,000 francs; Mr. Radislavoff, who  owns about 10,000,000 francs; Georgi-  eff, who owns some millions; and a  few others; but the people in general  are condemned to lose their prosperity.  (From   "The   Color of  the  East,"   by  Elizabeth Washburn: F.C. Stokes Co.)  Manchuria means an interminable  brown plain���������dry stubble, endless, empty furrows to be filled by-and-bye  with millet, kaoliang, waving, wonderful green plumage, high as a man and  higher, in which not many years ago  the Japanese hid whole armies.  Today it is the emptiest, most silent  spot in Asia. It spreads out flat and  tranquil in unthinkable forgetfulness.  The sun beats down fiercely out on a  deep, unbroken field of turquoise blue.  The air is biting cold. A sudden  breath of it is like a slap. A great  tingling follows and a sense of exra-  ordinary buoyancy. One feels impelled to laugh, to shout, to strike out,  to do violent things. To sleep or sit  with folded hands would drive one  mad. There is that in the air which  compels like the lash of a whip.  Over this brown waste, sheltering a  million seedlings, trails an endless line  of native life. A dull blue, curiously  blunt outline���������wheelbarrow men- with  sprawling legs and arms wide outstretched, coolies with bamboo poles  slung across their shoulders, innumerable mules, cased like warriors in  brass-studded bridles and head-pieces,  donkeys picking little steps with litters  on their backs, with wide toppling  loads, with native women sitting  astride far back upon their tiny  haunches.  These manchu people are a big boldfaced race, with brown skins whipped  dull red by the northern winds. Shapeless bundles of them, hoods pulled over  ears stand at the stations and-stamp  their feet and beat their arms and  watch the trains come in. A straggling line of native soldiers in bungling black uniforms, head3 wound  tightly in black turbans, a great  splash of blood-red lettering across  their breasts, present arms rigidly,  with bayonets fixed as the train 'pulls  in and draws out.  Our papers, our little country papers, seem drab and miserably provincial to strangers; yet we who read  them read in their line.- the sweet .intimate story' of life. And all these  touches of nature make us wondrous  kind. It is the country newspaper,  bringing together daily the threads of  the town's~ life, weaving them into  something rich and strange, and setting the pattern as it weaves, directing  the loom, and giving the cloth its color  by mixing the lives of all the people  in its color pot��������� it is this country  newspaper that reveals us to ourselves, that keeps our country hearts  quick and our country minds open and  our country  faith   strong.  When the girl at the glove counter  married the boy in the wholesale  house the news of their wedding is  good for a forty-line wedding notice,  and the forty lines in thc newspaper  give them self-respect.    When in due\  Report of a  Rich   Discovery of Oil in|  The Far North.    <  We haVe    long    known    something)  about  the   riches   of .Alaska   in  gold,  copper, coaL. timber and other miner '  als  and  products  of  the  ground   -im'  of the surrounding seas, including fun  and fishes; also,that    there are largtf  tracts of arable    lands    upon    whiel  vegetables, fruits and: ceri-ls may b  grown in abundance.   And how we arv  told that in the far north.of that cou.  try, within the Arctic circle;.there i  a great wealth in oil  awaiting' deve|  opment,. according to statements of j  discovery made by Eskimos arid oori  firmed   by   W.   B.   Van   Valin   of   th/  United  States    Bureau  of  Educatio//  The   native   discoverers     found     lou',  springs of thick oil close together an/,  maintaining a lake of thick, green o~  ol the" consistency    of vaseline,    intj  which   ducks   and   geese   occasionally  plunged   from   a  considerable  heigh ti'  ...    ���������   ������������������.   ..^���������cl   ���������i_      . ���������   mistaking    the    substance    for water}  right on general principles in his idea   5,nf.of course, perishing there.   Thes',-  that it takes    marked    ability to  *ay   Eskimos     wure   'n  utter ignorance o'j  out and practice thoroughness of work   ]"e nature of their find, and so great'  Three things  stand  in   Jy Puzzlf-d  that  tn"\   m:un- .,  iei-i ' x-/  most thoroughly done, and care taken  not to Jay out more work than can be  well done, is the one 1 have    noticed  that makes the most clear profit."  We   think   our   Wirr.ier  rriend     vas  on the farm  the  way:  1. A lack of broad intelligence and  judgment on the part of the farmer.  We all know that there are but few  such farmers ��������� compared, with the  whole.  2. The constant hazard and uncertainty   of   the   weather.  3. The scarcity of good farm help  and   its  high  expense.  But these three difficulties do not  change the logic of the situation. It  remains just the same that thorough,  comprehensive judgment and practice  .in the doing of our farm work pays  the best. Half-hoeing the hills of  corn in order to hoe more than we  can hoe well, don't pay. Lack of thoroughness is the curse of farming at  any -and all times.  We   are   all   poisoned   with  the   old  course, we know that their baby is a 'notion   of   turning   off   a   lot   of   half  twelve-pounder, named Grover or  Theodore or Woodrow, we have that  neighborly feeling that breeds the real  democracy. When we read of death  in that home we can mourn with them  that mourn. When we see them moving upward in the world, into a firm,  and out .toward the country club  neighborhood, we rejoice with them  that rejoice. Therefore, men and  brethren, when you are riding through  this vale of tears upon the California  limited, and by^chance pick up the  little country newspaper with its meagre telegraph service of three or four  thousand words���������or, at best fifteen or  twenty thousand; when you see its  array of, countryside items; its interminable local stories; its tiresome  editorials on the waterworks, the  schools, the street railroad, the crops  and the city printing, don't throw  down the contemptible little rag with  the verdict that there is nothing in  it. But know this, and know it well:  If you could take, the clay from your  eyes and read the little paper as it  is written, you would find all of God's  beautiful sorrowing, struggling, aspiring world in it, and what you saw  would make you rp'uch the little paper  with reverent hands.  ������������������������ -,-.-.r-  even under present  (conditions the hog can be raised quite  profitably by those who can provide  (Suitable pasture to supplement the  grain ration.  While it i3 true that certain sections of country are particularly  suited to tlie production of one particular crop,    it is equally true    that  Visit Your Schoofs  Plow many of our school children's  parents ever visit th;; schools or even  know the teachers when they meet  thorn on the street? How many know  what their children are studying or  how they are progressing Is there  any of you who have a building to  make, a house to paint or whatever  the job may be, that say to the one  .you have employed: "Here are the  tools and materials, go ahead and do  Native Tribe Gifts to the  Empire  The Masai and other native tribes  in East Africa are not permitting their  loyalty to the Empire to be unrepresented. Great Britain they state has  done so much to free them from the  yoke of internecine strife and raise  their status in the scale of civilization,  they must give proof of their thankfulness. The following are a few of  their most recent gifts:  3,000 goats, presented by tho Kavlr-  ondo chiefs of the Kisumu district.  Thirty bullocks, presented by tho  Masai Moran of the Matapatu clan,  and fifty bullocks by other Masai.  