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The Hedley Gazette Jun 14, 1917

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 vr ^iyji^Lj^JS^jsAi-f**'*'*  .1 l?    "ft, 4 <<.* ������   l"������������f ���������*'���������<'. _*1 .--l     *        J'). I A.  fflA���������--<.>,<  V/r'v,-  ?*<  **>' ^  T rbr,  '">' Irtjff Asso  aibly  Volume XIII.     Number 21.  HEDLEY, B.C., THURSDAY, JUNE 14,  1917. ������firf^������ $2.00, I^AdvaWe  ��������� \ '      ������*.     / . -  Travel by Auto...  Call up Phone No. 12  H A  good stock of Hm-ses and Rigs on  Hand.   H Orders for Teaming  "*- promptly attended-to.  WOOD   FOR   SA ]L"E4  PALftGk      -&?  Uveru, Feed & Sale Stables  Phono 12.  ���������HKDLEY   B. C.  D.  J.   INNIS  Proprietor  N.  f  Thomps n phonk skymour 5W3  MQR. WKBTKBH CANADA  Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd.  Steel Manufacturers  .Sheffield, Eng.  Offices and Warehouse 847*3 Boatty Street -  Vancouver, B. C."  r-  R.  FV EHROWN  -   British Columbia Land Surveyor  P. O. Dkaweb 160  Tkl. No. 27 -  PENTICTON,  B. C.  P. W. GREGORY  CIVIL  ENGINEER and BRITISH  COLUMBIA LAND SURVEYOR  Star Building       -       Princeton  WALTER CLAYTON  C   E.   HASKlNR-  CLAYTON & MSKINS  ���������v- Barristers,".Soticiiors, EiC   v  MONEY TO LOAN  PENTICTON,  B. C.  DR. J. L. MASTERS  '    . DENTIST."  OFFICE IN COVERT BLOCK.  Oroville,  Wash.  j*  Grand Union |  Hotel  HEDLEY,  British Columbia  Rates���������$1.50 a Day and Up  First-Class Accommodation;  Bar Stocked with Best Brands  of Liquor and Cigars  A.  WINKLER,     Proprietor. |  HEDLEY MEAT  MARKET  ���������   IBB  ac  All kinds of fresh and  cured meats always on  hand. Fresh Fish on  sale   every   Thursday.  R. J. EDMOND, Prop.  ���������1)18  GREAT NORTHERN HOTEL  HEDLEY B.C.  Bar and Table the Best.   Rates Moderate  First Class Accommodation  JOHN JACKSON, Proprietor.  ( - KEREMEOS ITEMS,   i  ' Mrs. Thos. Daly and daughter  are - visiting with friends in  Hedley.  ��������� Mi-s. Or���������er of Cawston visited  on Friday and Saturday with  Mrs. Gibson.  - Mr. Conway, traveling for P.  Slade & Co., Vancouver, was in  town on Tuesday.  Messrs. Broomfield and Daly  of-Princeton motored through  town on Tuesday.  ��������� ��������� . ,  Mr. Carley was ���������a , business  visitor to, Hedley ..and Princeton Tuesday and  Wednesday.  ' A party of Hedleyites' motored down on Friday to attend  the ice' cream and lawn social.  Mr. MilTs received a picture  of the Forestry battalion last  week. The Keremeosites are  alll looking welli   -  A cablegram was received  here on Monday saying the  Forestry battalion had arrived,  safely in England!  Another carload of lumber  arrived from the coast Monday  and extra men are being, put to  work at the cannery,       ~ .  Mr. D. J. Innis'.visited his  wife on Tuesday in .Oroville  hospital. He is wearinga.broad  smile these days���������twin boys.  M. Barcelo and W. Daly left  on Tuesday for Princeton where  they "will be absent>-for three  weeks looking after their cattle  on the range.  Mr. M. Bennie, accompanied  by Mrs. W. H. Armstrong, Mrs.  J. W. Armstrong, and Misses  Woodrow and Smith, motored  to Princeton on Tuesday.  ���������vThe-cut worm and wire^wbrm  are reported'are'reported' as  being very plentiful 'upon "the  bench this year among the tomatoes and early vegetables.  - Mr. Geo. Armstrong, manager of the Ogilvie Flour Co,  Medicine Hat, is here on a visit  to his hrothers, and is accompanied by Mr. .Cousins of Calgary.  Mr. Greer of Penticton, agent  for the. Ford Car Co.,-was in  town on Saturday;- and sold  three cars. The buyers were  H. Pai-sons, W. Mattice and A.  Mattice.  The marriage of Miss May  Louise Spraggett of Grand  Forks and Ivan L. Clifton, G.  N. agent at Keremeos,- took  place at Grand Forks on Tuesday, 12th inst.    ,   y        :   ::  Rev. Mr. Bunt and Mrs. Bunt  arrived from the. coast ori Friday and will be stationed here  for some months while the Rev.  M. Pike is visiting his home "in  Newfoundland on a honeymoon  trip.  Mr. and Mrs. G. Clarke and  family of Green mountain, accompanied by Mr. Clarke's  parents, motored through town  on Sunday to Hedley where,  they spent the day with Mr.  and Mrs. Forbes.  Word was received here last  week that A. W. Richardson of  Vancouver, formerly of Olalla,  had died of injuries received  from falling off a building on  which he was working.- Mr.  Richardson with his wife moved  to the coast last fall. While  here they made many friends  who extend their deepest sympathy to Mrs Richardson in her  sad bereavement.  "~ Rev. J. Knox Wright de  livered ah interesting and instructive leccure on missionary  work in Africa in the Keremeos  church on Monday night. It  was illustrated with slides  which the audience appreciated  very mnch. ��������� At the close a collection was taken up in aid of  the Bible Society. Owing to  the short-notice there was a  very small attendance.  In spite of the very disagreeable weather on  Friday night,  a large crowd gathered at the  lawn social held on the grounds  of M_rs. F. B. Gibson and all enjoyed a good, time. The girls  deserve much credit for their  splendid management and" the  way in which \ they had the  grounds decorated with flags,  bunting and Japanese lanterns,  c\vhich gave a veiy pleasing effect. The sum of $50.00 was  taken in which wilLbe given to  the Red Cross.  Goitre Prevalent.  Owing to the widespread  prevalence of goitre in B. C, so  much-so as to be alarming, the  provincial board, of health is  endeavoring through the medical health officers to gather all  information 'possible- on the  subject. Dr. .Elliot has just  completed the' examination of  children of this .valley, with the  following results?  -  "      " '    _ KOLL.     GOlTJIE.  Hedley .".  fil 18  Nickel Plate     8 3  Keremeos '.  35 15  Cawston.r -   12 6 '  Olalla  12 3  Similkameen.!  14 9  Water is generally supposed  to be the cause of goitre. If so,  all could avoid it by using a  using a small, distiller on the  back of ' the stove; and it will  come in handy after" prohibition passes. '*  The Bostonians.  Tuesday evening at the opera  house the Famous Bostonians  will offer for an engagement of  one night the sparkling musical  play, " The Rose of Honolulu."  The play is-f rom the pen of Mi's.  W. Lang, who3 wrote -it * from  data gathered'^while the company were playing" in the Hawaiian. Islands^ some few years  ago, una conies^ to us when  things ^Hawaiian are .in vogue.  Its story deals with the adventures of a sugar planter's, ward,  who visits Honolulu seeking  romance, and it is needless to  add that she falls under the enchantment for which the islands  are noted.  The(comedy is of the frolicsome order that bounds along  from curtain to curtain and is  enlivened by frequent dancing  numbers in which all jthe modern dances as well_ as the latest  things in eccentric steps figure  largely. There are many old  favorites iu the company this  season. Besides the best of the  Bostonians there are Australians who have been captivating  theatre goers this season, namely, Mr. Charles Bennett, a tenor,  with a rare voice and a pleasing  personality; Miss Dottie Brown;  a dancer and singer of excellence, and Miss Ethel Naylor,:  an exponent of the. art of Terpsichore of no Httle ability.  This combination, together  with other clever performers,  TOWN AND DISTRICT  Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Arnott  left yesterday for the east.  S. R. Manery of Similkameen  was a visitor in  town Monday.  Mrs. J. H. Bromley, of Bromley was a visitor in town yesterday.  Born���������In Hedley, Monday,  June llth, 1917,' to Mr. and Mrs.  F. H. French, a son.  W. Liddicoat of the N. P.  mine is in the hospital with a  badly-sprained ankle.  L. C. Clark,. Gerald Clark and  Roy Clark of Green mountain  were in town Monday.  The Bostonians will appear  in the opera house here-Tuesday evening, 19th inst.      \  Mrs. R. Wheeler and family  returned last week after spending the winter .in California.  C. A. Burton, Frank Thireault  and and George Witte of Twisp,  Wash,, were in-town this week.  The provindial government  roael force is taking some of.  the bumps or humps out of  Hedley's main thoroughfare.  Miss Viola Messenger of the  Nickel Plate returned -yesterday from Ward, Wash., where  she had been attending school.  John Simpson, ��������� Greenwood,  district chief of provincial police, wns in town Friday last,  and went on to Princeton Saturday.  W. R. Megaw, Mrs. Megaw,  Earl Megaw and Frank Bailey  were visitors in town Sunday,  the guests of Mr. and Wrs. Wm.  Arnott,  At the libtels: E.-:E.'/Burr,  Princeton; J.lvnox Wright, J.  Oberson, Emil Nelson, Vancouver; S. R. Manery, Similkameen;  C. J. Riley, Seattle; J. Stevens  and wife, A. K. McNaughton,  Kamloops; M. L. Guizon, Wm.  Liddicoat, Norman Tucker, N.  P. mine; L. C. Clark, Gerald  Clark, Roy Clark, Green Mountain; C. A. Burton, Geo. Witte.  Frank Thireault, Twisp, Wash.;  M. H. Parrott, Penticton; O. J. "  Knight, Princeton; J. Simpson,  Greenwood; John Steve, Keremeos; W. R. and Mrs. Megaw,  Earl Megaw, Frank Bailey,  Vernon.*  Norman Tucker of-the' Nickel  Plate, received a letter last  week' from his brother, Lieutenant Wm. Tucker, written  just after the taking of Vimy  Ridge, in which he sums up the  engagementas "great sport and  many souvenirs, old man!"  Lieut. Tucker went overseas as  a private in the 29th, and has *  been on the fighting line, with  the exception of eight-days'  leave, since his battalion went  to the front. He was in both  engagement's at Ypres, Mons,  and' Vimy." He is a native-of-  Cornwall, has won the M.v.M.  and .received promotion without political pull;--^Two "other  Hedley men, A. W. Jack and-T;  Knowles,' have risen from the  ranks to commissions."  is   a   guarantee   of   excellence' evening  for Vancouver to see  that is seldom equalled,  Who Shall Vote?  In the course of a speech in  opposition to an election during  the war, Ex-Premier Asquith  said:  " Voters fighting in various  theatres of war would not be  able to record their votes. An  election under- these conditions  would not be an election at all.  It would be a farce and a sham,  and nobody would regard the  house so chosen as possessing  in any real sense the moral authority either for legislation or  for criticism of administration.  To take a course which would  necessitate the, holding of an  election under such circumstances would be to fly in the face  of common law, common fairness and common sense."  PrincetPjm.-j.wjll celebrate ���������as  usual iLits' ^'qtir^on "llie^rst'of  July, with., astampede in'addition to previous years. See posters for particulars.  Thos. |and Mrs. Brown left  yesterday for Vancouver to see  their son Leo, who will shortly  go overseas 'with the Western  Universities battalion.  Major A. Megraw, inspector  of Indian agencies, arrived in  town yesterday. He is on a  tour of inspection of the southern agencies of the province.  J. Stevens and wife of Kam-  loops arrived in town Monday  and went up to the Nickel  Plate Tuesday. Mr. Stevens  has accepted the position of  storekeeper at the mine.  A slight break in the 20-mile  flume occurred this week which  was repaired-in''.about- half a  day. It is a pity the flume  hadn't been.built on the principle of the "Deacon's One Hoss  Shay."  T-  Arthur and Mrs. Clare and  Miss  Elizabeth   Clare  left  last  Fob Rent���������House on Hospital hill, lately occupied by Geo.  Stevens. Apply W. J. Cormack,  Bank of B. N. A. ������&���������  So many people fail to realize that the. small man cannot fill the big man's shoes by  merely stepping into them.  Richard Clare before he leaves  for oversees with a contingent  of the Western Universities  battalion.  E. E. Burr of Princeton was  in town yesterday. He is thinking of putting on a daily auto  stage between Princeton and  Keremeos. An effort will be  made to induce the Dominion  government to apply part of  the subsidy now paid the G N.  Railway for its very inefficient  mail service to subsidize the  auto line for a daily mail. Connections would be made with  the Kettle Valley railway passenger trains.  The L. O. L. entertained the  Li. (). B. A. Tuesday at progressive whist, after 'which,? ice  cream and cake were served.  The ladies' first prize was carried away by Miss Maud Beale,  she being the lucky high card  on a draw for the honors with  Mrs. McClure. The prize was a  picture in frame. Wm. Knowles  secured the |gentlemen's prize,  a bill poeketbook. The ladies'  booby went to Mrs. Hanson, it  beiiig a drawing set, and  the  fentTemeri's, a sedlitz powder,|to  Ir. Hanson.  Rev. J. Knox Wright, district  secretary of the Canadian Bible  society, gave a lecture on "South  Africa"   in   the-..-Star    Theatre  Tuesday evening to a very small  audience.    The  lecture and  illustrations were good and the  local officers of the society and _  prominent church  workers   of^  the  town   missed, a  rare treat,  and -probably "speared" a  few,  byybeing absent.    To  the  ungodly/"the- outstanding .rea'ture  o'F the   illustration.-*:' Wns   that  although" the^'teaehirigs of  the  Carpenter of Nazareth and contact with whites had  brought  spiritual light  to  the>blacks, it  also  had  resulted  in   many of  them  becoming  slaves   of  the  diamond and gold  mining companies. The illustrations showed  men and women in wire-fenced  compounds,  the   same as they  keep  their cattle,  where they  remain   as   long  as they are in  the  employ   of   the   company.  There were some very interesting views   of  South Africa, but  as  might  be expected the lecture was devoted principally to  the  missionary   and   Bible  society work inJSouth Africa.  May School Report.  DIVISION  I.  Advanced  Luke.  Prelim. Junior���������Geo. Beale.  Public School, Entrance Class  ���������1 Claire Loomer, 2 John  Smith.  Junior Fourth���������1 Geo. Wirth,  2 Gonier Jones.  DIVISION  II.  Senior Third���������Fred Hard-  man, Mary Fraser, George  Stevens.  Junior Third���������Marjorie Stevens, Ena   Winkler, Viola Naff.  Senior Second���������John Gaare.  John Hardinan, Marguerite  Jones.  Perfect Attendance ��������� Fred  Hard man, John Gaare, Johu  Hard m an.  DIVISION III.  First Reader-Norman French,  Mary Bentley.  Second Primer���������John Fraser,  Wilfrid French.  A Class-Arthur French, Dora  Burrows.  C Class���������Dorothy Stevens,  Albert Magner.  Perfect Attendance ��������� Mary  Bentley, Arthur French, Everett  French, Rachel Hardman, Carlton Loomer, Albert Magner,  Muriel Stanley, Gould Winkler,  Dora Burrows.  Junior���������Margaret  Neat desk blotters are being  sent free to applicants by the  British Columbia Nurseries Co.,  Ltd., 1403 Seventh Ave, W.,  Vancouver, B. C. ,s  THE  Gazette.  HEDLEY,      B.     C,  MICA HELPSTHE HAUL.  Dry hubs strain  i. The horses  2. The harness  3. The wagon  MICA  AXLE GREASE  helps  all   three   factors  in the haul.  It   smooths   t h e   axle  surface.  MICA is the important pare  of axle grease.  THE  JMPKRIAL OIL COMPANY  I Limited ->  "t-RAXCFIliS 1   IROUGHOUT  CANADA ,  VMS HHW MEHCH KSMaoV. Nat. H>2. S.&  THSRAPION 8������sM  lyreat succsij, cu.ii*:*> chronic weakness, lost vroon  US  VIM   riONEY     BLADDER.  DISEASES.  EtOOD    P0130K,  'PILES     EITHER  NO   UKUGGIST5 Or MAtt 81. f03T t CT9  Germany's Influence  Germany Blamed" for Disrupting  Fcaceful Ideals of the U.S.  When all is said and done, the  greatest injury which wc have sustained from Germany is the one  which is not mentioned in the list of  our grievances. Our commerce has  been attacked; American lives have  been sacrificed to the German government's disregard of international  law���������these arc the grievances everywhere specified. But greater than  these and more vitally affecting the  nation is the fact that by reason of  the German government's action wc  have changed from the greatest  peace nation of the world to a nation  lh.it must put itself on a purely militaristic basis and organize a con-  scriptivc system which may never be  dispensed with.  If the militarists "are right, then wc  ought to thank Germany for so  transforming* our life. That is to say,  if during all these years wc, hav  been playing the part of the fool by  eschewing militarism and refusing to  support large standing armies, then  wc ought to thank Germany for  shocking us out of our folly and fore  ing us lo do the thing wc ought long  ago to have done. ���������*  _ But if our old ideals were right,  if we were justified in offering the  world the spectacle of an unarmed  nation maintaining peace by the justice of its actions, then we can only  bringing us down  From the Detroit  With  EGYPTIAN  LINIMENT   .  For Sale by nil Dealers  Douglas &  Company, Napanee, Ont  wovosrkco.so.BSEKUAHsr newyurkc'lvmanBRoa   blame Germany for bringing us down  ���������Jorokto     write roi rBEE HOOK TO DR. LS CLSB4 I .'.���������">=���������_  UlED CO  HAVCRbTOCKRD  HAMPbrEAD   LONDON   HBO.  WEVNEV/ORAGSEITASr.SLESS)'������������������ORMOf    EASV TO TIER  ���������S   H2 Sairi^&lf    3yS������   LMTIMO COM.  SSS THAT TKAOE   MARKED  WOK.D     TIIE.1APIO.*(    IS OS  Sa.IT.GaVr STAUt AFJ/IxeO TO ALL G������NUINB1-ACUT6>  MONEY ORDERS  When  ordering goods by mail, send  a. Do-  minion  Express  Money  Older.  Land Settlement  s Act is Prepared  Will Propose    Grant    With    Provi-  vision for Loan of $1,500  or $2,000  The soldiers land settlement act,  which will provide for a free grant of  Dominion land to veterans of the imperial forces, coupled with a provision for a loan, to be advanced under supervision, of_ $1,500 or $2,000,  will be presented in the house by  Hon. Dr. Roche,'minister, of the interior, who with Hon. Martin Burrell, minister of agriculture, has had  charge of its preparation. It is. understood that its terms were settled  and approved by the prime minister  before leaving for England, and a full  . memorandum of its provisions 'was  furnished to J. Bruce Walker, or the  department of the interior, who went  to England for the purpose of representing Canada on the imperial immigration board.  .o her own level  News.  Minard's      Liniment  Friend.  Lumberman's  English as She Is Spoke  Knicker���������Funny thing about food  Bockcr���������Yes, a shortage      and  Io,nging  always  exists    at  lime.���������New York  Sun.  tl:  re    same  YES!  LIFT A CORN  OFF WITHOUT PAIN  Keep Minard's Liniment in- the house  Randall���������You ...know the story  about the cowboy who went to a  fashionable New York restaurant and  said, "Waiter, bring mc forty dollars'  worth of ham and eggs"?  Roger���������No: Let mc hear it  Randall���������Well, the waiter replied,  "We do not serve half portions, sir,"  Cincinnati   man   tells   how   to  dry up a corn or callus so  it lifts off with fingers  You corn-pestered men and women  need suffer no longer. Wear tin  shoes that nearly killed you before,  says this Cincinnati authority, because a few drops of freczone. applied directly on a "tender, aching  corn or calhts, stops soreness ��������� at  ence and soon the corn or hardened  callus loosens so it can be lifted off,  root and all, without pain.  A small bottle of 'freczone costs  very little at any drug store, but  will positively take off every hard or  soft corn or callus. This should be  tried, as it is inexpensive and is said  not to irritate the surrounding skin.  If your druggist hasn't any free-  zone tell him to get a small bottle  for you from his . wholesale drug  house. It is fine stuff and acts like a  charm every time.  British  Army   a Producer  The armies arc self-supporting, too  as surely armies never were before.  There is the very romance of organisation in the fact that "in Mesopotamia something like 3,000 acres of  vegetable gardens arc under cultivation;" and there,is certainly the hard  economics of it in- the fact that the  waste fat now saved from the soldiers' rations produces 1,000 tons of  refined glycerine a year,' which means  "propellant charges for approximately 12,500,000 IS-poundcr shells," and,  incidentally, a��������� saving to the munitions ministry of nearly 200 pounds a  ton on the prive of glycerine as purchased from America.���������London  Daily Telegraph.  It is a Liver Pill.���������Many of the ailments that man has to contend with  have their origin in a disordered  liver, which is a delicate organ, peculiarly susceptible to the disturbances  that come' from irregular habits or  lack of care in eating and drinking.  This accounts for the great many  liver regulators now pressed on the  attention of sufferers. Of these there  is none superior to Parmclee's Vegetable Pills. Their operation though  gentle is effective, and the most delicate  can use  them.  When Russian Soldiers Sing"  Their! =  March   the    Streets    Singing  Wild Russian Songs  Nowadays there are soldiers everywhere iir Pclrograd���������big blond boys j B  in long ,tan overcoats  with flat caps ; s  'slapped rakishly over one car.  They'  drill in dozens of squares, on the cobblestones space below-  the dome of  St. Isaac's���������which    suggests St.  Peter's  arrd    Rome���������and    march      the  streets clay and night** singing    their  tremendous  Russian songs.  Three or four files start the air, after a measure or two the next sec-,  tion comes iir, and so on down the  street until presently the whole column is booming a sort of "round."  The song, wild and 'melancholy with  tremendous basses, goes down the  street in a scries of waves, and as one  descends in front of you another is  flung to the housetops a little way  down the block  1 Let Us "Hope This Baby i  | Won't Reach The Poison I  H 306  children  were   reported pol- S  g soncd  in  tho last  three years by M  g arsenical fly destroyers.   And this  if  H is but a fraction of the actual nurn- &  Eg ber.   Arsenical   fly  poisoning and  {H cholera Infantum symptoms are al-  p most exactly tho same.   Diagnosis*  ���������= is difficult.   And first aid in arsenic  ������1 poisoning must be quick.  _, ,     .      , .. ,       Is      Don't subject yot<r children to this  They march slowly, with a curious | jg danger.   Use the non-poisonous fly  oiling of the shoulders and swinging' *=������  catcher  "The people on that farm" are very  hospitable They will take anybody  in."' "I know they will. Wc boarded  with them last summer."  roiling or tnc siioiuucrs ana swinging  of their long tan overcoats. " Their  feet go out and down with a snap���������  clop .... clop���������in a sort of modified goose step, and to accent the  rhythm they are taught to swing the  free arm, the one not carrying the  rifle, in a wide, slow arc, almost up  to the opposite shoulder and back  ���������"���������gain.   _ _ "\  - And this slow, deliberate reaching  forward and setting down each footi  ���������one recalls Kipling's "bear that)  walks like a man"���������together with thej  long high swing of the closed fist,,  repeated by innumerable blond giants  -K^^*aaeOT^s^nit2z  M[ safe, sure nnd efficient/which catches  {= the fly and embalms its body and  H tho deadly germs it carries ia a coat  *-- of disinfecting varnish.  Government Issues Warning  Xsnuat A. Fwaat, Ptie������d AnlfiUnt Surgeon )a tht UnltaA  flta'ea 1'ublb UealtaSerrlc*. make* Hi* foUjwInj itatetstat Id  t>ii['p'etr.elit ?ffl. 2������ t7 tha IVjllo )������ealtb Rsporti   "Otolltttf        potions Kcntlcasd, loacticn ihould ba loada, tctrtlj farapur* <  ���������=;    poca of cosjemnatlon, of Uio������ composed of ftrnulo.   FaUlciMI  =    ofpolEonlnc ofohiUrca ILcc'ifb Is. U-, of fuch compound, >n  i.n-.    .ii.ii    mi lj. L-m v ^ j  iiv-ii.    u     ..,.,..-    ������==   faftoo frequent, ind.O'.'ns to (no reiatnhlane* of nii,ulc\l pol'  UU3    ""    uiiliiMJin.._Mivn.    ioauai.i.    iB    otnlnj <o Iu������mjrJI������rrlic������.i.J o*lo!.r������ UfcaUm, Ii i������ bol'tred  thing more than accident in this, or M -bili',������������������cM.lr���������^������rt4doa,l1b>���������������nylll���������������i^Mm'p^')I^ibV'tot���������"I.  *^     ��������� - ������==    -'���������"sn'oBllij^uoetrojrsdM'c.Bniuifc'iorfitC') MeJtranHl/din,  the drill sergeant's notions���������some  thing at once tremendous and quaint,  something of the faith, heaviness and  slow, unconquerable  power    of  Rus  sra  itself.  you  Mrs.   Gramercy���������Why    don't  tell -that  neighbor   of. yours?  Mrs.. Park���������It isn't necessary, 'my  dear. We're on the same party wire.  Minard's Liniment Co., Limited.  I was very sick with Quinsy and  thought I would strangle. 1 used  MINARD'S LINIMENT and it cured me at once. T am never without  it now.  Yours gratefully,  MRS. CD. PRINCE  Nauwigewauk,  Oct. 21st.  Burnt  Into   German Mind  Tlie leading ministers in the new  Swedish Cabinet are pro-German in  their sympathies..  You know well enough  when your liver ia  loafing.  Constipation is the first  warning; then you begin  to "fee! mean all over."  Your skin soon -gets the  had news, it grows dull,  yeUow, muddy and unsightly.  Violent purgatives are not  what you need���������just the  gentle help of this old-  time  standard  remedy.  CARTER'S  ll-ITTLE  HIVER  JLMkaS  4/e/ru//7H   bears    S/gnetvrtt  Colorles&f aces often show  the absence of Iron in the  blood.  Carter's 8 rot* Pills  will help this condition.  W.     N.     U.      1156  Many mothers have reason to bless  Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator,  because it has relieved the little ones  of suffering and'made them healthy.  