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The Hedley Gazette Dec 14, 1916

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 tv..  Volume XII.      Number 4S.  HEDLEY, B.C., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14,   1916.  $2.00, In Advance  c>  Travel by Auto...  Call up Phone No. 12  11 A good stock of Horses and Rigs on  -Hand.   11 Orders for Teaming  promptly attended to.  "-   WOOD   FOR   SALE!  PALACE"  } Livery, Feed & Sale Stables  1  l-'hono 12.  ,HKDLBY   B.C.  D. J. IN MS  Proprlotoi  M. Thomps n piionts setmour 591S  MOB. WESTERN CANADA ,'      }  Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd.  Steel Manufacturers  Sheffield, Eng-.  Offices and Warehouse, 847-63 Bentty Street  Vancouver, B. C.  -  R. F>.  BROWN  British Columbia Land Surveyor"  Tel. No. 27  PENTICTON,  P. O. Dkawur 100  -      -      B. C.  f I  P.Vy/; GREGORY  CIVlC- ENGINEER and BRITISH  COLUMBIA"LAND SURVEYOR  * Star Building:,."    -       Princeton  WALTER  CLAYTON      ' C.   E.   HASKINR  CLAYTON & flASKINS  Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.  MONKY TO  LOAN  . PENTICTON, -        B. C.  DR. J. L. MASTERS  "DENTIST.  ..OFFICE IN COVERT BLOCK,  Oroville,  Wash  x  Grand Union |  Hotel  HEDLEY,   British Columbia  Rates���������$1.50 a Day and Up  First-Class Accommodation.  Bar Stocked with Best Brands  of Liquor and Cigars  g A.  WINKLER,     Proprietor. ������  HEDLEY MEAT  RSARHET ��������� ��������� ��������� ���������  All kinds of fresh and  cured moats always on  hand. Fresh Fish on  sale   every   Thursday.  R. J. EDMOND, Prop.  *&  GREAT  NORTHERN  HOTEL  HEDLEY B.C.  Bar and Table the Best.   Rates Moderate  First Clads Accommodation  JOHN JACKSON, Proprietor  (   KEREMEOS ITEMS.   |  Mr. Burkes of Victoria avus in  town last week.  Mis. Love of Olalla spent the  weekend visiting with Mrs.  Keeler.  There was a small skating  party at Cawston on Saturday  evening.  Mr. Geo. Cawston of. Princeton spent "a few days'in town  last week on business.  Mr. Wamsley of Conconully  passed through town on Saturday on his way from Princeton.  Mrs. Brown and Miss Ramsay spent the -weekend visiting  with Mrs. Crooker of Similkameen.  1  Mr. H. A. Barcello motored  to Hedley on. Sunday, bringing  home with him his wife aiid  daughter:  . A beautiful white mantle  covered the ground here on  Friday night, the first snow of  the season.  Cawston will hold their  Christmas, .tree.- entertainment  on Friday; December 22nd, in  the school house. *���������   ���������     .   ' -.  ,- Messrs./Summers and Hues-  ton of "���������Princeton spent Friday  "in town7 "-returning home on  Saturday's^ train.  *' Mrs. Chalmers, of -Nelson lectured 011. gardening and home  canning Monday and Tuesday  in the-Institute room.  Mr. Anstey, ^school inspector,  and-his "wife* spent a couple of  days in" town last week: and attended the school meeting.   ,  Mr. T. W. Coleman left on  Thursday's train for Tennessee  where he will spend a month  visiting with his daughter.  A few Keremeosites attended  the dance held i\t Cawston on  Monday night, the opening of  Newton & Sinclair's new store-  Mrs. "W. M. Frith received the  sad news on Saturday that her  nephew, Corpl.- A. F. Shaw had  been killed in action on November 19th.  Mrs. Kelly of Summerland  was guest of Mrs. McCallum on  Friday and spoke at the meeting held to discuss the consolidated school question.  Tho Boy Scouts with their  leader, Mi'. Stanton, and assistant, Mr. Kerr of the Bank of  Commerce,~went on a hike over  the hills on Saturday, which  they enjoyed very much.  Mrs. Corbett will leave this  week for her home in Seattle,  after spending several months  here with her son, E. F. Corbett, manager of the Bank of  Commerce. Mrs. Corbett finds  she has better health here and  will return after Christmas  and. probably spend the winter  here.. 7-.'  The Christmas Tree entertainment will be held in the  town hall on Wednesday evening, December 20th. It. will be  a "giving" Christmas tree instead of "receiving," the, same  as last year. The proceeds will  be given to the Children's Aid  fund of Vancouver. Admission  25 cents.  The meeting held here on  Friday night to discuss the consolidated school question was  well attended and the subject  quite thoroughly discussed.  Everyone appeared favorable  to the scheme. Mr. Anstey,  school inspector, gave a long  speech on the question. Mrs.  Kelley of Summerland also told  how they had carried it out.  Mr. Stanton also gave a short  address, Mrs. McCallum ably  filled the chair and explained  how badly such was needed.  Afterward an open discussion  followed and refreshments were  served by the women's Institute.  I    CONCENTRATES   |  The Standard mine at Silver-  ton has reduced its forco.  Coke ovens may be built at  Merritt in the spring.  Owing to a lack of water the  JRubh mill at Sandon has been  shut down.  Near Prince Rupert on Por-  cher island work will soon begin on a gold prospect.  The RepubHc Journal says it  is reported that tho B. C. Copper company will take over and  operate the Belcher mine.  Pat Perkins and partners of  Kaslo have bonded the Patricia  and Pat claims near Nelson to  Sandpoint.men for $15,000.  On account ���������*of shortage of  coke Rossland, mines . have  stopped ore shipping for the  present, the employees being  placed on development work.  But one out of- five copper  furnaces are now in blast at the  Trail smelter, due to .short sup  ply of coke. Lead and zinc  plants are operating at full  capacity. -  In the Okanagan at Garnett  valley galena has. been found.  Four claims have been staked  and some work has been done.  The ore so far assayed runs  about $10 in silver, and  $4 lead  December 1st the Consolidated company declared the  usual two and one-half per cent  quarterly dividend at Toronto,  payable January -2nd, amounting to $210,695 on the company's  issued capital of $8,427,800.  Coal miners' on the Crow  have returned to work while a  government official from Ottawa is investigating the increased  cost of living for basis of wage  increase. The miners ask for  decision by December 15th.  J. II. Thompson, manager of  the Echo mine in the Slocan,  reports that in running a crosscut from the big ore shoot recently encountered in the lower  tunnel of the mine, they have  crosscut three feet of steel galena at a point about thirty  feet from the big showing. -  rye and barley in the manufacture of beer and similar  liquors. Manure, weeds and  offal now find a ready market  at distilleries.  ���������/ \  .>        >���������**-  ** "J .a?  TOWN AND DISTRICT  The newspaper gang of  Southern British Columbia met  at Penticton last week and organized a press association. The  editors presented such a hungry  appearance everybody locked  their hen coops.-Republic Journal, Wash.  Junk from the Scrap Heap.  By J. Peck MacSwain.  Air has not been added to the  high cost of living.  Prune pie on the coast costs  ten cents a cut���������and a durn  small cut at that.  ; In the east banks will soon  accept eggs on deposit. They  are as valuable as gold bullion.  British Columbia hotelmen  are kicking about high license.  After July prohibition will reduce the license. So why worry.  Only twenty-five have been  killed.during the 1910 football  season. Football matches are  becoming as tame as .Sunday,  school picnics.  An auto struck a deer between Greenwood and Grand  Forks last week. The owner  was arrested on a charge of  killing game out of season.   '  This winter at Vernon the  chief industry is the internment camp. There are over  1300 Germans in it. They are  not allowed beer or Iimburger  cheese.  Ono of those high cost of living authorities says that half  a pound of Iimburger cheese  would satisfy tho appetite.  Quite true. So. would half a  pound of decayed skunk meat.  The Great Northern is erecting an addition to the station  at Chewelah, and the Independent says it looks as if the wind  had blown a dry goods box up  against the building..  ; The  British  government has  prohibited   the  use   of wheatf  L. O. B. A. Elect Officers.  Following are the 1917 officers of L. O. B. A.,No. 184, elected at the regular meeting held  Monday evening:  Past Mistress-Sister A. Forbes.  Mistress���������Sister I King.  D. M.���������Sister A. Jamiesen.  Chaplain���������Sister A. Smith.  R. S.���������Sister M. Jones.  Treas.-Sister E. C. Bowerman  F. S.���������Sister A. Forbes.  D. of C���������Sister Z/McOlure.  Lecturer���������Sister M. Beale.  Guardian���������Sister W. Knowles  I. G.���������Sister Helen Robertson.  , O. G.���������Bro. Wm. Lonsdalo.  Committee���������Sisters Winkler,  Hansen, Stanley, Knowles* and  Jones.  Pianist���������Sister Hanson.  Auditors���������Sisters Beale and  Jones.  The officers will be installed  Monday evening, 18th inst.  Dick Burde Decorated.  For "zeal aud untiring energy  in the performance of his duty  while under fire," Lieut. R. J.  Burde of the 102nd battalion,  C. E7 F., has been decorated on  the field with the Military Cross.  The ribbon emblematic of this  signal honor was conferred  upon Lieut. Burde by the army  commander after very conspicuous work in Northern  France. He will be decorated  with the modal itself by the  king-in a few days, when he returns to England on leave.  Lieut. Burde is well known  among printers and . writers in  B. C.,' having worked on the  Victoria Times as a compositor  twenty-five years ago, and later  as a writer on the Vancouver  Province, tho Victoria Colonist  and the Nanaimo Free Press.  He is publisher of the Port Al-  berni News and ex-mayor of  that town,'  As far as can now be seen tire  year 1917 will be even more  prosperous for the mining industry-than even this year of.  records has been. It seems  reasonable.- to suppose that the  metal market prices will remain  at levels which will continue to  ensure -large" profits to producers. The outlook for silver is  particularly bright, those pessimists who have held the floor  are gradually ceding their'  ground and thc optimists are  now' confident that the European demand will be sufficient  to' ensure.'the stability of .the  market, and possibly send prices  much higher.���������B. C. Mining  Exchange.  Postmasters throughout Canada have received the following order from the postmaster  general at Ottawa: "You are  instructed to take every opportunity of warning the public  that the only safe way of sending money by mail is by money  order, postal note or registered  letter." With Christmas near  at hand tho sending of money  by mail is naturally increasing.  Many people prefer- to send a  few dollars in a letter to sending some present that might be  inappropriate. Money sent in  an ordinary letter may reach  its destination all right, but it  is subject to many dangers.  A very successful smoker and  concert wos held at the Nickel  Plate mine Saturday evening.  A full report of the event, which  arrived too. late for this issue,  will appear next week.  Mrs.   R-   S.   Collin   returned,  Tuesday  after  a month at the  coast.  ThojHedloy rink will probably  open for skating Saturday  evening.  For Rent���������Dec. 1, 1910, Neil  McLeod's house. ,Apply C. P.  Dal ton. ^  O. II. Carle and D. J. Innis  of Keremeos were visitors in  town yesterday.  The small boys are having  real sport coasting down the  hospital hill.  Ten per cent off on all toys  next Saturday. See our ad.  Hedley Trading Co., Ltd.  Mrs. P. Quant and daughter  of Keremeos were visitors in  town last week tho guests of the  Misses Beale.  W. T. Butler spent a part of  this and last week in Spokane  and returned without a longhaired partner.  Miss Avonia Jones came in  from Vancouver Tuesday to  spend the holidays with her  parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. P.  Jones.  There will probably be a  meeting of the Sons of Rest  next week for the election of  officers and tho cleaning up of  deferred business.  A number of  deer were shot,  by residents of tho town during  past week.    Among  the lucky  hunteis  were   W. Corrigan, L.  Rolls and V. Zacherson.  Mrs. W. H Meher arrived in  town Tuesday to join her husband, Corpl. Meher. They have  taken the residence lately vacated by A. T. Horswoll.  A party of horso buyers were  in town this week and n number of horses disposed of by  local owners but tho buyer disappeared before '"pay day."  Miss Beale this week received  from the old country a number  of pieces of metal from tho first  zep. brought down in England.  Thoy arc on exhibition in the  drug store.  Santa Glaus is having a busy  time filling mail orders. He has  appointed T. K. Rotherm and  A. T. Horswell Hedley agents.  Letters left with them will receive Santa's careful attention.  G. M. Gilbert, who left for  England a. couple of months  ago, has returned to Canada  and. purchased a. farm at Wels-  ford, .New Brunswick. Tiim. letter to F. M. Gillespie he states  that ho and the family are well  pleased with the location.  Last week this town came  near getting a six months' hoist  so far as business is concerned,  and was saved by. a. coinon,  discarded 7-inch file. Through  a .'mistake the current of the  crusher motor was turned on  from a lower floor iu the mill  and things began to sizzle. An  old 7-inch file that was loafing  around the crusher floor dropped on the motor, short-circuited the current and probably saved the mill. This may  tound like a pipe-dream, but it  isn't,ainl the business men of thc  town should frame that file.  The business man who today  neglects to advertise is pulling  downthehou.se over his head.  In times like these more effort  is required to keep up the good  name and business of a community when times are normal,  and the business house which  does not make an effort in the  way of advertising to get and  to hold business soon will have  no business to get and hold.���������-  Enderby Press.  Some men work themselves  thin trying to sidestep the boss  and kill time. fj.  Volume XLl.      Number -IS.  HEDLEY, B. C, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14,  1916.  .00, In Advance  r>  Travel by Auto...  Call up Phone No. 12  IF A good stock of Horses and Rigs on  "H������,nd.    "TT Orders for Teaming  , promptly attended to.  WOOD   FOR   SALE!  KEREMEOS ITEMS.  Mr. Burkes of Victoria was in  town last week.  Mrs. Love of Olalla spent the  weekend visiting with Mrs.  Keeler.  Uvery,  Phono 12.  PALACE,  Feed & Sale-Stables  ��������� H1CDLBY   B. O.      '. .. '   '  ,    D. J.  INNIS Proprioto.  N. Thomps n r������ON*K setmouk 5911  MOR. WBSTKRN CANADA  Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd.  Steel Manufacturers  Sheffield, Eng.  Offices and Warehouso, 847-83 Bentty Street  Vancouver, B. C.  R.  F>. BROWN  British Columbia Land Surveyor  '  Teu No."i7  PENTICTON,   .,  P. O. Dka-wkb 100  -      -       B. C.  P. W. GREGORY  CIVIL"* KNGINKKR "and BRITISH  COLUMBIA; LAND SURVEYOR  Star Building,     -     " Princeton  WALTER  CLAYTON C.   E.   IIASKINR  CLAYTON & AASKINS  Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.  MONEY TO  LOAN  . PENTICTON,        - B. C.  DR. J. L. MASTERS  ' "DENTIST.  , OFFICE IN COVERT BLOCK.  Oroville,  Wash  1  Grand Union ������  Hotel  HEDLEY,  British Columbia  Rates���������$1.50 a Day and Dp  First-Class Accommodation.  Bar Stocked with Best Brands  of Liquor and Cigars  A.  WINKLER,     Proprietor  WK*tlW*KKKW&KX*KKKK*^*XK  ?-���������  HEDLEY MEAT  MARKET  ���������   B   ���������  &e  All kinds of fresh and  cured meats always on  hand. Fresh Fish on  sale   every   Thursday.  R. J. EDMOND, Prop.  J  GREAT  NORTHERN   HOTEL  HEDLEY B.C.  Bar and Table the Best.   Rates Moderate  First Class Accommodation  JOHN JACKSON, Proprietor  There was a small skating  party at Cawston on Saturday  evening.  Mr. Geo. Cawston of Princeton spent a. fow days in town  last week oh business.  Mr. Wamsley of Conconully  passed through town on Saturday on his way, from Princeton.  Mrs. "Brown .and ,Miss Ramsay spent the -weekend visiting  with Mrs. Crooker of Similkameen; . "      . .. ��������� ���������  Mr. H. A. Barcello motored  to Hedley on Sunday, bringing  homo with him his, wife and  daughter.  -. ~ A beautiful white mantle  covered the ground here on  Friday night, the first snow of  the season. *  Cawston will hold their  Christmas, .tree, entertainment  on Friday,' December 22nd, in  the school-house.  . Messrs. -Summers aud Hues-  ton of-Princeton spent Friday  in town7 returning home on  Saturday's, train.  iMrs. Chalmers, of Nelson lectured on. gardening and home  canning Monday and Tuesday  in the Institute room.  Mr. Anstey, 'school inspector,  and his, wife spent a couple of  days in town last week and attended the school meeting.  Mr. T. W. Coleman left on  Thursday's train for Tennessee  where he will spend a month  visiting with his daughter.  A few Keremeosites attended  the dance held at Cawstonon  Monday night, the opening of  Newton & Sinclair's new store.  Mrs. XV. M. Frith received the  sad news on Saturday that her  nephew, Corpl. A. F. Shaw had  been killed in action on November 19th.  Mrs. Kelly of Summerhind  was guest of Mrs. McCallum on  Friday and spoke at the meeting held to discuss the consolidated school question.  The Boy Scouts with their  leader, Mr. Stanton, and assistant, Mr. Kerr of the Bank of  Cornmerce,~went on a hike over  the hills on Saturday, which  they enjoyed very much.  Mrs. Corbett wilj leave this  week for her home in Seattle,  after spending several months  here with her son, E. F. Corbett, manager of the Bank of  Commerce. Mrs. Corbett finds  she has better health here'.and.  will return after Christmas  and probably spend the winter  here.  The Christmas Tree entertainment will be held in the  town hall on Wednesday evening, December 20th. It. will be  a "giving" Christmas tree instead of ''receiving," the same  as last year. The proceeds will  be given to the Children's Aid  fund of Vancouver. Admission  25 cents.  The   meeting  CONCENTRATES    i  The Standard mine at Silver-  ton has reduced its forco.  Coke ovens may be built at  Merritt in the spring.  Owing to a lack of water the  Ruth mill at Sandon has been  shut down.  Near Prince Rupert on Por-  cher island work will soon begin on a gold prospect.  The RepubHc Journal says it  is reported that tho B. C. Copper company will take over and  operate the Belcher mine.  Pat Perkins and partners of  Kaslo have bonded the Patricia  and Pat claims - near Nelson to  Saudpoint.men.for $15,000.  On account.of shortage ,of  coke Rossland mines have  stopped ore shipping for the  present, the employees being  placed on development work.  But one out of live copper  furnaces are now in blast at the  Trail smelter, due to -short sup  ply of coke. .Lead and zinc  plants are operating at full  capacity.  In the Okanagan at Garnett  valley galena has been found.  Four claims have been staked  and some work has been ' clone.  The ore so far assayed runs  about $10 in silver, and $1 lead  December 1st the Consolidated company declared the  usual two and one-half per cent  quarterly dividend at Toronto,  payable January 2nd, amounting to $210,695 on the company's  issued capital of $8,427,800.  Coal miners on the Crow  have returned to work while a  government official from Ottawa is investigating the increased  cost of living for, basis of "wage  increase. The . miners ask for  decision by December 15th.  J. H. Thompson, manager of  the Echo mine in the Slocan,  reports that in running a crosscut from the big ore shoot recently encountered in the lower  tunnel of the mine, they have  crosscut three feet of steel galena at a point about thirty  feet from the big showing.  