Over 150 bullocks and 280 sheep,  presented by Sendu, the chief Laibon  of the Loita  Masai.  Twenty-one bullocks, presented by  Masikonde.   .  These . gifts have been quite spontaneously offered by the tribes concerned.  S^ibC'^nSl'4   <������   -it   y������-sflf   and   it   will   suit  , i i ���������   ...._. trip "    Tc       hot.   nnt.    whnf   mnnxr   r\i   vnn  lo supply local needs. British Colum  l)ia should be one of the last provinces  in   the   Dominion   to  be   cc-m-  w. n. u. nor  me." Is that not what many of you  are doing with your children? You  say by your actions: "Here is my  child with its books, papers and pencil, I've furnished materials and  tools, educate him as you like."  Build New Ships  There are strong grounds for insisting that all interned German steamers be retained by the allies under  the terms of peace. But. that will not  take us far. We need ^ a thoroughgoing plan whereby at the first dawn  of peace the whole resources of British shipbuilding now mobilized for  naval work shall be switched as instantaneously as possible on to building steamers. Every merchantman  launched within the first year may  make an incalculable difference to our  post-war recovery.���������London Chronicle."  Scarcity of Labor is Acute  Result,Will Be  Invention of New Machinery, a Leader Asserts  I was talking labor with a man  whose official position makes him  speak for one of the half dozen largest  bodies of workmen in the world.  "The scarcity of laboring people today,, said he, "is certain to bring about  a great surplus of labor a little while  in the future, because necessity will  surely compel corporations to invent  machines to take the place of men."  Then he illustrated what he meant  by telling how' steel rails used to be  rolled and how they are rolled today.  Once two score men were necessary  to feed the huge lump of raw steel  into the rolls and keep drawing it out  and feeding it back until finally the  rail emerged complete.  Now a machine unattended does the  whole thing. The sewing machine in  similar fashion put out of work hundreds of seamstresses. The mowing  machine and the self binding reaper  drove thousands of farm hands from  hay and wheat fields.  I know that in three hours a handful of dock hands can load 12,000 of  iron ore upon a lake steamer where  once a small army of men couldn't do  it in a day.  I have seen fifty men and women  toil thre.e days in a Japanese harbor  to put' one thousand tons of coal in  the bunkers of a small steamer. They  hoisted it in with  rice straw baskets.  You may go down to some of our  own modern piers on the Delaware  and see a vast iron hand reach������out,  grasp a carload of coal and dump the  contents into the hold of a ship as  easily as you put a spoonful of sugar  in your coffee cup and in about "the  same time.  Inventive genius yoked with money  has done these and other things. Each  new mechanism has temporarily made  a plethora of labor by doing the work  of many human hands.  "That is what must now come with  increased force," said this man under  whom toil tens of thousands. "If we  cannot get enough men to do the work  we will take what at the start may  be an inferior machine, but which  practice will readily improve.���������Girard  in the Philadelphia Ledger.  finished work; keeping a lot of poor  cows rather than a less number of  good ones; trying to till more acres  than we can plow and till well. Of  course, help will always be scarce and  expensive on such a farm for there  is laid out twice as much work as can  be done with the help the farmer  thinks he can afford to keep. There  are any number of three and four men  farms being run with two men. Under such conditions how can they  pay the profit they should pay?  When we get down good and hard  to the idea of doing our farm- work  better than be have been doing; keeping only such cows as can do good  work; taking the best care possible  of our products when we have been  to the expense of raising them; then  we will find that he have a good deal  more money with which to employ  expensive help and make needed improvements. The channel through  which good profits come on the farm  is the most thorough efficiency possible. A3 we lower efficiency we lower profit, and there we are. Half-  done work never has paid and never  will. To avoid this trouble we must  enlarge our vision, our ability, our intelligence. That's the only way to  better success.  Verified His Suspicions  Tommy Atkins always takes his  fighting humorously, as one described the destruction of an aeroplane  which flew over the British lines  sporting French colors.  "Some'ow or other I thought the  blighter was German, and at last I  couldn't stand it no longer. "Puff!  puff!' said Archibald, and down the  beggar came.  Archibald, of course, is the slang  name for an anti-aircraft gun, and it  was found that over the planes with  their great-black crosses the Germans  had contrived movable flaps marked  with the tricolor. .  Mr. Slimpurse (feeling his way)���������  your charming daughter tells me. that,  she is an excellent cook and housekeeper. Old Lady (calmly)���������Yes, I  have had her carefully taught, for I  have always held that no lady who  does not understand housekeeping can  properly direct a retinue of servants.  express trip. 450 miles to the south', tl  the settlement called Wainwright, trf  consult the teacher of whom they ' ati  heard , and who it seems was so mu:i'  impressed by their story that he made .  the trip hack with them over the snow'  and frozen tundra 450 miles to a poin'/'  whose location he has not yet disclosy -  ed. There he found this- great lakia  ot oil constantly fed bv four springs/  pumping away under pn.psur* .->! na'f  ural gas. He made careful 'investi-ja'/  tion and surveys and staked -if" hi������|  claims, and provided with samples of  the liquid, went back to Wainwright,  and thence to Nome and finally to  Seattle. *  There is nothing to tell us a hint ot'.  the location of this richness in oil, ?x-  cept that it is in" the far northwest,  north of the Arctic circle, and not far  from navigable waters of the Arctic  Ocean or some river tributary to it,  Continue  Splendid  Co-operation      (  ��������� The ideal of course, would be for the-!  allies to adopt the policy of free trade-/  among themselves, -eaving the rest of'i'  the wo.rld to follow the example at itsi  leisure. That would mark the greatest!/  advance ever made in world relation-}  ships and would be the noblest fruit')  of the war. We hope that heroic, ex-!  pedient will be discussed at the con-',  ference. But in tht, absence of such!  an achievement, there are- many}  things to be done. The allies at the-l  present time are pooling their re- ]  sources in an unprecedented measure. )  We are working together as one firni,.|-  France concentrating on this form of)  production, .England on that, Russia./  on the other���������ail by arrangement, all.)  for the common benefit. We nave-,'  founded great trusts, not for private-I  advantage, but'for the general "ad van t- I  age, and have excluded the exploita- >  tion of the middleman from great, f  areas of trade. Let us organize the- /  continuance of this splendid co-opera-)  tion. It is saving us in war; it will  bless us in. peace.���������London Daily-  News.  I  Keeping   One's   Temper.  It was. Channing who said: "As '. ne*  sets himself against people or things,,  they all seem to him correspondingly  .belligerent. Nothing is more destructive than a continual resistant or pessimistic spirit." The lesson of this is-  that we should never be so sure we-  are right as to cause us .to... despise-,  the person \vith whom we disagree, for  then he will despise us, and that wilt  be a great deal worse than disagreeing.  