The Erupp's World of Shells  How Munition Making Is Speeded up  In the Land of the Hun  Writing to the Paris Matirr some  one who spent four months'in the  Krupp foundries at Essen gives Ins  impressions of whatws being produced there: "Three hfendrcd. thousand  workers,, of whom apout 60,000 arc  women, marshalled/in gangs on day  andJnight shifts, sweat, blood and  water in order that the Emperor  shall not lack'pnojeetiles. All these  {^people, with the exception of the  women have been impressed by the  military authority. The ages of llic  men, arc from eighteen to forty-six  ycars, and they are all told off for  the manufacture of munitions, Tl is  the same with the specialists above  the age of forty-five up to  fifty.  "The salaries paid them for working thus'from six. o'clock in the  morning to six at evening for the  day shift, and from six in the evening to six in the morning, for the  night shift, varies between eight and  fifteen marks a day. The women,  however, never get more than five  marks. Thi.s daily salary, which in  the eyes of some may appear a big  one, has 011I3- the real and ma*siinum  value of five French francs, so much  has the cost of living gone up,  "In the moutirof May, 1916, Krupp  was constructing simultancously  seven howitzers of -120 inili'mctres.  As it takes on the average from six  to eight months to make this kind  of gui); these should be about ready.  In the opinion of the head of the  workshop, Kriipp alone now 'turns'  cut'200,000 shells of every calibre a  day, without counting the manufacture of artillery cannon."  Mention of British    Nurse's    Name  Costs Belgian Woman' Month  in Jail  A well-authenticated' incident  which occurred recently during a  German court-martial in Belgium Iras  just become known in France. Mi-  Paul Tcrlinden, Burgomaster of Rix-  ensart, appeared before the court,  charged with shielding a wounded  Frenchman, for which he was condemned to twelve months' imprisonment.  His/daughter, Baroness de Con-  ir.ck, a young married woman, whose  husband is at the ;front, was.prcsent  at the hearing. A German'officer sat  down beside her, saying: "I believe,  madam, I. have met you before."  Baroness, de .Coninck replied: "You  arc mistaken. I don't know you, sir."  The German persisted, saying:  ."Perhaps I am mistaken, _ but you  greatly resemble : an English "woman  whom I  knew, well.".'."������������������:. ���������  "Evidently you mean Miss CavcII,"  retorted the Baroness'.        ���������'...'  For this answer she was sentenced  to one month' in prison";  H j.toiii and ihou'dneTcrbiuo!, a���������s If otbar ueaiuiai ara att Hi  p= Klfeaad." =-4  If                      Mado In Canada by M  g       THE O. & W. THUM COMPANY 1  [= -                    Walkerville, Ont. g  1 j= American Addro������s, Grand Rapids, Mich. 5  lllli  WOMAN SUFFERAGB.'  ltd War Time Aspect.  London, Eng. Tho women of England  are dome their duty. They arc taking  oaro of trie wounded, or if .they cannot  assist in work of that kind thiiy are adding  their savings to promoto thegood work.  They, aro knitting and sewing for the  soldiers at the front-. Th-s rsriffragists have  given bo littlo trouble to the government  that it will undoubtedly soften tho hearts  of those in Parliament,-since the "militants" have turned all their energies to  aid the fighting men of England, and  (30 sufferage may soon coma after thia  I terrible war, is over.    .  '  -Thousands of women in Canada have  overcome their sufferings,: and _ have  been cured of woman's ills by Dr. Pierce's  Favorite - Prescription. . This temperance  medicine, though started nearly half a  century ago, sella most widely to-day,  because it is. made without alcohol or  narcotics. It can now be had in taHet  form aa well as liquid, and every woman  who suffers from backache, headaohe,  nervousness,/should take this "Prescription" of Dr. \Pierce. It is prepared from  nature's roots and herbs and does not  contain a particle of alcohol or any narcotic. '. It's not a secret prescription for  its ingredients are printed on wrapper.  . Many a woman'is nervous and irri-  ' table, feels dragged down arrd worn out  for no reason that she can think of. In  ninety-nine per cent, of these cases it  is the womanly, organism that requires  attention; the weak baek, dizzy spells  and black circles about tho eyes, are only  symptoms..'' Go to the Bource. of trouble..  When that is corrected the other symptoms biisappoar.    ..*���������  St. Thomas, Ont.���������"I wish to say for  the benefit or other women who suffer  that 1 recommend Dr. Pierce's Favorite  Prescription aa a great help. I have  personally   recommended   the   same ������������������to  Xv'*l4������k  Amsrlca's  - Plonesr  Dog Remedies  BOOK' 0"X  DOG DISEASES  And How to Feed  Mailed free  to  any address fcjr  tho Author  H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Ine.  118 West 31 at Street, New York  Tht Great SnglUh Remedy.  Tones aod inyigorutes tha what)  nervous xysteio, makes new Blood  in old Veins, Cures -^ercostw  Z>ebiliiy, Menial and Brain Worrit, Dcspvst-  tSencjf, Loss of JSnermi, Palpitation of tht  Bear*, Failing Memory. Price SI per box, da  tor t5. Ono will ploaoe, six will eure. Sold by alt  iiagcLnta or mailed in plain pkz. on receipt of  grico. A'etc pamphlet mailed'free. THE WOOD  "Grovel" Was Right  "I grovel here before you in    the  dust!",   observed      the    impassioned  youth, as he sank on to the drawing  room floor.  -"I-don't know what you mean by  dust," replied she coolyT "I look after this room most carefully myself  every  morning."���������Tit-Bits.  --.  'S  ETS  USED TEN ������  Mrs. W.J'. Wilson, Carp, Ont.,  writes: "I have uscrl^ Baby.'s -Own  Tablets, for the last ten years and can  highly recommend, them for babyhood and childhood ailments. My  baby boy was very delicate; in-*-fact  we never thought he. w^ould live but  thanks to the Tablets he is now a  fine healthy boy." Baby's Own Tab-  Suggestion that may save  Much. Suffering  "Is your daughter studying music?"  "I wouldn't exactly calf*5, it  studying,", replied Mr. Curnrox  "���������She makes So much noise about it,  I don't sec how she can possibly, ge'  her mind on the subject."���������Washington Star.  Marysville, Pa.���������"For. twelve yearn  I  suffered  with   terrible   cramps.    I  would have to stay  in bed several days  every   month.    I  tried   all  kinds of  remedies  and   wag  treated by doctors,  but my trouble continued until one day  I read about Lydia  E/Pinkharri's Vegetable Compound and  what it had done for"  others.     I tried  ft  and now I am never  troubled with cramps and feel like   a  different   woman.      I   cannot' praise  Lydia E.  Pinkham's   Vegetable Compound too highly and I am recommend-  in "��������� it to my friends who suffer as I did.''  ���������Mrs. Geokge R. Naylor, Box 72,  Maryaville.Pa. ^'  Young women who are troubled with  painful oHrregular periods, backache,  headache, dragging-down sensations,  fainting spells or indigestion should  take Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable  Compound. Thousands have, been restored to health by this root and herb  remedy. . ��������� :   '     '       .  Write for free and helpful advice to  tydia E. Pinkham Medicine Co.'(confidential), Lynri, Mass. Only women  open ana read such letter*.  many who in turn have been helped a I ict3  should -be  kept  in   every homo  great   deal ��������� by_ its   use."���������Mrs.- F. v������ I where the  Bowdbn, 19 Oliver St., St. Thomas, Ont.  Good Advice from, an Ancient  .Juvenal, who wrote in the' first century of this era, urged the poorer  people of Rome to move into the  country, Where, for the same amount  of rent which they paid iu the city,  a small place of residence could be  bought, and they could be free from  the dark and narrow quarters which  they called home. Somehow this advice has' a familiar sound in the  twentieth century, and what is more  to the point, it is just as applicable  now, and is just as. sound as it was  then.���������Christian  Scicncp Monitor.  Wretched from Asthma. Strength  of'body and vigor of mind-are inevitably impaired by the ' visitations  of asthma. Who can live under the  cloud of recurring attacks 'and* keep  body and mind at their full efficiency? Dr. J. D. Kellogg's Asthma  Remedy dissipates the .cloud by removing the cause, ft-docs relieve.  It does restore the sufferer to normal  bodily  trim and mental happiness.  there are small children; They  regulate the bowels'-and-'stomach and  never fail to cure the minor ills of  little ones. The Tablets are sold by  medicine dealers .'or by mail at 25  cents a box from The Dr. William/  Medicine Co., Brock'ville, Ont,  A Sense of Propriety  You wouldn't sell your vote, would  you?". .  "No stir," answered Erasmus Pink-  Icy. "But if a genrmen what's Yun-  nin' foh office was to give me two  dollahs, common gratitude would  make lire vote foh him."  4,000 Flying Machines in the States  A New York firm alone has intimated that in a few weeks lime they  will have the plant to enable them to  manufacture some 2,000. aeroplanes ;  in twelve months. In two years they  can deliver to the United States 4,000  and arrange for a wide margin to  meet the demand fc-* improvements.  In. an interview the manager of the  firm, whose name has been withheld  for obvious reasons, stated that with  that number of machines any active  opposition to the expressed will of  the nation, in the event of war, would  be detected.'* There could be no  massing of rebellious civilians' with**  an aerial corps conducted on ruilitarj  principles.  A Catholic Taste  "Mother says here's ten cents and  to give mc' some castor oi! in soda  water."   ' ���������      w      ���������  Clerk-T-"vrery%-r.ll, sonny^. What  flavor will you-have?"-  "Give rne a little of'everything."���������  Lif������." ��������� '    *  People make much of little troubles if they have never had any grca'  ones.    ���������' ���������������������������'-"'  Willi*  You wm find relief In Zam-Buk I  It oases the burning, stinging  In, stops bleeding and brings  ease  Buk,  thfe?  Perseverance, with Zamu  means cure; Why not prove  ���������VrtcffffMa an4 *SSfcr^v���������  fOttwe.  s***"-"*"-)!-a*3'3*-2-  m^mmm ITKE     GAZETTE.     HJSDLEY,     B,     C,  ���������arm  CELSIQ  JMSURA.NCE  COMPANY  IS ISSUING a new policy contract which will  ���������jive your beneficiary a guaranteed monthly  income for life-   Write for pamphlet.  HEAD     OFFICE:  .TORONTO  Addressee   Civil Engineers J)octor JeUs ffow fa Strengthen  Eyesight 50 per cent In One  Week's Time in Many Instances  AMERICAN JOURNAL PRAISES TH  VALOR OF OUR CANADIAN TROOP  GREAT ADM1RATEON FOR RARE COURAGE SHOWN  Canada's   Sons. Have   Won   for   Liberty   More   Than   Added  *o  Territory, but a Victory Which Answers German Idea That  The World Can Be Reconstructed by Material Force  In a lengthy editorial under the  caption "Well done, Canada," the  New York Tribune says:  "Every American will feel a thrill  of admiration and a touch of honest  envy at the achievements of the Canadian troops about Arras on Easter  Sunday and  the  following  day.  "The glory of the Canadian fight  ' at the Yprcs salient has been too  little appreciated on our side of the  northern frontier. Rarely in history  have troops, volunteer troops, suddenly exposed to a flank attack  through no fault of their own, but  by the collapse of their neighbors,  had to bear a more terrific blow than  that which followed the first gas  attack. ,Yet in the midst of confu-  -sion, assailed fty the appaling poison  of German making, the Canadian volunteers stood and died as-the British  regulars had stood and died in the  gi cater battle of Yprcs of 1914.  .- "And now the Canadians have  swept up the famous Vimy ridge,  which halted the French veterans of  Foch and proved too great an " obstacle for the genius' of the greatest  offensive fighter France, has yet pro-  .duccd in the war. After long months  of .waiting the Canadians, have had  their hour.'They have-had a chance  to ' avenge their" comrades, crucified  by German brutes in Flanders; they  have had an opportunity to write  the name of Canada on the war map  of Europe and their imprint will be  remembered���������in Germany quite as  much as iu America.  "We shall know later at what price,  this achievement was accomplished,  but no price will be loo high and  for Canada this day of victory will  have a lasting.value. For Canada,  too, its value will be less than for  the British Empire.  "Nearly three-quarters of a million  of Canadian and Australian troops  have responded to the call of the  l?rilish Empire, more than half 'of  them wearing the Canadian Maple  Leaf. German plotting, German  scheming, the wise plans of the professors on paper and of- the German  soldiers' on the map, have been an-  it is possible lo speak lo Germans  . now.  "Americans will feel a certain envy  in the thought that Canada has outdistanced us in reaching the battle-  line, wliicft is the frontier of our common civilization. We shall take what  comfort we may from-the knowledge  that among the Canadian forces are  avconsiderable contingent-bf citizens  of the United States, " an unofficial  vanguard, wc shall trust, ' of that  American army which is in due  course to take its place along the  French front. They are serving in  worthy company.'  "No "praise of Canadian achievement can be exclusive. From the  plaiiv and from the mountains, from  the cities and the prairies 'Canada has  poured out her thousands and- her  hundreds of thousands; she has sent  across the ocean an army greater  than Napoleon ever commanded on  any battlefield; her volunteer regiments have shown that same stubborn and tenacious quality which is  the glory of the British army.  "Canada's sons have won for liberty not merely a few square miles  of _ French territory, but a victory  which makes answer to the German  idea that the world can be reconstructed without regard to the spirit  of man, merely by material force.  "Our entrance into the war should  make a new bond between the Canadians and ourselves."  The Haughty Master Cecil  "The waywardness of Master Cecil,  a boy of six .years, sometimes made  it necessary for his mother to use her  slipper. This usually resulted in a  Haughtiness of manner and expression for some hours after Master- Cecil had been "attended to." One  evening his father came " home to  discover palpable proof of the fact  that Cecil had been having a private  interview with his mother.  "Well,   Cecil,  what's    the    trouble  now?" asked his father,  "Your wife has been    licking    me  again Sir]" was the reply.  I^RCHANTt  AUBBE&S&J  towta Ci/ilto  Millions of colds start with wet  feet, which cojild and should be  prevented by wearing rubbers,  rubber farm shoes or high  rubber boots.  Through the slop and slush of  Spring you can work better, be  more comfortable, and efrjoy  better health, if your feet are  protected ,by rubber footwear  bearing one of these famous  Trade Marks:  Maple lea?  RUBBER^,*  "JACQUES CARTIER"  "MERCHANTS"    -'  "MAPtE LEAF"    -  "GRANBY"  - "DAISY"  "DOMINION"  Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co.  LIMITED  Largest Manufacturers of Rubber Goods in the British Empire  EXECUTIVE OFFICES   -   MOMTREAL, P.Q.  SEVEN LARGE, UP-TO-DATE MANUFACTURING PLANTS IN CANADA  88 "SERVICE" BRANCHES AND WAREHOUSES THROUGHOUT CANADA  46  Analysis of the Railway Situation by  Mr. W.  F.  Tye, C.E.  "In, a paper presented to the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers Mr.  W'.F. Tye, formerly .Chief Engineer  of the Canadian Pacific, gives a ^masterly analysis of the railway situation  iu this country. From his years of  experience thinking and rJolving railway problems as ' one of the outstanding, railway engineers- in Canada, Mr. Tye has had not only the  altitude of the engineer but that of  the economist as well.  Amongst Mr. Tyc's summarized  conclusions arc:  The National Transcontinental,  the Grand Trunk .Pacific and the  Canadian Northern Railways are unable to earn.their operating expenses  and their fixed charges. Canada has  built, and is operating, the first of  these roads, and Canada , and the  various 'provinces have guaranteed  the principal and interest of most of  the bonds of the other two. As the  roads are unable to earn their fixed  charges, they must, of necessity, be  paid by the-country.  The failure of these roads is due  to the duplication of lines by all the  railways, encouraged and bonirscd by  the government; to the excessive  cost of the Grand Trunk Pacific and  National Transcontinental Railways;  to the failure of the Grand Trunk  Pacific to provide itself with an adequate system of feeders in the West,  and to the' construction, by the Canadian Northern, of the long and unproductive stretches of road across  British Columbia and Northern Ontario, without feeders, terminals, etc.  If these railways are to.be maintained in two separate systems, it  will cost at least $400,000,000. " It  will be necessary to build five or six  thousand miles of feeders in the  West, and two or three thousand  miles of feeders in the East, and terminals costing many millions."  A consolidation of the Grand  Trunk, the Grand Trunk Pacific,  Transcontinental and Canadian  Northern Railways would give a  well-balanced system. Such a combination .would'not require more than  $100,000,000 to put it in proper'physical condition.  Including operating "expenses and  fixed charges, it costs the CamTdian*  Pacific.about $70 to do $100 worth or"  business, and.it costs the Intercolonial and ihe other Canadian government roads from $200 to $220 to do  $100 worth of business.  Canada should follow the wise example set by Sir John Macdonald  when dealing wilhVhe Canadian Pacific in 1879-80, and form a new private corporation with sufficient power and the necessary^ safeguards, lo  lake over and consolidate the Grand  'Trunk, Grand Trunk Pacific, Transcontinental and Canadian Northern  Railways, and develop another Canadian Pacific.  Such a combination would start  with gross earnings of at least $100,-  000,000 per annum, with a probable  average increase of 8 per cent, per  annum, and probable net earnings of  from $25,000,000 lo $30,000,000 per  annum, and a net revenue from- other  sources of about $2,800,000. Its fixed  charges at consolidation would be  about $35,000,000 and it would be under the necessitiy of spending, iu the  first five to seve- years, at least  $100,000,000 lo prwde rolling stock,  and to put its properties in good physical condition.  In order to conlrol its policy and  to share in its certain prosperity,  Canada should have an interest in  the new company. The Dominion  government should furnish 40 per  cent, of the money required, own 40  per cent, of the stock, and appoint  40 per cent, of ihe directorate, but  take no pari in the actual management. This would give aii the advantage of government control with  cut any of the manifest disadvantages  of government management.  A 'Prtc Prescription You Can Hcvt Filled  ������nd Use ������t Hcm������~  I.QMDON.���������Do you wear f-rlimei? Ar������  "rou a victim of tye strain or other e>-������ weaknesses I*1 If to/ you will be glad to know  that according to Dr. Lewis there la real hope  for you. Many whose eyes were failing- "ip,y  they have had their "eyes restored through th*  principle of this woiiderful free prescription.  One man lays, after trying it: "I was almost  blind; could not see to read at all. Now I  can read everything* without any glasses and  my eyes do not water any more. At night  they would pain dreadfully; now they fiel  fina all the time. It was like- a miraele lo  me." A lady who used it says; "The atmosphere seemed hazy with or ^without glasses,  Out after using this prescription for , fifteen  gays everything stems clear. I- can even read  fine print without glasses." It is believed  that thousand* who wear glasses esn now discard them in a reasonable time and multitudes  moro will be able to strengthen their eyes  so as .to be spared the trouble and expense of  Sver  getting  glasses.    Eye  troubles  of  many  escriptions-may be wonderfully benefited by  following tho simple rules. Here is the pre.  tcription: Go to any active drug store er.aj  ret it bottle of Bon-Opto,.tablets. Drop on(  Bon-Opto tablet In a fourth oi a glass ���������(  water and allow to dissolve. With this liqul*  bathe the eyes two to four times daily. Yog  should notice your eyes clear up perceptibly  right   from   the   start   axd   inflammation   will  ?uicMy disappear. If your eye* are bother-  nsT you7 even a little,' take steps to sa-f$  them sow before it,is too late. Many hoptV  lessly blind might have bees saved if they hs������  cared for their eyes in time.  Note i Another prominent Physician ta  whom the above article was submitted, said)  "Bon-Opto is a very remarkable remedy. T,tt  constituent .ingredients are well knows to eminent eye specialists and widely prescribed by '  them.       Tho    manufacturers  guarantee  it  te-  strengthen eyesight SO per cent, in one week*  time In many instances or refund the money.  It  caa be  obtained from  any  good  druggist  and is one of the T<ry few preparations I  feel should be kept on hand for regular ust  in almost every family." The Valmas DruJ  Co,, Stort 6, Toronto, will fill your order* &  your druggist cannot.  COLOSSAL FAILURE OF GERMAN  DREAM OF WORLD DOMINATION  WAR OF CIVILIZATION WAGED AGAINST BARBARISM  Men of Many Nations Have Chosen To Die and Have Risked  The Supreme Hazard Rather Than Permit the German  ��������� Gospel of Ruthlessness to Prevail ia the World  Arrange School Fairs  Agricultural  Society at? Moose   Jaw  Devises Excellent Plan  Arrangements for holding school  fairs in the various municipalities adjacent to Moose Jaw and of eventually bringing the prize winners of  the various schools to Moose Jaw  for competition in a big central fair,  are still being made and it looks as  though the efforts of the Moose Jaw  agricultural society iu this respect  will  be crowned with  success.  The idea in brief is to have as  many, schools as possible enter the  competition, the pupils themselves to  look after the raising of garden produce, roots, grasses, poultry, pigs  and calves. Tlie nunucipalitics arc  being asked to help the idea along  and with the aid of the trustees of  the various schools it_ is thought that  a number of successful local exhibitions will be held. After the competitions arc over, it is the idea of the  association to bringsall Ihe prize win-  *ners of the various schools to Moose  Jaw and have them compete one  with tire other for valuable prizes to  be given by the agricultural society.  Other help may als'o be asked for to  make the event a success and as it  means bringing quite a lot of children together with their parents and  friends from the rural districts, it is  altogether likely _ that Moose Jaw  merchants will wish to be represented in the prize list.  Satan is the father of lies and matrimony is the mother of excuses.  Thirty-two .months have passed  since the first German soldier crossed the Belgian frontier and by his  crossing opened a breach irr the wall  of civilization through which wave  after wave of barbarism has entered.  We are nearly three year/! away  from the monrenl when Germany  elected to put into play all thai vast  machinery she had prepared ,over a  generation, to employ all those colossal plans' she had made to achieve  that world power of which Bernhardi  wrote and German leaders dreamed.  And now, after these months, how  much of all the German ambitions  has' been realized? Belgium was  struck' down that Germany might  get at once at-'lhe throat of France,  and today German troops in France  arc retreating, while France remains  unconquercd and a million Germans  lie buried between the Meusc \and  Lhe Channel.  To overaAve Belgium German  troops acting under orders performed -their sordid task of mlhlessncss  in I.ouvain; they slaughtered children, outraged ^women, murdered old  men; they tuni'ed the city into a  shambles���������and after thirty-two  months the soul of Belgium remains  unconquercd and the sound of the  Allied guns draws nearer to the  ruins of  Louvain . ^  To paralyze Russia, German ?pics  and German agents corrupted Slav  generals, sowed the Russian court  with treason and enlisted Russian  autocracy and royalty, and today  Russia is" in fact a republic, .and the  voice of the Russian people has repudiated -the treason of Russian  leadership.  - To terrorize Britain Zeppelins were  sent over London and many innocent  non-combatants were killed. Edith  Cavell was executed, Captain Fryalt  was murdered, submarine fleets were  launched lo sweep Britain from the  seas, and today 2.U00.000 British  troops arc advancing in Franco, and  wherever a German agent h:i> _ endeavored lo sow Lrcason in a British  colony Britain has reaped a crop of  'loyalty and devotion. Australia. Canada, South Africa are represented in  the British battle line. Tire stoiu-rf of  the British empire have been cemented by the blood of Briton-, and  Colonials alike, shed in the *-amc  ci use  Great Britain, lialy, Rouinnnia, the  United States, each of the great neutrals, has in turn laid atidc thai neutrality which had become impossible;  there has been a plebiscite of peoples,  and the verdict of mankind is written; men of many nations have  chosen to die,-men of many races  have risked the supreme hazard,  rather than permit the. Gorman gospel, expressed utterly in the I'.