rye and barley in tho manufacture of beer and similar  liquors. Manure, weeds and  offal now find a ready market  at distilleries.  The newspaper gang of  Southern British Columbia met  at Penticton last week and organized a press association. The  editors presented such"a hungry  appearance everybody locked  their hen coops.-Republic Journal, Wash.  TOWN AND DISTRICT  Collin   returned  a month at the '  L. O. B. A. Elect Officers.  , Following are the 1917 officers of L. O. B. A.,No. 184, elected at the regular meeting held  Monday evening:  Past Mistress-Sister A. Forbes.  ���������  Mistress���������Sister I King.  D. M.���������Sister-A. Jamiesen.  Chaplain���������Sister A: Smith.  R. S.���������Sister M. -Jones.'  Treas.-Sister E. C. Bowerman  F. S.���������Sister A. Forbes.  D. of C���������Sister Z. McClure.  Lecturer���������Sister M. Beale.  Guardian���������Sister W. Knowles  I. G.���������Sister Helen Robertson.  , O. G.���������Bro. Wm. Lonsdale.  Committee���������Sisters Winkler,  Hansen, Stanley, Knowles and  Jones.  Pianist���������Sister Hanson.  Auditors���������Sisters Beale and  Jones.  The officers will be installed  Monday evening, 18th inst.  Dick Burde Decorated.  D. J. Innis  visitors   in  held here on  Friday night to discuss the consolidated school question was  well attended and the subject  quite thoroughly discussed.  Everyone appeared favorable  to the scheme. Mr. Anstey,  school inspector, gave a long  speech on the question. Mrs.  Kelley of Summerland also told  how they had carried it out.  Mr. Stanton also gave a short  address, Mrs. McCallum ably  filled the chair and explained  how badly such was needed.  Afterward an open discussion  followed and refreshments were  served by the women's Institute.  Junk from the Scrap Heap.  By J. Peck MacSwain.  Air has not been added to the  high cost of living.  Prune pie on the coast costs  ten cents a cut���������and a durn  small cut at that.  In the east banks will soon  accept eggs on deposit. They  are as valuable as gold bullion.  British Columbia hotelmen  are kicking about high license.  After July prohibition will reduce the license. So why worry.  Only twenty* five have been  killed-during the 1910 football  season; Football matches are  becoming as tame as Sunday  school picnics.  An auto struck a deer between Greenwood and Grand  Forks last week. The owner  was arrested on a charge of  killing game out of season.  This winter at Vernon the  chief industry is the internment camp. There are over  1800 Germans in it. They are  not allowed beer or Iimburger  cheese.  For "zeal and untiring energy  in the performance of his duty  while under fire," Lieut. R. J.  Burde of the 102nd battalion,  C. E. F., has been decorated on  the field with the Military Cross.  The ribbon emblematic of this  signal honor was conferred  upon Lieut. Burde by the army  commander after very conspicuous work in Northern  France. He will be decorated  with the modal itself by the  king in a few days, when he returns to England on leave.  Lieut. Burde is well known  among printers and writers in  B. C, having worked on the  Victoria Times as a compositor  twenty-five years ago, and In tolas a writer on the Vancouver  Province, tho Victoria Colonist  and the Nanaimo Free Press.  He is publisher of the Port Al-  berni News and ex-mayor of  that towr-  Mrs.   R-   S.  Tuesday  after  coast.  Tho'Hedloy rink will probably  open for skating Saturday  evoning.  For Rent���������Dec. 1, 1910, Neil  McLeod's house. ^Apply C. P.  Dalton.  0. H. Carle and  of Keremeos were  town yesterday.  The small boys are having  real sport coasting down the  hospital hill.  -  Ten per cent off on all toys  next Saturday. See,- our ad.  Hedley Trading Co., Ltd.  Mrs. P. Quant and daughter  of Keremeos were visitors in  town last week tho guests of the  Misses Beale.  W. T. Butler spent a part of  this and last week in Spokane  and returned without a longhaired partner.  Miss Avonia Jones came in  from Vancouver Tuesday to  spend the holidays with her  parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. P.  Jones.'  There  meeting  Ono of those high cost of living authorities says that half  a pound of Iimburger cheese  would satisfy the appetite.  Quite true. So would half a  pound of decayed skunk meat.  The Great Northern is erecting an addition to the station  at Chewelah, and the Independent says it looks as if the wind  had blown a dry goods box up  against the building. -  The British government has  prohibited   the  use   of wheat-r  As far as can now be seen the  year 1917 will  be    even' more  prospeaous for  the  mining industry- than  even  this year of  records   has   been.      It   seems  reasonable  to suppose that the  metal market prices will remain  at levels which will continue to  ensure largo profits to producers.    The  outlook  for silver i.s  particularly bright, those pessimists   who  have   held the floor  are     gradually    ceding     their  ground  and  thc  optimists are  now  confident  that,  the European demand   will  be sufficient  to  ensure, the  stability  of. the  market, and possibly send prices  much    higher.���������B.    C.    Mining  Exchange.  Postmasters throughout Canada have received the following order from the postmaster  general tit Ottawa: "You are  instructed to take every opportunity of warning the public  that the only safe way of sending money by mail.is.by -money,  order, postal note or registered  letter." With Christmas near  at hand the sending of money  by mail is naturally increasing.  Many people prefer to send a  few dollars in a letter to sending somo present that might be  inappropriate. Money sent in  an ordinary letter may reach  its destination all right, but it  is subject to many dangers.  A very successful smoker and  concert wos held at the Nickel  Plate mine Saturday evening.  A full report of the event, which  arrived too late for this issue,  will appear next week.  will   probably    be    a  of the  Sons   of   Rest  next week for the  election of  officers and  the  cleaning up of  deferred business.  A number of  deer were shot,  by residents of the town during  past week.    Among  the  lucky  hunteis  were  XV. Corrigan, L.  Rolls and V. Zacherson.  Mrs. W. H Meher arrived in  town Tuesday to join her husband, Corpl. Meher. They have  taken the residence latelv vacated by A. T. Horswell.  A party of liorso buyers were  in town this week and a number of horses disposed of by  local owners but the buyer disappeared before ''pay day."  ���������Miss Bcalo this week received  from the old country a number  of pieces of metal from the first  zep. brought down in England.  They are on exhibition in the  drug store.  Santa Glaus is having a busy  time filling mail orders. Ho has  appointed T. K. Rotherm and  A. T. Horswell Hedley agents.  Letter's left with them will re- -  ceive Santa's careful attention.  G. M. Gilbert, who left for  England a couple of months  ago, has returned to Canada  and purchased a farm at \Vels-  ford, New Brunswick. In a letter to F. M. Gillespie he states  that he and thc family aro well  pleased with thc location.  Last week this town came  near getting a six months' hoist  so far as business is concerned,  and was saved by a coition,  discarded 7-inch file. Through  a mistake the current of the  crusher motor was turned ' on "  from a lower lloor in.the mill  and things began to sizzle. An  old 7-inch file that was loafing  around the crusher floor dropped on the motor, short-circuited the current and probably saved the mill. This may  tound like a-pipe-dream, but it  isn't.and the business men of the  town should frame that file.  The business man who today  neglects to advertise i.s pulling  down tho house over his head.  In times like those more effort-  is required to keep up the good  name and business of a community when times are normal,  aud the business house which  does not make an effort in the  way of advertising to got and  to hold business soon will'have  no business to get and hold.���������  Enderbv Press.  ��������� ���������*.  "v.  ;:)i  Some men work themselves  thin trying to sidestep the boss  and kill time.  Jf.  11  ������������������*(���������'���������  ���������'���������< -,  ������������������'51  ^������������������������i������*m���������������������*5W<w������������*-������������-ns^?^ ���������v.  ���������*���������  t  r-  t  ������.  [THE.     JGfXZETTE^     HEDLEYA " ft,     ft  I\  ses ui  ni^  The Family Doctor Tried in Vain to .Heal tiie Sores-  Another Tribute; to This Great Healing- Ointment  It  may  be intcrcsti:*'-; to  note  that.baby was terribly .afflicted  with ccze-  Dr.  Chase's' Ointment   was  originally ' ma.   had   her  child   treated   by     their  Mansions of Meerschaum  compounded to" ciirc a case of eczema  on a child. The disease'had sp.ead  almost over thc entire body and defied all the regular treatments for  such troubles. The doctoi was perplexed, but finally hit on the formula  of Dr. Chase's .Ointment, and, as  many say, "il worked like a ��������� charm,"  healing up the nasty sores and leaving  the skin   soft and  smooth.  "That was a good many years ago,  and since then many thousands of  cases of eczema, both in children and  adults, have been cured, until today  Dr. Chase's Ointment is , recognized  as the standard, cure for itching skin  diseases.  Mrs. Geo. McNair. River Charles.  N.B., writes as follows: "We use Dr.  Chase's Ointment in our home, and  wouid ' not wish for anything better  for   cuts,  burns  and   bruises      A   few  own family physician, bin the IIIt'c  one got no better They tried- several  remedies, but lhey all proved useless  in this case. Upon the advice of a  neighbor, lhey got Dr Chase's Oint-  mcni, and before ! the'' first, box was  used the child was completely cured.  "I can also recommend Pi Chase's  Nerve -'Food to suffering friends who  I know will be glad to learn oi something to relieve their nervous trouble.  You have my permission to use this  letter  for  the,'benefit  ol others."  So soothing and healing is Dr  Chase's Ointment thai relief from  itching and burning comes almost as  soon as the ointment is applied The  sores are cleaned by the action ol this  treatment, and the'process, ol healing  is soon begun. By persistent use of  the ointment cure is effected 60  cents  a  box.  all .dealers,  or    Ir'tlrnan-  years     ago a   friend    of  mine,   whose, son.  Bales & Co.,  Ltd, Toronto.  The Advertizing Sense of the Hen  A" hen is not supposed to have  much sense or tact, yet every time  she lays an egg she cackles foi the  fact. A roostci hasn't got" a lot of  intellect to show, but none the Mess  most roosters have got sense enough  to crow. Bui man, the greatest masterpiece that nature could devise, will  often' stop and hesitate before he'll  advertise.  Lord  tellers  some ol  ST. VITUS DANCE  CAN B������ EASILY CURED  A   Tonic   for    thc    Blood    and  Nerves   With   Rest   All   That  Is Needed  .   Many a child  has been called awkward,   has   been     punished   in   school  for  noi   keeping  slill 01   foi   dropping  things,   when   ihe   trouble   was   really  St.   Vitus dance.      This    trouble  may  appeal  al  any  age, bill   is  most   oflen  niel   between   the    ages    of    six    and  fourteen.       The   mosl   frequent   cause  of   the   disease   is   pool   blood,   aggravated by indooi  confinement, or  men  tal   strain   at   school.        Under      these  conditions   the   blood   fails   to     carry  nourishment  to  the nerves    and    the  child   begins  to  show  lisllessuess  and  inattention.     Then     il   becomes   restless and twilclung ol the muscles and  jerkings of lhe limbs and body follow.  A  remedy  thai   cures St.  Vitus  dance  and   cures   n   so   thoroughly     that   no  trace of   the disease    remains     is   Dr.  Williams      I'ink      Fills,   which   renew  the blood, thus  feeding  and strength  ening  the slaived nerves.    This is the  only   way   10   cure   lhe   trouble,      and  parents   should   lose   no   time   in   giv  ing   this   treatment      if      their      child  seems nervous oi   irrilablc.  Mrs    Wm.  A.   Squires,   Caniimglon, ���������   Onl..   says:  "My   only   daughter,   now       fourteen  ye-irs of age, was troubled  lor several  years  with   Si.   Vitus dance.    She  was  so  bad   that   at   times she   would   lose j  control ot  her  limbs and  hc-i   face and  eyes   would   be   conlorled        VVe   had  ���������medical   advice   and   medicine,   but   it  did not  help her      In fad   we thought  thc   trouble   growing   worse,   and   fin  ally   we had  lo  take hrr   from  school  About   a   year   ago   wc   began   giving  her   Dr    Williams'   Fink   Fills, and   by  the lime she had  taken five boxes she  was  completely   cured,  and   is   now   j  fine, healthy girl      I  firmly believe we  owe  this   lo   I)i     Williams'   Fink    Fills  and  arc  very   grateful  lor   her   restore  ation   to   perfect   heallli "  You can gel these pills from any  dealer in medicine or by mail al 50  cents a box oi six boxes for $2.50  from The Dr Williams Medicine Co..  Brockvillc,  Out.  All He Had  Northclifle.   in      one, ol   his  rorn      the      Ironl.     describes  IIIr rumor   works of the greai  army    now   on    lhe   field. One   de  part merit carer, for the property of  the dead soldiers Tins is sen! in  large bundles from the field, and each  individual parcel finally sent to ils  proper    destination "1      watched."  says Lord Northclifle. "lhe."'.opening  of one such palhctii parcel during the  final checking \ It contained a few  pence, a pipe, a ' photo t.of wife and,  bairn, a trench ring made 61.-the alu  illinium ol an enemy fuze, a small  diary, and a pouch. It was all the  man  had "  Unpretentious Houses of This Material to Be Found in Spain  Even the most aesthetically inclined of our American millionaires  would hardly consider the luxury of  living in a palace built of meerschaum  as within the range of their fortunes,  yet there, are many unpretentious  houses of this material in the Spanish town of Vallccas. near Madrid,  where a coarse variety of this substance is'to be found. On the other  hand, the Moroccans, just across tiie  Straits of Gibraltar, find that still another variety of meerschaum lathers I  freely and they use it, perhaps spar- !  ingly, as a substitute for soap. .  Chips and, sawdust of the meerschaum pipe factories make an excellent cleaning powder for removing  stains from costly fabrics. An inferior pipe is also made (rom these  scraps, the fragments being'bound  together with some solution anc! then  molded  into  blocks.  Meerschaum is found in Greece  and in Hrubschitz, Moravia, as well  as in Asia. Minor, and to a limited  extent in Pennsylvania. South Carolina and in the upper Gila valley, near  Silver Lake.��������� N.'- iVi. Stone. New  York.  INSURANCE  AN EXCLUS1 VEL Y CANADIAN COMPANY  ESTABLISHED 1890  Excelsior Policies Are Money Makers  >s Richardson & Sons,. Limited  GRAIN  MERCHANTS  Western Offices       ���������        -        Winnipeg, Calgary, Saskatoon  Specialists in the handling of farmers' shipments. -Write, wire  or  'phone  our  nearest -office   for quotations or-information.  Bill your cars "NOTIFY JAMES RICHARDSON & SONS,  LIMITED," to insure careful checking of grades. Liberal advances  on bills of lading-. Quick adjustments guaranteed accompanied by  Government   Certificates   of  grade and  weight. <-V  Vou tWII profit by Scndini; lis Samples and Obtaining- our Advice as to Best  Destination before Sliippirur Your Grain, particularly Barley. Oats and Rye.  LICENSED AND BONDED ,   Established 1857  Comlort for the Dyspeptic���������There  is no'ailment so harassing and exhausting as dyspepsia, which arises  from defective action of the stomach  and livci. and the. victim of i! i.s to  be pitied Yet he'can find ready relief in'.. Par-melee's Vegetable Fills, a  preparation thai lias established itself  by years of effective use There are  pills that are widely advertised as the  greatest . evei compounded, but not  one of them can rank in value with  Parmclec's.  Weary Variety Agent: And what's  yout   particular  claim  to originality ?  Artist; I'm the only comedian who  has so far refrained from addressing  the orchestra as "you in.the iicnch."  ---London  Punch  Grand Complexion Improver!  Better Than Cosmetics  When it's so easy to bring back  the bloom of youth to faded cheeks,  when skin disfigurements can bc removed, isn't ii foolish iu plaster on  cosmetics?  Go to the roo' of the tioublc���������remove the cause���������correct the condition thai keeps you from looking as  you ought Use Dr. Hamilton's Fills  anil very soon you'll have a complexion to bc proud of How much happier you'll feel���������pimples gone, cheeks  rosy again, eyes bright, spirits good,  joyous health again returned. Never  a failure with Dr Hamilton's Pills,  get a 25c box today. '.'.:���������..  470 Grain Exchange  WE GET RESULTS THAT SATISFY.  Write for market information.  MINNEAPOLIS      WINNIPEG      DULUT  World's Record Wheat Crop  fn' view of the various claims of  world's record wheal crops fori large  areas; the Crowfoot Farming Company of Crowfoot, Alberta, submit a  sworn statement' of their results for  the year 1015. which probably surpass  all properly authenticated claims  from othci sources From 1,356 acres  thc Crowfoot Farming Company received an average yield of 51 bushels,  5b 1-3 pounds, per acre of number one  spring wheat. by actual selling  weight, 400 acres of wheat averaged  5������ \-Z bushels per acre. These records were established in the Canadian Pacific Railway Irrigation Block  in Southern Alberta.  Minard's    Liniment  ralgia."  Relieves     Meu-  "What do you think of this extra  hour of daylight scheme?"  "What I'm for is more moonlight,'-'  declared the romantic girl. ��������� Louis-  villr  Courier- Journal.  Catarrh Cannot Be Cured  with LOCAL APl'LI CATIONS, as ctiey  -aiinoi reach ihe seal ot the disease. Catarrh  is a local disease, fzre-ji\\y influenced by ion-  ctituiiunal conditions, and in order to cure it  foii inusi lake an interna! remedy. Hall's  Caiarrlt Cure is taken internally and acts  tliroui'li the blood on thc mucous surfaces  3l the system. Hall's Catarrh Cure was prc-  :cril)ril by one of the best physicians m this  .-ountry loi years. It is composed ol some  ol the best tonics known, combined with  Sorur ol the best blood purifiers. Tiie perfect combination ol the iiifirrdictits in Hall's  Catarrh Cure is what produces such wonderful results in catarrhal conditions. Scad lor  testimonials," Iree.  I*.   J.   CHENEY   &   CO..   Props.,  Toledo.  O.  All   UiuKU'-'ts.   "'Sc.  Hall's   t-'amily   Pills   lor   constipation.  IE HEADACHES  without erae  By  to  Education Progress  Forty-three new school districts  were .established in the province of  Alberta during the past three months.  There aie now upwards of -i.^00  school districts in lhe province, org  aui/ed according to the density of ihe  population, but none more than five  miles in   length  and   breadth  It's Sound  "The account of tins battle has a  menu   sound."  "vVhai   do  you  mean?"  "Il says the wcll-seasonrd Iroops  were mustered out and then peppered   with   shot"���������Baltimore   American.  "Madc in Canada"  li  The Friend of All Sufferers.