The surest sign of a man being right-  is his open-mindedness and his warmheartedness, and his making a friend,  of the person with whom he disagmss.  A noble opinion is never violent. It w-  always ready to return a smile and put  forth a hand. The way some men get-  mad when others refuse to adopt their  views is enough to make the very-  devils smile. Hope and anger do not"  dwell in the same heart.  Jim���������A dancer reminds me of a tugboat.  Jam���������How so?  Jim���������Lives by her tows.  1  Forest Destruction and Floods  "He doesn't seem to -nave any  brains."  "Brains! Why, that fellow would  search for eggs in a cukoo clock."  Nearly all the floods in Canadian towns are due to destruction of trees-  on the protective watersheds. The liv- ing forest holds back the surplus-  waters. The burned and hacked fores t releases them to do what mischief  they will.  *--i   r*i" "i '-" ���������'"->      M      r7>UfJ3[[*  r *i  iv  , f  i^'^tW^  ir"  ������������������geffE��������� ,GAZ������IXE7^: H������BrET)~~-i3: Or���������  jt 1  jatidit-  , ^raiashes". J:i!<^eye&  ^'Prompt Relief���������Permanent Care  I-CARTER'S LITTLE  [ SLIVER PILLS  Nail.   Purely vege  |'������I>le���������act surely  but gently  lie liver.  Stop after  tdinner  distress���������j  gestion��������� improve   the  complexion���������brighten  be eyes. Small Pill, Small Dose, Small Price.  Genuine must bear Signature  CI ,  fe&  wm&sm  is  no more neceseurjr  than Smallpox,   Army  experience has demonstrated  the almost mlriculoul ef'l-  -, and harmlessness, of Antityphoid Vaccination.  : vaccinated NOW by your pbvslclan, you and  ijur family.   It is more vital than house Insurance.  [ Ask your physician, druggist, or send for "Hare  [had Typhoid?" telling of Typhoid Vaccine,  suits from use, and danger from Typhoid Carriers.  niTTER  IABOBATOKY, 'BERKELEY, CAL.  iODUCltiO VACCINES * SERUMS UNDER U. S. S9V. MCEUU  u  Weed is Discovered  " ^t' "*" -���������" "-ii-HLL .i k'Vjj .' Vi ,,   - i   ,r ��������� l,  .-"���������The���������manner-ln^which.'jthe- commer-,  3cial necessities imposed by"tEe war,.  is resulting in the utilization of material hitherto considered mere waste  or positively nuisance, is nowhere,  more strongly illustrated than in the  leport which comes from Queensland',  to the effect that it is pioposed to use  the giowth of Prickly Bears in that  country for the production of Potaah  on a commercial basis. The PnckUy  fear has proven one of the mos^t  troublesome of the noxious weeds'in  Queensland. It had become such 'a  nuisance, that its destruction on a  large scale by means of arsenious ,tri-  ,chloudo,> had been seriously contem-  p'latc'd!.*--It has been discovered, however,^that, it .is possible to extract fifteen '-perl i-ccht. of Potash, from^the  ashes of this plant, by means of washing.'-.. ,Tii[ this way one-half torii'of  eighty per cent. Potassium Carbonate  may be obtained, to the acre. 'Ihe  ash is gathered by means of a vacuum  machine, but only cne-half of \t' is  recovered. This method is in actual  operation on one block oi land of'10,-  000 acres, which is infested by prickly  pear and the statement is made,'that  it is possible that Queensland ,'may  eventually, be able to expoit Potash,  manufactured from this source, i,.'  **4E NEW FRENCH REMEDY. Not N������2 WA  ^HERAPION SS&E'sa  SxtSUCCCSb   CUKES CHRONIC WEAKNESS   LOST VIGOR  'IM   KIDNEY     OLADDER    DISbAbES    BLOOD    POISON  JES     EITHER   NO   DRUGGISTS or MAIL SI    POST 4  CTS  fUGERACO   90   BtEKMAN ST   NEW YORK orLYMAN BROS  RONTO     WRITE FOR FREE BOOK TO DR   LS CLERO  Co HaverstolkRd Hampsiead London Ewa.  (V NEW DRAGEE ITASTELESS) FORMOF    EASY  TO  TAKJI  ������AFE AND  I " LASTING CUHB.-L  THAI   TRACE   MARKED   WORD     THERAPION    IS OH  IT   GOVT STAMf AFFIXED TO ILL GENUINE PACKET!  r ..  _____  M&'s'Gotten Root ,Co������ijdan4.\  _������__^     ���������"   '' A'eafe,rel{abierqntlaHng,  medicine. Sold in' threo degrees of strength No. 1,  -i'*l; No '2,^*3, NO..-3. *&  per- box. Sold by ..all  diusgists, or sent prepaid in plain package on  receipt of price. Fre������  pamphlet.    Address:   f  THE COOK MEDICINE COJ  XQ20HTQ. OUT. (ftmtdl Wtaiar j  .__<     >     AGENTS"     . .    "    ,,  ^Wanted In every town and village.  take~'or<iers tor the best-Made-to-  (easure   .Clothing uv Canada.   ,Good  pmmissions.' " Mag_ificent Samples.  STERLING. TAILORING  CO.,-  !>5 College Street "-       *  Toronto  ���������__~��������� ^  An Ancient Port  [The Black Sea port lately captured  ly tlie Russians - is so ancient that  Is ongin is almost lost in the mists  If histoiy. It was to. Trebizond, the  Incient Trapezus, that Zenophon, the  loluntcef soldier Irom ' Athens, endowed with raie military genius, con-  iucted. as described in the "Ana-  jasis," well knoA'n to High School  [oys, the Rctieat of the Ten Thousand  Greek's, when their Genera's had been  teacheiously slain oy the Peisians  Jfter the battle of Cunaxa, B C. 401,  ..here" Cyrus the Ypii.B_.ei, their com-  landci '.fell* at the moment of victory,  in stirvmg to wiest the Thione of  "ersia fiom his brother Artaxeies.  War Temperature - '  The temperature at which battles  are fought how the magnitude of ,the  war area.   Here aie a few indications;  Near Baghdad 120 in the sun.   t  ,. Near Kut-el-Kaimir, 80 deg. in" the  'sliade;!'''���������,,"?'' *," '-r.   -." ,'7,  lirzerum, 40 dog. "below" zero. J  Persian Gulf, 140 deg. in the shade/  'Qn the latter, British warships have  been doomea", to (patrol -what is desig-  jnatedr as the' hottest,' /corner   of the  whole" earth'   '  " '"*       /"    '"       ��������� '  Necessity is the mother of invention,  j[nd the hungry Frenchman "mentioned  a biogiapfiy recently published in  England lilustiates the old adage  |new. - \     v  He was in an English restaurant  [nil wanted eggs tor bieakfast,, but  pad foigotten the English word.' So  lie got around the difficulty in the  Jollowing  way  "Vaitene,    vat is dat    valking    in  |he  yaid."  "A .rooster, sir "  "Ah! And,vat you call de rooster's  Ivife "    *     l  "The hen sir."  'And vat you call de children of de  [-ooster and his vife?" , >,  "Chickens, sir " ,        '  "But vat you call de chicken oefore  ley aie chicken-'"  ' "Eggs, sir."  "Bring me two." ��������� *���������-"'  MEAL-TIME CONSCIENCE'-'  'hat,   Do, the  Sick   Children   Drink?  HARD WORKING WOMEN,  Will    'Find ���������  New-     Strength1  Through  the' Use  of Dr.  .-   - Williams', Pink Pills  " It.is useless" to tell a' hard working  woman to take life easily and not to  worry." Every woman at the head of  a home; every girl - in offices, shops  and  lactones is subjected to more or  less worry.   These cannot be avoided.  But  it  is  the  duty   of  every   woman  ',and 'eveiyjgirl to save her  strength  as much as possible, and to build up  her system to meet unusual demands.  Her  future  health 'depends  upon  it.'  To  guard    against  a  break-down    m  health  the  blood  must  be kept rich,  red and pure.-<-To Keep the blood in  this condition nothing can equal Dr.  Williams' Pink Pills. They strengthen  the nerves, res'tore the appetite, bring  the glow of health to  pallid  cheeks/  and renewed energy to listless people.  Women cannot always rest when they  should,   but  they'can   keep   up  their  strength and keep'away disease by the  occasional use of Dr.  Williams' Pink  'Pills., .Mrs   'A. .Rhodes,     Hamilto.n,  Ont., says   "A few" years ago on coming to  Canada, working long    hours,  and   close   confinement   began   to  tpll  upon me . I was completely run down,  and finally could do nb"work.  "I was  pale, suffeic'd from headaches, did not  i,est well, ,and  felt    altogether    very  jmiserablej  ,The; doctor'said'the trouble was anaemia,' and after doctoring  for  some"  week.s  without  getting  any  relief,   I   decided i to"\drop  the   doctor  and    take.Dr .Williams'    Pink Pills.  