^lgian  invasion, to prevail in the world.  There is no device- known to materialistic civilization, to sdc ntillc  and organized civilization,., that the  German has not employed. ' lie. has  used the hospitality of other nations  to plant treason within their borders; he has endeavored to turn one  man against another in each neutral nation; by treason, by terrorism,  by intrigue, by violence he has  sought to ^undermine the liberties or  to subdiy/ the spirit of. mankind. In  Europe as in America his spies and  his agents have labored in darkness  to turn nations against each other  he has offered to Italy provinces_of  France as he has offered Mexico  states of our nation; he has corrupted,  cheated, murdered, robbed.  And what has all this profited him?  His terrorism has aroused the courage of those he sought to intimidate  and his ruthlessness has armed the  hands and the wills of those he  sought to paralyze. His corruption,  his intrigue, have but united those  he sought lo turn agaiiist each other;  his brutality and his barbarism have  roused his opponents to8 a determination which broke the first rush of his  hosts at the Manic and the Yscr and  is now turning backward toward Germany itself the slowly weakening  mass of his armies.  What a monstrous thing this German attack has bcerr, and what s  colossal failure! The world has not  been conquered, no part of it; no  people among all that have been attacked has abandoned the battle,  however heavy the first blow- Europe*  has been sown with German dead,  but the harvest has only been" enemies. The German calculation included all but the,spirit bf man, but  the spirit of man has proven the decisive factor.- Mankind ..has willed  that the German menace should not  prevail, and we are seeing at last the  ebb tide of barbarism on the French ���������  fields.���������New York Tribune.  What Happened in Kansas  There arc, of course, differences ia  soil,_ but, when people talk about  making back-lot gardens this spring*  they might as well be reminded ol  something that happened to a Kansas back-lot gardener last season.  He planted pumpkins. They grew,  and they continued to grow until  they ran over the neighboring bacfe  lots and climbed the po"r*ehcs of  neighboring houses and trespassed  even upon the alley and the street.  Everybody, within the block mado  free with ' that man's pumpkins, and  yet a petition was sent to the town  council asking that he be forbidden  to grow things this year. He liars  compromised the matter by erecting-  a close wire fence around his premises, and the neighbors arc now  afraid his pumpkins will grow up-,_  wards until they shut out 'the afternoon sun.���������From the Christian  Science Monitor.  mm  They Melt  in the Mouth  You'll get a new idea of how  good soda biscuit can be, with  your first bite of  Plain or Salted.  In Packages only  Try our  COCOANUT WAFERS  They are dainty and delicious for  afternoon tea.     packages only.  North-West Biscuit Co,, Limited  EDMONTON  -  ALTA. ������  ���������!������*!������  W.     N.     U.     1156 ,(.-"-..--- .���������'���������fi'.y:--j ���������  tT-'V���������--r-'  'S1 f-.I   ''  -f;a,*^*F*--.,.  THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,  B.  A Morning  On the Ancre  Some Thrilling Incidents    Connected  With  the Big Drive  Tin-, battle of Boom Ravine deserves to be told more fully than the o.*H-  cral reports give it. in difficulty, if)  grim human courage, in all its drama  of fog and darkness and shell fire,  ami death, it seems to rue to hold  most or" what this war means to individual men���������all that can be askrd ol  them in such hours.  The thaw had just set in, and the  ground was soppy, which was bad,  luck. In spite of the thaw, it was  horribly damply cold, but the men  had been given a good meal before  forming up for the attack, and of-  ricers brought up the rum ration in  bottles, so that the men could attack with  some warmth  in them.  In  tlie    utter    darkness    of    early  morning,   unable   to  make  any  glimmer  of  light   lest   the   enemy  should  ..see,   the   brigades   tried   to  get     into  line.  A great fire of high explosives  burst over our assembly lines. The  darkness was lit up by the red flashes  of these bursting shells. Men fell,  wounded and dead. One battalion  v. as specially tried and their brigadier wondered whether they would  have the spirit to get up and attack  when the hour arrived- But when  the moment came they rose and went  forward, and fought'through the last  goal���������splendid arrd wonderful!  They were the first to get to  Giarrdcourt trench, which lay between  them and Boom Ravine. The wire was  not cut, and there was a hammering  oi machine guns and the swish ot  machine gun bullets.  This battalion had already lost all  the officers, who had gone forward  gallantly, leading their men and  meeting the bullets first. A sergeant  major took command, shouted to his  men to keep steady, and found a gap  through the wire- They found their  way through, passed Grandcourt  trench, and, with other men, dropped  into Boom   Ravine.  This place is a deep gully, almost  parallel with Grandcour. trench, and  with South Miraumorrt trench beyond. Before war came���������even last  summer, indeed���������it was like a Devonshire lane, with sleep sloping  banks, thirty to forty feet high, and  trees growing on either side with  overhanging roots. It was not-like  a Devonshire lane when our men  scrambled and fell down its banks.  It was a ravine of death. Our shell  fire had smashed down all the trees,  and their tall trunks lay at the bottom of the gully and their branches  v eve flung about.  The banks had been opened out by  shell craters and several of the German dugouts built in to the sides of  them were upheaved or choked. Dead  bodies or human fragments lay  among the branches and broken  woodwork. A shell of ours had entered one dugout and blown six dead  men out of its doorway. .They  .sprawled there at the entrance.' Inside were six other dead;  From dugouts not blown, up or  choked came groups of German soldiers, pallid and nerve broken, "who  gave themselves up quickly enough-  But the battle was not over yet. It  had only just begun. While ' Boom  Ravine was being cleared" of its living inhabitants by the first wave of  -English soldiers (they were men of  London and the southern counties),  other waves were coming up; or,  rather, not waves, but odd groups of  men, (lodging over the shell craters,  and. hunting as they went for German snipers, who lay iir their holes  firing until''they were pinned by bayonet points.  Some of them pretend to be dead  when our men came near. One o'f  them lay still, with his face in ���������.he  moist earth. "See that that man is  properly dead," said an officer, and a  soldier with him pricked the man. He  sprang up with a scream and ran  hard away���������to  our lines.  Six prisoners came trudging back  from the ravine with a slightly  wounded man as an escort. On the  way back they found themselves very  lonely with him, and passed some  rifles lying in their way- They seized the rifles and became firing men  again until a little Welsh officer met  them and killed every one of  with a revolver.���������Phillip Gibbs in the  London Chronicle.  To Help Production  Boys and  Girls  Will do  Their Part  This  Year  Judging by the large numbers of  entries received at Manitoba Agricultural College from boys and girl**  who are taking up the Boys' and  Girls' Club contests thii year, the  young folks of this province will do  their full part in the way of production during 1917- Up to March 12lh  the nrii'her or" entries registered by  Mr. S. T- Newton", Superintendent of  the Clubs for the province, was as  follows: Manual Training (woodworking, etc-) "700; Seed Growing,  770; pig, calf, or colt raising, 800;  Vegetable Gardening, 2,300; Potato  Growing 2,177; Poultry Raising,  1,960; Cookery, 850; Garment Making, 1,370; Vegetable Canning, 790;  Weed Studies, 910; Buttermaking,  260; Flower Growing, 1,280; Essay  Writing, 975. This is only a portion  of the total entry for the year; the  names  are   coming  in   right  along.  The boys and girls entering these  contests will not be simple signers  of their names to applicd'Jon fo.r'ms-  They have laid before them, in each  case, concrete undertakings of a  competitive nature, and in each case,  where necessary, there is a manual  of practical instructions. The special btiHetin on Seed Growing for instance, is a 24 page 'bulletin, of the  rrrost practical character, the sort of  bulletin, in fact, that the boy's father,  as well as the boy himself will find  of great value. That on Vegetable  Cardening is a 32 page bulletin, full  of the best sort of gardening advice;  and so on through other subjects.  The boys and girls who- enter these  contests arc bound to acquire not  only the knowledge which will come  to them through their own practical  experience, but also part of the best  that lire Agricultural College has to  leach   them-  British Women  Making Planes  Play Great Part in   Manuracture    of  All Kinds ot" Aeroplanes  Women are  now    taking    a    large  share in the indu. ry  which provides  one of the greatest assets of the for-  In a German Prison  Returned Soldier Tells    of-   Terrible  Experience at Ruhleben Camp  W. E. Collins, a returned prisoner  at Ruhleben, gives the foliowirrg ac-  ccirit of the condition of. the British civilians interned there: "One  man," he slates, "whom 1 knew well,  who has been- 13 weeks in a Berlin  prison, and whom  I watched beeo'm  ces orr land and sea, in the form of  aeroplanes, war balloons, sea-planes  and  other  ac-rial  scouts.       Not  only  are they to be sceir in those sections  ing insane, has died in a London asy  of  the  aircraft  industry  where   their) him.  . Another  man    had   been     for  help  might have  beerr    expected    in   seven   months  in  a   German     prison,  and  others I  often spoke with,  have  Measuring- Hay  Easy  Method   of Finding  the  Number of Cubic  Feet in  a Stack  Circular No. 67 of the Office of the  Secretary, United States Department  of Agriculture, gives a method for  measuring the number of cubic feel  in a round stack of hay- The fact  that the method as given in the circular is stated iir rather technical  terms, renders it desirable to reduce  the principles revolved to ordinary  language. This cair be done as follows:  First measure the total height of  the stack. The publication mentioned gives a simple method for accomplishing this. Then measure the  height from the ground to the  shoulder of the stack. The shoulder  is the widest part of the stack; or, if  the sides run up straight for a distance, it is the point where the top  begins to draw in- Subtract the  height of the shoulder from the total height of the stack,' to obtain the  height of the top of the stack above  the shoulder. Multiply the circumference of the stack at the ground  by half the height above the shoulder; add the two products together,  and multiply the sum by one-twelfth  of the circumference at the shoulder. The result will be the .number  of cubic feet in the stack.  pre-war times, such as iir cutting out,  sewing, painting and varnishing Ihe  fabric "for aeroplane wings, but they  are supplementing the men in the essential engineering operations. The  most important part of air aeroplane  ���������its heart, so to speak���������is the engine, the construction of which calls  for the utmost accuracy. Women are  now entrusted with much of this  work and are undertaking the milling  of the top and the grinding of the inside of the engine cylinders, and'they  are also engaged on machining the  connecting rods, the valves, ihe ������'is ���������  tons, and the holding down bolts. _  These processes are often carried  out to air accuracy of" half-a-thou-  sandth of an inch, that is, to one-  eighth of the thicknes sof an average  human hair, a. measurement which  can only be guaged by the most ingeniously constructed instruments.  Women arc further employed in the  aceto-welding process where conscientious and intelligent work is imperative, since upon the soundness ot  the joints depends the safety of the  machine and the life of .the flying  man. Such services may be best  offered by those of the educated classes whose previous experience fits  them for deftness of manipulation,  keenness of observation, and accuracy of judgment.-  A Scheme to Promote Thrift  Sub. Campaign  In Its True Light  Lord Robert Cecil Answers the German Chancellor  Lord Robert Cecil, the British  Blockade Minister, made reply to  the utterances'of Dr. von Bctlrmajin  liollweg, the German imperial "chancellor, in a statement lo the Associated Press.  "The German Chancellor^ claims  that Germany in the past renounced  the unrestricted use of her submarine weapon in the expectation tint "  Great Britain could be rrrade to ob-  ,    , .. ,.- ,,        ,. serve  in   her    blockade    policv' the  darkness.     My  own  cell  was    three   ,.llvs   of ]mmanily  aiul   . inicrniilional  bcerr in five or six different jails rn  solitary confinement and, from four  o'clock in the afternoon until eigJrt  o'clock  the next  morning,     in.   total  Ship Losses in Former Wars  -   It may be useful, as placing in better perspective the extent and nature  of the danger with   which  trade arrd  shipping arc threatened, to cite, from  a   French source,   the  figures  of losses    of    merchantmen    in    previous  great  struggles  in   which    we     have  been   engaged.     In   the   wars   arising  out of the League of Augsburg, 4,000  Pritish   merchant   ships     were     lost;  1,300  fell victims   in   the   VVar of  the  Spanish  Succession,  and 2,500 in   the  Seven Years' War; while in the Great  French   VVar,   when   Ihe   enemy's   efforts   were   specially   directed   to   the  destruction   of    oui*     commerce,     although 2,400    British   ..vessels    were  taken   or  sunk,   our   merchant     fleet  was   found  to  be   more  numerous  at  the end than in the beginning of hostilities.���������The  Scotsman.  Sugar Abstinence Advocated  Food Expert Tells of    the    Harmful  Effect of too Much Sweet Food  The war promises another blessing in disguise���������according to food  authorities. The rise iu the price of  sugar, along with the restrictions  that have been ' in full force for  months in Great Britain regulating  its sale, have brought forth some'  protests, but mainly apologists for  the advantages that will follow the  war if a restricted consumption is  maintained.  Eustice Miles, one of the foremost  food experts in London, England,  gives it as his opinion that indirectly  an excess in its use results in the  deterioration of the teeth and bones,  and in a.large number of other troubles, Which are usually put down to  some other cause.  "I an) not speaking here," he adds,  "of the fact that sugar may become  hem alcohol���������so that many teetotallers,  who pride themselves on their "abstinence," but indulge in gross excess  of sugar and sugary things, should  really be arrested for the possession  of illicit private distilleries within  themselves. I an) speaking of certain  definite signs aird symptoms which  result largely from regular and continued excess of sugar and other  carbohydrates.  "Up to a certain point let good  sugar be taken, but let it be realized  that, as sugar is taken now to excess, it is largely a stimulant and is  also a cause of many all too common troubles.  "How much better it would be .if  people had less of the while sugar  and sweets, etc., and more of the  crisp foods (such as potato chips,  toast, fried bread, biscuits,  etc-), in so far as they really  carbohydrates."  Working Out Plans    to    Encourage  People to Save Money  A British committee that is promoting thrift has been taking opinions as to the desirability of dispelling with all retail shop window displays���������the idea being, of course, to  remove'all suggestions for spending  money except such as come froni the  natural promptings of cold and luin-  ,gci*. Opinions of London merchants  are decidedly unfavorable to the idea,  and it docs undoubtedly go to an unreasonable extreme.  On the other hand, in time of peace  the suggestions to spend outnumber  the suggestions to save a hundred to  one. Any retail street offers to the  eye ten thousand ways of disposing  of the money in one's pocket; while  if one seeks a way of keeping the  money he has to hunt it up.  Recently some widely known men  in New York organized a company  that proposes to buy government and  municipal bonds7 deposit ���������/.them with  a trustee, and issue against them  saving certificates in denominations  as low as ten dollor's, which, in cooperation with department stores, cigar shops drug stores and so on,will  be offered for sale as nearly as possible wherecver people go to spend  ��������� money, so the man or woman with  ten spendable doilars will have right  at hand the suggestion that it may  be safely and conveniently disposed  of without exchanging it for merchandise.     , ���������'-.-.'���������  The chief objection to the plan is  that $10 is too high a minimum unit.  Probably a combination of savings  banks could work out a scheme  whereby savings certificates---for as  little as $1 could be had in''any. city  as conveniently, say," as a bundle of  cigars or a round oF drinks���������and the  fact that they were obtainable could  be kept constantly in the public's���������'cyc.  True, there would be little-or no  direct profit to those who issued the  certificates or sold them, but the indirect profit, in the long rim; might  be large���������Saturday Evening Post.  1 aces by two. We were given biea*'.  and water and treated like criminals.  The sanitary arrangements were too  awful for description. The exercise  allowed amounted to 20 ininuts pe-  day in a yard 17 paces by 13.  Describing lire partings      between  the interned   .men    and their    wives  end  families,  Mr.   Collins   continued.  "Eleven  of us  LiverpooLcotlon  men  happened to be living in Bremen    -it  that time.     We were,taken in  Black  Marias  to  the  railway station,  given  over   to   the   military,   and   told   that  we  had   to  obey  orders  or  be  she.  A  certain   lieutenant    had    told    his  men  that if    he    had    his    way    he  would  shoot the lot of us and ' give  our  wives  and  womenfolks   -over  tj  the soldiery.    On the way to Ruhleben we had nothing to eat or drink,  and  on  arriving    there"   we    wished  ourselves back in prison, for we had  to lie night after night on wet straw  sacks  on   the  stone floor,  under  the  grandstand of the race course. Those  who lay  close  to  the windows    had  their clothes frozen lo the windows'.  Then   we   were   removed    to    stable  lofts, full of-rats and  mice, . and    to  horse boxes, with  four sacks  to  five  r-rerr,  bullied  about all- the  time    by  brutal soldiers.    It was .awful  to see  the crippled men carried about in the  cfiiip.   One day Fsaw a man cut his  throat.   Sometimes we-had to line up  1/ times a day in slush, rain and cold.  And the awful food!    We were allowed one slice of bread every 24 hours,  and what we had at dinner time was  i-ot  worth  eating.      The  coffee  wis  made from acorns.    I have been back  some time now, but 1 never feci like  a  released  man."  Irish Chaplain Makes  A Daring Capture  rusks,  need  "You waltz beautifully, Mr- Flubdub.    Where did you learn?"  "I practiced with a revolving door.  J find that better than a chair-"���������  Philadelphia Bulletin.  The French cabinet has decided on  a reduction in the size of the country's daily newspapers.    Most of the! He is the one who'most needs love  The Boy Who Didn't Pass  A sad-faced .little fellow sits alone in  deep disgrace,  There's a lump arising in  his  throat  and  tears stream  down  Iris face;  He wandered from his playmates, for  he doesn't want to hear  Their shouts of merry laughter since  the world  has lost its cheer,  He has sipped the cup of sorrow, he  has drained  the bitter glass,  And his heart is fairly breaking; he's  the boy  who didn't  pass.  In the apple tree the robin sings a  cheery little song,  Eut he doesn't scenr to hear it, showing plainly something's wrong;  Comes his faithful little spaniel for a  - rorrrp  and  bit  of play,  But the troubled little fellow sternly  bids him go away,  And alone he sits in sorrow, with his  hair a tangled mass,  And his eyes are red with weeping;  he's the boy who didn't pass.  Oh,   you   who   boast   a   laughing  son  and  speak  of him   as  bright,  And  you  who  love  a  little girl  who  comes to you tonight,    y  Willi  smiling eyes  and dancing feet,  ���������   with  honors from her school,  Turn  to  that  lonely  little  boy    who  thinks  he  is  a  fool,  And take him kindly by the hand, the  dullest in   the  class;  With Party of Dublin Fusiliers    He  Persuaded Germans  to Surrender  The exploit of a Roman Catholic  chaplain who, with eighteen enthusiastic Irishmen, brought irr "450 very  thankful, if somewhat dejected, Germans," was referred to by Sir Philip  Sassoon in a recent speech at Folkestone. A reliable correspondent  stales that the hero of the incident,  home on furlough, has just been welcomed- by the parishioners of a mining hamlet in Lanarkshire.  It is stated that a party of the Dub.  Iin Fusiliers, accompanied by the padre, when returning, from a reconnoitring expedition, were assailed by  rifle fire from a wood where it was  known the enemy were entrenched.  They immediately sought the refuge  of shell holes, and from there fired a  round_of shots at the wood. Evidently the fire proved effective, for three  Germans emerged from the wood  with their- hands held up iu token oi  surrender.  The chaplain advanced to meet the  trio, and informed them that one of  their number could return to the  wood arrd give the remaining Germans the assurance that their lives  would be-spared if they surrendered.  The German who had been deputed  to give the message to his compatriots promptly left, but as he failed to  return after, a-reasonable interval, the  "Dubs" tried the effect of another  volley. Then two more Germans  came put, and a repetition of the fire  brought out another trio*'.  Encouraged by these repealed .evidences of the spirit of surrender, the  chaplain decided to enter the wood  and see the officer in charge of the  enemy. He did so, and the result of  his enterprise was that 450 Germans  offered  to  surrender.  They emerged from the thicket, but  when, confronted with only 18 Fusiliers���������and not an entire battalion, as  they probably surmised���������a number of  them sought to return to the wood,  with tlie obvious intention of renewing the combat. The "Dubs," however, sent a bullet or two in the direc-  agreements," said Lord --Robert..."It  is. difficult' to say whether this statement is the more remarkable-for. its  hypocrisy or for its falseness. It  would hardly^ seerrr that Germany in  irr a, position' to speak of hiimanity  or international'--agreements, - since  she began this war by deliberately  violating the international agreefnent  guaranteeing the -joutralily of - Belgium and has continued. it_ by violating  all  the dictates  of  humanity.  "Has the Chancellor forgotten that  the German forces have been guilty"  of excesses irr Belgium, unparalleled  irr history, culminating in tire attempted enslavement of a dauntless  people, of poisoning wells, of bombarding open towns, torpedoing hospital ships and sinking other vessels  with total disregard for the safety of  non-combatants on board, with the  result that many hundreds of innocent victims, including both women  and  children, have lost their lives?  "The latest manifestation of this  policy is -to be seen irr the" devastation and deportations carried >.ou< by  the Germans in their forced retreat  on the "western front. The Chancel-  lo) states that it is because the- allies have 'not abandoned their blockade and have' refused the .so-called  peace offer of Germany that unre- -  strictcd sumbarine warfare is now  decided on. As lo.this 1 will do'no  more than quote what the Chancellor  himsell'-said iu the Reichstag when '-  j-nnouncing the adoption of unrestricted  submarine  war.-  "He said that as soon as he himself, in agreement with the supreme  army command, reached the conviction that ruthless U-boat warfaie'  would bring Germany nearer to a  victorious peace, then the U-boat  v arfare would be started. He continued:  "This moment has now- arrived.  Last autumn the tune was not ripe,  btil today '.he moment has come  when, with the greatest prospect of  Success, w c can undertake this enterprise. We must "'not 'wait any  longer. Where has there been a  change? In the first place the most  important fact of- all is that the  number ol" our submarines has bcen-  very considerably increased as compared with last spring, and thereby  a firm, basis has been created for  success.".  "^Does not this" prove conclusively  that it was not any scruple or any  respect for international law or neutral "rights that prevented unrestricted warfare, from being adopted earl-  icr,..b'ul merely a lack cf means -to  carry it .put. 1 thi-rk it may  be useful once again to point out  that the illegal and inhuman attack  on . shipping by the Germans cannot  be justified as a reprisal for the action of. Great Britain in attempting  to cut off frorrr Germany all imports.  "The submarine campaign was  clearly contemplated as far back as  Feccmber, 1914, when Admiral von-  1 irpitz gave' an indication to an  American correspondent in Berlin of  the projected plan. As for the plea  that life allies are aiming at the  annihilation of Germany and her allies and that ruthless warfare is  therefore justified, it is sufficient in  oider to refute this to quote the" following passage from, the allies' reply  of January .10, 1917, to President  Wilsonfs note;  .'.'There is no heed to say that if  the allies desire-to liberate Europe  from the brutal covctousrress.'- of  Prussian, militarism, the extermination and political disappearance of  the German people has never, as has  been pretended, formed a part of  their design."  "The allusion made to Russia by  the German Chancellor can hardly  be treated seriously. A government  o1: Hohenzollerns cannot pose as the  champions.- of freedom and self-  government as against autocracy.  When the German people enjoy the .  benefits    of    a    truly    representative  tion of the retreating soldiers and! government, and are no longer dom-  soon dispelled all notions of rctalia-1 inr.1 ed by a military autocracy, Ger-  tjon ��������� mans  may appear in   that   role,  '-but  Paris papers had already decreased  the size of their publications. A further curtailment will possibly result  in some appearing iu the -form of a  single sheet.  the boy who didn't pass.  ���������Michigan   Christian   Advocate.  It is stated that one of the German  officers approached the chaplain and  askecLthat he might be spared the  ho rors of torture. At the same time  he significantly pointed to a bundle of  banknotes which he held in his extended hand. The retort, apt though  it was���������"We are British soldiers, sir,  and not thieves"���������was capped by a  stalwart Fusilier standing near, who  doubtless chagrined to see so much  money unsecured by lock and key, interjected: "Give that to me, me son,  and Oi'll take care of you and yer  rcceipts."  It is also slated that a second German officer handed to the chaplain an  Iron Cross of the 2nd class.  Sunshine will eventually  **��������� the thickest cloud-  puncture  A man seldom gets so full of cmo  tion that he has no room for dinner.' torv.  not   until   then.  The Warfare Savages  The contrast between German and  English . blockade methods could,  have had no more striking illustration. It is well to bear in mind that  the ships sunk by' Germany are always unarmed merchantmen. The  Kaiser's submarines keep clear of the  "British navy and avoid armed' vessels. They arc rrot seeking combat  but ruthless destruction' It has  been said in fancied extenuation of  these attacks, that the use of the undersea boat is- a new p.ode of warfare. The instrument is-new, but the  kind of warfare in which the Germans use it is precisely thai employed by-savages since the dawrr of Iris-  New  York Times. .  **s  ;.  Tsffr^-nfr'-i-^ffg '^-^-Jv5'"-**'^  ���������i -v',">r w fl-**'*---&.���������,{<;}^^';i-i-s^i :ir^r���������, ;Hfn2- --������*-!  i^-M^^m  'r.K'* -  "*/���������.-  ��������� v- -���������'  -" '"',;>*,  "f������. -.  '   r'<  , - ; -j i������fe=a*.  THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      B.      C.  Assisting  The Farmer  An Experiment in Credit and What  Came of It  An  illuminating example of how a  city community can increase its own  prosperity  by   helping  the   surrounding agricultural    population -  to    in-  /crcasc   theirs  is  to be  found  in    the  ���������success that has attended Lethbridge  Alberta, in its  scheme -for advancing  -    livestock   lo   farmers.   Lethbridge     is  not a  large city, measured alongside  ' of  New   York,   Chicago,    and    other  types of .the skyscraper class, but    it  hopes   to  be  some day;  and   it    has  -wisely   recognized   that  until   it    can  ,   get  on   to  the  plane  where    it   -will  grow  by its  own  impetus,  it  cannot  ���������do   better   than   increase  the   wealth-  jproducing power  of  its   rural     territory ; ��������� *~r  Recognizing, too, that the livestock  ������".industry is the foundation of all true  agricultural    wealth,    if   'formulated  some  three years  ago  a   scheme  for  ^���������ejping the farmers whose trade came  '���������to Lethbridge to    become    livestock  owners." "A  number    of    Lethbridge  business   men���������retailers,    wholesalers  and     professional     nien���������guaranteed  $150  each   to  form  a   credit,', with     a  bank,   paying   five   per   cent,   in "cash  and giving  their  notes  for  the      remainder.;-   It-was   not   expected   that  ���������   the  guarantors   would   make  any  di-  icct profits; in fact, no dividends were  -promised,    and  .as    far as wc  knov*.  none have been  paid.  This, credit being put into the  hands of trustees, applications were  ^accepted from a number of farmers,  and a number of cattle- and- hogs  ������ ere bought. It is a,noteworthy fact  that seventy-five per cent, of these  h ans have already been repaid. Th.s  scheme, now commonly known as  the1 "Lethbridge" scheme, was; because of-ils success, adopted by othe.-  Weslcrn Canadian city communilies.  Its success demonstrated to the-farming community generally that it  \ culd be good business if more far  meis could borrow onjiveslock pur-  ' -chases under lien. The United Fa *-  nicrs of Alberta look tlie matter "up  jit their 1916 convention, and obtained  from Hie Dominion government an  amendment to Bank Act, whereby  chartered banks are enabled to make  such liens. Any reputable farmer  ma"y now arrange with his own banker to increase his livestock operations, and the bank manager can feel  ���������6; fc in lending the money.  Where the Weather is Cold  86 Below Zero Was   Alaska   Record  Made This  Year  The coldest temperatures since accurate records have been kept in  Alaska have been recorded at various  points in the territory during the past  winter.  'The record for the coldest spot in  North America goes to Birches, on  the Yukon, a short distance below  Tanarra. At this station a special  spirit thermometer of the type used  in arctic research registered 86 degrees below zero on January 6 oi  this year.  Last summer a temperature of 92  degrees- above zero'was recorded at  Birches, making a difference of 172  degrees -between ' the' warmest and  coldest days in a period of less than  six months. It is difficult for persons  who have . riot experienced temperatures colder than 50 below to realize  the effect of the extreme cold. c  Al 80 below zero cold water thrown  into the air-clatters to the ground in  frozen hail; iron' or steel touched to  the flesh will inflict a more serious  burn than when, heated to 200 degrees above zero; in ordinary mercury thermometers the mercury runs  down into the bulb and then freezes;  animals breathe in short-gasps arrd  unless they can reach shelter soon  succumb, the air freezing the inner  lining of their,lungs; travelling is out  of the question, but few are caught  out in extreme cold weather, for at  the first sign of the thermometer going below 50 mushers seek "shelter.  Temperatures from 60 to 70 below  have been common.  Extreme temperatures were 'also  .noted in Anchorage, with 45 below,  at Valdcz, 24 below, ,and at Seward,  terminal of'tlre government railroad,  14 below.  The Greatest Asset  Of Democracy  The greatest contribution (it says)  that Great Britain has made to the  war is not the number of men- she  has put in the field, or the munitions  she has. turned out, or the "ships  which have sailed the seas, but the  unbroken front, solidarity, a stubborn   tenacity  of   the     nation     as  How and When /  To Get Gophers  J.  H. Grisdale,  Director-General    oi  Experiment Farms, Issues  Timely Bulletin  At the experimental station at  Scott, Saskatchewan, during the summer of 1915, it was discovered that  gophers  caused  a  loss  of  11   bushels  Boy Scout Notes  whole.    That is a true picture of the! and 5 pounds per acre in the case of  English which every one knows irr  slinctively to be true' The confusion  is in technique, and that is. unimportant. There are nations that might  run the war better, but there is not  one that could be more trusted to  win the war, and thai, after all, is  the thing that counts. To be sure  of this you have only to consider  w-hat would happen to the Allies if  England deserted them, and what  England would do if the Allies deserted her. She would go on alone,  is   she  has  been   known   to   do    be-  osts, and 18 bushels, and 21 pounds in  the case of barley- The records' from  which these losses -were estimated  were made between parts of the fields  that were attacked and other parts in  which they worked no  damage.  This information appears in Bulletin _No. 31," second series, "of the Experimental farms, prepared by J.H.  Grisdale, director-general, Experi  mental farms. The bulletin consists  of a" compilation of the most useful  information available- The gopher, it  is stated, is extremely fond of tench r  fore.    England denouncing herself asjS1"'1*11 plants and will travel long dis  inefficient is yet the greatset moral  asset of democracy iu Europe���������New  Y ork Times.  The Scotsman's Porridge  Testing the Herd  Wine in War Time  Tt is stated that the French government   has   requisitioned   for  the   pur-  u poses of the army a very substantial  - proportion of the vintage production.  In France, therefore, wine has assumed a military importance, for no less  Ihan 200,000,000 gallons of wine from  the country,  together with 40,000,000  gallons   from  her    Algerian    colony,  have beerT reserved for the use of the  .soldier-    It  would appear that    each  officer and man receives daily half a  litie  of wine.      This allowance    has  been   adopted  since  the  war    began,  and the authorities arc convinced that  it  has contributed  to  the  health "and  efficiency  of  the  troops     through     a  campaign   conducted  under .very  trying conditions.    The reasonable  consumption of the wine of the country  (vin  ordinaire)  is  evidently regarded  as   beneficial   rather   than   demoralizing.���������London  Lancet-  General   Cadorna  -  When Lord Northcliffe talks about  Cadorna there is a hint    of    a very  merry luncheon at  which  the Italian  generalissimo -kept  the  table amused  all  the time   "Here is the .description  of  the  cheerful    general:    A    short,  lithe, quick-moving man of sixty-five,  General Cadorna is the most humorous  of all  the generals in  the  Great  War-    He  has a glitter in  his    grey  cjes   that   reminded "me   of   those   of  the late  Pierpont  Morgan.    He  is  a  general who    believes    in  seeing for  himself   He took personal part in the  direction of the final battle for Gori-  zia, climbing the ghastly hill of Pocl-  gora with the vigor of an Alpini-    He  is a close student of war, and he has  al) the subtlety of the Italian.   In the  long  story  of. the   war  lie' is'.almost  the only general  who devised a surprise-  How to Make Cows Sure of a Better  Profit  The man familiar with  cows    may  make a fairly close estimate of what  any  one in  a  given  herd  will    give,  possibly per day,    per month or per  year.    Does it follow she is the "best  cow?". It depends somewhat on what  the owner is after;-he may look-'for  a large flow of milk, he may require"  plenty of cream,  or,  wisely, he may  expect a substantial profit above the  cost of feed.    So  your  cows,    as    a  herd, may "average" 6,000 pounds of  milk and 200 pounds of fat,    but    is  each   one   earning   "a     good    profit?  Cow testing,  checking up    each    individual,  will  answer  this  and  many  other questions.    It will also help, as  it has helped many dairymen, to add  at least 50*per cent,  to  their income  from  the  same number *of cows,  because    they    keep    tin se    that    are  known to be efficient.    Y'our averagx  may be  7,000 pounds, but 'in    three  years perhaps you can make it over  10,000 pounds, but it won't be unless  each  one is up  to  a good  standard.  Write  the   Dairy   Commissioner,   Ottawa, for milk record forms.      Y'our  letter does not need a postage stamp.  High Price of Oatmeal Has Brought  Forth a Strong Protest  In July, 1914, the price of oalmeal  in Great Britain was 2s 6d per stone  of fourteen pounds (50c), today it is  5s 2d ($1-20). What was then a  common foodstuff is now a luxury,  and a Scotsman thus relieves his  feelings on the situation by "writing  to the papers:" "The decadence of  the race has begun. The prohibi-j  tive price of porridge will, if not  amended "downwards, result in a serious diminution of the brain power of  the Empire. Oatmeal and theology  have yielded a harvest of deep  thinkers and hard workers for the  world. Carlylc's radicalism was due  to his oatmeal and buttermilk- Robbie Burns sang best when he did not  know the taste of "barley" bree," and  tances  to reach  them.    It has  many  natural  'enemies   among    which    are  coyotes,    badgers,    skunks,   .weasels,  snakes,  hawks  and   owls.      Methods  of   control  or  extermination     recommended are poisoning, shooting, trap,  ping, snaring, drowning and suffocating.    Of these methods  poisoning is  regarded as  the most effective-  Specific  instructions  are    contained    for  preparing aid    distributing    poisoned  grain,  and the precautions  necessary  lo protect farm .animals, children and  ollreiys    are    recommended.        Other  methods of destruction are stated to  be less effective and more expensive.  -Co-operation    of various    agencies  such as rural municipalities    and farmers' unions are recommended   along  with  the  offering  of prizes    to    the  young people  of  the  community for  the destruction of these pests.    Local  farmers' unions    have    adopted    the  plan of setting apart a day known' as  "gopher day,"  when  the whole  community declares  war on  the gopher.  This plan is recommended in this bulletin,   copies   of   which   are   available  on application    to    the    publications  t  went to the p, ow -after being fed  on   branchf department of   agriculture, a  vholesome milk and porrrdge.      J he I Ottawa-  glory of  the-Scottish Manse is    but1  another name for the virtues of oat  meal. It behooves'the government to  recognize that the new soldiers going off to Flanders will be terribly  'thin unless kepi up with porridge in  plenty, well boiled,' and well-dripped  ir milk. The government has committed a grave mistake in not regu-  1. ting the price of oatmeal and will  j, o out of power at the first throw of  the polilical ballot box, for at the  r.cxt election Scotland will hold the  casting vote in the deliberations of  rarliamcnll We will make politics  hot until we can get our .porridge  ence more at a price that will enable  the dishes to go all round the table"  Seed Garden of Canada  the  Lord Cromer and the Bible  Bible  knew  -His  gave  One fact concerning Lord Cromer  seems ^to  have   escaped  his     biographers.     He   was   one   of     the    most  thorough    students    of    the  among  public  men,    and    he  many portions  of it by heart-  long  association   with     Egypt  the Old Testament a special interest  for    him.  "---Lord     Northbrook,     his  cousin,   whom   he  served  as    private  secretary in  his   young  days, -was  a  deep  Biblical   student,  and  wrote,_>'n  his later years, a small book entitled  "The  Teaching of Jesus    Christ    in  His Own Words," which was intended  to  be  helpful   to- the  natives    of  India.    By the way, 1 have" not seen  it   mentioned   that   even   late   in   life  Lord Cromer and his brothers called  each other    "Major,"    "Minor," . and  "Minimus,"- as  they'   did    when    at  school    together.���������Westminster    Gazette- ,  The Sausage Mystery  Lord Devonport has decided that  the sausage is meat. That shows a  degree-of confidence which generations-have denied to anybody but the  maker of the sa'fisage himself  Henceforth the. butcher, in face of  talk about the mystery of the sausage, may refer to the authority of  ihe Food Controller, and Sam Wel-  Icr's dictum, that it is "the seasoning  that does it" is deposed from authority. And yet we are left wondering, if the sausage be meat and  nought else, how it is that Smith-  field will sell sausages at 8d a pound  when it demands Is 4d for the mcyt  from which they are presumably  made.���������Westminster' Gazette.  Tell-Tale Sea Gulls  The curious fact has been noted,  according to London Tit-Bits, that  sea gulls are one of the most dangerous foes German submarines have  to fear, and there is no known defence against these birds. When the sta  gulls catch sight of even the periscope of a submarine at sea they rise  from the water and circle about it  screaming loudly and for as long as  the periscope is visible to their sharp  eyes. By this means many ships at  sea have been warned in time to escape destruction by the undersea  boats.' For a submarine to fire on  the birds would be to warn approaching ships, and to excite the birds to  still more shrieking.  Big Permanent Industry for  Okanagan Valley  According to officials of the Canadian Seed Branch, the Okanagan Valley, B.C., promises to become the  seed garden of Canada. Before the  war most of the seeds used in Canada came froni Belgium, France, and  Germany. This supply has been  largely cut off and the" question of  getting, sufficient seed has been a  serious matter. One of the most  difficult problems has been to get  sufficient sugar beet seed which before lire outbreak of hostilities was  nca-riy all shipped from Belgium and  Germany.  Experiments have been nrade in  the raising of seed in the Okanagan  Valley, and this year several carloads of sugar beet seed will be procured. This, along with several other  valleys with similar climate, are the  most ideal in Canada for seed raising  and are the equal of California points,  the only places hitherto able to compete with Europe. Officials in Ottawa believe it will develop into a big  permanent industry.- , At present  prices arc high, and there is no doubt  that profits will be made. For instance, sugar beet is 22 cents a pound  as compared with six cents before the  war. Whether the Carradian growers  will be able to continue to.'compete  with the European countries after the  war depends largely oir the labor  nrarkct.  Why Did the Kitchen Stair?  A Little Misunderstanding That Was  Amicably  Settled  Why did the kitchen stair? Because the potato was making eyes at  her and wanted to mash her. The  bread was for toasting her, and the  lemon actually wanted lo squeeze  her- The meat saw it all, and ground  its teeth. The milk turned very sour  at this, and went off to catsup.  Meanwhile the yeast was rising, but  felt such a current of air that he  dropped plum into the ice crcanT7  and, to be candied, there was no raisin him.  "I never was in such a pickle," said  the vinegar- "It makes me hot all  over," said the pepper^ "I am all  curled up with fright," said the parsley. "1 am all a quiver," said the  jelly. "Things certainly are prett>  well mixed," said the mustard. "Oh!  1 don't know," said the black tea, "I  have seen it more so'-" "Eggactly,"  said the omelet.  While the sugar looked sweetly at  the butter, who was in a melting  mood, and gave her a flour, which  she kneaded to freshen her up a bit.  "Well, you may talk as you like,"  said the nutmeg, "but my troubles  arc grater-"  "Oh! cut it," said the knife. "Stick  to it," said the fork. "I think you all  need a good basting," said the spoon-  Then came a lot of sauce frorrr the  pan, which made the kettle so boiling  mad that she fairly spluttered, ard  cr-lled for the sage of the kitchen,  who agreed with Miss Marjcrum  that all this was very un-savorv, and  it was thyme it was stopped, or they  would all rue it.  Then there was peas.  Good  Health Essential  to the -Well-  Being of Every Boy  News   of the   death   of Her  Royal  Highness  the Duchess  of Connaught  was received with regret by the Boy'  Scouts   throughout   Canada    and   Sir  Percy    Sherwood,      the      Dominion  Commissioner    and    Mr,   Gerald  H.  Brown,     the    Honorary      Dominion  .Secretary   on-"behalf   of   the     Scouts  fcuwarded   the   following   cablegram:  "Respectfully    tender    sincere    sympathy of  Canadian Boy  Scouts,"-   to  which   His   Royal -Highness   replied:  All  Boy Scouts  grateful  thanks-"  , Good   health   is   essential     to     the  well-being of every boy.    This is no  secret   in   Scouting   circles.       Scouts  arc   shown   how   to   keep   themselves  fit,  and   taught  that fitness  is   essential to success in life-    At Scout age  (12 lo 18)  the great decisions of life  and   character  arc   made.    The    boy  must be prepared  but he will not be  properly   prepared  unless   he  is  physically  fit. . At   this  period  the  body  grows   rapidly,   the  muscles     harden,  the  voice   breaks   and   the  organs   of  reproduction begin  to function-    The  new powers of manhood are coming  to   birth,   the   fires   of   new   passions  are  burning in   his   blood.    Scouting  comes   to   the   rescue    and    supplies  him with  opportunities  * of ' physical  activity.    Most of his Scouting activities  arc  conducted  in  the  open-     In  the summer months he goes to camp  and .during  the   winter     months     he  goes on  hikes.    In addition  he takes  part in almost every known form  of  athletics.     He   trains   in   the   gymnasium-       He    learns   to   box,   wrestle,  fence   and   do     many     other     things  which arc a benefit to him phj'sically.  From many foreign countries come  encouraging    reports     of       Scouting  progress.     From   France   and     Italy  reports  show that  Scouts   have  been  ably  performing  public  services  similar   to   those  rendered   in   this   country-     In   Roumania  where   there    are  some* 6,000   Scouts,   the     good     war  work done by the boys has been the    -  subject   of  comment  in     the     press.  Some lost  their lives on  duty during  the   aerial .raids   on   Bucharest.       In  Holland   the   two   existing     societies  have   been   combined   into   one.       In .  Uruguay   the  formation   of  a  society  for   Catholic   Boy   Scouts   has     been  reported.  Decline of Drunkennss  in Great Britain  Reduction in Four Years More Than  Half the Aggregate Number  of Convictions  The  London Times  in  an .editorial  "the     decline     of     drunkenness,"  A Poor Excuse  The   consumption  of 2,500,000  tons  of barley per annum in "the mantifac-l irial   centres   been  To Fine Gossips on 'Phone Lines  The gossip in Ontario who listens  to a conversation on a rural telephone  line, and repeats it to the neighbors,  will have to pay a fine not exceeding  $25, if detected. Operators who offend will also be punished in the  same way. A bill to this effect has  lias been introduced in the legislature  by Hon. I. B. Lucas, Attorney-General.  Germany's Moral Isolation  The plain truth is that the moral!  isolation of Germany, in- this matter  of lawless and inhuman warfare at  sea, is complete. Wlratever the action of neutrals may be, their feeling is unanimous. And it is nonsense to assert that this fact, when  it penetrates to the knowledge of tlie  German people, will not have its depressing effect. Bravado and boasting may prevail for the moment, but  in the end a nation even in desperate  mood must experience a sense of recoil and * apprehension when it is  made aware that its policy goes counter to the deeply-rooted convictions  of the civilized world.���������Frorrr the  New York Evening  Post.  The Limit of Music  Little Andrew is a clever little chap  and possesses a very sweet voice.  The other night, therefore, he was  chosen to sing at a hobo corrcert in  London and obliged them with air old  favorite, "Kathleen Mavournccn,"  which he sang very sweetly indeed.  His rendering of one line, however,  "The 'orn of the hunter is 'card on  the 'ill," jarred very much on the  nerves of one man, and when congratulating him afterward he mentioned that he really ought to put a  few "aitches" in now and then.  "Garn!" said Andy, eyeing him witji  pity, "don't show ycr ignorance���������  don't  yer know  there  ain't  no  H   tn  ture of that which has only produced  national drunkenness, poverty, disease, crippled efficiency, and moral  degradation" does not admit of defence at any time, arrd under war  conditions it is altogether criminal.  It is said that a great amount of valuable food for stock is obtained as a  by-product of the malting of barley.  Assuming this to be so, it does appear a very roundabout way of utilizing barley as a food for stock. One  who has tested the point says that if  the feeding units of barley arc placed  at 92, the feeding units of the after-  malting products arc 28.64, or a loss  for feeding purposes of 71-64 per  cent, in the co-efficients of the original barley.���������The Scottish  Fanner.  