���������- Like  lo "the shadow of a rock in n weary  land" is Di Thomas' Eclectru Oil  lo all (hose who sillier pain It holds  oul hope to everyone and realizes il  by stilling -suffering every where  is .i liniment thai has thr blessings of  hall a continent, ll is on sale every  wlirre and can be found wherever  erujuired   for  Best for. Quality, Style  and Value. Guaranteed  for all  climates.  ASK  YOUR  DEALER  The Last Great West  Northern British Columbia is lhe  ' lasi.gieai undeveloped west F.vcry  where else in the United Stales and  Canari-i - settlement has proceeded  rapidly, bill as yel, m lhe north of  this province the newromei has hard  ly- madc a place lor himself Those  who know predict, thai the "las! great  west" will be lhe gieale.sl of all; its  agncultural possibilities will give il m  lln? course of liriie a development that  is noI now even guessed al. Hut that  developme.nl will have to be guided  and aided by judicious ("overtime rilnl  assistance.��������� Vancouver   World  Applying    Sloan's    Liniment  Forehead  You Can Stop  the.Severe Pains  Many headaches are of a neuralgic  origin The symptoms of such headaches are intense, and lingering pains  in the brow, temples or back of the  head  There is one certain relief thai lias  becn known and recommended for  years back. Sloan's Linimeni One  application and the dull pain is practically gone. It is easily applied  without rubbing. Rubbing is unnecessary, as Sloan's Lintmetii quickly  penetrates  to  the seal   ol   trouble  Aching muscles, rheumatism, bruises, lumbago, chilblains, sprains and  stiff neck can also be most effectively  treated with Sloan's Liniment.  Cleaner than mtissv plasters or ointments, -it docs not stain the skm or  clog  the pores.  Ai al! drug stores. 25c. 50c. $1.00.  Their Itinerary  Crawlord. Did vou have any iegu-  lai schedule when you wem on your  motoring   lour''  Crahshaw. Oh. no. we lust naiur-  aily stopped wherevei the car happened to have its breakdown ���������ludge  Tuberculosis Among Troops  More  Soldiers  Develop  Tuberculosis  in Canada Than Overseas  Col. Thompson, of the Yukon, who  is in charge ol the convalescent hos  pitals far soldiers in Canada, made  the interesting..statement, bearing out  a previous 'report, thai more Canadian  soldiers developed tuberculosis th  Canada than in England oi at ihe  front He said the ratio was OO to  40. ^  Col. TJioinpson gives as the reason  for this thai tuberculosis in it's incipient stage is very difficult'lo diagnose  and recruits who have a tendency to  tuberculoi trouble* olien develop it  with the change in mode of life. Thc  change lo barrack life frequently hastens the development of tuberculosis  in these men  . WATERPROOF COLLARS AND CUPMS  Something better than linen and bis Uiicidn  bills      Wash    it   with   soap. and   warn       Al  stores   or direct.     State  ntyle  and   ������iiie      Fa  25c   we will mail you  THE ARLINGTON COMPANY  OF  Canada, i.iraiw  5S frcaer Annu. Torgnlg, Ontario  Many mothers have reason to bless  Moilier Graves' Worm Ex terminal or,  because it has relieved the little ones  ol  suffering   and  made  them  healthy.  any  ood  Too Good  "Strange, "Mary doesn't have  offers! She'd make some man a  wife."  "Yes. bin the trouble is everyone  knows she'd make him a good husband,  too."  Minard's  Liniment  Cures Dandruff,  W.  N,  U.  1130  A deaf man was being marrtrd, and  thc parson asked lhe usual ijtie.slion,  "Do yon take ihis woman for your  lawful   wife'"'  "h"!]?" said  the  deaf   man.  "Do yon take this woman for 3'otir  lawful wife?" this time a bil  louder.  1 he groom seemed to gel angry.  "Oh. I don't know." lie said. "S!ie  am'l so awful. I've seen ivuss than  her thai didn't have as much money."  The family was going on an onli'ig  in lhe woods, and moihei was packing  the   lunch   basket.  "Let me see," she murmured "Fve  goi lettuce sandwiches, olive sandwiches, peanul butler sandwiches,  macaroons, pickles, ginger snaps and  chow-chow I wonder if I've forgotten   anything."  "How about putting in something  io eat?" said  father, sai rustically.  "I shall never scold my husband  again foi spending so much tune at  the  club."  "Tell   me  aboui   il."  "Well, last night a burglar got **nto  the house, and my husband knocked  him senseless with the poker I've  heard several men speak ol him as a  poker expert, lie has evidently been  practising al ihe club foi just such an  emergency I"  L  America's  Pioneer  Dag Remedies  BOOK   ON  DOG DISEASES  And How to Feed  .Vailed   free  to  any  address  by  ���������- the Author  H. CLAY GLOVER CO.. Inc.  118 West 31st Street, New Yorki  A new story is at hand bearing upon the exasperaiing delay in completing the Lambs' new clubhouse. Thomas Findlay was one day passing iht  clubhouse, where the work upon ih<  addition is still in progress. Meeting the janitor, Findlay asked him  how soon the building would be readi  foi  occupancy.  The janitor, an Irishman, replied.  "Aboui  the firsi  of  Ociembet "  Findlay retorted: "You mean Sep-  tober?"  "1 mean! what .I'said/' insisted tin  janilot, "Oclcmber."  "Bui there isn't any such 'momIt.'  declared  Findlay  "That's why I made it On ember.'  answered the janitor. ������������������ New Yoil  Telegraph  Belle: They say that limmy makes  heller approaches than any man in  the  club.  Jack: I should say he docs! The.  first lime 1 mcl him I leni him twenty  dollars.���������Brooklyn   Life.  Do its Duty  Nine times in ten when the liver Is r^M St  stomach and bowels are right  CARTER'S LITTLE  LIVER PILLS  gently but firmly com  pel ��������� laiy live* to  do its duty  Cures Con  ��������� tipation,  Indiges  tion.  Sick  Headache, and Distress after Eating,  Small PHI, SmaIl Dose, Small Pric*  Csenume must bear Signature  /  am w-w-'^rtf^rafrw-^w-''-'^^  THE      GAZETTE.      HEDLEY,      B.      C.  VIANY MISLED BY OFFICIALLY CONTROLLED NEWS  Very Little is Known by the People of the Successes of the Allies  On thc West Front, and if Real Facts were Revealed, they  Would Shake Foundations ot the Teutonic Empire   __       o   In "An American's Report of Ten  Months in Germany," D. T. Curtiii.  of Boston, *"Mass., writes as follows:  Early in August last I was in Berlin. The. British-French offensive  which had begun on July 1, outwardly appeared to attract liille notice in  German}'. Even in the highest military quarters it was considered Britain's final bluff. Thc great maps in  thc shop windows of every street  showed no change, and still show no  , change ' worth noticing. "The maps  speak,"  say   lhe  Germans.  One hot evening in Berlin I me.i a  young officer whom I had known on  a previous visit. 1 noticed he was ill  and out ol" sorts. He fold me he had  been unexpectedly called to his regiment on the western front. "How is  that?" I said. \lc madc that curious  indescribable Germ an gesture which  shows discontent and dissatisfaction.  "These English," he. said,,"arc putting every man they have got into a  final ridiculous attempt to make us  listen to peace terms. My leave was  cut short 1 his evening." We had a  glass of beer. "You have been to  England, haven't yon?" he inquired.  J told him 1 had been there last year.  "They seem to have more soldiers  than wc thought," he said. "They  seem lo be learning the business. My  battalion has suffered terribly."  The next day there were other  rumors in Berlin, rumors unknown  to the masses, ft was suggested to  me by a friend that if 1 wanted to  learn the truth I should go lo Pols-  dam and sec the arrival of the wounded of the famous Prussian Guard,  who had had a terrible experience at  the hands of the English in Contal-  maison on July 10. flc drew me  aside and told me that the slate of  things on the Somiiic if known  throughoul Germany would effectively destroy the pretension of the annexationist parly, who believed thai-  Germany had won the war and would  hold Belgium, thc conquered portion  of France and Poland. He told mc  to go out to Potsdam with caution  and warned me that 1 would have the  utmost difficulty in getting anywhere  near the.artillery signs al the railway  station.  I asked another extremely well-informed friend if anything- parlicular  was happening- in the war. and told  him I thoueht of going to Potsdam.  He said: "What for? There is nothing seen there���������the same old drilling and drilling." So well are secrets  kept iii Germany.  /However, I went, and what T saw  in Potsdam would,* if known to the  German people, shake the very foundation of the 'empire. The" hypnotic  effect of thc German newspapers is  not apprehended in Great Britain.  Those newspapers arc all directed  from the foreign office, which can  manipulate 'the. thoughts .of these docile people and turn their attention to  a particular part of the war with the  same celerity as the operator of a  searchlight can direct the beam to  any part of the sky. For the moment  the'whole German nation looks at the  beam, nothing else.      When people in  England ask, "Arcn'i they beginning  lo learn the truth?" I reply thai sonic  are, bin that thc great majority think  cxacilv what they are told. The  great newspaper searchlight today is  switched on l-Tindenburg. Almost all  of these industrious human ants think  of nothing bin Hindenburg. The loan  which is now dragging its slow  length along is the "Hindenburg  loan"; Silesia has named a town Hindenburg; newly arrived infants are  loaded down with the name; lhe daily  tobacco stores display "Hindenburg  cigars," and the, busi of the fierce-  looking warrior is in every middle-  class house. Thc deification of Hindenburg and the downfall of England are the uppermost thoughts in  the whole German mind. 1 hough a  few thoughtful cynics in high'places  regard him as a well atlvei tized  dummy.  Substitute for Rubber  Australian   Chemist   Discovers   Compound to Replace Regular  Article  A question asked in lhe legislative  assembly of Vicloria about steps to  prevent a certain valuable. Australian  invention from falling into the hands  of the "rubber ring" have directed attention lo a very interesting discovery. Mr John Flint, Rushcuttcr's  Bay, near SydiiTy. has. like otheis  all over the world, been experimenting for years with a view to discovering a substitute for rubber. He  claims to have solved the problem.  His compound, which has been patented wherever possible, is said to  have been partly the result ol" an accident. He had been working for  years  upon   a   certain   formula.  In making up another formula he  madc a mistake, and the resuli exceeded the expectations which he  cherished all along. To put his discovery lo a severe lest, he made a  motorcar tyre, one-half of -which was  rubber and the oilier halt ol* his composition. The tyre has been used  for four months, has travelled 1,500  miles and is still running.  Air. Flint admits that as regards  actual wear his compound shows  slightly more depreciation than lhe  rubber, but it is doubtful whether an  ordinary observer would notice it.  Since then, however, he has improved  his_compound, and ils possibilities, as  a rival to rubber are plainly suggested by the fact that it can bc made al  a cost of 10 to 12 cents a pound. It  is claimed for lhe new material that'  it will serve all the purposes for  which rubber is used: thai it will not  ignite; and that when heated it will  not melt.  France's Legacy After War  New  Railways Built and Other r".i-  Improvements Made Through  Exigencies of thc War  When the merry'bells of peace ring  throughout France, and her exiled  sons turn to their devastated homes  in Northern France, there will at  least be some compensation for the  deluge of blood and iron that turned  their  Edcnic fields into a hell.  Mr. Warner Allen, with timely  thought, reminds France of what she  will possess as a legacy from the  war. "There arc many places in  France," he points out. "that have for  years been clamoring for light railway facilities. The exigencies of  modern, war have provided them today with a profusion of railway communications, and when peace is declared, however much the rails may  have been torn up by shell fire, ihe  tracks will slill bc there for future  use.  OVER THREE THOUSAND COUNTRY ELEVATORS  Some  Interesting  Information   Given  by   Mr.  C.   A.   Dunning,  General Manager of" the Saskatchewan Co-Operative Elevator  Co., in Reference to Marketing Conditions in the  Prairie Provinces    o .   "Similarly, all along thc front roads  have been bioadcncd and multiplied.  In certain districts, where the want of  water   was the main  obstacle  to  pro- | fh'csc"farmers'      companies  gress.   hundreds   of   wells   have   been ; approximately    one hundred  There arc in the three prairie provinces over.three thousand country  elevatois operating at thc prescnl  time with a total storage capacity of  about fifty-eight million bushels. Of  these three thousand, a large number are owned by line companies.  Nearly two hundred are in "Manitoba  operated by farmers' companies, two  hundred and sixty-otic in Saskatchewan and about  a  hundred in Alberta.  landled  million  The cost of producing grain in  Saskatchewan was stated by thc  Saskatchewan Grain Commission lo  be approximately 62 cents to produce  and place at the railway poinl a  bushel in an average year, under average conditions by an. average farmer.  At thc time this figure was made  known there .was a great deal of criticism of it, but Mr.- Dunning said he  was glad to see thai this figure has  been confirmed b:, the Census Bureau  of the Dominion Government and the  l_,..i    nn,i  :,   .,,.,,. i.���������  ,iri,   ...  ,i,������  t.n,j , -<-���������---        ---:���������'      -������������������- -, ,        "���������  "-   ""'"u" uovcrnmcrit and in-  bo.cd. and n  may  tie mat  at me tiui   bushels oi  thc, 101-. crop and arc bc-   Department    of  A<*n'culturc      Trans  r\\    lwi������i ilif ire      riQlnels       wmeh       were ��������� -....      - .: i        ��������� ., . . . .i���������iii.imuii.       iiuus  of   hostililies    districts     which     wer.c  | coming    increasingly     an    impoi'.aut  practically     barren  and    unpopulated   f;u.l0 ,-*-������������������ ,i,e handling of the crop of  will     enjoy  abundance  of   water  anc  consequent prosperity  "Then  al  the factories  which  have  Ihe West.  Speaking al   Kcgina  on the marketing of the grain  through these clcva  been constructed or the preparafon t0*rs_ V|. q a |")liml*nff| general  of acids, tar products powder, and ' lllan;]ircr 0f t'ie Co-operative Elcvator  explos.vcs can bc easily tran-=ionncd I (Jompanv, showed in detail the vari-  into woiks that will ukikc arttfic-ial j ou> ^tc.ps tuu-cn in the liandlinc; of lhe  penumes. photographic maienals. I a.op ;ls u.cl- a? l)ie varving k;ni|s 0f  pharmaceutical products, and hot.) i documents used in the "movement of  organic and inorganic chemical  dyes.   lhc   crop   from   l]le   c0���������mrv   elevator  With a view" to paving the way towards this important transformation,  a number of powerful associations  have been formed, of which one of  the most important is the "Syndicaf  National des Matieres Colorante-*,"  which is a combination of coal and  metallurgical companies, papcrmak-  ers. ilveis. textile  manufacturers, c-ic.  Dreams of Annexations  lo the  ocean  port.  Air. Dunning slated thai he had the  opportunity of making comparisons  in this direction when he was a  member of the "Royal Commissio.*.  appointed by the Government tonic  lime ago to investigate marketing-  conditions, and he had conic to the  conclusion that the Canadian facilities   for   handling   grain   with   respect  porlatiou and expenses to Liverpool  cost approximately 34 cents in average times from the ordinary Saskatchewan country point, which meant  that when thc price of wheat went  below lhc dollar mark at Liverpool  the farmer lost money.  German Terribieness  Never a  More.  Monstrous .Halliicina.  tion  Than  That  Which  Holds  the Teutonic Mind  For    twenty-five months    the Gcr*  man   soldier, like  the   German   sailor,  has been sowing    hate    and loathing  and     enduring     detestation     in     thc  hearts  of millions.    lie  has not   won  a world hy it; he has not  won a war  by it.    The battles  thai   he  has   won  ; to legislative  regulation, grading and | have  been  through  thc superiority of  [handling   generally   were   supcrior_to! his   organization,   or   his  any   olhei   exporting   cotin-  Germany Continues to Talk of Exten- ji,lho*sC   of  sion of Territory f'fhc   Canadian      facilities  were   far  The   national   bond   in   Germany   i** j more  advanced  and   efficacious     than  based upon force; nothing more true, nhose in Australia.  In    the Antipodes  And   this  is  why  the   German   people j the grain was handled in  bags. Their  believe now, as they believed in  ivS7(l, j girding system was known as the "'-".  preparation,  not through the fear he has put in  the hearts of his foes. There has  never been a time when his foe ���������  that is, the individual fighting man ���������.  was afraid ol" him.  What a strange delusion this German idea is, at once ludicrous and revolting! How deeply into the mind  of the German has sunk thc chatter  about a "superior race!" As if it were  conceivable     that      people     of     the  "Can you tell me where f can buy  a good, healthy rattlesnake?"  "What on earth do you want with  a rattlesnake?"  "My cousin Bill in Florida just sent  mc a pet alligator and 1 want to reciprocate." - -  Nausea smd Heartburn  You cannot have sick headache when  your liver is right. Dr. Cassell's Instant  Relief sots it right, and that is why it  cures sick headache and other***-bilious troubles so quickly, so  surely, so thoroughly. Ifc is not violent, like so many preparations, and you don't need to keep on taking it." It just helps  your liver to regain its power, and thus natural action and  natural cure follow at ouce.  " Soisncs Sittings," a prominent English scientific journal, says  (April 11, 1916):���������" Providenoa has given us the brains to rioviso moans  to compensate Natures for our ifl-traatment of her. . . . Tho moans  at hand oomo from natural sources, and we have thim embodied in  suoh splendid combinations as Dr. Cassell's  Instant  Relief."  Take Dr. Cassell's Instant Iteliof for constipation, biliousness,  torpid  liver, ei<-k headache, dizziness, speckn   before   tho  eyes,   flatulence  and .  windy   spasms,  acidity,  heartburn, impure  blood, and that dull, h<iavy  feeling which is  a. sure  indication o-' fiver troubles.  Price 50 cents, from all Druggists and Storekeepers,  Oi direct from tiro sole agents for Canada. Harold P. Bitchic and Co.,  Ltd.. 10,  M'Oaul-strect. Toronto.   War Tax 2 cents extra.  Or. Cassell's Instant Relief is the companion to Or, Cassell's Tablets.  Sole Proprietor! ��������� Vr. Cassell's  Co., Ltd., Manchester. England.  Dr. Cassell's ,-d  that right is might. _ This is the ever-| a. Q.," or fair average quality style  lasting truth to which Prince Billow ��������� and could not for one moment coin-  gives utterance. There in noihing un- pare with the 'Canadian. Russia, as  expected   in   il.     But   even   if we  arciWell,  was behind in  its  facilities, and_  noi surprised al this opinion, ii makes | no onc \n  '���������'"uropc would buy Russian   French.     Russian    or   British   nation  us  pause  to  think.    