Very soon I began to notice a change  for the better, arid byithe'time I had  used half- a dozen boxes of the Pills  I  was  again    enjoying    the    best i of  health.    I have never had any return  of the  sickness and .uever  felt bptter  in my life than I,do now.   I give'my  cxpeiience,_therefoie, that it may be  .used for the benefit of otheis."  .' You can   get    Dr   Williams'    Pink  Pills from any medicine dealer or by  mail at 50 cents a boA or six boxes for  $2.50 from The Dr Williams' Medicine  Co',, Brockville, Onfv "t" v.' f���������"*       <     <  forest Preservation  Mfa K  nstri^favilPubli'cations (sfued byrTtne  > jtCanadian Forestry Association.'   'j  i\     ^-^"l    J J '   fl    (.,,>"|l   J,  r'   fj ft  T/ie first edition of  "A Matter    oi  Opinion?'*;' 'a, ilittle iboqkte.t issued'f by  fhial     Co'i-l'oHio1^! 4   lU-A'ni^+^v        Ace/in, olinn  the!  c  h  ���������    Ca'ri'adi^rl^Jj'ore'-tx'y   Association  amounting1 ''to1*'2Si6o6vdupies,! h,as J| al-  reatlyp been dis,tnbuted to settlers,  lailwayj t emplpyees, '\ 'campeis,^, 'fire  raugeis andLothers who1" are speciaily  lntferested in. forest .preservation. "A  Matter of Opinio7i'' "brings hofne'in a  direct, and-"Jtoiciblp,J way ,the great  irrrpo'rtah"ce ' of 'eonserymg' tlio',, \t6jpat  re'souices of .Canada for present "arid  future gcnera't'ioris/'- The -Canadian  l(,orestiy *Associationuis-a-purely public spirited body, not being connected  in any way with government or special  intcicsts, and nt. has, done valuable  work throughout the Dominion in developing an interest in tho highly  commendable task -t has set itself to  achieve, iAH, should have^ajCopy of  the insiuctrve publications 'issued'by  the association. These' may' be had  oy acldiessing1 a'eard to thc secretary,  Hobson Black,r , Booth building, Ottawa. ,,   ,,,    i ,  Grippe Left Her  o;,!'J;;'\,sepj6usiyiiii  BUT DODD'S KIDNEY PILLS CUR-  I ''I'uED'HER^COMRLETELY-  ii i\!/<)Sj . . i -. ���������rr-x   ,    -i ,     ,   ,  Mrs. Halquist Tells Just Why She'is  the Firm Friend of the Grand Canadian'Kidney'Remedy,''Docld's Kid-  1 'ne'y'Pills. -���������>���������., , , < , . i  ' Uangsund, ��������� Sask.���������((Special)���������Mrs.  Pete. .Halguist, a well known resident  here, is a fiim believer m1 Dodd's' 'Kidney 'Pills, and is always ready to,tell  the reason why. ,  "About a year ago," Mrs. 'Halquist  says,'"my little gnl<was taken ill with  the grippe. , She was sick in bed for  three weeks with pains in 'the joints.  They'were'swollen and -stiffs ��������� ��������� .  i "She had,cramps in'her muscles, so  it was awful hard for her to ' get  around'for the longest time' > After  she' was able to be around, her skin'  became harsh and came off in scales.  ''"After using two boxes of,Dodd's  Kidney_Pills she was as well as eyer  she ( was in her life. She has ' been  strong'and healthy ever since.'"'  The after-effects of grippe , are  more to be dreaded than the disease  itself. That is because they generally  act on weak kidneys and put them, out  of woikmg order. Sick kidneys are  the cause of rheumatism, ' backache,  dropsy, 'and numerous, other, diseases.  Thej one sure way to^avbi'dthem'is to  keep the k'idneys toned up and able to  do' their 'work. .The best way to keep  the1 kidneys healthy is to use Dodd's  Kidney .fills.  *T-*! gS'VT.I.'jl ���������,ilJi  wr  f.  "FL-isf"*'  , You wftffinjf relief fn Zani^uk* I  Ii eases the burnjrg, stinging,  pain, stops,feeding, and brings  ease.,,Per^evera'ncej with'Za-sn-,  Buk, means cure. ,Why not prove'  ! ..this ?   ���������*#'J>ruoiriat* and Stores.^-'  LITTLE   ,  THINGS COUNT  Even in a match you 'should  consider-the "Little Things,"  the wood���������the composition���������  the   strikeability���������^the   flame.  MATCHES'  are made of,strong dry pine  stems, with a secret perfected'  composition that guarantees1  "Evei-y, Match A Light." '65  years of knowing how���������that's'  the reason t ' "      '  '       -   ' ���������   ' ������"    ii      i    , <���������,  "All Eddy products   are dependable products���������Always.  DominionJE*qiefrtniental Farmri n>,t1  Advises Growing Flax >  * > />iij"i  \L  Live Stock Market  The .Officer (after a complaint)���������  This tea's all right. What's the complaint" , ,  Tommy���������it ain't tea, sir.  It's stoo!  The Officer���������And very nice stoo I  Minard's  Liniment used by Physicians.  "Why are you down on Sam, Ras-  tus',- He thinks a great deal of you,  he" told* me' to."  "Well, you just tell dat nigger fo'  me dat his feelin's am not recipros-  sified, dat's all."  to Safe-  Minard's  Friend.  Liniment     Lumberman's  "There are times when, mother or  father feeds the youngsters,something  ihat. they j krio>v children;should not  lave. Perhaps it is some'rich dessert  )ut 'more, often it is tea or coffee.--- :.~-  It-is better-to have some delicious,  ibtfood-drinkithat you can take:your-:  ielf:-and- feed to your children,. coh-  icious that it will help'and strength-;'  m, but never hurt  them. -.\  An . H-'astern lady says: "I used  :offee many years in spite of the coh-  i-iction that it injured my nervous  system and. produced my nervous  Iheadaches." (Both tea and coffee are  injurious to many persons, especially  mildren, 'because they "contain the  subtle,, poisonous drug, caffeine). ���������  '.'While visiting a friend I was serv-  :d with Postum and I determined  to  ;et a package and try it myself.. The  ���������esult. was ail. that could be desired-  delicious,, finely flavored,, richly col-  ired   beverage.    Since    I  quit coffee,  [Postum  has  worked  wonders for .me.  "My   liusbr.hd,, who    had    suffered  irom    kidney trouble    when-drinking  :offee,   quit  the  coffee  and   took    up  'ostum  with  me -mid  since drinking  'osturn he has felt stronger and  bet-  :er,   with   no     indication     of   kidney  trouble.-  'You may be sure I find it a great  iomfort   to   have   a   warm   dripkr: at-'  teals ���������������������������thai' I   can   give  my   chil'dren,'  "ith   a  clear  conscience  that  it   will  ) and not hurt them as tea. or coffee would."  Name  given   by  Canadian    Postum  ;6., Windsor, Ont. , ..  Postum  comes in  two  forms:  '.Postum Cereal���������the original form���������  t'ust  be ,well  boiled.    15c    and    25c  >kgs.;  Instant Postum���������a soluble powder���������  lissolves quickly in a cup of hot wa  ter, and, v/ith cream and sugar,-makes,  delicious beverage instantly. 30c am  )c tins.  "'"'J'-th forms are eually delicious anc"  T-cost about the same per cup.  \ "There's a Reasonl' for Postum.  ���������sold by Grocers.  W. N. U.  1107  Keepingf One's Temper  l It was Channing who said: "As one  sets'"lrimself against people-or things,  jthey all seem to. him correspondingly  b'elligereiifc-'���������"���������No'tliingii's'-Jm'bre 'destructive than-,a ;coutinual resistant or pessimistic ^spirit;"-!.I The lesson of this  that we should .never. be so sure we  are right as to cause us to "despise the  person - !with whom; rw,e disagree, for  then he will despise us," and that will  be a great deal;jWbrs'e'*-than disagreeing. The surest; sign of/a'-ma'h Deing  right is his: ppen-riiindedh'ess and his  warm heartedriess, and! his making a  friend of ithe.'Rersb'n with, whom he  disagrees. A -noble; opinion is never  violent. It is. always; ready to return  a smile arid put; forth-ja hand. The  way spnie men get'rriad when others  refuse to adopt their views is enough  to make the very devils smile. Hope  and anger do "not dwell-in the same  heart.        ;' ���������-.        -  ,- .