on  says  "Police returns of convitions for  drunkenness in large towns in Great  Britain for the last four years show  a reduction of more than one-half  the aggregate number of convictions,  there being 158,831 in 1913 and 77,-  396 in 1916. The reduction has occurred almost wholly in the last three  years, or during the war, the fall between 1913 and 1914 being only  I'bout 3,000, while iu London there  was actually a rise of 200. In the  next twelve months the aggregate  reduction was 300,000, and in the year  just passed the reduction from 1913  increased  more  than  40,000.  "These remarkable facts show that  there never was so great a reduction  spread over so large a population in  the same space of time. There is  evidence that the diminution of public drunkenness is not offset by an  increase of private drunkenness, for  this, too, has diminished. When,  however, we stop to determ.ne the  causes of the reduction, we arc confronted  with  difficulties.  "The first and * foremost is the  withdrawal of men for the army.  This enormous change cannot fail to  affect the state of the streets. On  the other hand, the withdrawal oi  men by enlistment has in. the indus-  counter-balanced  music?    It only goes up to G!"���������Chicago Herald.  "Old Blank's nieces and nephews  don't dare balk him in the slightest  thing."  "He  must have great will power  "You   bet   he   has!       He  can  $5,000,000."  Dead Quiet  "Oh, where  can  rest  be found?"  A weary poet sighs,  That's easy.    Drop into a store  That does  not advertise.  Do Not Explain High Prices  At a time when there is so much  discussion as to the price of potatoes,  figures compiled by the Bureau of  Census and Statistics at Ottawa,  throw sonic light on Canadian production.  The area planted in  1916 irr    potatoes was 499,000 acres, conrparcd with  479,000   acres  in   1915-     The  average  yield per acre last    year    was  136.21  against   130.85  for  1915.     The    total  yield  in   1916  was   61,229,000  bushels  will! compared   with   62,605,000    in     1915.  j Potato exports last year were $1,424,-  ( 519 as against $506,302 in the corrcs-  I ponding  twelve months.       There    is  little   in   the  figures   to   explain     the  high  prices  which    now  obtain,    cs-  i pccially when over two million btish-  ! els  arc in the country-  by the infkix of munition workers.  In these towns the war change would  rather tend to increase drunkenness.  In point of fact it did so for a time  in several of them. This one fact  goes to prove that whatever influence enlistment had, it cannot account for more than a part of the  reduction.  "Female drunkenness has fallen as  well as male, far too heavily to be  explained away by any hypothesis  but that fewer women have been  drunk in the streets. The reduction  is considerably less than the men, ->.s  it would naturally be, but is very  large. Moreover, nearly all of it took  place   in   1915     and     1916.      Betwcc i  1914 and  1915   the  number of  female  convictions     dropped     but   ,  between  1915 and   1916   they   fell   nearly     14,-  000.  "The great change which took  place between these two years was  after the general application of restrictions by the liquor control  board. They were first appF.cd in  August, 1915, and some improvement  followed in the second half of the  year, but 1916 was the full .year of  restrictions. The difference of female drunkenness between it and the  previous year is, wc believe, a fair  measure of the effect."  At an evening party the hostess had  coaxed a protesting guest l.o-sing. After the song she went up to him  smiling, "Oh, Mr. Jenkins," she said,  "you must never tell me agairr that  you can't sing���������I know now." THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,       B.  A Morning-  On the Ancre  Some Thrilling Incidents : Connected  With  the Big Drive  The battle of Boom Ravine deserves to be told more fully than the o.*t;.-  cial reports, give'-it.- In difficulty, in  grim human courage, in all its drama  of fog and darkness and shell lire,  aiid death, it-seems to me to hold  most of what this war 'means to individual men���������all that can be asked ol  them in sue!) hours.  The thaw had 'just set in, and the  ground was soppy, which was bad  luck, in spite of the thaw, it was  horribly damply cold, but the inen  had been given a good meal before  forming up for the attack, and officers brought up the ruin raiion in  bottles, so that the men could attack with, some warmth in them.  In   the    utter    darkness    of    early  morning,   unable   to  make  any  glimmer  of  light   lest   the 'enemy, should  ,_ see,   the   brigades   tried   to   get    into  line.  A great fire of high '.explosives  burst over our assembly lines. The  darkness was lit up by the red flashes  of these bursting shells. Men fell,  wounded and dead. One battalion  ��������� was specially tried and their- brigadier wondered whether they would  have the spirit to get up arrd attack  when the hour, arrived- But when  the .moment came they rose and went  forward, and fought'-through the last  goal���������splendid and wonderful!  They were the first to get to  Grandcourt trench, which lay between  them and Boom Ravine. The wire was  not'cut, and there was. a Hammering  of machine guns and the swish o)  machine gun bullets.  This battalion had already lost all  the officers, who had gone forward  gallantly/leading their men and  meeting the bullets first. A .���������������������������sergeant  major took command, shouted to his  men to keep steady, and found a gap  through the wire- They found their  way through, , ��������� passed Grandcourt  trench, aiid,- with other men, dropped  into Boom  Ravine.  This place is a deep gully, almost  parallel with Grandcourt trench, and  with South Miraumont trench . beyond. Before War came���������even last  summer, indeed���������it was like a Devonshire lane, with, steep sloping  banks, thirty to forty feet high, and  ��������� trees growing on either side with  overhanging roots.' It was hot "like  a Devonshire lane when our men  scrambled and fell down its banks.  It was a ravine of death. Our shell  fire had smashed down all the trees,  and 'their tall trunks lay at the bottom of the gully and their branches  were" flung about.  The banks had been opened out by  shell craters and several of the German dugouts built into the sides of  them were upheaved or choked. Dead  bodies or human fragments lay  among the branches and broken  woodwork. A shell of ours had entered one dugout and blown six dead  men out of its doorway. They  sprawled there at the entrance. Inside were six other dead.  From dugouts not blown up or  choked came groups of German soldiers, pallid and nerve broken, who  gave themselves up quickly enough-  But the battle was not over yet. It  had only just begun.. While " Boom  Ravine was being cleared of its living inhabitants by the first wave of  .English soldiers (they were men of  London and the southern counties),  other waves were coming up; or,  rather, not waves, but odd groups of  men, dodging over the shell cralcrs,  and hunting as they went for German snipers, who lay in their holes  firing until they were pinned by bayonet points.  Some of them pretend to be dead  when our men came near. One of  them lay still, with his face ' in the  moist earth. "See that that ���������man is  properly dead," said an officer, and a  soldier with him pricked the man. He  sprang up with a scream and ran  hard  away���������lo  our  lines.  Six prisoners came trudging back  from the ravine with a slightly  wounded man as an escort. On the  ���������way back they found themselves very  lonely with him, and passed some  lifles lying iu llicir way- They seized the rifles and became firing men  again until a little Welsh officer met  them and killed every one of 'hem  with a revolver.���������Phillip Gibbs in the  London Chronicle.  To Help Production  Boys  and  Girls  Will do   Their Part  This  Year  Jiiclging by the large numbers of  entries received at 'Manitoba Agricultural College from boys and girls  who are'.taking' up the Boys' and  Girls' Club contests thiu year, the  young folks of this province will do  their full part in the way of production during 1917- Up to 'March 12th  the' nnnber of entries registered by  Mr, S.-T-' Newton', Superintendent of  the Clubs for the province,was as  follows: Manual Training (woodworking, etc-) 700; Seed Growing,  770; pig, calf, or colt.'raising, 800;  Vegetable Gardening, 2,300; Potato  Growing ' 2,177; Poultry, Raising,  1,960; Cookery, 850; Garment Making, 1,370; Vegetable Canning, 790;  Weed Studies, 910; Butfermaking,  260; Flower Growing, 1,280; Essay  Writing, 975. This is only a portion  of the total entry for the.year; the  names   are   coming  in   right  along.  The boys and girls entering these  contests will not be simple signers  of their names to application forms-  They have laid before them, in each  case, concrete undertakings of a  competitive nature,'and in each case,  where necessary, there is a manual  of practical instructions. The special bulletin on Seed Growing for instance, is a 24 page bulletin, of; the  'most, practical character, the sort of  bulletin, in fact, that thc.boy's father,  as well as the boy himself will find  of great value. That on Vegetable  Gardening is a 32 page bulletin, full  of the best sort of gardening advice;  and so on through other subjects.  Tlie boys and girls who enter these  contests are bound to acquire not  only the knowledge' which will come  to ���������'.them '.through' their own practical  experience, but also part of the best  that the Agricultural College has to  teach   them-  British Women  Making Planes  Play Great Part in Manuiacture of  All Kinds ot Aeroplanes  Women are now taking a large  share in the indu. ry which provides  one of the greatest assets of the forces on land and sea, in the form of  aeroplanes, war balloons, sea-planes  and  other atrial  scouts.       Not  only  In a German Prison  Returned  Soldier Tells    of-   Terrible  Experience at Ruhleben  Camp  W. E. Collins, a returned prisoner  at Ruhleben, gives the following account of the condition of. the Briti:  i.sh civilians'1 interned, there: "One  man," he states, "whom 1 knew well,  who has been- 13 weeks in a Berlin  prison, and whom''I  -watched  becom  Sub. Campaign  In Its True Light  are they to be seen* in those sections] ing insane, has died in a London asy-  p.   the   aircraft  industry < where   their) lum.     Another   man     had   been     for  Measuring1 Hay-  Easy  Method  of Finding the  Number  of-Cubic  Feet in  a  Stack  Circular No. 67 of the Office of the  Secretary, United Stales Department  of Agriculture, gives a method for  measuring the number''-of cubic feel  in   a   round  stack  of  hay-     The  fact  help might have  been    expected    rn  pre-war times, such as in cutting out,  sewing,  painting and varnishing/   the  fabric'for aeroplane  wings,  but  they  are supplementing the men in the essential   engineering  operations.'���������'.���������.'The  most important part, of an aeroplane  ���������its  heart,   so   to   speak���������is   the   engine, the construction of which calls  for the utmost accuracy. . Women are  now entrusted  with    much    of    this  work and are undertaking the milling  of the top and the grinding of the inside of the "engine cylinders, and they  are  also  engaged on  machining    the  connecting rods, the valves, the i*is-  tons, and the holding down bolls.  , These   processes   are   often   carried  out  lo  an accuracy-- of " half-a-thou-  sandth  of  an   inch,  that is,     to  one-  eighth of the thicknes sof an average  human  hair,  a    measurement    which  can only be guaged by the most ingeniously,   constructed    instruments.  Women are further employed in   the  aceto-wclding    process    where    conscientious and intelligent work is imperative, since upon the soundness ot  the joints depends the safety of the  machine and the life    of  .the    flying  man.    Such services    may    be    best  offered by those of the educated classes  whose    previous    experience  fits  them  for deftness of      manipulation,  keenness   of  observation,   and   accuracy of judgment.-  A Scheme to Promote Thrift  Working  Out  Plans    to    Encourage  People to Save Money  A British, committee that is 'pro-  moling thrift has been taking opinions as to the desirability of dispelling with all retail shop window displays���������the idea being, of course, to  remove" all suggestions for spending  money' except such as come from .the,  natural promptings of cold and' hunger.     Opinions of London merchants  that  the  method  as grven rrr   the  cir-i ,    ��������� ,    ,, ,- ��������� <    .     ,.     -,  ...i,.  :.   ,.,.,,���������,i     ; .i I  ,;    i   are decidedly unlavorable lo the )dca  cular   )������ ,stated     in   rather     technical I.    , ... ., T....i_..i.i. ji.. .���������  ,  terms,   renders  it  desirable  to  reduce  the  principles    revolved    to  ordinary  language.    This   can   be  done   as  foi  lows:  First measure the total height of  the stack. The publication ���������mentioned gives a simple method for accomplishing this. Then measure the  height from .the ground to the  shoulder of the stack. The shoulder  is the widest part of the stack; or, if  the sides run tip straight for a distance, it is the point where the top  begins to draw in- Subtract the  height of the shoulder from the total height of the stack, to obtain the  height of the top of the stack above  the shoulder. Multiply the circumference of tlie stack at the ground  by half the. height above the shoulder; add tlie two products together,  and multiply the sum by one-twelfth  of the circumference at the shoulder. The result will ".be the number  of cubic feet in the stack.  Ship Losses in Former Wars  . It may be useful, as placing in better perspective the extent and nature  of the danger with which trade and  shipping arc threatened, to cite, from  a French source, the figures of losses of merchantmen in previous  great struggles in which we have  been engaged. In the wars arising  out of the League of Augsburg, 4,000  British merchant ships were lost;  1,300 fell victims in the War of the  Spanish Succession, and 2,500 in the  Seven Years' War; while iu the Great  French War, when the enemy's efforts were specially directed to the  destruction of our commerce, although 2,400 British ..vessels were  taken or sunk, our merchant fleet  was found to be more numerous at  the end than in the beginning of hostilities.���������The  Scotsman.  "You-waltz beautifully, Mr- Flubdub.    Where did you learn?"  "I practiced with a revolving door.  I find that better than a chair-"���������  Philadelphia Bulletin.  Sugar Abstinence Advocated  Food Expert Tells of    the    Harmful  Effect of too Much Sweet.Food  The war promises another blessing in disguise���������according to food  authorities. The rise in the price of  sugar, along with the restrictions  that have been in full force for  months in Great' Britain regulating  its sale, have brought forth sonic  protests, but mainly apologists for  the advantages that will follow the  war if a restricted consumption' is  maintained.  F.ustice Miles, one of the foremost  food experts in London, Englano,  gives it as his opinion that indirectly  an excess in its use results in tire  deterioration of the teeth and bones,  and in a large number of other troubles, which are usually put down to  some other cause.  "I am not speaking here," lie adds,  "of the fact that sugar may become  alcohol���������so that many teetotallers,  who pride themselves on their "abstinence," but indulge in gross excess  of sugar and sugary things, should  really be arrested for the possession  of illicit private distilleries within  themselves. I am speaking of certain  definite signs and symptoms which  result largely from regular and continued excess of sugar and other  carbohydrates.  "Up to a certain point let good  sugar be taken, but let it be realized  that, as sugar is taken now to excess, it is largely a stimulant and is  also a cause bf many all too common troubles.  "H,ow much better it would be if  people had less of the white sugar  and sweets, etc., and more of the  crisp foods (such as potato chips,  toast, fried bread, biscuits, rusks,  etc-), in so far as they really need  carbohydrates."  and it docs undoubtedly go to an unreasonable extreme.  Ou the other hand, in time of/peace  the suggestions to spend outnumber  the suggestions to save a hundred to  one. Any; retail street offers to the  eye ten thousand ways of disposing  of- the money in one's pocket; while  if one seeks a .way of keeping the  money he has to hunt it up.  Recently some widely known men  in. New York organized a- company  that proposes to buy government and  municipal bonds',' deposit then) with  a trustee, and issue against "them  saving certificates in denominations  as low as ten dollors,Which, in cooperation with department stores, cigar shops drug stores and so on, will  be offered for sale as nearly as possible wherecver people go to spend  money, so the man or woman with  ten spendable dollars will have right  at hand the suggestion that it may  be safely and conveniently disposed  of without exchanging.It' for merchandise.  The chief .objection to the plan is  that $10 is too high a'.minimum unit.  Probably a 'combination of savings  banks could work out a scheme  whereby savings certificates���������for as  little as $1 could be had in any city  as conveniently, say," as a bundle of  cigars or a round of drinks���������and the  fact that they were obtainable could  be kept constantly in the public's���������cyc.  True, there would be little-or iro  direct profit to those who issued the  certificates or sold them, but the indirect profit, in the long rim; might  be large���������Saturday Evening Post.  seven months in a German prison,  and others I often spoke with, have  been in five or six different jails in  solitary confinement and) from . four  o'clock in the afternoon until ''.eight  o'ciock the next morning, in. total  darkness. My own cell was three  I.aces by two. We were given biead  and water and treated like'Criminals'.  The sanitary arrangements were too  awful for description. The exercise  allowed amounted to 20 miniits pe  day in a yard 17 paces by 13.  .  Describing the  partings       between  the interned  ..men    and  their,  wives  rnd  families,  Mr.   Collins   continued.  "Eleven  of us  Liverpool cotton men  happened  to" be living in Bremen    at  that time.     We were .taken in Black  Marias  to   the  railway  station,  given  over  to   the   military,   and   told   that  we  had   to  obey  orders  or  be  shor.  A   c.crtain  lieutenant    had ' told    his  men  thai if    he    had     his     way    he  would shoot the lot of us" arrd    give  our  wives   and  womenfolks   -over   tj  the soldiery.    On the way to  Ruhleben we had noil.ing to cat or drink,j  and   on  arriving    there"   we     wished  ourselves back in prison, for wc had  to lie night, after night on wet straw-  sacks  on   the  stone  floor,  under  the  grandstand of the race course.  Those  who  lay   close  to  the  windows    had  their clothes frozen to the windows.  Then   wc   were   removed     to     stable  lofts, full  of rats and  mice, . and    to  horse boxes, with  four  sacks   to, five  men,  bullied  about all   the  time   "by  brutal soldiers."  It was .awful   Lo see  the crippled men carried about in tire  c;mp.  One day  I saw a man   cut his  throat.  Sometimes we. had to line up  17 times a day in slush, rain and cold.  And. the awful food!    Wc were allowed one slice of bread every 24  hours,  and what-we'had at dinner time was  rot  worth   eating.      The coffee was  made from acorns.    1 have been back  some time now, but I never feel like  a  released  man."  Irish Chaplain Makes  A Daring Capture  The Boy Who Didn't Pass  A sad-faced little fellow sits alone in  deep  disgrace,  There's a lump arising in  his  throat  and  tears stream  dovvrr his  face;  He wandered from his playmates, for  he doesn't want to hear  Their shouts of merry laughter since  the world has lost its cheer,  He has sipped the cup of sorrow, he  has drained  the bitter glass,  And his heart is fairly breaking; he's  the boy who didn't pass.  In the apple tree the robin sings a  cheery little song,  But he doesn't seem lo hear it, showing plainly something's wrong;  Comes his faithful little spaniel for a  romp and  bit  of play,  But the troubled little fellow sternly,  bids him go away,  And alone he sits in sorrow, with his  hair a tangled mass,  And his eyes are red with weeping;  he's  the boy who didn't pass.  Oh,   you   who   boast   a  laughing   son  and  speak  of hiiii  as   bright,  And you** who  love a  little girl   who  comes to you tonight.  With  smiling  eyes  and dancing  feet,  with honors from her school,    Turn  to  that  lonely  little  boy    who  I thinks  he  is a  fool,  The French cabinet has decided on I And take him kindly by the hand, the  a  reduction in the. size  of  the  coun'-j dullest in   the  class;  try's daily newspapers.    Most of the! He is the one who'most needs love���������  Lord Robert Cecil Answers the German Chancellor  Lord Robert Cecil, the British  Blockade Minister, made ��������� reply to  the utterances of Dr. von Bcthrnahii  Hollweg, the German imperial chancellor, in a statement to the Associated Press. ' ~  "The German Chanccllor: claims  that Germany in the past renounced  the unrestricted use of her submarine -weapon in ,the expectation tint  Great Britain could be made to observe in her ," blockade policy] ' the  laws of humanity and international  agreements," said Lord Robert,. "It  is difficult to say whether this statement is the more remarkable for it.-*  hypocrisy or for its falseness. Jt  would hardly seem.that Germany is  in a position" to speak of humanity-. "  or international--agreements, - since  she began this war by deliberately  violating the international'agreefiTeht  guaranteeing' the neutrality of,- Bel-'-  glum and has continued, it by violating .all  lire-dictates ,of humanity.  "Has'the Chancellor forgot'err that -  the  German  foices  have-been  guilty"  of  excesses  in  Belgium, unparalleled  in    history,    culminating  -in,    tire attempted   enslavement  of a. da'unlles***  people,    of poisoning wells,  of bombarding ope'rr towns, torpedoing hos-   ���������  pital  ships  and   sinking other" vessels  with total disregard for the, safely of  non-combatants on board,    with    the  result  that  many  hundreds    of  innocent   victims," including   both   women .  and  children,,have lost their lives?  "Ihe   latest   manifestation-    of   this'"  Policy is-to   be   seen   in   the"-, devasta -  lion  and  deportations  carried sou1   by  the   Germans   in   their, forced   retreat*  on the'western front.    Tire Chancel-   .  lor  stales   that   it   is   because   the- allies have not abandoned Iheir blockade   and   have  refused   the   .so-called  peace   offer, of .Germany     that  unre- -  striclcd   sumbarinc   warfare   is     now  decided on.    As  lo  this  I  will  do no  more than quolc'what the Chancellor'  himself said in  the   Reichstag     when -.  announcing   the   adoption ' of     unrs-  slricted   submarine   war'.  "He said that as soon as he himself, Jn agreement with the supreme  army command, reached the conviction that ruthless U-boat warfare  would bring Germany nearer to a  victorious peace, then the U-boat  varfare would be started. He continued:  "This moment has now arrived.  Last autumn the lime was not* ripe,  but today '.he moment has come  when, with the -greatest prospect of  Success, wc can undertake this enterprise . ' We must" hot "wait any  longer. Where has there been a  change? In the first place the most  important fact of all is that the -  number of our submarines has been'  very considerably increased as conr-  pE.red with last spring, aiid' thereby  a firm., basis has . been created for  success.".  ^"Does not this' prove conclusively  that it was not any scruple or any  'respect Tor: international law or. "neutral "rights that prevented unrestricted warfare, from being adopted earlier,,but merely a lack of means -to  carry it put. 1 think it may  be useful once again to point out  that the illegal and inhuriian attack  on ..'shipping by the Germans cannot  be justified as a reprisal for the action of Great Britain in attempting  their hands held up in token of! to cut off from Germany all imports,  ndcr. ������������������'.���������'���������'" I     "The    submarine    campaign      was  clearly contemplated as far back as  December,. 1914, when Admiral . von���������  1 irpitz gave an indication-- to an :  American correspondent in Berlin of  the projected plan. As for the plea  that the allies are aiming at . the  annihilation bf Germany and her allies and that ruthless warfare . is  therefore justified, it is sufficient m  Older to refute this to quote the following passage from the allies' reply  bf January 10, 1917, to /President  Wilson's note:  '.'There is no need to say that if  the allies desire "to liberate Europe  from the brutal covctousness..- of  Prussian militarism,' the 'extermination and political disappearance of  the German people has never, as has  been pretended, formed a part of  their  design."  "The allusion made to Russia by  the German Chancellor can hardlyk  be treated seriously. A government  o? Hohenzollerns cannot pose as the  champions- of freedom and self-  government as against autocracy.  When the German people enjoy the .  