One of the. most I whcat without  seeing it. with   all   iheir centuries  of  war     and'  intelligent men in Germany, one" \rr Dunning also rcfeircd to 'he courage, of battle and conquest bc-  who.se political experience is ol thc agitation which is going on in some'hind them, could be shaken by the  widest,   has  only   been   able   to   draw   ((U;ll-[Crs to permit mixing of grain in'mere  prcscuie before  them of troops  lhe terminal elevators and for pro-j of a nation which is but a newcomer  vincial grading. He thought it would i in the world and has seen its capital  bc the'greatest mistake in the world j occupied and its sovereigns liumil-  to allow it. "The reputation of 1lic;iated, its armies routed and scattered  Canadian Government grade ccrliii-|,-hy Frenchmen aud Russians more  catc in  Europe is    loo    valuable    to'than once.  lose," he continued. "Any mixing of _ Nor is it less preposterous for the  grades would not deceive thc Euro- German to imagine that the men who  pcan miller for one moment, and our \ willingly and completely dedicate  certificate'-would bc held in the. same j their lives to the service of iheir  suspicion as that of the United j tonniry, who go forth to battle pre-  States." v j pared to die, can bc frightened. Never  Canada is situated geographically! was Ihcre a more monstrous hallucm-  at a. greater disadvantage than any i ation than ihat which holds the Tcu-  of ils competitors in the world's mar-J tonic-mind in thrall. The German  kct. "We have a very long rail haul, I sees himself irresistible, terrible, all  and rail hauling of grain is the'most compelling; then he transfers this  expensive, method. The UnitedI self-appraisal to the mind of his foe.  States can hardly bc taken into ac- T������ ac.t upon the state of riiiiul he  count because they are becoming less conceives to exist iu the enemy, he  factor in the world's mar-i has recourse to devices which a fool-  led. Any grain which they export j ������*"*h- nurse might employ to terrify ?  and    which  comes     into   competition   nervous  child.  with  Canada is chiefly exported from       1 here  is  only  one  thing  that   Ger  the two  coasts  or close  to  the great   nv.\x\  terribieness has accomplished  in  lakes,   and    thus    thev    have a short   t'115*  world so far.     It has dug a  gulf  haul." ' between    thc    German    and the    rest  Speaking- with reference to the Ar-lof civilized mankind. Millions of  gentine. "Mr; Dunning stated that the[nl.e" tor the rest of 'their lifetime  grain growing area is nowhere more I "���������*���������'..'" feel toward thc German as .most  than five hundred miles from water i ol. mankind feels toward a snake The  transportation. This transportation ! crimes, the , offences against human-  is not like our great lakes, which in-i itj\ decency, against all human and  volves two or three transfers, but' c'n'!ne '*}"' which has marked German  is.one of the greatest rivers in thc j P������hcy since August, 1014, have open  world. Ocean-going steamers come i etl .:l chasm that u will be m;uiv de  right up to the ports. They have an  advantage in    view    of    lhc fact that  they   have   the .cheap   peon   labor,   a J _ '. "   thing not desired in Canada. Mr.! ^ Destruction ot Rheims  Dunning pointed out that he was j Rhoims in time of peace Inn  speaking at all limes of condiiio.'-s; thousand houses intaci; of thrsr.  as they exist in normal times and;thousand have been entirelv destroy  his whole address must be taken, ed and three thousand have hern  from that point of view. [damaged  more or  less seriously    l"hc  As to Australia, the wheal belt was.' Germans have kuux at a disianre of  merely a belt and nothing else. The'just one mile from the Cathedral, and  belt was round thc coast, for as J the Cathedral is in the verv heart of  everyone knew,     the    interior    was a, Rheims.     liven   vviii;   their   held   guns  1  onc . conclusion from thc terrible  drama which is at present shakiui;  Europe to ils foundations, by the will  of Germany���������that is, that German  militarism must bc developed. "vVe  must strengthen ourselves on our  coasts and on our frontiers. The result of the war must not bc negative,  but positive. The re-establishment  of the status cpio ante helium would  mean for Germany not a gain but a  loss. Wc must insist upon an augmentation of guarantees and of real  securities."  Annexations   and   annexations,   and  still   more   annexations,   such   is   thc  theme of "Prince Bulow, just the same  as those  oi  Burian, Belhmaim, Tisza  and   others.     After  four  and  twenty  months  of impotence)  Germany  con  fesses    to    what    her intentions are. j an(j (  What   would   lhey  have  been   if,     as ���������'  she  intended,  she had  won     in     sixj  weeks?    .    .    No. peace   can   be   lust- j  ing   which   is   not   founded   upon   the  complete  and     total  defeat     of  Germany, a defeat which  will enable the  conquerors   to   take  lhe  maximum   of  guarantees   -against    Prince    Billow's  plans.    ... :  Prince Bulow knows the country  will agree with him; bul in expressing his views he pronounces the  country's condemnation. German  militarism and the German nation  arc onc, he tells us. -Hence the necessity imposed upon us of taking precautions in the future not only  against the military organization, but  also against thc people who arc  identified therewith. ��������� Lc Temps,  French Conservative.  534,727 Teutons Takerl  The Paris Journal of September 1������  publishes a table of the prisoners and  booty captured by the Allies on the  four principal fronts from July 1 lo  September IS. The captures of the  Kinrianian army and the Saloniki  army arc uol included. Thc figures  arc:  Machine  Prison  Guns  Gnus  ers  French   ..  . .     1-15  729  .1.1,699  British   ..  ..     109  )���������?>  21,-150  Russian    . .  . .    S-II  1.5S0  ���������102.-171  Italian   ..  . .      36  92  ;������,04S  cades   before     a   new   German   spirit  j could close.���������Xew  York  Tribune  sis.  I WO  great desert.    In Australia the  WiiC.  1 : of  .77  calibre    stationed     at   Nogent  Total  ,131  2.624  -190,608  These figures were obtained from  the officail   communiques.  From September 18 to October 4,  according to the communique, the  French increased liic.ir total of prisoners to 40,313, lhc British lo 27,602,  the Russians to 432,564, and the Italians to 34,248, giving a grand total  of 534,727 prisoners taken on lhe western,, eastern anc! southern fronts  from July, when the Somine offensive  began, lo the present time.  ripened and was threshed right on 1'Abessee and in the famous tori of  the field. There was no very great ! Brimont they can hurl shells upon ihe  expense involved, and they also had I Cathedral. Thc two greatest indns-  an aihautagc in ocean transport:;-j tries of the city before the war were  lion. The Australian tariff rcgula-; lhc woollen manufactures and the  tions with thc Motherland gave them j making of champagne wine- The  an advantage which Canada did not ��������� Germans were unable to loot the bulk  possess. Australia has a far mor.*|Of the champagne supply or to wreck  marked British preference than Can-j the immense mileage of wrne cellars,  ada for their importations of Ilritish; hut il is a different storv with regard  goods. They had a lower freight j lo the woollen industry. There is not  rale because vessels coining to take'a single woollen factory left in  wheal over came, loaded with goods, j Rheims. The Germans' espionage  while of lhc vessels carrying ("ana- j system had revealed to them the lora-  di;in   grain   came   cither   with   half   a j tion  oi every woollen  factory, its ca-  Not on Any Team  She: ,1 suppose wc shall hear of  nothing but football for the next  three months.  Her Brother: Well, sis, I don't see  any necessity  for  you  lo kick,  cargo or^with a cargo not very profitable.  India possessed the cheapest labor  in thc world, and Kussia, the greatest  wheat producing country in the  world, could produce at a low cost.  "It is useless to speak of a home  market." continued Mr. Dunning, "so  long as we are exporting two-thirds  of what wc produce, and lhc possibilities of production, so far as grain  is concerned, ar,: so far ahead of  the possibilities ol" consumption thai  it will always be regulated by the.  price at Liverpool."  pacily and  equipment.  "Mabel,   do  uirriagc?"  "Think about il  Candid  you   ever   think   about  I worry, about it.  Wife: This paper (ells of a man out  iu  Ohio who lives on onions alone.  Hub: Well, anyone who lives on  onions ought to live, alone.��������� Boston  Transcript.  m  --���������.if  W.       N.  U.  1130 THE      GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,       D.      C.  Destruction  Of Militarism  Further Military  Successes Required  to Break the Obstructive Will  ''.':''  of Germany  We quote 'he final sen fences of a  document which, being prepared primarily for influencing opinion in neutral countries, has not found publication iii our ordinary press. After a  rehearsal of the necessities which  brought the Allies into conflict with  the German claims, and which compel us to continue fighting until  Prussian militarism is destroyed, the  signatories of'this document, amongst  whom we note consistent supporters  of our cause, such as Mr. Archer,  Professor Gilbert Murray and Professor Hobhouse, give the following  account of our national demand:  "When our ministers spoke of destroying Prussian militarism, they  meant the ending of a system which  has compelled all Europe to arm, and  now to send all its sons to die in  ���������million's. That system can be ended  as soon, as Germany is ready to accept what most other nations have  long* desired, the settlement of international question by peaceful arbitration or co-operation in council, and  not by the open or secret menace of  the sword."  Here, it. seems to us, is < the clear  statement of the first condition of a  settlement. It is not certain that any  military victory, however decisive,  can in itself bring the ending of the  Prussian system, or can even compel  the German people to desire its end  instead of desiring to foster it for  some distant revenge. It is probable  that further military successes for  the Allies will be required to break  the old obstructive will of Germany.  But there are signs that, with the  gigantic loss of life she has sustained  and with the certainty of further disasters staring her in the face, she  is ripening for a repudiation of all  her conquests." If Germany could  be brought to such a definite repudiation, and to a clear expression of  her willingness to enter such a European system as is proposed, a preliminary basis for negotiations would  have been reached. We should then  be some distance from concrete terms  of settlement.���������The  Nation.  A Pathetic Picture  When the Kaiser's Entrance to Paris  Was Foiled  That illuminating writer, Mr. Ifil-  aire Belloc, who has written a whole  volume on the glorious victory of the  Marne, makes thc disclosure that the.  Kaiser himself was a witness of that  first disastrous defeat of his armies���������a defeat that nothing the Germans have since been able to do  could retrieve. It seems that the  Kaiser had prepared to ride forward  into Paris in all the glory of his  "shining armor," but he arrived at  the plateau of Amancc only to see the  rout of his troops.    Says Mr. Belloc:  "Thc little, aged figure of that unfortunate man, whose physical disabilities were perhaps in part responsible for the war, was to be seen  from the French lines watching, the  battle from the ground behind. He  was distant fronv the nearest observers by more than the common range  of a field piece; he was caught-only  by the careful" scanning of glasses;  but the figure and its surroundings  were unmistakable. Grouped about  him was the "brilliant staff" of the  newspapers and stage; and the "White  Cuirassiers, which were to be the escort of his triumph, were massed to  thc left and behind. Pie had also put  on for that day the white uniform of  that corps and the silver helmet. It  was pathetic and a little grotesque."  The Kaiser has had . many disappointments since, but it is .to be  doubted if he ever experienced such a  bitter disappointment as he suffered  when he found that he would not be  allowed to enter Paris in the character of conqueror.���������From the Montreal  Herald.  Cut Down Fatal Wounds  Speed Up Ambulance Service From  French Battlefields to Hospitals  Dr. Alexis Carrell has announced  an impending reform in the methods,  of surgery throughout France which  is likely to result in a vast diminution of amputation and fatal wounds.  He said;  "Grafting of the tissue of the bone  and flesh hitherto has been next to  impossible, owing to the difficulty of  transporting the wounded from the  field to the hospital before gangrene  or infection have set in.  "The American ambulance, however, has demonstrated the possibility, with an efficient transport department, of getting the ' wounded  soldier from the battlefield to the  hospital within ten hours. Heretofore  the average time has been twenty-  four hours, which entailed much loss  of life and many otherwise needless  amputations.  Y . "The French Army Medical Service  ;(frankly recognizes the splendid  methods of the American- hospital,  and has decided to speed up its transport everywhere and generalize the  use of Dakcn solution for the washing of suppurating wounds, thus rendering possible a vast campaign of  grafting which will result in enormous progress in that branch of sur-  gery."    Prevention of Hail  Taste and Manners  Good Taste  Is  Largely  a Matter of  Experience  What is the difference between  taste and manners?  It may be bad manners to knock a  man down; but it is not necessarily  bad taste.  A rich man in  Philadelphia gave a IalT'the  reception and issued invitatiom cards -'connection with the work of a  Y  upon which    were engraved    his picture.    This was not bad manners.    It  was certainly bad taste. .���������'.���������������������������������������������,...'  A    large, handsome    woman    once  Who Will Help the  Boys at the Front  Contributions of Games and Musical  Instruments Forwarded Through  '"';;��������� the Ontario W. C. T. U.  The Ontario  VV.  C.  T.  U. in  No*  vcmber,  1914, became responsible lor  necessary money    outlay  m  ' Al.  C. A. representative in France. lu  January of 1914 two such men were  taken under our care. In all, we have  Y. M. C. A. representatives.  broke] into     a  meeting  of  President ��������� these���������Capts. Oscar Irwin and Harry  -,.        ..     ......        *    vVhiteman���������died   in   France.   A   third.  Lincoln's cabinet, interrupting the  proceedings. The homely Lincoln  arose and, addressing her,' said:  "Madam, what do you wish?"  She replied:  "I came in here to take a look at  you."    ���������  "Well, madam," he replied, "in the  matter of looking, I have a distinct  advantage of you."  That was   both   bad  taste and  bad  was' invalided home. Wc are now  supplying all thc needed support lor  Capts. Ed. Archibald and Charters  Sharpe.  The following letter from Capt. Ed."  Archibald has recently .arrived:  France^  Dear    Mrs. Thornley,���������I    received  the marked Testaments and the leaf-  "  J  aimers on her part; on the part of J^?P'K" for which **-cceP- our heart-/  Lincoln^  and  i thanks.  it  was good    manners  aim i     w���������.,:������������������ i���������������- ���������  ..   i   .  good  taste  to refrain from  throwing L?*^"*-J?,Ccn **PP������-.--ted  -������  ovcrsf  k���������   ......   -r  ii..  ...:���������,i    ���������.  .-..   _....: * I the - physical    recreation  and-   sports.  Germany's Crimes in Africa  World Record Hen  Produced at Gueiph  Champion Barred  Rock During  Last  Year Laid 310 Eggs  Ontario's .Agricultural College at  Guelph has produced, according-. to  the records in the hands of the Department of Agriculture, a world-  rccord-beating hen. For some years  now the poultry branch at the college  has been specializing upon thc Barred  Rock species as a utility breed of  poultry both for egg and meat production. During the past year one  member' of the flock laid 310 eggs.  This is the greatest number of eggs  laid by any hen of this breed in one  year, so far as official world's records  are obtainable.  The  world's    record  in   egg-laying/ Bomking  for hens of all breeds is 314 eggs in a  year, and the Ontario champion had  ten days of her twelve-month still to  go when she fell a victim to the heat  and suddenly departed life. Her  demise is believed to have spoiled a  new .world record, since to the time  of her death she was laying an egg a  day as regularly as clock-work.  Thc Ontario Agricultural College,  however, has not abandoned the coveted goal. The poultry department  this year has produced more hens  who have laid an average of 200 eggs  per year than ever before. Among  these successful layers the daughters  of the dead champion stand among-  the highest producers, indicating that  they intend to keep up the family  tradition.  So far as official records go, the  high-water mark in egg-laying previously reached by the Barred Rock-  species was 282 for the year. This  record was made three years ago.  The average annual production of the  ordinary barnyard hen is 80 eggs per  year.  The experiments at the college arc  being carried on by Professor W. R.  Graham, regarded as one of the best  poultrymcn on thc continent. The  Provincial Department of Agriculture  has already distributed 8,000 settings  of eggs through the district representatives and the school fairs to  children in Ontario desirous of going  into the poultry business. ��������� Toronto  Globe.  Enemy     Officers    Order.   Atrocities,  Saying Colonial War Is  Uncivilized  Not only does the Hun practice his  policy of blind, indiscriminate mutilation of the wounded, the infliction  of awful crimes upon the helpless  women and children in territory at  present occupied by himself in Europe, but in his insenatc rage he visits  his_ spleen and hate upon harmless  natives of African territories. . The  London Daily Express publishes the  following as proof of this assertion:  "War in the colonies is uncivilized  and .does not come under The Hague  convention."  This remarkable statement was  made'by a senior German officer in  the Kameroons to a British officer.  It is printed in a blue book published  recently, describing such an astonishing series of German atrocities and  breaches of the rules' of war as make  it impossible ever again to include  Germany among the civilized nations  of the world.  The papers include a series of official reports from October, 1914, dealing generally with German cruelty  shown to the native inhabitants of the  Kameroons and East Africa. Terrible  examples are given of German cruelty to natives, including women, because of their British sympathies.  The Germans hanged the King of  and shot    several  of    his  people because  they  refused  to   take  up arms against the English.  The blue book also contains particulars of the poisoning of wells in  (late) German Southwest Africa.  