-���������'''���������  The^Vyay;tc)' Win  One of the biggest men-in this country maintains that'your :success depends upon how hard you work. He  says, if you want to make a success  of. anything, keep pegging away at it.  and the" mea*sure"-of -your achievement  will -depend--., upon how hard you  '���������plug." He-reminds you of the fact  that one .night of riotous living consumes , the equivalent physical and  mental'strength of two days of.hard  toll.--.- ';-j j    "���������-;   n-*f- --.j-'i -;,,-, - ,,.,..,.   It'is' a fact,- where i one riiah dies  from overwork, one hundred die- from  stagnation���������;too many persons... -are  -prone to give up a project before they  get really'started one it.; He winds':up  this practical advice by saying: -'Get  the respect of your rivals by beating  them at their own. game in a clean  ,vay.",    ,'��������� ,   ' ,.   "  The Roumanian army now numbers  *no,000 men, while her navy is-strong  inough to give Austria some sleepless  ughts that is, if she took sides  with  Lier best friend���������Russia.  "So Hunter is after the heiress. By  the way what does he do for a living?"  "Banking, at present."  "Indeed I"  "Yes, he's banking on marrying  her"  Miller's Worm Powders are sweet  and palatable to children, who show  no hesitancy, m taking them They  will certainly bring all worm troubles  to an end They are a strengthening  and stimulating medicine, coirecting  the disorders of digestion that the  worms cause and imparting a healthy  tone to the system most beneficial to  development.  "Keep nearer to the enemy," was.  it has transpired,..the signal that Admiral David Beatty sent frorii-;the  Lidfriri the Dogger Bank fight. It,was  in this fight that .the,German Dread'-  nought Blucher was, .sunk. "Engage  more closely,", was ..Nelson's famous,  battle signal. :'    '     ! -'���������  "I'm afraid John thinks I'm extra-,  vagant. He didn't even smile when  ^c saw my new dress."  "Some men have no sense of  mmor I"  u-.~::fc--i  How^s ThisT  We offer , One, Hundred Dollars Reward for any case of Catarrh that  cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh  Cure. ;-'  Hall's Catarrh Cure has been .'talc-  en by; catarrh sufferers for the past  thirty-five years, arid has become  known as the most reliable remedy] for  Catarrh. Hall's Catarrh Cure acts  through the Blood on the Mucous surfaces, expelling the Poison from the  Blood and healing the diseased portions.,,  .;..-���������,       ... '|: ���������"���������������������������'" ���������'  After you have taken Hall's Catarrh  Cure for a short tinie you will'see' a  great improvement In your general  health. Start taking Hall's Catarrh  Cure at once ;and got rid of catarrh.  Send for testimonials, free.  F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, Ohio.  Sold by all Druggists.  75c.  Dubbliegh���������at ;a  reception this  afternoon  I   exchanged   ideas  with  the  famous Professional Saduka.  '"' Miss* Keen���������That   explains . why I  found the professor so tiresome.  Ask for Minard's and take no other.  A Pyrrhic victory is one gained at  too great a cost. Pyrrhus was King  of Epirus (318-272 B. C.) After his victory at Asculum in 279 B. 0., he is  said to have exclaimed���������"Another  such victory and we are lost.".  TfMNEL*     Granulated Eyelids,  Liyes inflamed by exposure  to Cold Winds and Dust  ,_ _i-.,Tt7t C quickly relieved by Murine  TOUR tLYtaBye Remedy. No Smarting, just Eye Comfort. At Your Druggists'  50c per Bottle. Marine Eye Salve inTubea 26c  For Book of the Eye Free write  Murine Ey������ Ramady Company. Chicago  M\:M$������kM)  Action Being Taken in U. S  guard the People Against Con-'  ' trolled Markets. '  The American Live Stock Association, the Corn Belt Meat Producers  Association, the,. Kansas Live Stock  Association, the Texas Stock Growers  Convention; the Missouri Cattle,  Swine and Sheep Feeders Execuhve  Committee, and the Panhandle and  Southwestern Stockmens 'Association  'are on the war path, hunting the scalp  of Controlled Markets. During 1915  and '16 these various associations have  resolved ' in conventions against the  octopus of Controlled Markets and set  ,in( motion an effort to discover 'the  modus operandi'of'said octopus.  The octopus is a-devil    fish���������small  of body but with long and numerous  tentacle arms that grab its prey.    It  is the terror of the.sea,There are various land octopus corpoiations with far  reaching    and    grasping    arms    that  strangle competitors 'and. feed -ipon  everything    within   reach.     But thc  greatest of all is the octopus of Con-  ti oiled Markets     Whatever has to do  with the    control of a nation's    tood  supply   is the   most   dangerous, the  most   enslaving   and   the   most, rapacious unless contiolled by the government that permits its existence.  \    These various associations are convinced  that  the  big    meat    packers,  formerly known as the beef trust until  absolved  fiom 'this  stigma by a' generous government,  are already reaching  their  grasping tentacles  into  too  many avenues of  trade  that have to  do with'the food supplj of the nation.  They control the meat packing situation and the stock' yaids and terminals,  and cattle loan companies    tiiat  can tie the feeders   hand   and    foot,  stock  yards  banks; 'rendering woiks,  leathei, refngerator and cold storage  seivice, fruit and  fiuit juices;  poultry  and poultiy products,  dairy products; fertihzeis, cottonseed prod acts  and stock feeds of various kinds, besides gieat teiminal grain elevators  For some unknown but easily guessed reason the'packeis have kept the  prices of stock on foot so low that  feeders have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars in the last two years,  yet the price of fresh meats and packed meats have been high, giving the  packers nearly1.' double' ' the ���������; surplus  earnings -of ������������������ 1915 oyer 1914. . They get  ,war.; prices for what they' sell' but' fail  to. pay war prices''to the! farmers tfor  stock'-'on foot.-.It is:time.,something  is done ,to safe-guard tlie people'  against Controlled' Markets.''���������'������������������    j. :.;  ;  ...���������Nothing.,as. Good for .Asthma.���������Asthma remedies come and go'but every  'year the sales of the.' original Dr. J.  D., Kellogg Asthma. Remedy grow  greater and greater. No further, evidence could be - asked of it's remarkable  merit. , It relieves.,., It is always of  the same unvarying quality which.the  sufferer' from asthma learns to' know.  Do not;suffer another attack, but get  this splendid remedy' today.'    , .  Nelson Waited Long ���������'���������'������������������  Sea power is not a stage' property  to be squandered to provide exciting  stories to daily newspapers. When  Nelson was awaiting the final triumphant meeting with the Napoleonic  fleets he knew better than, to.fritter  away , his force in a series of futile  attacks upon their bases, even though  in his day the mine.and .the submarine were non-existent. He kept his  battle fleets in their proper place?���������  on the high seas-r-and the war was  nearly two and a half years old before  he met the enemy.���������-London Truth.  A New War Decoration  His Majesty has created a new war  decoration to be. known" as the Military Medal. It is to. be awarded; to  non-commissioned officers' and men  "for bravery in the field." The medal  will be silver, and will be worn imr  mediately before all war medals.  The Royal warrant instituting the  medal, which was published in a  supplement of the "London Gazette,"  states:  I is ordained ha he   Miliaryeerddnd  It is ordained that the Military  Medal shall bear on the obverse the  Royal Effigy, and on the reverse the  words, ''For Bravery in the Field,"  encircled by a wreath surmounted by  the Royal Cipher and a Crown.  