benefits of a truly representative  government, and are no longer dominated by a military autocracy, Germans may appear in that role, ~but  not  until   then."  Paris papers had already decreased  the size of their publications. A further curtailment will possibly result  in some appearing in the -form of a  silicic  sheet.  the boy who didn't pass.  ���������Michigan   Christian   Advocate.  Sunshine will  eventually  *��������� the thickest cloud-  puncture  With Party of Dublin Fusiliers    He  Persuaded Germans  to Surrender  The exploit of a Roman Catholic  chaplain who, with eighteen enthusiastic Irishmen, brought in "450 very  thankful, if sonic what dejected, Germans," was referred to by Sir Philip  Sassoon in a recent speech at Folkestone. ' A reliable correspondent  states that the hero of the. incident,  home on furlough, has just been welcomed by the parishioners of a milling hamlet in Lanarkshire.  It is slated that a party of the Dub.  lin Fusiliers, accompanied by.the padre, when returning", from a reconnoitring expedition, were assailed- by  rifle lire from a wood where it was  known the enemy were entrenched.  They immediately sought the refuge  of shell holes, and from there fired a  round .of shots at the wood. Evidently the fire proved effective; for three  Germans emerged from the Wood  with thei  surre  The chaplain advanced to meet the  trio,-.'and. informed them that one of  their number could return to the  wood aiid give the remaining Germans the assurance that their lives  would be-spared if they surrendered.  The German ''who had been deputed  to give the message to his compatriots promptly left, but as he failed to  return after a reasonable interval, the  "Dubs" tried the effect of another  volley. Then two more Germans  came out, and a repetition of the fire  brought but another, trio-  Encouraged by these repeated .evidences of the spirit of surrender, the  chaplain decided to enter the wood  and see the officer in charge of the  .enemy. He did so, and the result of  his enterprise was that 450 Germans  offered   to  surrender.  They emerged from the thicket, bnt  when confronted with only 18 Fusiliers���������and not an entire battalion, as  they probably surmised���������a number of  them sought to return to the wood,  with the obvious intention of renewing the combat. The "Dubs," however, sent a bullet or two in the direction of the retreating soldiers and  soon dispelled all notions of retaliation.  It is stated that one of the German  officers approached the chaplain and  asked, that he might be spared the  horrors of torture. At the same time  he significantly pointed-lo a bundle of  banknotes which he held in his extended hand. The retort, apt though  it was���������"We are British soldiers, sir,  and not thieves"���������was capped by a  stalwart Fusilier standing near, who  doubtless chagrined to see so much  money unsecured by lock and key, interjected: "Give that to me, me son,  and Oi'll take care of you and yerj  receipts."  It is also stated that a second German officer handed to the chaplain an  Iron Cross of the 2nd class.  A man seldom gets so full of emotion that he has no room for dinner.  The  Warfare   Savages  The contrast between German and  English . blockade methods could,  have had no more striking illustration. It is well to bear in mind that  the ships sunk by Germany are always unarmed merchantmen. The  Kaiser's submarines keep clear of the  "British navy and avoid armed vessels. They arc not seeking combat  hut ruthless destruction- It has  been said in fancied extenuation of  Ihcse attacks, that the use Of the undersea boat is- a new r.ode of warfare. The instrument is-new, but the  kind of warfare in which the Germans use it is precisely that employed by-savages since the dawn of history.���������New  York Times. . ,  \  /������������������'  n mmrm^m^^i^  w ...**.*  *,.HV^"*- ���������������"%  ~i?.ra  :> ifpf''$%>!*������&*  ?*iV'i&.~~5.  ���������y&+j!  ���������.-���������V-V -- '  "-<- :���������.'- it?  :$-il  THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      B.      C.  Assisting  The Farmer  An Experiment in Credit and What  Came of It  An illuminating example of how a  city community can increase its own  prosperity by helping the surrounding agricultural population - to increase theirs is to be found in the  success that has attended Lethbridge  Alberta, in its scheme for advancing  livestock to farmers. Lethbridge is  not a large city, measured alongside  of New York, Chicago, and other  types of the skyscraper class, but it  . hopes to be some day; and it has  -wisely recognized that until it can  get on to the plane where it will  .grow by its own impetus, it cannot  '.do better than increase the wealth-  producing power of its rural territory..^.  Recognizing, loo, thai the livestock  -industry is the foundation of all true  agricultural    wealth,    if    formulated  some  three' years  ago a "scheme  for  F-eJping the fanners whose trade came  ���������to" Lethbridge  to    become    livestock  -owners.  "A  number    of    Lethbridge  '    business  men���������retailers,    wholesalers  ,. and     professional      men���������guaranteed  $150 each   to  form   a  credit  with    a  bank,   paying   five   per  cent,   in- cash  and giving*  their notes  for  the      remainder^   It  was   not  expected .that  .' the  guarantors  would  make  any  direct profits; in fact,'no dividends were  -promised,    and  ,as    far as wc knovv  none have  been paid.  This, credit being put into the  hands of trustees, applications' were  accepted from a number pf farmers,  and a number of cattle- and hogs  uere bought. It is a noteworthy fact  ahal seventj*-five per cent. . of these  leans have already been repaid. Th.s  scheme, now commonly known as  the "Lethbridge" scheme, was; because of its success, adopted by othc.-  Weslern Canadian city communities.  Its success demonstrated lo the farming community generally that it  i.culd be good business if more far  mers could borrow on__livestock purchases under lien. The United Fa -  liters of A-lberta took the matter "up  ���������at their 1916 convention, and obtained  from the Dominion government an  amendment to Bank Act, whcicby  ���������chartered banks are enabled to make  such liens. Any reputable farmer  inay now arrange with his own banker to increase his livestock operations, and the bank manager can feel  ���������--���������.fc iu  lending the money.  Where the Weather is Cold  86 Below Zero Was   Alaska   Record  Made  This Year  The coldest temperatures since accurate records have been kept in  Alaska have been recorded al various  points in the territory during the past  winter. .   ���������  The record for the coldest spot in  North America goes to Birches, on  the Yukon, a short distance below  Tanana. At this station a special  spirit thermometer of the type used  in arctic research registered 86 degrees' below zero on January 6 of  this year.  Lasl summer a temperature of 92  degreed- above zero was recorded at  Birches, making a difference of 172  degrees between the warmest and  coldest days in a period of less than  six mouths. It is difficult for persons  who have not experienced, temperatures colder than 50 below to realize  the effect of the extreme cold.  At 80 below zero cold water thrown  into the air-clatters to the ground in  frozen-hail; iron or steel touched lo  the flesh will inflict a more serious  burn "than when heated to 200' de  grces above zero; in ordinary mere  ury thermometers the mercury runs  down into the bulb and then freezes;  animals breathe in short gasps and  unless they can. reach shelter soon  succumb, the air freezing the inner  lining of their lungs; travelling is out  of the question, biit few are caught  out in extreme cold weather, for at  the first sign bf the thermometer going below 50 mushers seek "shelter.  Temperatures from 60 to 70 below  have been common.  Extreme temperatures were also  noted in Anchorage, with 45 below,  al Valdcz, 24 below, and at Seward,  terminal of'the government railroad,  14 below.  The Greatest Asset  -   Of Democracy  The greatest contribution (it says)  thai Great Britain has made to the  war is not, the number of men she  has put in the field, or the munitions  she has turned out, or the ships  which have sailed the seas, but the  unbroken front, solidarity, a stubborn tenacity of the nation as a  ������������������...hole. That is a true picture of the  English which every one knows instinctively to be true- The confusion  is in technique, and thai is. unimportant.    There   are   nations   that   might  How and When  To Get Gophers  ot  at  J.  H.  Grisdale,  Director-General  Experiment Farms, Issues  Timely Bulletin  At the experimental station  Scott, Saskatchewan, during the summer of 1915, it was discovered that  gophers caused a loss of 11 bushels  and 5 pounds per acre in the case of  osts, and 18 bushels and 21 pounds in  the case of barley- The records from  which these losses -were estimated  were made between parts of the fields  run"the "war belter, "but there is'not   that were attacked and other parts in  Wine in War Time  Tl is slated that the French government  has1 requisitioned  for   the   pur-  -poses of the army a-very substantial  '"��������� proportion of the vintage production.  In France, therefore, wine has assumed a military importance, for no less  than 200,000,000 gallons of wine from  Ihe  country,  together with 40,000,000  .gallons   from  her    Algerian    colony,  have been* reserved for the use of the  ���������soldier-    It   would appear that    each  officer and  man receives daily half a  litre of  wine.      This  allowance    has  been   adopted  since   the  war    began,  imd the authorities arc convinced that  it  has  contributed  to   the  health  and  efficiency  of   the  troops    through    a  campaign   conducted   under .very trying conditions.    The  reasonable consumption of the wine of the country  (vin  ordinaire)   is  evidently  regarded  as   beneficial   rather   than   demoralizing.���������London  Lancet-  General Cadorna  When Lord Northcliffe talks about  Cadorna  there  is a  hint    of    a very  merry luncheon at which  the Italian  generalissimo-kept- the table, a mused  all the time   "Here is ��������� the_description  of  the  cheerful    general: .A     short,  lithe, quick-moving man of sixty-five,  General ..Cadorna is the most humorous, of all  the  generals in the  Great  War-    He lias a glitter irr his    grey  eyes   that   reminded   me  of   those   of  the  late  Pierpont  Morgan.    He is  a  general who    believes    in seeing for  himself   He took personal part in the  direction of the final battle for Gori-  zia, climbing the ghastly hill of Pod-  gora with the vigor of an Alpini-    He  is a close student of wai*, and he has  al! the subtlety of the Italian.    In the  long  story  of   the  war  he  is '.almost  the  only general who  devised a surprise-  The Sausage Mystery  Lord Devonport has decided thai*  thc* sausage is meat. That shows a  degree-of confidence which generations have denied to anybody but the  'maker of the sausage himself  Henceforth the butcher, in face of  talk about the mystery of the sausage, may refer to the authority of  ihe Food Controller, and Sam Wel-  ler's dictum that it is "the seasoning  that does it" is deposed from authority. And yet we are left wondering, if the sausage be meat and  nought else, how it is that Smitli-  lU'ld will sell sausages at 8d a pound  when it demands Is 4d for the mcyt  from which they are presumably  made.���������Westminster   Gazette.  Testing: the Herd  How to Make Cows- Sure of a Better  Profit  The man familiar with cows may  make a fairly close estimate of what  any one in a given herd will give,  possibly per day, per month or per  year. Does it follow she is the "best  cow?" It depends somewhat on what  the owner is after;-he may look-'for  a large flow of milk, he may require  plenty of cream, or, wisely, he may  expect a substantial profit above the  cost of feed. So your cows, as a  herd, may "average" 6,000 pounds of  milk and 200 pounds of fat, but is  each one earning "a good profit?  Cow testing, checking up each individual, will answer this and many  other questions. It will also help, as  it has helped many dairymen, lo add  at least 50 per cent, to their income  from the same number "of cows, because "they keep those that are  known to be efficient. Y'our average  may be 7,000 pounds, but in three  years perhaps you can make it over  10,000 pounds, but it won't be unless  each, one is up to a good standard.  Write the Dairy Commissioner, Ottawa, for milk record forms. Y'our  letter does not need a postage stamp.  one that- could be more trusted to  win the war, and that, after all, is  the thing that counts. To be sure  of this you have only to consider  what would happen to the Allies if  England deserted them, and what  England would do if the Allies deserted her. She would go ou alone,  as she has been known to do before. England denouncing herself a.-s  i.iefficient is yet the greatset moral  asset of democracy in Europe���������New  Y ork Times.  The Scotsman's Porridge  High Price of Oatmeal Has Brought  Forth a Strong Protest  In July, 1914, the price-of oatmeal  in Great Britain was 2s 6d per stone  of fourteen pounds (50c), today it is  5s 2d ($1-20). What was then a  common foodstuff is now a luxury,  and a Scotsman thus relieves his  feelings on the situation by "writing  to the papers:" "The decadence of  the race has begun. The prohibitive price of porridge will, if not  amended downwards, result in a serious diminution of the brain power of  the Empire. Oatmeal and theology  have yielded a harvest of deep  thinkers and hard workers for the.  world. -Carlyle's radicalism was due  lo his oatmeal and buttermilk- -Robbie Burns sang best when he did not  know the taste of "barley' brec," and  vent to the plow after being fed on  vholcsome milk and porridge. 'Ihe  glory of the-Scottish Manse is Lut  another name for the virtues of oatmeal. It behooves; the government to  recognize that the" new soldiers going off to Flanders will be terribly  tl'in unless kept up with porridge in  plenty, well boiled, and well-dripped  ir milk. The government has committed a grave mistake in not regu-  1 ting the price of oatmeal and will  j. o out of power at the first throw <*f  the political ballot box, for at the  next election Scotland will hold the  casting vote in Ihe deliberations of  parliament. We will make politics  hot until we can get our .porridge  ence more at a price that will enable  ihe dishes to go all round the table"  Seed Garden of Canada  Lord Cromer and the Bible  Bible  knew  -His  gave  One fact concerning Lord Cromer  seenrs ^to have escaped his biographers.' He was one of the most  thorough students of the  among public men, and he  many portions of it by heart-  long association with Egypt  the Old Testament a special'interest  for him. -Lord Northbrook, his  cousin, whom he served as private  secretary in his young' days, w;as a  deep Biblical student,".and wrote,, iri  his later 'years, a small book entitled  "The Teaching of Jesus Christ in  His Own Words," which was intended to be helpful to* the natives of  India. By the way, I have not seen  it mentioned that even late in life  Lord Cromer and his brother's called  each other "Major," "Minor," and  "Minimus," " as they' did when at  school together.���������Westminster Gazette-  *'/.,���������  Big  the  Permanent    Industry    for  Okanagan  Valley  According to officials of the Canadian Seed Branch, the Okanagan Valley, B.C., promises to become the  seed garden of Canada. Before the  war most of the seeds used in Canada came from Belgium, France, and  Germany. This supply has been  largely cut off and the question of  getting sufficient seed has been a  serious matter. One of the most  difficult problems has been to gel  sufficient sugar beet seed which before the outbreak of hostilities was  nea-riy all shipped from Belgium arrd  Germany.  Experiments have been made in  the raising of seed in the Okanagan  ���������Valley, and this year several carloads of sugar beet seed will be procured. This, along with several other  valleys with similar climate, are the  most ideal in Canada for seed raising  and are the equal of California points,  the only places hitherto able to compete with Europe. Officials in Ottawa believe it will develop into a big  permanent industry.-,, At present  prices arc high, and there is no doubt  that profits will be made. For in-1  stance, sugar beet is 22 cents a pound  as compared with six cents before the  war. Whether the Canadian growers  will be able lo continue to compete  with the European countries after the  war depends largely on the labor  market.  The Limit of Music  Little Andrew is a clever little chap  and possesses a very sweet voice.  The other night, therefore, he was  chosen to sing at a hobo concert in  London and obliged them with an old  favorite, "Kathleen Mavournecn,"  which he sang very sweetly indeed,  cape destruction by the undersea i-t;s rendering of one line, however,  boats. For a submarine to fire on <"r-*iC 'orn 0f the hunter is 'card on  the birds would be to warn approach- ule >\\\;> jarred very much on the,  ing ships. and> to excite the birds to nerves of one man, and when con-  still more shrieking. gratulating hint afterward he mentioned that he really ought to put a  few "aitches" in now and then.  Tell-Tale Sea Gulls  The curious fact has been noted,  according to London Tit-Bits, that  sea gulls are one of the most dangerous foes German submarines have  to fear, and there is no known defence against these birds. When the s-ja  gulls catch sight of even the periscope of a submarine at sea they rise  from the water and circle about it  screaming loudly and for as long as  the periscope is visible to their sharp  eyes. By this-means many ships at  sea have been warned in  time to es-  which they worked no  damage  This information appears in Bulletin No. 31,-second series, "of the Experimental farms, prepared by J.H.  Grisdale, , director-general, Expert  mental farms. The bulletin consists  of a''compilation of the most useful  information available- The gopher, it  is stated, is extremely fond of tench r  grain plants and will travel long distances to reach them. It has many  natural enemies among which are  coyotes, badgers, skunks, weasels,  snakes, hawks and owls. Methods  of control or extermination recommended are poisoning, shooting, trap,  ping, snaring, drownir.g and suffocating. Of these methods poisoning is  regarded as the most effective- Specific instructions are contained for.  preparing aid distributing poisoned  grain, and the precautions necessary  to protect farm^animals, children and  others are recommended. Other  methods of destruction are slated to  be less effective and more expensive.  .Co-operation of various agencies  such as rural municipalities and farmers' unions are recommended along  with the offering of prizes to the  young people of the community for  the destruction of these pests. Local  farmers' unions have adopted the  plan of setting apart a day known as  "gopher day," when the whole community deciares war on the gopher.  This plan is recommended in this bulletin, copies of which are available  on application to the publications  branch, department of agriculture, at  Ottawa-  Why Did the Kitchen Stair?  A Little Misunderstanding That Was  Amicably  Settled  ��������� Why did the kitchen stair? Because the potato was making eyes at  her and wanted to mash her. The  bread was for toasting her, and the  lemon actually wanted to squeeze  her- The meat saw it all, and ground  its teeth. The milk turned very sour  at this, and went off to catsup.  Meanwhile the yeast was rising, but  felt such a current of air that he  dropped plum into the ice crcan"i7  and.'lo be candied, there was no raisin him.  "I never was in such a pickle," said  the vinegar- "It makes me hot all  over," said the pepper. "I am all  curled up with fright," said the parsley. -"I am all a quiver," said the  jelly. "Things certainly are pretty  well mixed," said the mustard. "Oh!  I don't know," said the black tea, "I  have seen it more so" "Eggactly,"  said the omelet.  While the sugar looked sweetly at  the butter, who was in a melting  mood, and gave her a flour, which  she kneaded to freshen her up a bit.  "Well, you may talk as you like,"  said the nutmeg, "but my troubles  arc grater-"  "Oh! cut it," said the knife. "Stick  to it," said the fork. "I think you all  need a good basting," said the spoon-  Then came a lot of sauce from the  pan, which made the kettle so boiling  mad that she fairly spluttered, ard  cc-lled for the sage of the kitchen,  who agreed with Miss Marjoram  that all. this, was very un-savorv, and  it was thyme it was stopped, or they  would: all rue it.  Then there was peas.,  Boy Scout Notes  Good  Health Essential to  the -Well-  Being of Every Boy  News   of  the  death  of  Her  Royal  Highness the Duchess of Connaught  was received with regret by the Boy*  Scouts   throughout   Canada    and   Sir  Percy    Sherwood,       the      Dominion  Commissioner    and    Mr,   Gerald  H.  Brown,    the     Honorar3'      Dominion  Secretary  on "behalf   of   the     Scouts  forwarded   the   following   cablegram:  "Respectfully    tender    sincere < sympathy of Canadian  Boy Scouts,"    to  which   His   Royal   Highness   replied:  "All   Boy Scouts grateful  thanks-"  ��������� Good   health   is   essential     to     the  well-being of ever}- boy.    This is no   ,  secret   in   Scouting   circles.       Scouts  arc   shown   how   to   keep   themselves  fit,  and   taught  that  fitness   is  essential to success in life-    At Scout age  (12 to 18)  the great decisions of life  and   character  arc   made.     The    boy  must be prepared but he will not be  properly  prepared  unless   he  is  physically fit.    At  this   period  the body  grows   rapidly,   the   muscles     harden,  the voice  breaks  and  the   organs   of  reproduction  begin  to function-    The  new powers' of manhood are coming  to   birth,   the   fires   of   new   passions  are   burning   in   his   blood.     Scouting  corrres   to   the   rescue    and    supplies  him with opportunities    of    physical  activity.    Most of his Scouting activities  are  conducted  in  the  open-     In  the summer months he goes to camp  and .during  the  winter     months     he  goes on hikes.    In addition  he takes  part in almost  every known  form  of  athletics.     He   trains   in   the  gymnasium-       He    learns   to   box,  wrestle,  fence   and   do     many     other     things  which arc a benefit to him physically.  From many foreign countries come  encouraging     reports     of       Scouting  progress.     From   France   and     Italy  reports  show that Scouts  have been  ably performing public services similar  to   those   rendered  in   this  country-     Iri   Roumania  where  there    are  some* 6,000   Scouts,   the     good,   war  ���������-.sork done by the boys has been the  subject   of  comment   in     the    press.  Some lost their lives  on duty during  the   aerial   raids  on   Bucharest.       In  Holland   the   two   existing     societies  have   been   combined   into   one.       In ..  Uruguay  the   formation  of  a  society  for   Catholic   Boy   Scouts   has    been  reported.  Decline of Drunkennss  in Great Britain  Reduction in Four Years More Than  Half the Aggregate Number ..  of Convictions  The London Times in an .editorial  on "the decline of drunkenness,''  says :  "Police returns of convitions for  drunkenness in large towns in Great  Britain for the last four years show  a reduction of more than one-half  the aggregate number of convictions,  there being 158,831 in 1913 and 77,-  396 in 1916. The reduction has occurred almost wholly in the last three  years, or during the war, the fall between 1913 and 1914 being only  ;.bout 3,000, while in London there  was actually a rise of 200. In the  next twelve months the aggregate  reduction was 300,000, and in the year  just passed the reduction from 1913  increased  more  than  40,000.  "These remarkable facts show that  there never was so great a reduction  spread over so large a population in  the same space of time. There is  evidence that the diminution of public drunkenness is not offset by an  increase of private drunkenness, for  this, too, has diminished. When,  howev-er; we stop to determ.ne the  causes of the reduction, we arc confronted  with  difficulties.,  '  "The   first  and     foremost     is    the  vilhdrawal of    men     for    the army.  This enormous change cannot fail to  _ affect   the   state   of   the   streets.     On  A Poor Excuse the   othcr  hand>   the   -withdrawal    of  The  consumption  of 2,500,000 tons  n:en  by enlistment has in the indus-  -balanccc*  of barley per annum in "the manufac  ture of that which has only produced  national drunkenness, poverty, disease, crippled efficiency, and moral  degradation" does not admit of defence at any time, and under war  conditions it is altogether criminal.  It is said that a great amount of valuable food for stock is obtained as a  by-product of the malting of barley.  Assuming this to be so, it does appear a very roundabout way of utilizing barley as a food for stock. One  who has tested the point says that if  the feeding units of barley arc placed  at 92, the feeding units of the after-  malting products arc 28.64, or a loss  for feeding purposes of 71-64 per  cent, in the co-efficients of the original barley.