General Louis Botha states that on  the occupation of Swakopmund six  wells had been poisoned by means of  arsenic. In some instances bags full  of poison were found in wells. t  TMajor-General Dobell, reporting to  the war office on Jan. 28, from general headquarters, Duala, says that  the Germans adopted a systematic  policy of extreme brutality towards  those natives who they considered  might favor thc allied forces. "From  the military point of view," he says,  "they obtained certain advantage by  their methods, in that the natives  were terrified, and afraid to give information of their movements,"  A Matter of Fact  A visitor to a Sunday school was  asked to address a few remarks to  the children. He took thc familiar  theme of the children who mocked  Elisha on his journey to Be'thcl ���������  how the young ones taunted the  prophet, and how they were punished when two "she bears came out  of the wood and ate forty-and-two  of them. "And now, children," said  he, "what does this story show?"  "Please, sir," came from a little  girl in the front row, "it shows Ifow  many children two she bears can  hold!"  Sugar's History  Has Been Known and Used Since the  Beginning of Time  The beginning of sugar's history  is lost in the mists of antiquity.  It has becn known since the dawn  of history, but not in all countries,  and the Chinese appear to have delighted their palates with some sort  of sugar for more than 3,000 years.  It was known in India earlier than in  Europe, being made from a juicy  reed or cane.  One of the generals of Alexander  the Great is said to have carried sugar to Greece in the year 325 B.C.,  as Sir Walter Raleigh, some 2,000  years later, carried tobacco from  Virginia to England. But even as  late as A. D. 150 sugar was stili a  rarity in Greece.  "   The famous physician,  Galen, used  it  as  a  remedy  for certain  maladies.  The invention of thc first process  for refining sugar is ascribed to the  Arabs, and a Venetian merchant is  said to have purchased the secret  from thern and introduced the process into  Sicily.  The refining of sugar was first  practised in England about 1659.  French Invention Which Is Said to  . Prevent the Formation of Hail  In most parts of Canada we are  particularly free from those disturbances of nature which involve the  destruction of life and property.  Of course we have our own troubles. In the east there are gales and  often high tides, which inundate  large areas. In the west there are  the "prairie twisters," which sometimes wreck a whole city. But.nothing like the national disasters of  other countries has ever overcome  us. . ��������� ��������� r7  ��������� But there is much' damage occasioned each year.by lightning and  hail. In Europe out of every 2,000,000  deaths about two are caused,by lightning. In South Africa the number, is  55, and im this country not more than  eight. ���������'���������.���������-. ,: ������������������".  Hail damage alone causes much destruction in South Africa. Because  of this the South African farmers are  particularly interested in a French  device known as "Parahail," which is  supposed to prevent hail from forming in the upper regions.  A parahail is simply .a tall steel and  copper post extending down into permanent moisture, and it acts on 'he  same principle as does a lightning  rod. _,  No theory was involved in. the invention. It was observed that in the  vicinity of the Eiffel Tower in Paris  no hail ever fell. The same was observed in other places where tall towers had been erected. The French  Government became interested, and  in 1915 exhaustive experiments were  carried out regarding the matter. It  has been demonstrated that even otd-  inary lightning conductors have a  modifying influence on the formation  of hail.  The theory is that atmospheric  electricity is necessary in order that  hail may be produced. Otherwise  thc moisture falls in large soft flakes  of snow. Meteorologists never have  been unanimous regarding ideas of  the formation of snow, hail and frozen fain���������for, by the way, hail is not  simply frozen rain. Therefore the  electric theory, improbable as it may  seem, is not antagonistic to facts  which  we already possess.  The posts used in the experiments  in FYance cost about $1,000, and were  erected two and a half miles apart  each way. One post is reckoned to  protect about 4,000 acres. This  means that the average annual expense per acre should not exceed two  or three cents.    '  It may be that the posts which  have proven so effective under  French conditions as to interest the  Frcuc.i Covernrr"*nt in experimenting  with them iu the year 1915, will not  prove practical under Canadian conditions. Perhaps our thunder and  hailstorms are of a different character. Nevertheless, the proposition is  wprth looking into. It might be that  such posts would completely protect  thc surrounding areas from lightning.  South Africa is, of course, much more  interested in this proposition than we  arc, with her unusually high lightning  death loss. Nevertheless, the prairie  provinces, with their occasional violent thunder and hail storms, should  have a very real interest in a proposition of this sort. We should find  out more about what the French are  doing.  her out of the window, as in  strict  justice, he should have done  Good  taste  is  largely  experience,    united  to  natural  ties.  To go up to your father-in-law at  your wedding breakfast with a bottle  of champagne in your hand and, slap  for the whole Canadian  corps,, 1  am'  a  mittpr  e>f \'m a Position to use anything in    the  *-*l!way  of outdoor or indoor games  ���������  abili-  bascball,    football,    lacrosse,    tennis,;  checkers, chess, dominoes, etc., etc.���������  anything out ot which the boys could  get pleasure and exercise!  I     1 also  want all sorts of small mu-  ���������W^������0?-lnhnt SmS^ 5'"} |sical  instruments-concertinas,  flutes,  banneri'bu?^fched   en2."- *������?'"- ������"���������*. n���������*?*���������'*^  pecially if the old gentleman is worth ior they arc a *-rcat lactor in our eu  a million.  To be told that, your friend is too  busy'to see you in his office and then  to call him up over the nearest telephone, is "not necessarily bad taste,  but bad manners. The two may go  together, but this is not an invariable  rule.���������Life.   ,   . ',.���������-.  Pastoral Scenes Near  The Firing Line  Literally Construed  Publisher: What you want to avoid  is writing over the heads of the  people.  Author: I know it. If you take this  book, I'll be able to give up.my attic  room and do my writing on the  ground floor.  'You once kept a cook lor a whole  month, you say?"  "Yes."  "Remarkable.  age  ?"  How  did  you  man-  "We were cruising on a house-boat  and she couldn't swim." ��������� Pittsburg  Chronicle-Telegraph.  Canadian Airman's Exploit  Warm congratulations appear in  the British press on the prowess of  Lieut. Ernest Hicks, who has just received the Military Cross after bringing down two enemy machines and  driving three others back over lhc  lines,  and bombed  trains.  Hicks is a Canadian. It is barely  four months since he made his first  flight. He came over with the Princess Pats and was wounded in the  second battle of Ypres. He was afterwards transferred to the Royal  Flying Corps.  Barbed Wire Used to Prevent Cows  Knocking Over Aiming Posts  One can hardly... tell where peace  ends and war begins, in this country.  I saw a field with one or two rather  fresh shell holes in it, from which the  grain was being harvested. Farmers  carry their operations up to and,even  beyond our gun positions. In fact, we  drove.biii* guns aiid wagon into a field  which had been manured and partly  plowed. A field of oats were neatly  stooked in front, and some of the  stooks had to be moved out of the  way. In some cases we have had to  put barbed wire around our aiming  posts to prevent the cows from  knocking them over. It is something  of a nuisance to have to drive the  beasts out' of the way .of our shooting irons;  Even when carrying on his operations in the war zone the Belgian  farmer maintains his reputation as a  careful and skillful tiller .of the soil;  indeed, fields actually under fire appear to be cleaner and better cultivated than some of those farther  back.  In company with a friend I spent  one of my days off in the inspection  of a Belgian grist mill operated by  wind power. The mill was. of the old  Dutch type, very old, it was built in  1785, and looks its age. Mills like  this are erected on the highest ground  available, so rs to take full advantage'  of the wind. The mill which I visited is about 35 feet in height.- The  building for holding the grain is fifteen to, twenty feet high, twelve feet  square, is built on a single-beam or  axis, and is some twenty feet above  the ground level.. The sweep of the  sails makes a circle of sixty feet.  The sails are four feet wide, .and are  covered with canvas. On very windy  days the sail is shortened in order-to  lessen the power developed. All the  cogs and wheels used in the gearing  arc of wood. A remarkable thing  about the structure is that when\the  wind changes the whole building is  turned 'around on its axis by means  of a beam running out on a slant from  the building to the ground. This resembles the trail of a gun in its appearance and action. In addition to  serving as a lever the beam supports  the stairs leading up to the mill. Although the building is 130 odd years  old, the mill is probably able to develop close to fifteen horse-power in  a fair wind, but on account of the  rough, wasteful machinery, the grinding capacity is not over one to onc  and a half hundred-weight per hour.  The carts used here are about as  old and as interesting as the wind  grist mills, 'lhey are all three-wheeled affairs, two good sized ones behind and a small one in front. There  are no shafts, but there is a brake to j  hold the weight in going down hill. |  These carts are used for medium to  heavy work, and, despite their ancient  appearance, they are much easier on  horses than the two-wheeled wagons  so common in England.  Somewhere in  Belgium. ��������� Gordon  Furrow,   in  Toronto  Globe.  tertainments. .  Wc have been having some  trying  times lately    and have    lost    a large'  number of our men.    But there must  bc no pause in our service, whatever  the   casualties.���������Yours    in   the   work,.  Ed. is. Archibald.'"  No one can read 'the accounts of  !life aL thc front without realizing die  intolerable strain under which our  men live. Again and again Capt.  Archibald and other Y. M. C. A. workers have mentioned the absolute  need lor recreation and-tne soothing  helpful influence of music and games,  in thousands of Canadian homes  therc are just such unused articles as  Capt. Archibald needs, lhe boys  have grown to men and gone their  ways out into thc world; and the  once cherished flute or mouth-organ  or football is lying away in some tor-  gotten corner. Look lor it, mother  dear, and send it to us,'that it may  help those other brave 'lads to bear  their almost intolerable burdens.  But if you should have nothing of  the kind���������perhaps the grandchildren  have taken possession���������and are still  I minded to help, you can send us the  money to buy anything you designate. Should you decide to purchase  yourself, please do not get several  instruments when the money you expend would procure one article that'  would give real satisfaction. F"or instance, the 35c mouth-organ is not to  be compared with the 75c make in  tone, range and durability, lhe key  desired is C, if that is procurable.  Where the keys are alike or can be  harmonized, trench concerts can be  arranged.  And that box of dominoes, or the  checker board or chess set ��������� hunt  them up and send them along to the  City W. C. T. U. Headquarters, 432  Park Avenue, London, Ontario, Canada, where all the supplies for Capt. -  Archibald's work are being gathered.  Please do not forget the last two  items of this address, for since the  war began many a leitei intended for  this town has crossed the ocean.  As fast as enough material is received to fill a barrel, it will be shipped.  Both Capts. Archibald and Sharpe  are anxious for Gospel portions. They  can also use an unlimited quantity  of the specifically prepared soldier's  leaflets. These arc daintily gotten up  and $1'00 buys 50 copies. They carry  the Good News in winning language  and  attractive  dress.  Hoping, that those who are at  home may help promptly; -and r.hat  those who are still holidaying may  not forget the appeal until-such times  as they can respond to it; and on behalf of the. Ontario VV. C. T. U. Heartily thanking you, Mr. Editor, for-'he  space so kindly accorded, etc.���������(Mrs.)  May R. Thornley, Pres. W. C. T. U.  Patriotic and Missionary Board, 843  Dundas  Street,  London,  Ontario.  Crawford: Last autumn he sold his  bungalow and bought a car.  Crakshaw: Now he's sold ihe car  and rented the bungalow.���������Dallas  News.  What Is Farming?  I*"arniing is not breaking clods;  farming is not moving soil; farming  is not ploughing���������these are some of  the little bits of inevitable, unavoidable experience and labor. Farming  is gathering sunshine, preparing the  soil and the seed that the plant may  come and gather in sunshine and  strength from Mother Earth. This  is better than speculation or making  money on the stock exchange, whereby the other fellow becomes poorer.  It is gathering and humanizing for  the service of the race the great unused powers of Nature.  War Reduces Crime and Insanity  Dr. William Graham, an authority  on mental disease and crimonology,  states: "The fact is indisputable," lie  affirms, "that insanity, like crime,  has lessened during the period of  the war. It will not do to say that  the vast number of men called to  the colors include some who might  otherwise bc reckoned among our  asylum population, for the greatest  reduction is among women, 119 being  admitted in 1915 against 154 in 1913.  .Discussing these facts, Dr. Bernard  ���������Hollander pointed out three main  factors in the decline: The increased  prosperity of the working classes;  the effect of military discipline and  hard work on men; and the more  purposeful  lives  of women.  "It is the discipline of work that  leads to discipline of mind, and thus  prevents insanity." Dr. Graham in  his reports mentions neurasthenics  as being specially benefited by the  war.  "We girls had hardships when we  camped out���������only one drinking gliss  among five girls."  "Horrors!"  "And only one mirror."  "Good night!"���������Kansas City Jour-  nal.  ^-������������������rF,VT,i"'''V"'*?'''^n ''*" "������������������������������������*""'"*"���������  ������*������-at^u-.^;;v.;.-.i.*iSVCiS;,r.. THE.    GAZETTE,      HEDLEY,      13.      C.  Merman Loss in Colonies  Is Canada's Gain  Invoice of Empire's New Possessions  Captured in War  It Because of Britain's mastery of the  [even seas and by aid of her overseas  dominions, the acquisition by conquest of vast German colonies has tavern place.'' "777  For Canada the chief material interest of these conquests lies in trade  possibilities. Canada's western ports  1 e within easy reach , of Australasia,  l/hii.e. South west Africa is available-to  ler Atlantic ports. The future needs  %i these new dominions are produced  (large    measure, in Canada.    This  ountry with Its enormous surplus of  gricultural    products and its phenomenal     increase     in     manufacturing  .���������uipment   ��������� must  look  abroad  when  jie war is over for markets.   It is of  tluq,  therefore, that these new pro-  ices should be known.  Those, in Australasia consist chicf-  of groups of -small islands stretch-  ] \g across   the  Pacific   Ocean     from  ,ie Philippines    to    the French Mar-  juesas,    .which     were'   taken     from  jerniany   in -August and   September,  >l4,''by Australia and Japan.  'The  British  Trade Journal,  in  the  "���������sue of "August" 1, says: "As a com-  hercial community it behooves us to  [ike stock' of these new acquisitions,  jhd   to   ascertain  whether  the  planters   and .traders   of  the   British   Ein-  ('"ire ' cannot ��������� turn them to good ac-  'oun't.       Here in  brief is  the official  'avoice:  Kaiser     Wilhclm's     Land, " 70,000  -ptare miles of New Guinea.  Bismarck-      Archipelago,        22,640  f'quare miles.  CaVoline,     Pelaw,     Marianne,    and  lylarshall   Islands,   1,000  square  miles.  Of .these by  far  the  most .valuable  the  New Guinea section',' having a  population,    according'  to", thc latest  '.etui-ns,    of    450,000,    including.   280  Europeans  ind the cocoa-palm succeed well, and  she forests contain valuable woods.  [Petrolcum deposits have becn discov-  ired-.near Eitapc. The imports in 1912  ,'ere valued at $2,300,000 and the-ex-  -.orts-at $3,020,000.  To the.east of New Guinea is the  Bismarck Archipelago, consisting  liefly of New Britain, New Ireland,  f-'New .Hanover, the Admiralty ls-  lands,:Buka and Bougainville. These  included, the area is about 31,500  square miles, and . the population  .300,000; including .about 360 Europeans. The chief exports are copra,  [pearl shell, ivory,, nuts, sandalwood  and tortoise shell, and there are many  (,cocoanut plantations.  The" Caroline and Marshall Is-  1 lands form two distinct groups north  of New Guinea. They are of coral  formation, and many are uninhabited." The Carolines were purchased  by Germany from Spain in 1899 for  about $4,200,000. The chief islands  f'in this group are-Yap, Ponapi, and  Kusai, and its. area is about 560  square miles, the population being  f 50,000., The Marshall group consists  ���������oi two chains or sub-groups, one  known as Ratal and the other one  lvno\Vn as Ratak, both ranging southeast-to northwest. - The whole of the  Marshall Archipelagoes composed of  .some thirty-three atolls, 160 square  miles' in area. They were annexed to  Germany ab.out 1885. The population  is about 15,000, consisting mainly of  !'' Micronesians, who are skilled navigators". The exports are chiefly copra  and phosphate.  The Pelaw group consists of  twenty-six islands, of which six are  inhabited, the total area being about  250 .square miles. The group is surrounded by a coral reef. The population is about 10,000. The Marianna  Islands have an area of about 250  square miles, a population of ' about  10,000. In this group the islands are  fifteen in number, and all, except  Guam, belonged to Germany, which  bought them from Spain. Guam had  been ceded by Spain to the United  States in 1898, and is used by the  Americans as a coaling station. Ten  of the group are of volcanic origin;  of these only four are inhabited; five  are coralline limestone islands. All  are densely wooded and the vegetation luxuriant, the chief productions  being cocoanut, areca palms, yams,  manoic, coffee, cocoa, sugar, cotton  and  tobacco.  The possibilities of what was German Southwest Africa are as immense as its area. This territory, occupied by thc Germans since 1883,  comprises 322,450 square miles, which  is six times-the size of England. Before the war its population included  1-5,000 whites and 250,000 natives. Its  three great natural resources are  minerals, pasture land and' agricultural land.  According to a South African authority, who writes for The Cape  Times, the diamond fields form a  rich treasure house, the  tending from Conception Bay for 260  miles, the area being interspersed,  however, with widfc stretches of  worthless   sand.    