Director! J. HuGrisdale Predicts .Good  Prices   and   Profits   From  This '  I,' Cron  f'As' a   crop'likely 1!to 'be''quite   asa  profitable- as ' wneat I this   year,", ,says  'Mr    Grisdale, ,. "may    be  mentioned  flax. The annual* co'nsurription' 'of "flaxseed   is, in   'he   neighborhood   of  30,-  000,000(   "budhbls' on    this   continent.*  The'.combined crops of seed in  Canada and the United States fall usually  12,000,000   or''15,000,000   bushels   short  of this  amount.    This  extia seed  is  normally', brought 'from-Argentine; and  is coming /n at the present. The high  cost of ocean transportation at' pr'es-1  ent (about 70c per buuhel from BuenoB  Ayres to New York) has had the natural ' effect������ of   raising   tho   price , of  every bushel of seed on  this continent so that now'instead of 70'to 80c a  bushel as' was the puce at Winnipeg  in  1912,  $1.95 to   $2 00  per, bushel  is  being   paid   at  the   same   point.  i "��������� Where_, wheat seeding has progressed rather slowly,' it will 'often be'advisable to sow the^ last few acies in- j  tended for wheat rather to flax. The  cash returns  per  acre'from the  two  crops   are   likely- to     be.i  practically,,  equal^ this year, and about the same'  as they were last year. For this reason,., ifc is well worth trying flax and  running no risk with late wheat which  is usuallyJ a poor crop, i       ' .,' j .     ; ,,  "Only clean seed -should ,be, sown  and that on clean land A limited  area' of well prepaied land sown with  clean seed will be1 m'ore profitable  than a' large 'area' ofi badly prepared  land-on which dirty seed is used."  "For" the new settler or'the man  with new breaking 'done before May  25 to 26th, flax offers an opportunity  for money making this year on this  land such as is not possible with any  other crop. - Breaking about three  inches deep, discing as soon as broken so as to fill all openings or spaces  between the furrows and to conserve  moisture as well as make a solid seed  bed, will be such a preparation as  gives a fair chance of a fair crop of  flax A,f good seed is carefully' sown  before the first of June. Sow <at the  rate of 30 to 40 lbs.  per acre.  "Prices ,for flax are likely to be good  this coming fall." '  Turkey has discovered a fruitful  field of labor In return for (German  kindness she has sent missionanes to  I  The Arch  Looter  The most conspicuous failure of the |  war is the individual who did most to ?  precipitate    it���������the--German    Crown j  Prince. ,   After, emerging jrom the Ar- i'  dennes' his1 Army 'narrowly' 'escaped i  destruction.    The. only, reputation he_|  has acquired is that of being the arch"  looter m that nest of thieves���������the German  Army ���������- 'If, for? any,'' reason  this  precious person is called to the Imperial' throne,- Jwhai'wlU  be the posi-'  tion  of  the    Hohenzbllern    dynasty,  represented i by . ar,braggartt failure .at  the close of,,an' .unsuccessful'   war?���������  Times of India. >���������" '* "*  '���������   -���������'���������>.   ?    * -.,/ . ; -(,  Corns cannot exist when Holloway's  Corn Cure is applied to them, because it goes to the fodfand kills the  growth, r *'       ,,, - m 1A   ������  "Did you hear about the defacement  of Mr. Skinner's tombstone?" asked  Air. -Brown a few 'days-after the'funeral of that eminent, .captain of industry, 'ii        . sA'>  ; "No,  what    was *t?"   ,inquired- his  neighbor, curiously."'    '   -''' - -  - "Someone added the word 'friends'  to the epitaph." (  "What was the epitaph?"      ,: i    ,  " 'He did his best.'."    .      ,  Lady   (compassionately)���������There,   af-'  ter four, hours a miserable'little fish*  is struggling-on the'hook.   'Oh.i such  cruel spoit! si  , ,'<   j        r"   ,  Fisherman���������Are ������ you    pitying' 'the ,  Germany with the object of convert-   fish, are you pitying ,the worm or are  ing the people to Mohammedanism.       you pitying me?  Strongest Liniment in 100 Years :.7.i  ,   Best For Either Man or, Beast  Nothing for Family Use Can  Compare With It  RUB'ON NERVILINE  When you have been exposed to wet  and cold and your muscles are full of  pain, nerves are jumping with neural  gia, then you should have ready at  hand a bottle of Nerviline. It robs  pain of its teirors, gives relief to all  suffering, brings ease and comfort  wherever used.  No care or expense has been spared  to secure ifor Nerviline the purest and  best materials It is prepared with, a  single aim- to restore the sick to  health. This cannot  be said of the preparation that an  unscrupulous dealer  may ask you to accept instead of Nerviline, so,we warn you,it is the extra  profit made on 'inferior goods that  tempts nthe substitutor. Of him oe-  waie.  Get Nerviline when you ask for it,  then, you  aie  sure  of a remedy  that  will cure all aches, strains, swellings, J Co J Kingston, Canada. , {Q  ������������������ *    - ���������: '"���������.   . v  and the pains of, rheumatism, neuralgia and lumbago. '''  In the last hundreds years no liniment has been produced that can compare with ^Nerviline in, strength, in  penetrating power, or in curative abil-  ity *���������'-������������������ ill  i<or nearly forty ("years it has been  Canada's household remedy,'*and mothers will do1 well!to -follow -the*" advice of Mrs.-Jessie,'Beggins, of. Stella,  P. O, Ont, who says: '    ������'  "Very frequentlythereTare ailments  in the family that rcan be cut "short if  Nerviline ,is handy. When my'emld-  ren come-m ifiom'play, with) a, -rough  or a bad cold, I rub them well with  i, e-Nervilmei" and they  ,are well almost at  once.' Nerviline is  jfine ,for earache,  too thache," ''chest    -colds, lumbago stiffness, rheumatism or neuralgia. . In  fact there is scarcely"a pain^br^ache  m man or beast -it won't cure jquick-  *y- ���������    v.  The1'large 50c family size bottle is  the/most, economical; trial size, 25c,  at   all   dealers,'   or the1' Oatarrhozono  i1?  ^'  $"Vi  - '������,  ���������I  ��������� '4  Pale, Sallow Clteeks-  show that the blood is impoverished and that the stomach is not properly, assimilating its food. In fact a woman's physical condition always"  shows inher face."' Paleness, blotches, pimples, sallowness or dull eyes all  fell tlte Need Of  *."U  Beecham's Pills. Women who are subject i to these conditions should  riot fail to avail themselves of their prompt and beneficial effect.     '   '  Beecham's Pills are Prepared to furnish the necessary relief. T]hey  clear the system of impurities, gently stimulate,the liver, regulate ,the  bowels and tone the system. Their mild arid thorough action quickly-  rid the skin of blemishes, improve the circulation and help the digestion.  ' ' '       * ���������    '      ' ' ���������  i . '���������������������������������������������' .��������� ��������� i '       .'���������'((   i i" ��������� ,'"t *  Every woman should know the corhfbrt and-experience the help o������tj. THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,  ioifimaii&6o,  "The Big Store"  _  Messrs.   Tweddle,   Frith  and     fPfe OkfrjM&to ffi_3%_.ttd      \  owen motored to Oroville on     **-���������-*   "J*���������** \PJUKINs  and - I  General  Merchants  KEREMEOS, B. C.  SING LEE  Laundry, Contracting of all  kinds, Ditch digging, Wood  Sawing, Clearing lana, Cooking and all kinds of Chinese  Labor.  Ivehkmeos, B.C.  Bow  Friday.  Stanley Mattice of Vancouvoi  is here on a visit to his uncle  John Mattice.  Mrs. Bowen visited with Mrs.  Bromley at the Richter estate  lower ranch on Friday.  Mr. and Mrs. Daly of Island  Lodge were guests at tho Willows over the week end.  F. H. French and family, accompanied by friends, motored  through town on Sunday.  Mr. and Mrs. T. Daly were  guests of Constable and Mrs.  Bowen at Keremeos Center on  Victoria day.  Miss MacConnell arrived from  the coast on Saturday and will  spend a few days here looking  after her property.  A large number of visitors arc  in town to take in the empire  day celebration.    