���������The Scottish  Farmer.  To Fine Gossips on 'Phone Lines  The gossip in Ontario who listens  to a conversation on a rural telephone  line, and repeats it to the neighbors,  will have to pay a fine not exceeding  $25, if detected. * Operators who offend will also be punished in the  same way. A bill to this effect has  has been introduced in the legislature  by Hon. I. B. Lucas, Attorney-General.  Germany's Moral Isolation  The plain truth is that the moral!  isolation of Germany, in- this matter  of lawless and inhuman warfare at  sea, is complete. Whatever the action of neutrals may be, their feeling is unanimous. And it is nonsense to assert that this fact, when  it penetrates to the knowledge of the  German people, will not have its depressing effect. Bravado and boasting may prevail for the moment, but  in the end a nation even in desperate  mood must experience a sense of recoil and apprehension when it is  made aware that its policy goes counter to the deeply-rooted convictions  of the civilized world.���������Frorrr the  New  York   Evetring   Post.  'Gam!" said Andy, eyeing him with  pitv, "don't show ycr ignorance���������  don't yer know there ain't no H m  music? It only goes up to G!"��������� Chicago Herald.  "Old   Blank's   nieces   and   nephews  don't  dare balk  him  in   the  slightest  thing."  "He must have great will power."  "You   bet   he  has!       He  can    will  $5,000,000."  Dead Quiet  "Oh, where  can  rest be  found?"  A weary poet sighs,  That's easy.    Drop into a store  That does  not advertise.  Do Not Explain High Prices  At a lime when there is so much  discussion as to the price of potatoes,  figures compiled by the Bureau of  Census and Statistics at Ottawa,  throw some light on Canadian production.  The area planted in  1916 in    potatoes was 499,000 acres, compared with  479,000   acres  in   1915-     The   average  yield per acre last    year    was  136.21  against   130.85  for  1915.     The    total  yield  in   1916  was  61,229,000  bushels  compared  with   62,605,000     in     1915.  Potato exports last year were $1,424,-  ( 519 as against $506,302 in the corrcs-  | ponding  twelve months.       There    is  . little   in   the  figures   to   explain    the  j high   prices  which   now  obtain,    cs-  i pccially when over two million bush-  ! els  arc iu the country-  trial centres been counter-oaiancec  by the infhix of munition workers.  In these towns the war change would  rather tend to increase drunkenness.  In point of fact it did so for a time  in several of them. This one fact  goes to prove that whatever influence enlistment had, it cannot account for more than a part of the.  reduction.  "Female drunkenness has fallen as  well as male, far too heavily to be  explained away by any hypothesis  but that fewer women have been  drunk in the streets. The reduction  is considerably less than the men, ^s  it would naturally be, but is very  large. Moreover, nearly all of it took  place   in   1915     and     1916.      Bctwcc i  1914 and 1915 the number of female  convictions    dropped     but      between  1915 and 19.16 thev fell nearly 14,-  000.  "The great change which took  place between these two years Was  after the general application of restrictions by the liquor control  board. They were first appl:cd iti  August, 1915, and some improvement  followed in the second half of the  vear, but 1916 was the full year of  restrictions. The difference of female drunkenness between it and the  previous year is, wc believe, a fair  measure-of the effect."  ���������I  At an evening party the hostess had  coaxed a protesting guest to-sing. After the song she went up to him  smiling, "Oh, Mr. Jenkins," she said,  "you must never tell me again that  you can't sing���������I know now." ^|f^^|.i|pM?MW^|-^ilS  T 1 -������-r-.-*-> r >  T"1 1 - fl   TT  ill. L)A/-hJ  HEDLEY,      B.      &  ���������Wt^OBJtta^W^aWiriMLIi^W  L  A BKIGHT TOBACCO OF THE FINEST QUALITY  Jft CENTS PER PLUG  w**y>,*y*>' ���������:ww*T*",\Mi  r  Room  Nineteen'  BY ���������"  FLORENCE WARDEN  WARD, LOCK & CO.. IJM1TED  J  (Continued.)  It was bad enough to have lost the  sou; at least she would keep guard  over the father.  So she checked him as he began  to _ talk of going to the hotel, to the  shipping agent's office, lo this place  and that.  "Haven't you been lo the police  about him?" she .inquired, cutting  him short.  "Of course. Trial's where I sent  word the first thing, as soon as M.rs.  Lowndes brought .mc ... news this  morning that the boy had disappeared. His little bed was found empty,  and they think he must have, gone in  the early hours of the morning���������-or  that he was decoy.ed_.,away. I  thought of you at once. It would  be you he would think of, if he came  away on his own accord."  Mabin was crying still.  "Had you any suspicion of any���������-  any foul play?"  "Of course I had. Don't T,: know  that that scoundrel >Joc Wright  would be glad to make away with  the pair of us? Don't T-kuow that  he nearly succeeded with mc���������at  Fryer's office in the city? Haven't  I been saving myself up���������all these  weeks���������for nothing but the joy of  facing himyagain, of taking."the: cur  by the throat, and shaking him like a  rat, and after telling him what I  knoiy,  treating him as  lie deserves?"  As he uttered these words, which  seemed lo be ground out of him under the pressure of a deeply-seated  passion, Ciprian glared at the wall  before him with eyes bright with  fever, and as he spoke he clenched  his right hand and ground his teeth,  as if enjoying the revenge of which  he spoke. ^  "I don^t quite understand yet. What  is the position of things at Heath  'Hill?' FJon-'t tell me if you would  rather not talk. But. I'm iu the  dark you know. I've heard nothing  since. I was sent away by Lady  Moorhamptou."  Anxious as she was about poor little Julius, Mabin knew that' his father had done all that was possible in  going to the "police about him, aiid  therefore, thrusting aside her own  grief over the disappearance of the  child, she gave herself up to the care  of the man, being eager to detain  him until he had had time to rest  and to recruit his strength.  Meanwhile she made him drink a  glass of wine, and then Avaitecl for  his reply to her question. He himself, conscious that, since the boy  was not with Mabin, he had no suggestion to offer as to where he might  be found, presently yielded to her  wishes to the extent of givinghhcr.au  account of what had happened after  her departure from Heath Hill.  "I heard of your going," said he,  "from Mrs. Lowndes. It made me  mad. For I kirew what it would  mean to the boy. I knew you were  the best friend be had; I knew I  could feel he was safe while you  were with him. When I learnt that  you had gone, j guessed-who it was  that had sent you away. It was thai  Jezebel, my fathers wife."  Mabin raised her head quickly.'  She had not heard him express his  opinion of Lady Moorhampton before.  "Oh, don't be shocked. She's not  fit for you or any other decent woman lo speak lo. She and her rascally brother have ruined the old  home. Nothing is allowed to stand  between them and their desires, however mean or ignoble; you know  what he is; but I swear there's not  a pin to choose between him and his  sister. That is what makes the clanger of the combination. The one  backs the other up. and my father is  as weak as water in the hands of a  clever, selfish woman, and her utlcrly  unprincipled  brother."  "But wouldn't Lord Moorhampton listen to you? Wouldn't he believe you when ...yoai" told him what  Mr. Wright did lo you in the office?"  "I  haven't  told  him,"   said  Cipnan  When Your Eyes Need Care  CTseSrnrincK.veMedicine. NoSmarting���������Feela  Fine ��������� Aots Quifildy. Try it for Red, Weak,  Sore Byeoand Granulated Eyelids. Murine Is  compounded hy our Oculists���������not a "Patent  Medicine"���������but used in successful PliyGie^aTis'  Practice for many years.    Now dedicated to  Murine Ey������ 5������rfleify Company. Chicago. Ady.  W.     N".     U������      1156  in a strangely reticent-manner which  struck her as chilling, and as signifying that on that ���������subject' she must  ask no  more'questions-.  There was silence for a few minutes. He iwas silting before the fire,  with his head bent, and his hands  henging down limply over his knees.  It; went to Mnbin's heart to sec  how-haggard and' thin his, face "was;  how deep the hollows wci*c under his  eyes, - and how ; thin .were the long,  capable-looking hands.   ''  Suddenly he turned his head, met  her goalie eyes gazing full upon  him, and as she quickly averted her  own head, she heard a sob escape  him.  "Don't, idon'l," whispered Mabi'i  hoarsely. '  Jn that one rapid glance she had  seen something she could not fail to  understand; she had recognized, with  a* flash of instinct that, just as lie had  been set up irr her heart"on a pedestal of romance,, so had she, the girl  he had met so unexpectedly, occupied  in his dreams a place' all to herself,  not only as the creature to whom he  had confided his treasure, his child,  but as the girl who seemed to him  to embody all he asked bf womanhood. .���������.*���������'���������'.. '������������������/'  Not all this, certainly,did Mabin  understand in that one look they exchanged; but, enough to guess "the  rest dimly, to feci comforted and  soothed and to feel that there was  between them a tic as strong as ii  they had been lovers for. years.  He drew his chair nearer to her,  bent his head to try to look into her  eyes, and said, iii a low voice;  "I see. You understand."  He put out one of his long, thin  hands, grasped her left hand firmly,  arid after looking at it in silence for  a few moments, pressed it to his  lips. . ���������'���������.'    "  Then the words came, broken,; disjointed,  but with passion, with inov-  .irig pathos and tenderness, as"wcll.as  ���������'with despair." y '.'/'" t.        i  "You know I love you, you know  I loved you-from the moment I.saw  you first, and saw I could trust you-  I knew it was all right; I felt certain the boy was safe, even while I  lay so ill that more than half the  time I didn't know what I was doing, or where I was lying. ..Whenever I came'to myself, that thought  always came to comfort mc: "He's  all right with that girl; Dibs'is all  right, with Tier.". I didn't ... know  where you were, or what you would  do, but I felt as certain that_ you  would find him and take care 'of. him  as I am that I am holding your hand  in mine now. That was why I was  so easy to manage, and why I didn't  peg out. Good Lord! I don't know  how I got through now I. My head  must have been jolly bad, I was so  Queer for days and _dajrs. Then I  got a chill, .pneumonia, all sorts of  things; but I got through the lot,  just because I knew that somewhere  or other, my boy and the best little  girl that ever lived were safe, thinking of me, and wanting me to come  back to  them."  Mabin  was  openly sobbing.  "There, don't cry, child, don't cryT  You don't know what you have been  lo mc."  "I���������I haven't been anything; J.���������-I  haven't done anything. I���������I did  mean to, only���������only I couldn't manage it,"  sobbed poor. Mabin.  "Yes,"child, you did more than you  thought. When I knew that 1 ,was  under the same roof with you, and  with my boy, I took it easy, I knew  I could wait, rest,, get strong, and  then meet those wretches, and have  it out with them. I was like a lamb,  that old woman, Mrs. Lowndes said.  I had got over the effects of the  long journey from town, and I should  have been upon my legs in a week,  if 1 hadn't suddenly learnt that you  had  been  driven away."  "Mrs. Lowndes shouldn't have  told you!" t      ,  "She couldn't help herself. I asked for_you. I had lo be told. I  think'that put mc back a bit. that,  and the news that Wright was hanging about, guessing that something  was up. However, I lay low, and  kept as quiet as I could, thinking I  would get fit first, and have it out  with my father, and turn Wright'out  of the house, and then come lo you,  and bring the boy with me. I had  planned it all out.- And then���������well  ���������then came the news this morning  that my boy was gone. I got up  then, the poor old lady tried to stop  -mc, but 1 couldn't listen. I went  straight  lo  my father."  Mabin was listening, "open-mouthed- ,    ,  "Foor old chap! He had never  known a word of what everybody  else in the house knew by that time,  that. I was alive and under his own  roof I H'c nearly had a fit. Then I  told him-all about things, though  there wasn't time for much more  than outlines, for we both were^mad  ���������-bout  the  boy's  disannrirance.' i  "And���������did* you sec���������Mr.  Wrightt"I  Ciprian rose slow!}',  with  a    dark  cloud over his face. t  "Yes," said he, "J. saw him.  "What did yoii do?"  "I met bin)���������outside the  house, on ,  the terrace, with that mockery of womanhood, his sister."  His voice sank very low, and Mabin, alarmed, and guessing vaguely  that some awful revelation was impending/hung on his next words,  slowly.  "I suppose.--I'd    heller    tell    you.  Don't take on about it, will your"  (To. Be Continued.)  The Princess Pats  MADE  ONTARIO   BABY  STRONG  Mrs. jarvis says Dr.  Cassell's Tablets  cured her Delicate Child  when nothing else could  ; Mrs. Jarvis,.Box' 2S6, l'enetanff, P.O., Ontario, writes: "It is a pleasure to tell you  what Dr. Cassell's Tablets have done for my  baby. When only live months old he fell ill,  and though I had .medical advice for him he  got worse. -I tried several special foods, but  none-of them would stay ou his itomach; and  he became so thin that he seemed just skin  and bone, lie only weighed 10 Jlis., and we  never 'thought he could live. 'But chancing  to hear of Dr.y Cassell's Tablets I got some  for baby, and am thankful 3 did. lie is a  bonny boy now, quite cured, and weighs  25..lbs. at twelve mouths old."  A free sample of'Dr- Cassell's Tablets will be sent to you on receipt of  5 cents for mailing and packing.. Address: Harold F. Ritchie & Co., *fctd*,  10, M'Caul-st-, Toronto.  Dr. Cassell'sf Tablets are the surest home  remedy for Dyspepsia, Kidney Trouble, Sleeplessness, Anaemia, Nervous Ailments, Nerve  Paralysis, Palpitation, and Weakness in Children. Specially valuable for nursing mothers  and during the critical periods of life. Sold by  druggists and storekeepers throughout .Canada. Prices: One tube, 50 cts; six tubes for the  price of five. Beware of imitations said to contain hypophosphites. The composition of Dr.  Cassell's .Tablets is known only to ihe proprietors, and no imitation can ever be the same.  Sole Proprietors: Dr. Cassell's   Co.*  /Ltd., Manchester, England  "Time is money," said the bore.  "Yes," sighed the troubled man,  "and I wish you'd go somewhere else  to spend yours."  The West Can Claim Some Distinction in This Connection-  Ottawa announces that the Princess Patricia's regiment is officially  declared as belonging to the *������tlawa-  Kingston military district. That appears lo be about the coolest piece  of man-stealing the department has  put over yet. Hitherto Alberta battalions have been broken up lo supply 'men to fill the slackers' gaps in  units claimed by towns scattered all  the. way from one ocean to the other, and drafts have been taken from  Edmonton to enable Ottawa and  Kingston to have the credit of being  represented by units overseas.  ' But this seems to be the first instance in which a battalion has been  stolen intact and put to tire credit of  a district" having no shadow of claim  lo it. It is the more notable that  the battalion-in question has been  longer at the front than any other  Canadian unit, has suffered more, and  has come to be the most widely  known for its exploits. Montreal supplied the colonel and western Canada the men for the original Princess  Pats! Alberta  contributing    more  men than any other province. 'Reinforcements have been recruited  among the students at universities'  from McGill westward to Alberta, to  which Ottawa university and-Kingston may have contributed contingents but not disproportionately  large ones. ���������"*  . On the face of it, therefore, if this  regiment is to be allocated to" any  particular district Alberta has by all  odds the rightful claim, and of all  possible competitors the Ottawa-  Kingston district -has just about the  least pretence of a claim.���������From the  Edmonton Bulletin.  Point of View  Willis���������Pleasure is all in the point  of view.  Gillis���������That's right. A man goes  lo a dance, leaves at twelve o'clock  feeling fine and fresh, and calls it ������  good time; but a woman doesn't  have a-good time unless she slays  until four o'clock, spends the last  three hours iu agony, and goes home  fceJing as' if a steam-roller had run,  over her.���������Life.  "Brains are a common commodity." "Thatso?" --"Yes.. What I'm  always looking for is a man who  knows   how  to   use' his   brains."  Our CATALOGUE NO. 62 T. of  Baseball?  Tennis,  Football,  Golf and all   "  Outdoor Summer  Sports, mailed on ���������   ���������  request.  Ihe Hingston Smith Arms Co., Ltd!.  Winnipeg   ,  A Desperate Case  "Dear," said the fond mother, "1  must punish you for _disobe3-ing my  orders."  "Please ma," said .the little boyP  "may I go to my room first?" *-���������  "Yes," .consented  the parent,    and  she cautiously followed her first-bonr  upstairs. There .Robert was kneeling  by his-bed, and his  ymolhcr.   heard,  him  say:  "Dear Lord, if You ever wanted to  help a little fellow in trouble, now's  Your chance.?'  The whipping was' indefinitely  postponed.���������New York Times.  uimnniHrnrmnnuniiUiuiUHmiiM  S3  Of Every Description  and for every line of business.   Our books are the Standard of Quality  and used from Coast to Coast. ~   --"  We Specialize on CARBON COATED or BLACK BACK BOOKS,  and what we make are the best to be had in Canada.  Duplicate and Triplicate Separate Carbon  Leaf Books, m all sizes  Duplicate   and   Triplicate   Carbon Back  looks, in all sizes  is  X  0. K. Special Triplicate Books, patented  Write us for Samples and Prices before placing your next order, or  see our agent, the proprietor of this paper.  'apers  pa* .  n  ������  s  appers  FOR ALL PURPOSES  Waxed Bread and Meat Wrappers, plain and printed. Confectionery  Wrappers. Pure Food Waxed Paper Rolls for Home Use. Fruit  Wrappers, Etc.  Write for Samples of our G. & B. WAXED PAPERS, used as a meat      V  wrapper,   It is both grease and moisture proof and most reasonable  in price. .   Genuine Vegetable Parchment  FOR BUTTER WRAPPERS  We are large importers of this particular brand of paper. Our prices  on 8 x 11 size in 100M quantities and upwards are very low, considering  the present high price of this paper. We can supply any quantity printed  " Choice Dairy Butter" from stock. No order too large or too small to  be looked after carefully.  Our Machinery and Equipment for Waxing and Printing is the most  modern and complete in Canada, and ensures you first-class goods and  prompt service.  Appleford Counter Check Book Co.  LIMITED  a  ������3  SI'  Offices: Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg:, Vancouver ������  iiiiiimiiimiiiiiiimiiiii^  *' ti* rP'Tv ?&x?.ffi������ wri*** vffivz*  '-��������� ^���������tot^'V;^ ? srrrPr**m ��������� Vi <-;       'y'.  ',*(  '"  Vj|  V.  -THE      GAZETTE.      KEDLKY.      B.      07  " '$  For Distemper ISS^  < Sure and positive prevcnti-re, no matter how horses at any  age are,afflicted or "exposed." Liquid, siven on the tongusj nets  ou the blood and ulanda; expels poison oui frerms from tho  body. Cures Distemper In Dogs and Sheep and Cholera la poultry. Largest selling live stock remedy. Cures La Grippe among  human beings, and is a fine Kidney remedy. Cut this out. Keep  it. Show to your drug-fist, who will get it for you. Free Booklet,  "Distemper, Causes and Cures."  SPOHN  MEDICAL  COMPANY     ,  Chemists  and  Bacteriologists,   Goshen,   Ind.,  V, S.  A.  B=  For the Price of One!  Both sides of EDDY'S-  Twin - Beaver Washboards  can be used���������giving doublo  service for the price of one.  Made of INDURATED.  FIBREWARE (which ia  really pulp hardened and  baked by a special process)  it cannot splinter or _ fall  apart. Won't hurt your fingers) or ��������� tear you clothes.  Double value for your money���������almost lifo lasting.  Don't do another washing  until you get one.  ASK YOUR DEALER.  The E. B. Eddy Company  Limited"  \ HULL     -      -     CANADA  Views of Marriage  Spinster Whose Prejudices Were of  , a"Most Decided Kind  A Miss Graham who died while  engaged in war work at Malta, and  left legacies of $500,000,'held strange  views on the marriage question. On  the ground that her views indicated  an unhealthy and unsound mind at  the lirfie when she prepared her will  a relative opposed probate.  . In the evidence adduced it' was  P'-ovcd that the deceased had altered  a former will under Avhich her rel,*.-  li-/c would have received a substan-=  tial legacy and some valuable property because she had "degraded  herself" by entering the abhorrent  state of matrimony. The deceased  lady even assailed the Archbishop of  York for his marriage views, and  called him "filthy minded."  The point at issue was submitted  to a jury, who held that strange  marriage views did not prove a state  of insanity, with which the judge  concurred. At the same time the  foreman expressed the regret that  the deceased had Jiad. no experience  of matrimony, when ,shc might have  revised her verdict.  Several Thousand  Foresters Wanted  Ottawa Calls for Drafts lo Let Men  Return to  Other Units  TKc Militia Department is, calling  for several thousand more recruits  for the Canadian Forestry Battalions  overseas. There arc now ten thousand^ men in the Forestry Battalions  in England and France, under the  command of Brig.-Gcncral Alexander McDougall. Some five thousand  of these were supplied by Canada,  and .the balance was drawn from  ove'rseas troops originally enlisted  for 'other purposes. To allow these  ���������alter to return to their original units  forestry drafts are wanted from Canada. The age limit for forestry -recruits "is 48 years, and men of 4 ft.  11 inches in height arc accepted. Re-  ciidling depots have been opened in  all the lumbering centres of Ca'nada.  Saved by British Navy  , ���������'   \    We 'know that the Entente navy  ���������was and is the one thing that saves us  "today from any possibility that Germany at present may try to do what  she tried to bribe, Japan and Mexico  into doing. Every instinct of preservation, of national safety, demands an  alliance with the Entente, if we" are  (to be safe from such dangers, hereafter, and it is the logical course now  ���������If we are best lo cope with the submarine war on our shipping and our  ���������citizens.���������Boston Advertiser.  Wise, and experienced mothers  know when their children are troubled with worms and lose no time in  applying Miller's Worm Powders,  the most effective vermifuge that can  be used. It is absolute in clearing the  system of worms and restoring those  healthy conditions without which  there can be no comfort for the  child, or hope qf robust growth. It  is the most trustworthy of worm exterminators.  REPLENISH ���������-  YOUR BLOOD  N THE SPRING  Whether the corn be of old or new  .growth, it must yield lo Holloway's  Gorn-Curc, the simplest aifdbcst cure  ,-affcrcd to the public.  - Luring on to Destruction  There is one reason to believe thai  .more than one of our lost liners have  met their doom by hastening "to answer the bogus S.O.S. of the submarine which lay in wait for them.  Now. the survivors of a French des-  ���������troyer torpedoed in the Mediterranean reports that, while struggling iu'  the water in lire blackness of the  -night, thejq were brought within effective range of the submarine's guns  iby the enemy shouting in good  French;- "This way, comrades!"  ���������,ould deviltry go further?���������Glasgow  Herald.  The Safest Course'"  Is  there no way of stopping  Ihese  cyclones? asked a  traveler who  was  relating his  experiences  in the    Far  West. -     '  No, replied the narrator. The'best  way is to go along with them.  "* To Use Scotland Yard System  'The "finger print" system of .criminal identification, as used at Scotland Yard, is to be applied to criminals in Canada. An Order7in-Couii-  cil lo this effect'has been passed at  Ottawa on the recommendation., -of  ���������the- Commissioner -of the Dominion  Police. As an additional means ' of  Identification, photography is authorized.  Catarrh Cannot be Cured  with LOCAL APPLICATIONS, as they'  ..annot reach the seat of the disease. Catarrh  It a local disease, greatly influenced by con-  'ctitutional conditions, and in oider to cure it  you must take an internal remedy. Hall'*,  Catarrh Cure is taken internally and acta  through the blood ou the mucous surfaces  il the system. Hall's Catarrh Cure was pre-l  Icnbcd by one of Iho best physicians in this  ,couittry  for  years.     It  Js   composed  of  soma  pf   the     best  tonic3   known,     combined   with! i ������,i ., -  i    i   ..     ,   i  ionic  of  the   best   blood   purifiers.     The  per-!.   C1"S,  but  do  not  be  persuaded to   take  '���������feet  combination  of  the ingredients  in  Hall'*    "*���������������������*t,:-~   :.,~<   <���������)...   ..