From   1908  to   1913  As a source of wealth, pasture lands  come next to minerals. Dr. William  Macdonald, ��������� the South African agricultural expert, who visited the colony a couple of years ago/described  it as a land of enormous agricultural  possibilities, destined to become one  of the finest ranch countries in the  world. Dr. Rbhrback, the German  Imperial Emigration Commissioner,  estimated that the grazing steppes,  stretching from the Orange River in  the south ��������� of Kunene in the north,  were equal in area to the German  Empire in Europe and' capable", of  maintaining nearly 1,000,000 Europeans. Stocks of live stock in 1914 were  approximately 1,500,000 head, including'horses; cattle, sheep and'goats.  . With regard to agriculture, there  are already 1,330 farms, comprising  33,484,000 acres", but only 13,000 acres  arc under actual cultivation. Four-  tenths of this area is in the Groot-  fontein district and three-tenths in  the, Windhuk district. Mealies, potatoes, lucerne, melons, vegetables,  grapes, and tobacco are the principal  articles grown. Much might be "done  by improved methods of farming and  by means of irrigation, since the land  is quite fertile. German authorities  had partly developed a huge irrigation scheme to redeem an immense  area for agriculture. "British occupation," says a United States journal  in reference to the conquest, "will  lead, to far more rapid development,  with an influx of capital, especially  for exploiting its mining possibilities.  Thc Portuguese explorer, Diaz,  first landed on the coast in 1486. It  has been suggested that the territory  be renamed ,Bbthaland after Britain's  famous Boer statesman-general, who  conquered it.  The Old-Fashioned Hymns  Old Hymns Sound Sweeter Than the  Modern Compositions  ...        a-     I    ^n ������'C-* Tennessee darky got up in  tobacco,  x:otton,_conee,-| .t mass meeting of negroes attending  """      ""'    the  national    Baptist    convention  in  Kansas City the other night, called  the choir down for not singing an old  time hymn like it ought to be sung,  and then showed them how to sing  it.  "Dat ain't de way my mammy used  to sing it down in de cotton fields,"  he declared, interrupting the chorister, a modern. musician.  "Amen!" shouted the older members of the congregation, and then in  a little while he had them all singing  the old hymn in a way that would  take you plumb to glory. 7  We didn't hear the ; singing, of  of course/but we've heard some modern choirs, and also we remember  how in the days of our forefathers  even white folks used to sing the old  hymns. So we can imagine how it all  happened. We are quite sure had we  been there we should have added our  "Amen!" to those of the congregation.  Wc wouldn't say a word against J  modern choirs or modern hymns for  the world. But we can remember a  time, before the day of salaried choirs  and anthems and such, when folks  used to sing like _ they had religion  sure enough. They didn't put the  trills and quavers of the' modern singers in their singing, perhaps, and the  hymns didn't sound so much like a  cross between an opera and an old  cotillon tune as the new-fangled  hymns do. But they sang like they  meant it, and while we are not a  musical highbrow; and could not tell  the difference between a sonata and  a symphony if we heard them, we  will make bold to say.that those old  hymns sounded sweeter as they rose  to the throne of the Most High than  any modern hymn that ever was composed.���������Star-Telegram, Fort Worth,  Texas.  Sending Relief Supplies  Turkey   Now Admits , Starvation of  Syrians  The solicitations of the English  and. French ambassadors at Washington, supported by many citizens  of the United States, for the transmission of relief supplies to the  starving thousands of Syrians have  at length prevailed. Enver Pasha, it  will be recalled, denied that starvation conditions existed,'and that if it  did, the Government of the Sultan  would adopt- its: own measures of relief.' Events showed that the measures emanating from Constantinople  consisted of the usual border to "massacre."  The facts established, the Washington Minister at Constantinople  adopted a firm attitude on the question, and now, after thousands of  lives have been starved to death, the  military authorities at Beyrout have  agreed to permit food and drugs to  land under the aegis of the Red  Cross and Red Crescent Societies.  Pen Picture of Prairies  By a Western Author  Poisonous Plants  Some Plants  Owe Their Defense to  Deadly Poisons  . There are many kinds of preparedness in the plant world. Some plants  secrete a milky juice which exudes  whenever the plant is injured, and  which usually covers the invader with  a touch of raw india rubber. Others  secrete resins, such as turpentine,  others supply themselves with a defence of tannic acid, while still others  manufacture poisons or have strong  scents like lavender and mint, or  spines, like thistles, or thorns, like  roses.  While we dislike a plant that poisons us when we touch it, yet if wc  investigate the reason for its poison  we discover that a vast number of  plants develop poisons and near poisons, and when we look over the list  we find that wc would be rather badly  off without them. It is true that most  of them arc poisonous only when  fields ex-1 eaten, and that few are poisonous to  touch, but they have all developed  these  qualities   in   self-defence.  Some of them store their poison in    .their    seeds,    others    in  their    root  gems   valued   at  $35,000,000  were   re-'stocks   and   others   in  their  roots   to  Robt. J. C. Stead Contributes to the  Wealth of Canadian Literature  in  His New Novel  Western Canada affords a natural  setting for literary masterpieces,  with its wonderful background ot  prairie and mountain, but, generally  speaking, literary men have as yet  made no serious attempt to do the  setting justice. Une average story  of the West, written by someone who  knows the country only from the car  window,'or from the fiction of others  whose information was as meagre as  his own, bears the mark of stage  scenery in every chapter, and passes  for "the real thing" only among  readers who have no personal knowledge of the suLject.  Fortunately Western Canada is herself producing a new generation of  writers who promise to redeem the  country from the makcrbclieve literature of the transient novelist. In  this respect it must be said that  women have so far contributed rather  more than their share. Airs. McClung  and Mrs. Murphy have caught the  breath of true western inspiration in  many of .their chapters,-and have already made an impress on Canadian  life. , Ralph Connor, although the  best known and most widely read of  all Western Canadian authors, has  been somewhat limited in his types  of characters. R. W. Service has  written of the North rather than the  West.  Robert J. C. Stead, of Calgary,  promises to restore the balance of ihe  male sex, and at the same time make  a permanent contribution to.Canadian  literature, by his new novel, "The  Homesteaders,", the. first copies of  which have just arrived from England. Mr; Stead is already widely  known as a virile and original-writer.  No author can claim more intimate  knowledge of the West, and none has  shown greater fidelity or sympathy  in his writings. Three volumes of  verse which paid their way in a time  when verse was little in demand  established him in the literary field.  His recent verses on the death of  Kitchener have been reprinted by the  leading literary publications in all  parts of the Empire and the United  States, and are universally regarded, as the finest tribute paid to the  great general. A selection from  Mr. Stead's ' poems was also chosen  some time ago as the inscription to  appear on a monument in Aldershot  military cemetery.  The Calgary author's first novel,  "The Ball Jumper," published two  years ago, won instantaneous recognition as a distinctive type of Canadian story. Those who have been  privileged to read "The Homesteaders" declare that it reveals a literary  art and a skill of conception and construction not excelled by any Canadian author. The story opens with  the land boom of Manitoba in 1882,  and closes with a similar boom in  Alberta 25 years later. It is a talc  to grip the hearts of the old-timers,  while carrying a plot of love and adventure keen enough to whet the  most jaded appetite.  "The Homesteaders" is published  in England by T. Fisher Unvvin,  Limited, and in Canada by the Afus-  son Book Company. The first Canadian edition was shipped from England on' September 5.  Good Seed  Government Commission Will Investigate Grain Seed Conditions  Nothing is of more importance to  the western farmer than he should  have good seed. If he has poor seed,]  no matter how early the season or  how. propitious are the growing conditions, ;his crop.cannot be good.  The department of agriculture of  the Dominion Government has always  paid great attention to this question  of good seed and testing laboratories  are provided at many prairie points  to" which farmers may send samples  of their grain so--that its germination  qualities may, be determined. All  these precautions, however, are based  oh the premise that there is good seed  available*'in the country, as there generally has been.  The Prosperity of  Southern Alberta  Phenomenal Yields of Grain Strengthens Confidence in the Country  The following editorial from The  Morning Albertan, of Calgary, is reprinted without comment. It tells its  own  story:  The statements that Southern Alberta can honestly make respecting  its grain crop this year are such, as  should prove a powerful incentive to  prospective settlers. There is no need  of drawing the long bow, or of un-���������  seemly boasting. The plain narration  of the facts will suffice.  From the reports^ which the threshers are turning, in, it is apparent that  this season's harvest is an average  j one only in comparison with the phe-  Inomenal yields of a year ago. Measured by all other standards, it is itself  something to wonder at. The case of  the. big Noble farm, on the Alder-  syde-Kipp branch of the C.P.R.,  which is expecting to thresh at an  average rate of 52 bushels to the  acre from 1,000 acres, and to beat the  world's record, is only an isolated instance. Records of 40, 45 and 50 bush- ���������  This year, however, it is stated that  owing to the poor crop in. thc northern part of the United States our  neighbors across the line will be compelled to come to Canada for a great  proportion of their supply. It is further said that there are already agems  from the. United States in the Canadian West for the purpose of, buying  seed.    In view of these circumstances j els to the acre are-being reported so  the department of agriculture is about  to appoint a commission whose duty  it   will  be  to   see   that   enough   good  often that the narration becomes a  commonplace. The'; fact is, every  farmer in ��������� thc  southern country  who  seed is kept in Canada for next year's'has cultivated his land properly is  planting. This is a wise and timely | achieving splendid results, and the  action on the part of the,government, i average production will be such that  and one whose value will perhaps bcLl'l.e compiler of publicity pamphlets  more generally recognized in- ��������� '-six I. will -hesitate 'to' print the figures for  months' time than it is today.���������Cal- iicar of being denounced as a lier.  gary Herald. I    Right here,    in the    fertile district  which is tributary lo Calgary, it can  be claimed in all truth that no more  abundant harvest and no grain of a  finer quality is being produced this  year anywhere on the continent. Let  us realize that we are blessed indeed  iu having the good fortune to c'.vvell  in such a region. As the mayor remarked after his recent trip, during  which he saw with his own eyes the  riches of the land, it is "a country of  solid prosperity."  What Holland is Doing  covered, chiefly by Germans. - It is  estimated that the fields already dis-  ���������covered^ will last for twenty years.  Copper mines rank next in importance, exports in 1913 being worth  $1,982,000. In this metal the country  is exceptionally rich. Prospecting  work has been done in connection  with gold, tin, iron, lead, sulphur, etc.,  but the results have been somewhat  disappointing, although immense deposits of iron and tin ores are known  to exist. A seam of coal has been  found, and the Germans had begun  to exploit immense layers of white  and colored marble of excellent quality.  protect their progeny from harm  They do not go about looking for  trouble or seeking whom they may  destroy, but they are prepared to resist invasion of thc rights of their  children. Nux vomica and aconite  are two of this kind.  Others develop alkaloids, like the  nicotine of tobacco, the quinine of  the cinchona tree, and the thcine of  tea, to protect themselves. Strychnine, digitalis and a hundred indispensable drugs that are poisonous  in overdoses are the gift of the  plant w.orld to man as a by-product  of plant preparations for self-defence.  Cutlery and Rust  An alloy steel has been devised in  England which is non-rustable. It is  said that knives, forks and other cutlery made of it will not even tarnish,  and if turned out by the factory  bright and shining they will remain  in that condition to the end. A little  washing is all that is necessary to restore it under any circumstances,  The new composition is not a high  carbon steel, as it only averages one-  fourth or one-third carbon, and the  ingredient which imparts to it its  peculiar properties is said to be  chromium, a chemical element somewhat similar to nickel. By mixing  about 12 per cent, chromium with  mild carbon steel, thc new stainless  compound is produced, defying acid  as well as rust and tarnish.  This sort is more expensive than  the steel ordinarily used in making  cutlery, but its lasting properties and  its power to retain its brightness  more than offset its higher cost. No  doubt if found useful for cutlery purposes its use will be extended in other j  directions, too, |  Splendid Work in Caring for Small  Nation of Refugees  One of the redeeming and outstanding features of this desperate  war has been the attitude of the  neutral nations towards the distressed belligerents who have sought their  hospitality.  It is scarcely realized how great j  a strain it has been upon the resources of Holland, for instance, to receive and care for the crowds of Belgian exiles who have streamed over  her borders; but" it is really wonderful what the Dutch have done in the  exercise of their instincts of humanity.  That they have spared neither personal effort nor money is amply  borne out';.by the startling fact that  in Holland's Budget for 1916 no less  than one-eighth, or thereabouts, of  the expenditure is allocated entirely  to the maintenance and relief of tiie  Belgian refugees.  The Dutch had nothing -to gain  either in goodwill or future interest,  but spontaneously local committees  sprang up in all directions, and, in  addition to general private hospitality, camps were organized with extraordinary rapidity for the housing and  relief of the destitute.  ..One little Dutch village of 1,300 inhabitants made means to welcome 25,-  000 refugees. Since then the work of  mercy and relief has proceeded along  lines of well-thought-out and methodical philanthropy, as the problem  of dealing with some 100,000 homeless exiles called for something which  even abundant sympathy cannot continuously supply.  In four large camps are now concentrated some 16,000 persons," who  have neither friends nor means to  find hospitality like more fortunate  refugees. These camps are complete  cities of refuge, fully provided with  hospitals, creches, dispensaries, isolation wards,, and schools. Doctors,  nurses, and nuns give their services,  and they work in conjunction with  the Society of Friends, whose organization, under the leadership of Miss  Vullamy, is one of the most remarkable features of the scheme of relief.  But in addition to the poorer refugees thus provided for, therc are  over 80,000 being relieved otherwise  throughout the country.  Nor is the future of these refugees  overlooked. Holland's guests are not  only given their livelihood now; they  are also, one and all, accumulating  funds with which, in due time, they  may have every hope of starting to  rebuild the ruins of their life in Belgium.  Reading-room, a theatre, a library  (liberally helped by the Society of  Friends), all have their part; but  meanwhile the inmates are busy with  profitable trades ��������� manufacturing  boots, for instance, that command a  wide sale, and under the special tutelage of the Friends, doing brush  and mat work of a quality so superior  that they have, established a steady  trade among thc many daily visitors  to the camp.  Jericho Will Fall in the End  Though Jericho will fall in the end,  we must not suppose that we have  reached the seventh day of the trumpets, much less tne hour of the shouting. To close the line of. investment  by linking up all the Allies on the  Danube, and to do it before autumn  is over, will still take all the skill and  vigor of the great league, and its ablest political as well as military direction. After . the single continuous  front is drawn round the Central Empires wc may begin to play with the  scriptural analogy. Then for the Biblical days, read months, and for the  shouting that went before the fall, the  climax of the Allies' artillery.���������The  Observer (London).  "Gullibly's son is a young man, I  think,  of great  promise."  "Have you been lending him money  also?"���������Baltimore  American.  The Cattle King of Australia  Although Enormously Wealthy,   Sits  on Valise in London Street  Smoking Pipe  Wc have a cattle king in Australia,  Mr. Sidney Kidman. It will help to  form an idea of the extent of his  realm when it is stated that the area  of country held by him, mostly on  leasehold from the state governments, aggregates at least 50,000  square miles. These figures . may  make Mr. Kidman look like a monopolist, but his biggest leaseholds  arc in places where nobody else went  and it is very likely.that but for him  huge areas that are stocked -would  otherwise not have been utilized. His  huge "out back" ventures, subject to  drought like Australia is, entails correspondingly big risks. Mr. Kidman  mentioned a couple of days ago, in  reply to assertions that his holdings  were not sufficiently stocked, that last  year's drought meant to him a-loss  of 28,000 head of cattle on one run  alone. He mentioned also by way of  illustration of other difficulties, that  when he recently bought "some"  cattle, including 18,000 cows, in  Queensland, with the intention of restocking drought-afflicted holdings in  South Australia, the Queensland government concerned itself only with  keeping down the price of meat with-,  in its own boundaries and refused to  let any of these cattle go across the  border.   ���������  Ranch king and millionaire that he  is, Mr. Kidman remains surprisingly  modest in manner, speech and mode  of living. He left his home near Adelaide, South Australia, when 13 years  of age, to make his own way in the  world.-. He was proud when, at the  start, he earned ten shillings a wceit.  