It promises to  and  Similkameen Advertiser.  Subscriptions in Advance  Per Year 32.00  "   ( United Stiites)  '2.30 |  Advertising Rates  Measurement. IS lines to the inch.  Transient Advertisements���������not exceeding one  inch, Sl.OO for one insertion. 25'cents for  each subsequent insertion. Over one inch,  16 cents nor lino for drat insertion and 5  cents per line for each subsequent insertion.  Transients payable in advance.  Contract Advertisements���������One inch per month  Jl.25; over 1 ineh and up to -1 inches, ������1.00  per ineh permonth. To constant advertisers  raking larger splice than four inches, on  "- '"- "-ill lm irivcii of reduced  TAKE  i-ka  For siomaoh  and Bowel Trouble  raking larger spnee limn  mm i,.~..~.,  a in iii cut ion. rules will bo given of reduced  char,        * -  "1 ��������� "���������/" f>' Mnice and length  ication, rates win uu _,i%un ������.. .   _ -gcs. based on size of space and length  of time.  Certificate of Improvements ������10.00  (Where more than one claim appears  in notice, S'2.50 for each additional  claim.)  Jas. \V. Gkier. Publisher.  fledl6uDrua& Book Store  Hedley,B.C.  _m_-Mr<  J  Hoilk-y, B. C May 25, 1010.  KEREMEOS  Two'auto cars, carrying traveler:-, wore in town Saturday.  Miss Sewell was a visitor to  town between I fains Saturday.  Mrs. ���������). Innis returned from  Green Mountain on Saturday.  ���������Miss Ramsay spent the week  end the guest of Mr. and Mrs.  W. M. Frith.  Miss. Winifred Manery spent  Sunday with her parents at  Similkameen.  Be v.   F.   Stanton   is   leaving  ���������' thisweck  foi- Vancouver to attend conference.  Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Brown  were guests of Mr. and Mrs.  Carle on Saturday.  Miss Boalc of;] Hediey speir*-  the week end with Mr. and  Mrs. Percy Quant. "  Mrs. B. Yuill of Greenwood'  was a visitor in town between  trains on Saturday.  Mrs. Keller of .Myers Flat is  visiting at the home of Mrs.  Tweedle, higlewood.  Mrs. Le Lieval of Springbrook  ranch, accompanied by her son,  was in town on Monday.  Mr. aud Mrs. F. Howse and  friends of Princeton motored  throng ii town on Sunday.  Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Brown left  for their home in Ashland,  Oregon, on Sunday traveling  by auto. '  A very interesting meeting of  the W. M. S. was held at Mrs.  :Stanton"s (parsonage) Thursday  afternoon  Oscar    Lachmund, ���������   superin-  be a great success.  Miss Annie Innis returned to  her home here on Thursday  after spending several days the  guest of Mrs. Bromley.  Mrs. .J. P. Thomas visited  Oroville on Thursday, returning  home Saturday. While there  she had a lot of dental work  done.  Thc  present   publisher   took  charge   on   the   Gazette on the  15th inst., having purchased the  type,    machinery     and    paper  stock  from  the  owner, and is  not responsible  for   the   policy  of the paper, or financial obligations entered into in  the name  of The Hediey Gazette previous  to   that  date.    AVe   pay ������������������'spot"  on delivery  and expect   others  to   do   same  when   account  is  presented.    ���������_BPi      -��������� ���������- -  Judgixc; by express and  Ireight received the past week  cither the Great Northern or  Kettle Valley railway employs  expert smashers to destroy  goods entrusted to their care.  Even trunk-looting is occasionally indulged in.  Ambition  If you would r-isc above  the  throng  Anil seek the crown of fume,  Yon must do more than drift along  And merely play the game.  V/hatever- path your feet may  tread,  "Whatever be; your'quest,, ,   i.  The only way to get ahead  Is striving for the best.  The West and Verdoifc.  Fighting   still    continues   to  spring  into   fierce   activity   at  Verdun,  but that  the  French  consider  it is   over is shown in  the  promotion  of  Geueral Pe-  tain.   The  Germans may   and  do affirm that their whole  object    has    been     attained    in  the  staving  off for  a  time of  the  British  and  French offensive, but if that is all they have  to show, it amounts to rio more  than   a   postponement   of   the  evil day for a little longer. And  the price  they   have paid must  remind    stricken   Germany   of  the drive on Calais and the huge  losses between  the Marne and  'the    Aisne.      Once   -l-arain    the  Grown    Prince  Robert Carmichael returned  home on Saturday's train from  Chopaka, where' he had been  looking over some mining property.  Another crowd of land seekers arrived on Saturday's train  from Regina and are looking  over land of the Similkameen  Land Go's.  Mr. Mackay. mining expert of pod were Chief of  Police  Jack  | Spokane, was last week looking Simpson and the   editor  of the  over the copper property owned   Gazette,  but   when   Pete   An-   u<.-.n....~.    __.  by Carle, Wallace and William-  nance is pardoned- there will be  thing  assumes   more and more  son at Olalla, near the Daulphin.  no difficulty in proving an alibi,  a grimmer aspect for  the Ger-  ���������-.������������������ ���������������������������" mans.    The  price will  be  stu-  MEDLEY GAZETTE  "It may appear to be a coincidence that tho only strangers noticed in town' the evening  Jas.  Stewait's till was tap-  has made a  reputation���������that of another  French commander. Meanwhile, with Russians pouring  in, with Britain under general  conscription, and with France  forged into pure steel under the  hammer  blows   of war, every  __s~i  ���������V" ��������� *���������������'.. ,.- *-<������������������ ������������������������������������������ tr   - ��������� -^  ���������g___l_i_g_iagWSB5i^.-.graP^^^^^  WHEN YOU ARE IN NEED OF  Constable Sproule of Hediey  was in town on Friday with a  couple of prisoners. Owing to  Constable Bowen's absence he  had to return with them to  Hediey.  Visitors from South Keremeos last week were Messrs.  Taylor, Newton and Sinclair,  Mesdames Wright, Newton,  Sheridan, Ring, and Miss  Sinclair.  Owing to moving the plant  this week the Gazette is a little  behind in issuing. We have  had plumbers, electricians,' carpenters, skinners and printers  nil working together with more  or less harmony. The form'bf  the paper has been changed to  eight pages, with what is known  as a "patent inside." With the  advertising patronage it was  impossible  to  continue   an all  ern lines, accompanied by a  party of friends, passed up the  line Thursday, returning, in the  evening.  Road Superintendent Turner  was in town Wednesday on his  way up the line. Returning on  Saturday he inspected the new  bridge that has been built over  the river.  Miss Queenie Fraser of Arm-  ���������       "**��������� r  nclair. .m^^.....   __  Superintendent O'Neil, of the home paper  without  reducing  Great Northern railway's west-  the size, and .this,would be un-  ���������'--i ��������� u_. ��������������������������� fair to subscribers. The ready  print gives more reading matter with less expense.  If our  legislators  would  de-  vote more, time to legislation  and less to trying to prove each  other rascals the public might  be benefitted. The electors can  be depended upon to leave the  majority of the crooks at home  when voting time comes. The  of  the legisla-  Oscar    Lachmund,   superin-      M- ^���������-~ aunt, Mrs. present  Bession .of  the U*t  tendent B.C. Copper  company,^ on ^ ^     Miss Fmser tare   has    been    practical.  Greenwood, was in  town^ Mon-    J     -ey fl.om fche ban.m    one,     except    n  .dav on his way to Princeton. * ���������-^_ ;, R  hll9   been   Ilt- tempts   by  members   to  pi  is on her  way  home   from the  . coast where she  has   been   at  The Misses Eva and Kathaleen  tendiu'*- school.  ���������Gibson   entertained   a   few  of  their young friends on Wednes-      The sad news reached  Kere-  day evening at  their beautiful  meos last week   of  the sudden  --'-*-    ---- death of Mrs. Felloes (nee   Miss  Scot t) at Middloton, Ohio,   who  home, Riverside Lodge  Araoiis-   those registered  the Hotel Keremeos last week  were: M. B. Bwart, Penticton;  J. M. He id, Miss C. Maconnell,  G. Brady, Tom Slattery, Vancouver: II. Ingle,F. Boyd, White  Lake; Ii. Kellog, Hediey; J. C.  Kenny, Piinceton.  Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Jones and  son, Mrs. B. W. Knowles, Messrs.  Wheeler and Prior motored  from Hediey on Sunday and  were guests of Mrs. E. M. Daly  at the W i I lows. After spending  a delightful musical evening  they returned to Hediey.  Word was received here  last  week that Lieut. Moody, at one  time resident   here,   had   been  wounded.     No     details     were  given.    Moody enlisted with an  ���������Irish   regiment   about   a year  ago,    afterwards    joining    the  engineers, where he   gained a  commission.  taught school here for almost  two years, and made many  friends to whom her death  came as a great shock.  It is rumored that Sir Wilfrid 'Laurier intends resigning  the leadership of the Liberal  party. The bi-lingual question  is said to be the reason.  This camp should  met', with its pi  lie   a luiin-  H-roM.  The burning  ������tim--uon is. will  Pete An mince bo pardoned V  barren    one,     except    in    at-  ts   by  members   to  prove  each   other  crooks.     The mistakes, intentional or otherwise,  are past.    Tlie province is practically   undeveloped.     Builders  are   needed  in   the   legislature  Any   common,   vulgar    vandal  can pull down and destroy. The  statesman   builds a permanent  national   structuie;   the  politi-  tieian    caters    to   the   present  popular fancy.    Electors should j  vote, i or a  constructive  policy  for the future,   ami   not on the  mistakes of  the  past; for men  who will do what they say  The provincial botanist states  in a coast paper that British  Columbia has no skunk cabbage.  Bears think differently, and  they are possibly better judges  than the botanist.  mans.    ---   i  pendens, but it will bo paid.  This year may not see peace,  but it ought to see the beginning of the end.-The Weekly  Tattler, Montreal.  *s Contrngen-t  Following is the list of the men who  have gone to the front from Hediey.  The Gazette publishes them, in the  hope that our readers will not fail to  remember these brave fellows who are  fighting our battles for us.. Write  Lhem-a letter oceasionally to let them  know you are keeping "The Home  Fires Burning.' Addresses gladly  furnished on request. _  Pte  Sid Edwards (Killed in Action)  L. a, Blair  Mills (Killed in Action)  Pbe. W. Fullmer  ������������������   J. Stapleton  "   J. Frame  "   Tom Corrigan  .������  Bbenzer Vans, (Died in Hospital)  "   Hoy Corrigan  "   T. C. Knowles  "   N. B. Bwart  "   Bobby "Robertson  "   .Tuck Howe  ������   M. J. Meher, (Yorkie)  "'  Dan  Dev.-me  "   Dan Dollemore  "   J. T. N. Hepper  "   Arthur Coles  "   Bert Schubert  Corp.    Frank Dollemore  Pte. Rod McDougall  "   R. .1 :tine&  " . M. II- I"-- Jacombs  "   B. .)��������� Rothei-ham  "   Arthur Freeman  "   C. Christiana  Letterheads  Billheads  . Envelopes  Statements  Meal Tickets  Milk Tickets  Ball Programs  Posters  Dodgers, Dates  Circulars  Invitations  Business Cards  Bills of Pare  Memo Heads  Butter AY rappers  Visiting Cards  JL UOU&lo II  TRY Us' .-WE. GIVE SATISFACTION  ___'... -.^        ra.      AVW      X"*"*   :A*r*. .  ^*_ **������������&.. #&_VJ  The Nickel Plate  Bart)_r_snoD  SATISFACTORY, SANITARY  TONSORIAL SERVICE  This shop it equipped with  Baths and all the latest  Electrical  Appliances.  W.T.BUTLER, - Prop.  Hatching  Eggs  $i.oo PER SETTING  Single Comb Rhode Island  Reds (selected stock)  D. HENDEESON   .  Call up Phone No. \  ......... V  11 A good stock of Horses and.I  Hand.    H Orders for Team!  pi'Oiiiptl5r attended to. j  W OOD    FOR   SALJ  ':-'������������������'? ft Lft'6-E    I  yveru, Feed & Sale -Sr    HEDL-Y' B. C. j '  Phoue 12. D.  J.   INNIS li  ������������������  I!  Bow tec Lauij  ���������  Only First Class W<|]  Laundry Delivered Anj  60   YEARS  PEBSENCE  GREAT  NORTHERN ,.  HEDLEY B.C.    i  Bar.and Table the Best.   Rates ff  First Class Accommodate  JOHN JACKSON, Propr|  P RESBYTE Lll.A N   (JHURCH  Si-i'vici-s   every   nli.-rimtc  Sunday   at  7.30 p.m 1  Hebley Methoihst Ohubch  FRANK STANTON, B. A.  Minister  Services will be held the First and  Third Sunday.1- of the month  at 7.80 p.m.  "   J. Corrigan  Giiiiui-i- Chas. Siuinders  Pie. A. P. Miirtiii  Si-i-g<-ai)t, A. W. Jack  Pte. T. Culvert  "   Yv\ Liddicott  "    George Boxilll  ���������������   AV. Tucker  "   Fred Beck  2nd Lieut. A. E. Denman  Pte. .J. M<-<Tmto.:k  "    A. B. S. Stanley  Princeton Star accuses the  Gazette of having a liver. It  may lie true, but we never had  time to consult a physician, so  don't know.  ^____________B1Z^^  Trace Mark**  OS-signs  -rr-rv-i"--       Copyrights &.c  Anyonosending '\f'!������'_,^t,1i._e whether, oi!  qulclcly aacerliiiii our V'tpVitiihl������: Communion-  Invention a p-obnbly j,' * Wiyw'SQtf on l-alenra  tions strictly conBuentliij.Ahi'UJUf       .nnts  V*.     . u   ���������Cjr w ������������������ *������ - ������ "*       ^ , ,           v ..- rfi;t Cir*  AhniKlBomely ninsti-ii;-. W;-**;"'.','    '.y,./,^. !-3 u  oulation of any selei-- ..J" '    -���������,   _OWMleolerp.  your; lour raontus, "���������'��������� -<������-"' ���������'-���������''         ,������      .  (BONN������Cs.a'J ^-^io^  * Br.~.ncb r������ !'..-������-���������  NOTICE  Synopsis of Coal Mining Rcl  COAIj mining rights of the D  Miinitotu'i, Saskatchowan n  the Yukon Territory, the North  toi-ics iui<l in a portion of tlio Pro  tish Columbia, may bo leaned f<  twenty-one years at an annual n* j  aero. Not more than 2,5(!0 acres Vj 1  to one applicant. j I  Applicution for a leaso must be-! f  applicant in porson to tlie Agent <? j  ot tlie cliiiirlcb in which tho i-iKhtjl  ai-o situated. J-  In Hiirvoyert territory tlio laiui  eribod by sections, or legal ���������.. .  sections, and in unsui-voyed terrif J  applied for shall bo staked out' ���������' I  himself. Sj  Each applieaWon must be accof  fee of $5 which will be rofundet?  There is space for  a., few live  advertisers in The Gazette.  PAINTING  PAPER-flftNGING  KALS0M1NING  TERMS MODERftTB  -��������� MEDLEY, B.G.  MINKRA^ACT feo _f SJ5 which will be rofiindcf?  eerfflicateoi improvements ^^^������ga___S_S__%4   ��������� per ton. ,    *  IJnLY'fVVE.  ______;.,  Midnight Fractional Mineral Claim, situate  in thc Osoyoos Mining Division of Similkauiccn  Disti-i6t.  Where located:���������Camp Hcdloy.  TAKK NOTICE that. I, William Waugh.  Frpe Miners Certificate No. 751')2-**, intend,  Rixty days from date horeof, to upply to thc  Mining Recorder for a. Certificate of Improvements, for tho purpose of obtaining a Crown  Grant of tho above claim.  < And further  tako notice that  action, under  section 85, must bo commoneod before tho issuance of suoh Certificate of Improvement,  I    Dated thlsllth day of April, A.D. 1B1U.  per ton.  Tho person operating the miin..  thcxVgent with sworn returns f| I  the full quantity of inei-cluiiitali|J  and nay thc royalty thereon. T-r j  ing rights are not being opcratcijj  should be liu-nished at least onci|  Tho lease will include tho coal j I  only, hut the lessee may bo pell  chase whatever availablo surf.] 1  be considered necessary for tho j 1  mine at the rate of $10.00 an aorj 1  l<*or full information anpiieaaf  made to tho Sccrotary of tho j) li  tho Intorior, Ottawa, or o nnifi  Agent of Dominion Lands.        jll  Doputy Minisyei- (T  N.I?.-TJnauthoiizcfl pi-'T ,;, .,;  I isoment .will not be pai>. ...

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