���������������������������  >>     ic   ..���������..  Catarrh  Curo is  what -produces such  wonderful   results  in  catarrhal  conditions.    Send for  le&tiinonials,  free.  F.  J.   CHENEY   &  CO.,  Props.,  Toledo,  O,  All  Druggists,  75c. ..;.-"  ���������  .Hall's family'Fills for constipation.  Just now yoti arc feeling "out of  sorts"���������not your usual self. Quite  exhausted at times and cannot devote real ener-gy to your work.  Sleep docs not rest you and you wake  up'feeling "all tired out." Perhaps  rheumatism is flying through j-our  muscles and joints, or may be your  skin is disfigured by rashes, boils or  pimples* Headaches, twinges of neuralgia, fits of nervousness .irritability  of'temper and a disordered stomach  often increase your discomfort in  the  spring.  The cause���������winter hasxleft its mark  on you. These troubles are signs that  your blood is poor and watery, that  your nerves are exhausted. You must  renew and enrich your blood at once  and restore tone lo 3*our tired nerves,  or there may be a complete breakdown. The most powerful remedy for  these spring ailments in men, women  and children is Dr. Williams' Pink  Pills for Pale People, because these  Pills cleanse bad blood and strengthen weak nerves.  New, rich, red blood���������your greatest need in spring���������is plentifully created by Dr. Williams' Pink Pills,  and with this new, pure blood in your  veins you quickly regain health and  increase your strength. Then your  skin becomes clear, your eyes bright,  your nerves strong, and you feel  better, cat better, sleep better, and  are able to  do  your work.  Begin your spring tonic treatment  todav for the blood and nerves with  Dr. Williams' Pink Pills���������the Pills  that strenghten.  These Pills are sold by most deal  Just The One  The children happened* to be present when mother received an applicant for the position of nurse-maid.  "Why were you discharged from  your last place?" asked the mother,  when she had ascertained, after  much ingenuity, that the applicant  had not voluntarily left that place.  "Well, ma'am?' said the girl, very  frankly, "to tell the truth, 1 sometimes forgot lo wash the children,  ma'am."   .  Whereupon there came from the  children in chorus, "Oh, mother,  p'lease engage her!"���������Harper's Magazine.  Germans Buy.  British War Loan  Counter Check-  Germans Buy British War Loan  Some Germans have a sirange way  of showing their confidence in the  victory that is to settle the war in  their favor. A number of Germans,  well-known to people in England,  knowing that they could not purchase certificates in the recent * war  loan, set the wheels of negotiation  going through friends in neutral nations and bought largely in" this  way. The fact has just'eome to the  knowledge of the London Stock Exchange and now il is a question with  the_ broker, who innocently arranged it whether he can in any way cancel the deal.  Well-Kiiowii Farmer  Gives His Evidence  Mr. Merchant:���������  If you are not already using    our  Counter  Check  or  Sales   Books    we    would respectfully solicit your    next   SAYs DODD'S    KIDNEY    PILLS  order.     Y ears  of   experience  >n    the  Release at Hand '  Young Playwright���������What did "you  think of my climax?  ;   Critic-���������It was very welcome,  Minard's Liniment Used   by   Physi-  ,���������' cians.      :  >,��������� -'  osf~  w;    N,     U.     115tJ  '. Use City Boys on Farms  Systematic Way to Increase    Crops  in the yDpminion-  The Canadian government is adopt,  ing a very systematic way to increase  thefcrops of the Dominion. An official commission, composed bf professors of diffeertn universities, has  been appointed to visit the high  schools .and colleges and enlist boys  for agricultural work during the summer months. Attention wifl be given  I he physical ability of the boys and  they will sign, with the consent of  their parents, for six mouths' service  on the farms. A record will be kept  of their work and efficiency, which  will be credited to them the same as  if it were, in the regular classc; iii  the schools and colleges. This looks  like a pretty good scheme, not only  to get intelligent farm workers, but  for  the  real  advantage  of  the boys.  II was tried in a small way last year  and the result was that the boys who  worked on lire farms outstrippr-d in  their studies those who remained in  the schools. That is the same sort  of record that has been made iu some  manuals-training schools where tlie  bo\ s who spent half of their time at-  work and the other half at their stud,  ics, took nearly all the scholastic  prizes in the intcrschool contests,  while they swept the platter almost  clean in the athletic fields. If there  could be a scheme invented that  would put the large groups of boys  who idle' away their time in the pool  halls and on the streets out on the  farms during the summer months, it  would be of incalculable advantage to  tbcni and their country.���������Omaha  World-Herald.  something just the same." If you  can't get the genuine Pills from your  dealer Ihey will be sent you by mail,  post paid, at 50 cents a box or six  boxes for ������2.50 by writing The Dr.  Williams' Medicine Co-, Brockville,  Out.  ,A Cynic in Overalls -  :-."! suppose," said the facetious  stranger watching a workman spread  a carpet from the church door to the  curb,- "that's tht. road to heaven you  are fixing there?" .  ���������"No,"   replied   the   man,     "this     is  merely a bridal path."  ... Ready-made** Medicine.���������You need  no physician for ordinary ills when  you have at hand a bottle of Dr.  Thomas' Electric Oil. For coughs,  colds, sore throat, bronchial troubles,  il is invaluable, for scalds, burns,  bruises sprains il is unsurpassed  while for cuts, sores, ulcers and the  like it is an unquestionable healer.  It needs no testimonial other' than  the use, and that will satisfy anyone  as to its effectiveness.  Clerk���������Let the show you our latest  machines. We have a motor car now  that can climb any hill on earth.  .Chauffeur���������That's nothing. The  last one you sold me tried to climb  a tree.  He���������I should really like to see myself as others sec me, don't you  know.  She���������You wouldn't give yourself a  secoud glance.  /  Democracy Against Autocracy  "Autocracy has broken down in  Russia. It is doomed in Germany, as  the avowals of the chancellor and  the secretary for foreign affairs admit, even if the*, throne and dynasty  arc saved. It- cannot survive in Austria if it shall fail in Germany. This  is fast showing itself, as it was from  the beginning in it's real clijiractcr a  war of popular government against  imperialism. On lire side of the allies if is a war that "government of  the people and by the people aud-for  the people shall not perish from the  earth."���������Philadelphia Record.  WIFE FINDS RELIEF, TOO!  Lachnto   Mills,   P.Q.  "I was troubled for many yearn  with Kidney Disease, and a friend  told mo to take GIN FILLS.  After taking a few "boxes I was  greatly relieved, and after finishing  the twelfth box the pain completely left me. My wife is now using  Gin Fills and finds that sho has  hcen greatly relieved of the pain  over her kidneys. I can safely  recommend any one suffering from  Kidney trouble to give a fair trial  to   GIN   FILLS.  Thomas Stophenson.**  All druggists  sell  Gin Fills  nt  GOc. a box, or 6 boxes for $2.50,  Sample free if you write to  ���������NATIONAL DRUG &  CHEMICAL  CO.   OF CANADA,   LIMITED  Toronto, Ont. - 67  manufacture of this line enable us to  give you a book as nearly perfect as  it is possible to be made in these difficult times.  All classes and grades of paper are  now from 100 to 400 per cent, higher than they were two years ago.  Carbon papers, waxes for coated  books, labor, in fact everything that  goes-into the cost of counter, check  or sales books are very high in price.  Notwithstanding these, facts, our  modern and well equipped plant for  this particular work enables us to  still keep our prices reasonably  low. Before placing your next order  write us'for samples and prices, or  consult the proprietor of this paper.  We make a specialty of Carbon  Eack or Coated Books, also O.K.  Special Triplicate books. On these,  and our regular duplicate and triplicate separate Carbon Leaf Books, we  number among our customers the  largest and best commercial houses  from coast to coast. --No order is too  large or too small to be looked after  carefully.  We have connections with the  largest paper mill in Canada, ensuring an ample supply of the best grade  paper used in counter check books.  You arc therefore assured of an extra grade of praper, prompt service  and shipments.  Waxed Papers and Sanitary  Wrappers '  We also manufacture Waxed Bread  and Meat Wrappers, plain and. printed; Confectionery Wrappers,''"���������Pure  Food Waxed Paper Rolls for Home  Use, Fruit Wrappers, etc;     ���������  ��������� ���������   j  Write- for samples of our G. & B.  Waxed Papers used as a Meat  Wrapper. It is both grease and  moisture proof, and the lowest priced article on the market for this  purpose.   *       . ^  Genuine Vegetable Parchment for  Butter -Wrappers  We are large importers of this  particular brand of .paper. Our prices  on 8x11 size in 100M quantities and  upwards, arc very low, considering  the present high price of this paper.  Wc can supply any quantity printed  "Choice Dairy Butter" from stock.  Our machinery and equipment for  Waxing-and Printing is the most  modern and complete in Canada and  ensures you first-class goods" and  prompt service.  AFPLEFORD COUNTER CHECK  BOOK COMPANY, LTD.  Hamilton,  Canada.  ���������Offices:   Toronto,   Montreal,     Winnipeg,  Vancouver;.   \ ,  German i-V&iuty in the War  One  Is  Not Tempted  to  Envy    the  Germans for Their Cleverness  There has been far too much laudation of German ability in this war.  When one" considers the vast amount  of forethought given by the Germans  to the war and the mobilization for  a period of forty years of the best  brains of the country toward the one  end of military success and then  surveys the results achieved one is  not tempted to envy the Germans for  their cleverness, but rather to think  how much better the French, the  Americans, or the English would  have done the job if they had given  their mind to it. The Germans in  international ^politics remind us of  the dull schoolboy who, having worked out with immense industry an  enormous sum in multiplication and  division quite _ correctly to thirty  places of decimals, manages at the  end to produce a widly incorrect result by pointing his decimals two or  three places out.���������H. Sidtbotham  in Atlantic Monthly.  When a man is dressed in a little  brief authority he is even more conspicuous than a woman in the present style of abbreviated skirt.  CURED HIM  OF.GRAVEL  Dr. William Wood of Hadlington,  Ont., is Added to Long List of  Cures by the Great Canadian Kidney Remedy, Dodd's Kidney Pills-  Hadlington, Ont, (Special)���������Mr.  William Wood, a well-known -farmer  living near here, is shouting the  praises of Dodd's Kidney Pills. He  claims they cured him of two of the  most painful and dangerous ' forms  of kidney trouble, bladder trouble  and gravel.  "Yes, 1 was troubled with grave!  and bladder trouble," Mr. Wood  said when asked about his cure. "But  since I took four boxes of Dodd's  Kidney Pills my troubles are gone.  I also had heart flulterings and shortness of breath. There were flashes of  lights and specks before my eyes and  I was very nervous. All these troubles have gone, too, since !��������� used  Dodd's Kidney Pills."  Others in this neighborhood have  used Dodd's Kidney Pills and found  thai they arc the greatest of all remedies for kidney troubles of any  kind. Dodd's Kidney Pills are specialists. They cure sick kidneys and that  is all they claim to cure. The reason  they.arc given credit for curing rheumatism, lumbago, dropsy, diaber.es  and Bright's disease is that all of'  .these diseases are caused by sick  kidneys, '������������������'   .  '     Place in the Sun;    *       ������  John (angrily)���������Now I sec through  vour subterfuge.  Marie���������Well, that's    only    because  there's a very bright sun.���������Dartmouth'  Tack o'Lantern.  Ask for Minard's."and-take no other-  Using Grass to Make Paper With  Although several of the largest pa*  per mills in England have been  forced to shut down because the  government stopped the importation  of pulpwood, many others have managed to keep going by utilizing grass  which they obtain from Scotland, tho  Fenlands and India.  Printing paper and notepaper is  being made from grass mixed with  other materials. The cheapest fibre  is obtained from rags which are no  longer exported. Rag cuttings are  now worlh $140 a ton, which is still  below tlie cost of wood pulp, now  selling for $150 a ton. It was $40 a  ton  before the war. J  gives'  strength  to win  On sale at all,   "  Druggists and Store*,  r  !'l*  )���������'  *"i  I  "M  "'Si  %\  if-  ������ .i       ^' **.-     ,        ^L.  \:&Sr}i*Zni  U'l'i'V-iT*'"-*^'^  :\>\ ;*--���������*-*-/  t&  THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      B.  Goieman&Go.  @ @ @  "The Big Store"  General  Merchants  KEREMEOS, B. C.  Tie Nickel Plate  BarDer_SHop  SATISFACTORY, SANITARY  TONSORIflL SERVICE.  Thjs shop it equipped with  Baths and all the latest  Electrical  Appliances.  W.T.BUTLER, - Prop.  to whether or not we are going  to put tho returned solciiess,  after the war, to the inconvenience of hanging the referen-  duinists. There is efficiency and  progress on the Western front;  the opjiosite on the Eastern  front. War can't be run by  referenduins. The principle has  been a failure in the conduct  of trades union affairs. It  leaves tho settlement of vitally  important questions to those  who have given no thought to  to the subject, and often useful  laws are defeated bj' the mouth-  ings of a few demagogues.  An honest energetic man can  obtain constant employment  with us, full or spare time, by  representing us locally or traveling. Apply immediately B. C.  Nurseries Co., Ltd., 1493, 7th  Ave. W., Vancouver B. C.   21-4.  fearful hour to make a record  with those who have already  and still are passing under the  rod can only be weighed and  measured by concrete performance.���������Oroville Gazette.  CEbe 1kd!ep  Subscriptions In Advance  Per Year $2.00  "   (United States)  2-50  Advertising Rates  Measurement. Hi linos to the inch.  Transient Advertisements���������not exceeding one  inch, $1.25 for one insertion, 25 cent's for  each subsequent insertion. Over one inch,  12 cents per line for first insertion and 8  cents per line for each subsequent insertion.  Transients payable in advance.  Contract Advertisements���������One inch per month  f 1.25; over 1 inch and up to 4 inches, $1.00  per inch per month. To constant advertiser's  taking largor space than four inches, on  application, rates will be given of reduced  charges, based on size of space and length  of time.  Certificate of Improvements $10.00  (Where more than one claim appeal's  in notice. $2.50 for each additional  claim.)  Jas. W. Grieu, Publisher.  \  Hedley, B. C. June IL 1917.  "He who does me once, shame on him;  He who does me twice, shame on me."  THIS AND THAT.  There are signs and portents  of a bad mix-up in Ottawa over  conscription.    Already some of  the members of parliament are  beginning to  feel prickings of  conscience in harmony with the  sentiments   of   a   majority   of  their constituents.    It is quite  right that they should represent  the views of those who elect  them, but there are times in the  ' history of every country when  to act quickly is its only salvation.   Belgium might have had  a l'eferendum before opposing  the   Germans   and   saved   the  people from temporary misery,  but   the   history    of   Belgium  would have ended there. France  might have asked for a "mandate" from its people,  but   before    the   mandate   had   been  signed,. sealed    and    delivered  France   would    have    dropped  from   among   the   nations   of  the world.     The British   government might   have  referred  the question of war to  a referendum, ^but before an expression of the eloctorate could have  been   obtained   France   Would  probably   have   been   overrun  and a German army in England  and  the referendum   idea   replaced by German kultur. There  were    people   in   the   United  States  who   clamored    for   a  . referendum while citizens of the  country were being murdered  almost daily by German pirates,  yet in one day ten million young  men  registered for active service.   A referendum should be  put to the people of Canada as  It is  to  be  hoped  that   the  |  speakers who address the public on the 4th of  July  will  cut  out the  bluster, buncombe and  balderdash so  common  to the  American   speaker.    It   is   not  necessary to tell the public what  a great country this is, or what  wonderful people the Americans  are.    That has been hammered  upon our tympanum forbears,  and is cheap rodomontade. This  is  not a  season  for exalting a  people who  have made good in  the past, and who we are satis-  lied  will  make good in  whatever position  the  exigencies of  the times may place them.    Let  us take it for granted that the  people of today are  worthy of  the generations ��������� that have done  their part and have gone before,- and let it go at that.    The  American   is   rather pi-one   to  feel    tickled    by    exaggerated  praise of "what he is, the cream  of  the earth,  and it is a weakness to  throw  our greasy tiles  in the air and  voice loud acclaim   when   the   impashioned  orator,  with    slight    idea    of  modesty,  spreads it on as thick  as - mud.    We  have   reason to  feel proud of accomplishments  in the past, but Americans are  yet to be tried  in  the crucible  of fire that has aroused admiration for the people  of France,  England,    Russia,   Italy,   Germany and  Austria. ���������That  our  own   sons and  neighbors   will  uphold   the  traditions   of   the  country when  it comes to the  supreme test, but let the records  be   made   through   deeds   and  not words.    Thi.s  is no time for  boasting.    The  country is facing a serious  test, more serious  than  the  rank  and  file of the  population    realizes,    and   the  ability of the Americans in this  The Nanaimo Herald takes  issue with us for our remarks  on the importance of having  qualified men appointed to the  position of mine inspectors. We  advocate metal mining men being appointed to inspection of  metal mines, and coal men to  inspection of coal mines, ability  constituting, the qualification  rather than parly politics. The  article appeared unanswerable,  and certainly the subject has  been impressed on us by operators who have very definite  views on the subject. The  Herald is troubled with the  usual distorted vision of the political organ.���������Mining and Engineering Record.  Coal Miners Are Ou;.  Yesterday morning (7th inst.)  the underground men at the  Princeton Colliery did not turn  out for work, and since then  the mine has been idle. The  men, about fifty in number, are  asking for anincrease in wages,  and at the time of going to  press their differences with the  management had not been adjusted.���������Similkameen Star  2BSB  PAINTING  PflPER-fiANGING.'  KflLSOMINING  TERMS MODERATE  DALY AVE.   -   -   ttEDLEY, B.C.  DR, T. F.-ROBINSON  Dentist.  Office with Dr. Lewis, Oroville, Wash.  L. O. L.  ..  The Regular    meetings of  Hedley Lodge 1711 are ncld on  the  first and third Monday in  every month in the Orange Hall  Ladies meet 2nd and 4 Tucrdays  Visiting brethern arc cordially invited  W. LONSDALE. W. M.  H. F. JONES, Sec't.  Nickel Plate Camp  No. 15662  Modern Woodmen  of America ,  Meets in Fraternity Hall the Third  Thursday in each month at 8 p. m.  A.      are, V. C.       J. SiriTii, Clerk.  OPERA -  Tuesday Night, June 19th  B. E. Lang Offers  THE FAMOUS  THE  SWEET SIXTEEN GIRLS  Jto the Sparkling Two-Act  Hawaiian Operetta  H60I60 Trade 60, Ltd  SF������RIlNO  NEEDS  Poultry netting, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6-ft. widths,  50-yard rolls, $5.50, $6.50, $7.50, $8.50 Roll.  Wire cloth for windows and doors,' 30-in.  30c. yard; 36-inch. 35c. a yard,       "  Garden hose, 50-foot lengths withfittings,  $8, $8.50, $9.50 and $11.   : ,    "      "  Pipe and Hose fittings, all kinds and sizes  Hoes 90c, Rakes $1.15, Hay Forks $1.25,  Manure Forks $2, Spud Forks $1.75, Garden Trowels 25c, Weeders 20c, Shovels,  Picks, Mattocks, Wheelbarrows..  tiediey Trading 6o. Ltd.  THE CANDY SHOP  NEILSON'S. the Chocolates that are "different.  .   In Bulk and Boxes."  NELSON'S   LUXURY   TOFEE,   a   delicious  confection.    This is worth trying. .  Ice Cream, Sodas; Cones, Buttermilk.  X. H. ROTHERHAM  HEDLEY GAZETTE  JOB DEPARTMENT  WHEN YOU ARE IN NEED OF-  Letterheads  Billheads  Envelopes  Statements  Meal Tickets.  Milk Tickets  Ball Programs  Posters  TRY US =  Dodgers, Dates  Circulars  Invitations  Business Cards  Bills of Fare  .Memo Heads    -  .Butter Wrappers  Visiting Cards  WE GIVE SATISFACTION  Prices   -.-..,���������'-   $ 1.25 and $ 1.00  Seats Now Selling at Drug Store.  WATER 'NOTJC'K  (s'I'ohaoi:.)  Takr Xotiuk Unit Tho Duly Reduction Co.,  Ltd., whoso address! is Hedley, 11. C, Cmuidn,  will apply for a lieeneo for* the storage of 50  cubio feet per' second of water out of .Summers  Creek, which Hows south autl drains Into One  Mile Creek and Birnilkiuneen River*, about one  mile below Princeton, 11, O.   The storage dam  will bo locatnd at the ijiiturnl outlet of j\Iisse-  y.uln Lake.   The capacity of the reservoir-to be  created is about l;J00 acrufcol, and it will /loud  no additional lai)d. The water will be diverted  from the stream atti point about one-half mile  from lledlly, 13,.O,, and will bo used for power  purposes upon the land described  as lied lev  Townsite and area within 20-milo radius.   Th'e  licence applied for is to supplements right  to take and use water ae per licence number  3183,   This notice was posted on the ground on  the 2Gth day of April, 11)17.   A copy-of  thi.s  notice and an application pursuant thereto and  to the " Water Act, 1������H." will be lllod in the  ofilec of, tho Water Recorder at Princeton, B,  C.   Objections to the application  may be filed  with  the   said   Water   Recorder or with  tho  Comptroller   of    Water   Rights,   Parliament  Buildings. Victoria, Ji. 0���������  within  thirty days  after the  lirst appearance of this notice in a  local newspaper.   The petition for Iho approval  of the undertaking will ho hold iu the ollice of  the Board at a date to be fixed by the Comptroller or the Water Recorder ot the District.  The territory within ' which  the powers in respect of this undertaking aro to bo exercised is  described as Hedley Townsite and area within  a radius of W miles.   Tho date of tho lirst publication of this notico is May 4th, 1917.  The Dai-y RuDrcrroN" Co., Ltd.    .  Applicant.  By Gonioi' P. Jones, Agent.  Synopsis of Coal Mining- Regulations  /^OAL mining rights of tho Do:  Y Manitoba, Saskatchewan an  the   } ukon  Territory, tho  >rninjon,  h  d  AHiqrt.ii.  .    . ,. -���������-.-���������  -.��������� - NorU|-\vua(*  fori'j.  tones and rn  a portion of the  PrQYipepof Jli'l-  fpra fciun  I'pptal or si  hi  1)0 l0(l.S'Ji|  A. F. & A. M.  REGULAR monthly meetings of  Hedley Lodge No. 13, A. F. & A. M.,  are held on tho second Friday in  Mich month in Fraternity hall, Hedley. Visiting  brethren aro cordially invited to attend.  Q. H. SPROULE,  W. M  , E. HAMILTON  Secretary  tish  Columbia,, may be leased  twenty-one years at an*annual ,������������������  acre.   Not moro than 2.5C0 acres wi  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must bo made by the  applicant in person to tho Agent or Sub-Ageui  of the district rn whioli tho rights applied ior  are situated..        - * ���������  In surveyed ���������territory the land must bo di*>:  oribocl by sections, or legal sub-divisions i.f  sections, and rn unsurveyed territory the ti-iu-.l  applied for shall be staked out the applioun.  himself. . ���������  , Kl"-cl) application must be accompanied bv  fee of S5 which will, bo rofunded if tho rigl.'t.-  appliod for aro not available,- but not other  wise.   A royalty shall bo paid on the rnoreha>;  able output of the mine at.the rato of live com.,  per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnMi  the Agent with sworn returns accounting ti.v  the full quantity of merchantable . uiiii. if  and nay tho royalty thereon.   I coiU tnin-'"  ing rights are nobboingoperated.su     return--  should be furnished at least once a year.  The leaso will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lossoo may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights rn.'.v  be considered necessary for tbo working oft'li',"  nunc at the rate of $10.00 an acre ���������'',  For full  information  application should-hi;  mudo to tho Secretary of the Donrtrtmonfc ',-f  tho Interior, Ottawa, or  o any Agorj'Cor S)������J)- -  Agent of Dominion Lands.  W.-W. CORY.  Deputy Minister or the Intorii ���������,  N.B.-Unauthorlssed publication of this adv ;i.  ^isoniont will not be paid fqr, 17 em  I '���������   ��������� '   '       ���������Mw^wir^"w.^^-^^w. i . ......  Support the Home Paper./ \  10.

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