A little story about him published in  the press during the week is worth  repeating. It is to the effect that a  couple of years ago, finding that he  had a little time to spare, he visited  Europe. Arriving in London, this  plainly dressed, weatherbeatcn man,  in a slouch hat, and carrying a rather  old-fashioned valise, suddenly turned  into High Holborn Road. For a minute he stood as if bewildered by the  roar and surge of traffic. Then he  deliberately dumped his valise down  on the pavement, seated himself on  it, pulled out his old favorite pipe, and  then, puffing meditatively, assimilated  his new impressions and adjusted his  bearings. Possibly some of the  passers-by felt some pity for onc who  was apparently a weary wayfarer unable to find any other resting place.  None of them guessed that it was the  cattle king of Australia, placidly,  calmly enjoying his noontide "smoke  oh" in the capital of a country smaller  in area than the total area of his  cattle runs.  Enthusiasm  There are just two kinds of farmers���������the one who is full of enthusiasm and the one who doesn't care.  It doesn't matter so much, after all,  what a man knows, for all of us would  have becn rich long ago if wc had  done as well as wc knew how. It is  the enthusiasm, thc desire to do- better this year than last, that counts.  The man who is in love with his business, who takes delight in the growing calves and joy in thc shooting  corn, is the man who succeeds always.  What he doesn't know he will find  out.���������Prairie Farmer.  "You can't tell; that boy of Todd's  may be a Congressman some day."  "Indeed! Why, I thought he seemed quite, bright"���������Lif������ A BRIGHT TOBACCO OF THE FINEST QUALITY  10 CENTS PER PLUG  -Opportunity's Little Ways  "Opportunity      knocks     at      every  man's door." .'  "Too  often,' however,  it  is   the  op*  portnuily     to  open  a     peanut ' sjtand,  whereas   -wc    wouhl    rather    start    a  bank."  as much as he ought for his own. If !'of thc boy and his pony , over thc  you have anything ,co say about him;. mantelpiece. Lord Moorhampton no-  you   may  safely   tell   mc.     1   for-one   ticcd   lhe   glance;   and   was   surprised  Bovril makes other foods  nourish you. It has a Bodybuilding power proved equal  to from 10 to 20 times the  amount -of    Bovril    taken.  ar  ^  oom  Nineteen  FLORENCE WARDEN  WARD. LOCK a. CO.. LIMITED  Leocfoa. MdboHTKe. juuJ Toronto  ^  don't believe this cock-and-bull story  of Mr. Wright's about Mr. Ciprian's  being drowned. Drowned, indeed1"  echoed she indignantly, as if it were  a form of death wholly unknown and  discredited.       ;.' : '  "Don't you think lie's dead, then **"  demanded Mabin eagerly. "Have you  heard of his being alive?"  '..' Mrs. Lowndes, still looking  shrewdly at.'hcr. answered deliberately--.   '���������'.'���������  "I. think: .there's more .than., one  would be sorry to hear of his being  dead, by drowning or any other iva.v"  But I hough- I admit it's odd Mr Ciprian shouldn't have becn here by. this  time, seeing the ship .;hc was .coming  by has arrived safe. 1 shan't believe  he's been drowned till I hear it from  somebody more worthy of belief than  Mr    Wright "������������������������������������      ������������������;���������.���������'   ,.   ,  Mabin hesitated. Then she said  quickly, in a low voice���������  "'-(..������������������do know something about him,  aud I came here to tell it But now  I'm here, I'm half afraid to speak."  Mrs. Lowndes looked at the girl  earnestly as she said in a whisper���������  "Dou'i be afraid. Speak out, fell-  all you know to my lord. He's a'deal  too'-easy-going; and too fond of his  own ease, andoL seeing everything  go like clockwork round him, and  they take advantage of that. But lie's  a man for ail thai, and if you-have  anything to tell he's the person to  know it. Not any of the others, neither  my lady noi  any of them."  Mabin was thankful for this advice, which strengthened her in the  course she'"designed to pursue. Hurriedly finishing hei toilet with the  help of lhc- housekeeper, she hastened downstairs, and crossing the hall  al. .-the1'back so quickly' that Capt;-.in  Daluwine. who sprang up, from his  scat-to intercept het, jus) failed to do  so, she fled along the passage behind  ihe portiere, ...liid . knocked timidly-.at  the  library   door.  at her'-quickness of apprehension.vHe  had  made  her  leave  her  chair  lor  a  cosier    one near    the Civc, and     was  standing, on thc hearthrug..     ,.;'.  His countenance grew, grave. ���������  "Yes," he. said, answering her look,  "it  is "the news of ray son   which has  Special Grades of Grain       J  For Seed Purpossc;  ! ��������� ��������� '    ��������� ' _;  J  Order-in-Council   Has    Been    Passed j  By Dominion Government !  With- thc object  oi  creating  a  spc- j  cial  grade of-grain of  superior  qua"  ity   for    seed,  the    government  jjisiressed me so much. After eight ; passed an'��������� ordcr-in-council. under the  years' absence, to hope to see him ���������! authority .of lhe Dominion Seed Act,  and  then to learn that he is 'dead, is J creating  the following grades exclus-  J  (C unturned '  .CHAPTER VI11.  Lord Moorhampton was seated al  a big wriling-lablc. turning over  Unle bundles pi discolored and yellow, papers He looked up with an  eaget smile when ��������� Mabin came in, and  rising, offered her a chair al the opposite side ol the table, and asked  het    il   she   could    work   the   bar-lock  Above     all   she   was    tonscious   of  such .-'. feeling ol disgust and a version t ' vpewntei  from  Joe   Wrighi   thai  she  fell   as  if       Mabin   replied  that   she  could, and  il   would  be impossible lot   hei   to  re-    he   told   her.   with   a   nod   of  salisfac-  inaiti   under   the   same  rool   wiih   him   'ion, thai fie wanted her to take down  without showing openly how she felt, i notes upon it at his dictation.  Aud   for   Captain   Daltnaine  with   his       "'   am   making  a   record,"   he  said.  bold stare oi unwelcome'admiration  she felt only less distaste than she  did for joe, Lady Moorhamplon's infamous   brother  "Lord Moorhampton doesn't seem  hard  to, get  on   with," she  suggested.  "Oh, no, he isn't He is loo easy,"  said Mrs Lowndes And, pursing up  hei mouth, she changed the subject  in a significant manner. "Shall I see  what we can find you in the way of  a  pair   oi  shoes'1"  I.  'ol our family history, and to do this  1 have to go through cartloads of old  letters and papers I'm afraid you'll  find the work rather dry: most of the  young laches say so."  "I shan't," cried Mabin bnghtl; . "I  shall find ti very interesting. I know."  She was speaking from conviction,  for Mabin was an intelligent girl,  and never having been subjected to  the crushing system of a High School  or any of thc new educational fads,  "No, thank  you," said Mabtn    "But! she   was alert, and   ready  to  take  an  I should like to ask you a question.  Did   you  know���������Mr    Ciprian ?"  Her agitation wa������ so extreme as,  she put the question, thai Mrs.  Lowndes looked at  her keenly  "1 knew him from a baby." she answered promptly "And a nicer nor  swectcr-natured boy  I  never  met"  "Then you were here when he went  away" demanded   Mabin eagerly  Mrs. Lowndes looked at her askance.  "I'll tell yon about that." she said  hurriedly, "some other time���������if vou  stay,"  she added-ominously  interest in new things. Lord Moorhampton found, to his surprise, when  he had been working for an hour  with het. that instead of offering him  the listless help of an automaton,  which was the most he usually got  from his secretaries, Mabin was of  actual use to him. making shrewd suggestions, grasping a point with quickness, and above all showing a live interest and sympathy with his work.  He lost his usual cold manner and  grew excited and eager; his quiet  eyes grew bright, his manner warm;  and   when  al   last  he  sat  back in  his  Bui  Mabin. was eager to hear more.'chair  with a  sigh of  satisfaction, and  "Tell   me   now.   please,"   she     said'said thai they had done a good after-  -tniickly. I noon's  work,  she smiled back at  him  The    housekeeper     looked    at    her! across   the   lable.   and   felt   that   she  shrewdly. (had  made a   Iriciul.  "Did     you  know  him'"    she asked*)     "1   feel  mosi   grateful  to   you.   Miss  suddenly,  fixing  upo  from  which  there  w  an experience too tragic not to leave  its. effects."'  Mabin    leaned    forward,  her    face  flushed, her voice unsteady���������  ''You arc sure he is���������-not alive?" she  asked in a  whisper. ,  Lord .Moorhampton looked ciown  at  her curiously.  ��������� '���������'I'm afraid .so,", he said , rather  shortly Then, as she drew back, and  it occurred to. him that he had been  unduly 'curt, he added in a gentle  tone���������"It has been an unhappy story  from tlic"first But .1 must hoi bore  you with talk of this sort. It's lugubrious, isn't  it?"  "Not to me," said Mabin earnestly.  "I should like to hear���������whatever you  will  tell  mc about  him."  There'was. no mistaking the. reality,  of her interest,-..and, drawn out of his  reserve by the pleading eyes, the sympathetic manner, Lord Moorhampton  at first almost timidly, like a man unused to confidences, dropped into lhc  narration of his son's story,  "You arc very good," said he. Then,  after  a  pause���������"Ciprian   was, a   high-  spirited   fellow,   energetic,  merry,     a  very devil of fun  and  mischief.    But  before he  had "been  back long from  Oxford    there  was    friction   bclwc-en  him and Lady Moorhampton."and finally a  downright   quarrel.  The  whole  details   of   it,   indeed,   I   never   knew.  But he went away, suddenly, without  taking leave, after J  had been drawn  into a quarrel in a  way, J .have-since,  1 confess it, deeply regretted. He was,  hurt, wounded, offended.    How deeply   I  never guessed at thc time.    But  he never came  back,  never sent  any  news of his whereabouts, and'I'never  traced him, never knew where he had  gone to, till a year ago.  when    Lady  Moorhampton's son  was born, she insisted  upon  my  taking steps  to have  Ciprian's death presumed.    1  did this  with  reluctance, as you  may imagine.  But the  result  seemed to  be satisfactory;  for Ciprian got  wind  of it,.and  sent   a   formal   intimation,   through   a  solicitor, that  he  was alive, and  that  he was coming homo.    Nothing more  than that.   1 wrote to the lawyer, saying that I should be delighted to welcome  my son  back  home  again, and  Lady   Moorhampton   insisted   that   he  should  meet   her brother in  town as  soon    as he arrived,    to  intimate to  him   that   she,   for   her   part,   was   as  ready to forgive him as. T was.    Her  brother,   however,  came   here  yesterday   with   the news  that   Ciprian  nad  been drowned on the voyage."  Mabin made no answer for a moment. Then she asked, in a voice  which was tremulous and scarcely  audible���������  "Do you know, Lord Moorhampton, whether your son was���������was married?"  He looked al   her curiously.  "No.     1    know   absolutely   noth'ng  about  his life or his adventures from  the  time    he  left   home    eight   years  iv'cly for  seed  purposes  No. 1 Canadian Western seed oats  shall be composed cf No. 1 or No. 2  C. W- oats, shall contain 95 per cent,  of white oats,, sound, clean and free  from other grain, shall bc free from  noxious weed seeds and shall weigh  not less than .34 pounds .to thc bushel.  No. 3 Canadian Western seed barley shall be composed of thc six-  rowed variety, sound, plump, free  from oilier grain, of fair color, free  from noxious weed and shall weigh  not less than 45 pounds to thc bushel.  No. 1 Manitoba Northern seed  wheat .shall'be composed of 85 per  cent, of Red Fife, or S5 per cent, of  Marquis wheat, sound, clean and free  from other grain' and free from noxious-weed seeds, weighing hot less  than  60 pounds  to  the  bushel.  For No. r. seed purposes Red Fife  and Marquis wheal shall bc kept separate, '���������..".-;  No. 2 iwhcat shall be composed of  grades No. 2 Northern, No. 3 Northern or No. 4 slightly frosted -wheat  of Red -Fife ."or .Marquis variety, and  when rc-clcaned shall be practically  frce.Jrbm other grain and noxious  weed seed, and the, weight not less  than 5S pounds lo the bushel.   .  For No. 2 seed purposes Red Fife  and Marquis wheat shall be kept  separate.  No grain shall be accepted for seed  which will require a large dockage to  clean. -'..���������������������������.���������.-..:���������'���������'  Moving  "Dad."  said   the   cigh:-year-old     ol  the  family,   "here's  a  book tha: says-  that   OrpHcus   was   such   a  fine musician   that   he   made   tree-   and  stones-  move."  "Sou.1'  said  f-iihei.  -olemnlv, "Your-  sister Bess ha? Orpheus beaten.   Her  piano-playing   ha?   made   twenty families  move out  of :hi> building in the-  last three months."���������Puck.  Old'-Uncle"'Jacob was'walking majestically up and down lhc village  street dressed in his Sunday suit.  "Hallo, Uncle Jacob,"- cried one. of  his neighbors, ''arc you having a  holiday?"  "Yes, 1 am." replied Uncle Jacob,  proudly. "J'm celebrating my golden  wedding."  "���������Then why isn't your wife celebrating it  with  you?" said the  man.  "She ain't got aught to do with  it," replied Uncle Jacob indignantly.  "She's  the  fourth."  Correct Prognostication  The man who thought the first" five  years of the European war would bc  thc worst  seems to have hit it right.  ago.  "You don't know, then, whether he  had���������a���������a son?"  (To   Be Continued.)  Mabin   was  disconcerted.  "f I've met him���������once," she stani-  rnered  out,  I'.ut it was vain to expeel to evade  that searching look, or the frank in-  ������liiiiy which came at once���������  "I lave you met him lately-5 Don't  think I would ��������� ask out of curiosity,  Miss Wrest, but I've been here many  years,   I   may   truly  say   I'm   the  best  n  the girl a  gaze I Wrest," he said, "and rather guilty at  as no escape having set you lo work so soon.    I'm  a     hard   task-  one     by   your  at raid you'll find me  master, for you help  sympathetic interest, and make one  feel inclined to go on and on for ever.  You must need a rest. You would  like to go into the drawing-room aud  have some tea.  wouldn't  you?"  But Mabin was not at all anxious  to leave the society of Lord Moor-  lamptou    for   that  of    his  wife;  she  friend   Mr   Ciprian   had   here,  barring i was  dying,  besides,  to  find   a  chance  my lord, w!io is loo easy-going to do   of   telling   him   the  story   which   was  ready  to her lips.  "I could go on for another hour  without feeling the least tired." she  said  eagerly  "No,   no.     I   mustn't   be- selfish.     I  jut-a  Granulafed Eyelids,  Eyes inflamed by exposure to Sun, Oust and Wind  quickly relieved by Murine  Eye Hen-edy. No Smarting,  juet Eye Comfort At  If'oitr Druggist's 50c pei Bottle Murine Eye  ������alveir.Tubes2Sc ForBookofiheEycfreeask  Pniggiits oi Murine Eye Remedy Co., Chicago  Light in the Poultry House  Fowls Need Plenty of Sunshine  During Winter. Months  It seems superfluous lo say that  the poultry.-house should face the  south so that as much sunshine as  possible may bc admitted through thc  windows. The fowls need all the  sunshine they can get during the winter months.. The windows should bc  placed about eighteen inches from  the floor and should be so arranged  that they can bc opened on pleasant  days. It is a good plan to use double  windows, not only because thc ' arc  warmer, but also because they will  not, if tightly fitted, become covered  with frost as a single window does,  and will allow thc sun's rays to penetrate thc interior of the building.  Where single windows are used, it i.s  a good plan lo have a blanket so arranged that il can bc let down over  the windows on extremely cold  nights. Care must bc taken not to  get the windows too large���������that is,  not  too  much    glass  in   thc  front  of  Medicine Which Made Sur-*  geon's Work Unnecessary.  Astoria, N. Y."���������-"For two years 1  was feeling ill and took  all kinds'of  _, tonics.    I was gating worse everyday.  I had chills,my head  would ache, I was  always tired. I could  not.  walk   straight  because of tha pain  in my back and Iliad!  pains in my stoi"-  aeh.   I went to*.*  doctor and he said I  must* go under an  operation, but I did  not go.    I read in  the paper about  Lydi.i E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound .and told my husband about it.    I  said ' I know nothing will helpme but I  will try-'this.''.   I found myself improving from the very first bottle, and in two  weeks tithe I..was. able to sit down and  eat a hearty breakfast with my husband, which I had. not done for twoyears.  I am  now in "the best of health, and  did not   have  the operation." ��������� Mrs.  John A. Koentg, 502 Flushing Avenue,  Astoria, N. Y.  Every one dreads the surgeon's Imif������  and the operating table. Sometimes  nothing else will do; but. many times  doctors say they, aro necessary when  they are not Le tier after letter comes  to the Pinkham Laboratory, telling how  operations were advised and were not  performed; or,if performed,did nogood,  but Lydia E.Pinkhani's Vegetable Compound was used and good health followed,  If'you want advice writ������ to  "Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Co������  (confidential'*', Xynn, Mass. " ���������  - a  "' .il  It  it  Be Kind to the Horse  shouldn't have asked you to work to-jihe house, unless thc roosts arc par-  day but for die fact that I've just had jtitioncd off or otherwise protected,  some bad news which has depressed An ordinary sized window such as is  me   and   made   me  anxious   to   forget  used     in    'dwelling-houses    is   plenty  large  enough  for a  hoTTSc" ten  by  fifteen     feet,    and    should    be    placed  it  for a little while if I could."  Involuntarily Mabiri's eyes wander-  Artist (pointing to his very successful picture, "A Donkey"): What  do you really think of it, anyhow?  F.tithusiastic Lady: Lovely! And  vou have put so much of yourself into  it, foo!  W,  Nk  U,  1130  ed,  when he said this, to thc portrait  lengthwise with thc floor  Of all overworked women probably the  housewife is the hardest worked." She  has so much to attend to, with very little  help. Her work can be lightened if she  knows the value of system and she should  .try and take a short rest in the daytime.  A physician who became famous almost  around the world, Doctor Pierce, of  Buffalo, N. Y., the specialist in woman's  diseases, for many years practiced medicine in a farming district. He there observed the lack of (Sj'stem in the planning  of the work.  lf.it is a headache, a backache, a sensation of irritability or ^twitching and  uncontrollable nervousness, something  must, be wrong with the head, or back, a  woman naturally says, but all the time  the real trouble very often centers in the  organs. In nine cases out, of ten the  seat of the difficulty is here, and a woman  should take rational treatment for its  cure. Thc disorder should be treated  steadily and systematically with Dr.  Pierce's Favorite  Prescription.  For diseases from which women suffer  "Favorite Prescription" is a powerful restorative. During thc hist fifty years it has  banished from tho lives of tens of thousands of women the pain, worry, misery  and distress caused by these diseases.  If you are a auffernr, get Dr. Pierce's  Favorite Prescription in liquid or tablet  form to-day. Then address Dr. Pierce,  Invalids' Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y., and get  confidential medical advice entirely free.  "Waiter,   it   seems   to   me  the   portions have  grown  much   smaller."  "Yes.   sir,   but   see   how   thc   place  has been enlarged."���������Boston Evening  'Transcript.  Follow   the   Golden   Rule and Treat  Your Horse as You Would Wish  Him to Treat  You  Bc kind to the horse, says The  Indiana Farmer. Don't berate, him  because he doe> something which  should uoi have been done. Perhaps he had the right motive, Imt in  his dumb way he was unable to express it. Pcrhap* he wanted to help  you. Possibly lie' meant tm c\il,  though outwardly he seemed perverse and stubborn. Give him credit  for at ieasr trying to bc good, for  there arc few horses which arc naturally bad. ;..'..  Many persons rake u for granted  that when a horse does wrong lie intended to do so, and they therefore  puiiish him for it. Now, this action  only aggravates lhe. matter. a.nd if  continued will result in an incorrigible animal, made so solely from  mistreatment by his master. This  and this only explains why some  horses are bad.  The best policy is io be kind to lhe  horse. Remember thai he is ��������������� thiiuh  animal. Don't expect as much understanding from him as you expeel  of men. Remember that ot all the  animals which aid man the horse  is the most useful. Civc him credit  for that. Don't think him mean, lor,  unless made so by man. he seldom  is. Don't punish him for every  wrong he docs, for possibly lhey arc  not so intended. Try to put yourself in his place, and don't forget-  that he is a slave.  Be kind to him, and see for yourself if your work does not proceed  more smoothly than ever before. Follow the Golden Rule, and treat your  horse as you would wish him to treat  you if your positions were reversed.  Investigate for once, and you 'will  never say again that kindness doesn't  pay.  The official geologist of Newfound* ���������  land estimates that the iron ore deposits in that colony are about J.o35,-  500.000 tons. On Belle Isle. Conception Bay, alone, thc estimate is put at  35,000.000 tons. All thc ore from  Newfoundland is now being taken by  Canada   for   munitions   purposes. THE     GAZETTE.     MEDLEY,     B.     C,  1   -^DE IN CANA^*^f  For  maklnc  coap.  For soft������n<"I  'taff water.  For. .removing [  (paint.   ���������  For dlalnfoctlnc I  [ refrleroratort,  ��������� Inkav   closets,!  drains and for BOO. [  ' other purpoaos.  RKFU6E SUBaTITUTBfc  39PS*  decreased Wheat Yield  For Canada This Year  , "porr.inion  Government's Estimate Is  for a Total Crop of 159,123,00  Bushels  ������������������ The wheat crop of Canada for the  present year will be only 159,123,000  ibushcis. as compared with 370,303,600  Sbushcls in 1915, according to an official estimate. . Thc average yield per  "acre, was estimated at 15 7-S bushels  from a harvested area of 10,058.300  acres, as compared ivith 29 bushels  from a harvested area of 12,986,400  acres iu 1915.  -  A marked-decrease in the'production of oats also was indicated by ihe  estimated vield of 338,169,000 bushels  from 9,795,000 acres, a yield of 34.55  SSushcls per acre, as against 45.76  bushels last year when the production was 520,103,000 bushels from a  harvested area of 11,365,000 acres.  Thc barley crop was cslimatcd at  32,299,000 bushels from 1,32S,S00  acres, or 24.31 bushels per acre. Last  year's crop, was 53,331,300. and the  acreage 1,509,350.  Thc probable production of rye was  announced as 2.05S.500 bushels from  101,420 acres, or an average yield per  acre, of 20.30 bushels as against a total production in ,1915 of 2,394,100  bushels-from an acreage of 112,300.  Too Complicated for Comfort  Thc laic Gihnan Marstou of New  Hampshire, was ait'iiing a complicated case,-and looking up. authorities  back to Julius Caesar, At the-end of  ah. hour and,a, half,, in the most intricate part of his pica, he was.pained  to sec what looked like inattention.  It ��������� was-'.as ���������"he had feared. The-judge  was imable to appreciate the nice  points of  his  argument. :"���������7  "Your honor," ho said, "I beg -your  pardon; but do.'you follow mc?".  "I have so far," answered the judge,  shifting wearily about in his chair,  "but I'll say frankly that if 1 thought  I could find my. way bad:. I'd . quit  right  here."���������Argonaut.  The Orkneys in Pawn  . Whether-the corn be. of old or new'  "growth, it must yield lo Holloway's  Corn Cure, thc simples! and best cure  offered to the public.  The New '-"iiglish Armies  Tt is the soul ol Kngland which in  two years hari made an-army thai s  not content to-hold its ground against  an army at. which Prussia has been  laboring for three centuries. It is  .the. Englishman who has beaten thc  German. It is the itilanlrymen from  the other side of the Channel and  the other side of the sea. (he Lnglish  mail from the Thames, lhe quiet  country, and the industrial hive, the  Scotsman faithful to-his kilt. the  Canadian who defendstwo countries,  old and new, the Australian, bronzed  by the sun and like a young Greek-  god. It is these .men who have pp.  to rout the inosi famous regiments of  the enormous empire of prey. ��������� Lc  Figaro,  Paris.  Cure skin troubles by applying ointment to the surface skin. You must  reach the underlying tissues where  thc disease has its roots. Ordinary  ointments cannot, do this,- and that  is why the relict they give is only  temporary.  Zam-Buk, on the contrary, ha3  such power of penetration, combined with unusual germ-destroying  properties, that It reaches and destroys all germs in tho underlying  tissues. Then the healing essences  promota tho growth of new flesh,-  which gradually develops until the  diseased patch is entirely replaced  by new, healthy tissue, and a complete and permanent cure ifl effected.  Zam-Buk isobest for eczema, and  fill skin troubles, ringworm, ulcers,  abscesses, salt rheum, chronic  eores, blood-poisoning, boils, pilesi  cuts, burna, scalds and all skin injuries All druggists, or Zam-Buk  Co., Toronto, 50c. box, 3 for 51.26.  Could Be Kedeemed By Denmark By  Payment of Pledge  The Orkney Islands, says Pearson's Magazine, do not really belong  to Great Britain in the sense that  they were, ever ceded by treaty or  acquired by conquest. They: were  simply transferred by Denmark to  Scotland in ,1468,;...in pledge for the  payment/of the dowry of the Princess  of Den mark, who was married to  James III., King of Scotland. In the  deed of transfer, which is still in  existence, it is specially mentioned  that Denmark shall have the right to  redeem them at any future time by  paying the original amount of thc  dowry with interest  to date.  There is no likelihood, however,  that Denmark will ever attempt to  exercise her' right of redemption, because sixty thousand florins, the  original amount of the dowry, plus  compound interest for 448 years,  would amount to perhaps a trillion  pounds, and that is a bit more than  thc islands are  worth.  -<3!5  r~*  ���������(���������<&>���������  ^  ���������or  V3������?  irowmg  ���������em  "^OSSS?*  Worms, however generated, are  found in the digestive tracts, where  they set up disturbances detrimental  to the health of the child. Therc  can bc no comfort for the .little ones  until the hurtful intruders have been  expelled. No better preparation for  this purpose can be had than Miller's  Worm Powders. They will immediately destroy thc worms and correct  the conditions that were favorable to  their existence.  are dependent on nourishment for growth.  Their health as men and women is largely  established in childhood.  If your child is languid, bloodless, tired when rising, without ambition or rosy cheeks, Scott's Emulsion is a wonderful  help. It possesses nature's grandest body-building fats so  delicately predigested that the blood absorbs its strength  and carries it to every organ and tissue and fibre.  First it increases their appetite, then it adds flesh��������� strengthen* ^jjf  the, bones���������makes them sturdy, active and health}'. jriiL  No c!coho! or sarcotic in Scott's Emulsion, just purity and strength.  13-""  ,-vsc wr-iKSWBo w.tfjzxmx0of* m et-r-feN: a-:--.  ���������A -Scottish farmer was being iities-  tioned by a lawyer in a local cotirl.  "You affirm thai when llns happened  you were going home lo -j meal"'"  said lhe lawyer. "Lei us' he ipnir cei  tain-on this point, because it is a very  important one. "Be good enough to  tell me' what meal 'it was vou were  going  homr  to "  "You   would     like    io  l-tio.w     whs'  meal it   was11" said  lhe Scotsman  "Yes,   sir.   I   should   like   io   know,"  replied   the   lawyei   iinpie.ssivrlv  "Weel. then,  it   was  just'oaintraII"  Sunny  Dispositions  mul {"food digestion fro  hand in hand, and one  of lhc big'.q-cst aids to  good ^digestion is a regular dish of  This wonderfully delicious  wheal and barley food is so  processed that it yields its  nourishing- goodness to the  system in about one hour���������a  record for ease of digestion.  Take it all 'round, Grape-  Nuts contributes beautifully  to sturdiness of body and a  radiant, happy personality.  Every table should have its  daily   ration   of Grape-Nuts,  "There's a Reason"  Canadian Posttitn Cereal Co,, t,td..  Windsor. Out.  Stole Serbia's Crown ."Jewels  It is slatetl Irom Ccttinje that thc  betrayal of a peasant, have at last  Austrian authorities, thanks to ilie  been able to lay hands on the famous  Measures ol the Monastery of Det-  chani, in New Serbia, valued at several  millions  ol   Iratics.  King Peier stopped at Detchani  during ihe greal retreat of the Serbian army, and it is rumored, though  there is nothing io vouch for its accuracy, thai the ciown of Serbia was  hidden by the monks ol Detchani, in  a safe hiding-place. The Ausiria:is  Ifave (omul tiie hiding places in the  catacombs anil thc ossuaries of lhc  convent. Cases of precious stones,  ancient gold, arid, silver, money, gold  chalices, and sacerdotal -vestments  covered with Cyrilian characters.  Viennese antiquaries are- said to  have proceeded there to value lhc  treasure on behalf of the Austrian  Trcasur*'.  Minard's Liniment  Co.. Limited.  Dear  Sirs,��������� I   can   recommend   MINARD'S    LINIMENT   for   Rheumatism   and  Sprains, as   I   have  used it  for both  with  excellent  results.  Yours  Truly,  ''.���������'"'     T. B. LA VERS,.  St. John.  ' Standard Type in Stables  Modern efficiency is rapidly' evolving a standard type of barn and stable. This barn is about thirty-six feet  wide, and as long as may be necessary to accommodate thc number of  cattle kept on the farm. This provides for two rows of cattle and gives  the owner an opportunity to regulate  the inside furnishings properly and to  instal feed and manure carriers, and  to use milking machines. Thc manufacturers of the inside furnishings  for dairy stables have standardized  their stalls, stanchions and mangers  to conform to these measurements.  In building a new barn or remodelling an old barn it is always better  to consult an expert and have definite  plans to. follow while the work is being done.���������Successful Farming.  Unity of French and British  The Bigger Scope  The following is quoted from a  letter written by Harry~"C. Williams,  of Pambruiii, Saskatchewan, dated  September 24, 1916: I'Before coming  here I was one ol the advertising  forces of one of- the most progressive  papers in the Southern States, in,addition to being a stock-raiser. I used  to boom- my section, and justly so,  for it was one of nature's paradises,  but ��������� here one has a bigger, broader  scope which eclipses ray former home  a hundredfold, and 1 confidently expect . to bring at leasl ten families  back with mc or place them in communication with you to let them become citizens of the Best West���������the  Last   West���������the  Canadian 'West."  HARD ON LITTLE ONES  Canadian fall weather is extremely  hard on little ones. One day it is  warm and bright and the next wet  and * cold. These sudden changes  bring on colds, cramps and colic, and  unless baby's little stomach is kept  right the- result may be serious.  There is nothing to equal Baby's Own  Tablets in keeping the little ones  well. They sweeten thc stomach,  regulate the bowels, break up colds  and make baby thrive. Thc Tablets  arc sold by medicine dealers or by  mail ai 25 cents a box from The Dr.  Williams Medicine Co.. Brockvillc,  Out.  An Aeroplane Factory  Government    Will    Make    European  Aeroplanes in Canada  If the Government's present plan'3  are put into effect, Canada in thc  near future-*will not only have' an  aviation school, but also a factory for  manufacturing European aeroplanes,  including aircraft motors which have  not hitherto been built in Canada.  The Imperial Munitions 7 Board will  supervise the aviation school, half of  the staff of competent instructors is  being provided by the Imperial government and also the employes for  the establishment and operation of  the factory.. It is understood that  the British Government will then take  the,,output of the factory durina the  war.   . '.",.:���������"-.'"  Canadian aviators at the tront  have been eminently successful and  establishment of the school is a just  recognition of their services. In the  Som'me the Canadian aviators have  played a' prominent part. At the outbreak of the war some Canadian military authorities had little confidence  in the aeroplanes as fighting scouting  craft. The use of those machines  have proven their value, and Canada  will sooti have an aviation branch of  the service in keeping with its various other military forces.  What Strict Accountability Means ���������  President Wilson's strong plea to  the electors of thc United Stales is  that he "has kept his country out of  the war." The All-Highest also has  kept most of Germany out of the war  for thc time being, but lie has not  kept the Germans out of it. Nor has  the President of the United States  kept Americans out of the war. Over,  a hundred of them were killed when  the Lusitania was torpedoed without  warning, many more were blown to  pieces on their own soil, and so far  the murderers have not been held to  "strict accountability." ��������� Victoria  Times.  Complete   Harmony   and   Singleness  .   of Purpose Marks All  Operations  There is an aspect of the Franco-  British offensive that one hears nothing about, and that is thc comple.e  harmony of the armies of the Allies  in their field operations. Never before in history, we believe, have two  nations fought side by side iu a great  war without friction, confusion, cross-  purposes and heartburnings. There  have been mistakes and badly timed  movements in the great campaign in  Prance, but nothing was said about  them except bv the critics al the rear,  who were more . concerned about  claiming credit for .France or for  England, as the case might bc, than  in doing justice (o the commanders  and to the spirit of their men. Have  men of one race ever gone into battle  with more singleness of purpose and  high courage than the soldiers of  France and of the British Empire? It  has been an inspiring spectacle, and  surely the world would never have  beheld it if the traditional enemies  did not believe their cause was just  and that the consequence of failure  would be disaster irreparable. ��������� Nc  York Sun,  Cheerful, Chubby Children  Make the Home Happy  Weak, puny babies are a constant  care to tired mothers and are subject  to many diseases that do not affect  healthy children,  Keep your children in good health.  See that their bowels move regularly  -especially during the teething period  This is a distressing time in the life  of every child and the utmost pre  caution should be taken to keep them  well and strong.  By thc consistent use of  n  w's  Soothing Syrup  it is possible to avoid many childish  ills now so prevalent.  It is a corrective for diarrhoea, colir  and other infantile- ailments. It soothes  the fretting baby and permits the  child to sleep well and grow healthy  It brings comfort and relief to both  child and mother.  His Name Was Walker'  Severe Elderly Lady: Why are you  not at the front, young man?  Likely-looking Recruit: Have yo'i  ever seen me walk, madam?  Severe Elderly Lady (rather abashed and fearing she had made a bad  blunder): No!  Likely-looking Recruit: Well, madam, you watch me walk to the next  corner. (She did, and the miscreant  promptly disappeared from view.)   -  Important  "Isn't what they call 'the approach"  an   important   consideration   in  golf?"  "Very important. You've goi to  have the kind of a job thai will permit you to approach the golf links  early, in the afternoon."���������Washington   Star.  Minard's   Liniment   for   sale   everywhere.  Minard's Liniment Cures Burns, Etc.  ;   1=  w.  N,  U.  113C  Trade was bad. At thc end of another blank day the discouraged  salesman called on another prospective customer and asked to show his  samples.  "No, there is nothing I want today," said thc customer.  "But will you just examine my line  of goods?" the salesman persisted.  The customer would not.  "Then," said thc salesman meekly,  "will you let mc use a part of your  counter to look at them myself, as I  have not had the opportunity for  some time?"���������New York Times.  Soothing Syrup  Makes Cheerful,  Chubby Children  Is absolutely non-narcotic. It contains no opium, morphine nor any of  their derivatives. It is soothing, pleasant and harmless. For generations  mothers in all parts of the world have  used it and millions of babies have  becn benefited by it.  Buy a bottle today and  have it handy  Relieve and Protect Your Children  Sold by all druggists in Canada and  throughout th/ rworld  The Neighborhood Club  In any neighborhood there arc certain problems, both business and social problems, that ought to bc solved These problems cannot bc solved  by the individual, but they can be  solved by groups of individuals. No  otic outside the neighborhood is interested in them. You and your  neighbors will build up your neighborhood or let it go into dry rot. Thc  neighborhood club is the real working unit in any comprehensive plan  for rural organizations In this connection, all people are agreed that  rural organization is a great need of  the day This docs not mean that the  neighborhood club cannot bc affiliated with other neighborhood clubs  the country over in lhe attacking of  problems that are larger than the  community Thc place to start work,  however, is right in your own neighborhood.���������Thc Farmer,  -"FORTHEJ& KIDNEYS  lARTYFT TO PAiNS ifi  THE BACK  Halifas. N.S.. Jan. 15, 1916.  About eight months a������o I re3.1l  your advertisement in on������ of tho  Halifax paper* oflfertns a freo  sample, of Gin Pills for tn������ Sidneys. I had been a martyr for  years to intense pain* across tna  back and decided to try Gin, Pills.  Before I bad finished tno third  t>ox I found myself ror ih������ firm;  time in years perfectly freo from  pain.  Yonr? sincerely.  Mrs.  (Jane)  Percy.  AU rlragjrista sell Gtn Pills as  50c a Box. or 6 Doles for $���������* So,  S&mplo rreo 11 you write to  JTATIONAX   DBDG  ft   OKEMTr!A.li  CO. OF CANflJDa.   CltUTEO  lomnw, Out.      oa ���������  fMt WtWrsEWCH BEMeDV. W.I M.2 a*.  Used in freocfc  Hospitals nrilK  ffr-at success, cukes chronic weakness lost vtGoa  ft VIM KIDNEY BLADDER. DISEASES BLOOD rOlSOa.  PILES EITHER NO DRUGGISTS or MAIL SI POST 4 CT������  fOIJGERA CO   90   BEEKMANST   NEW YORKorLYMAN BRO������  roaONto write for FREE book to dk le Clehq  Med Co iiaverstockRo. Hasipstead London Sua.  rR> NEW DRAGEE 1TASTELKSS) FORMQP    EASY   T0   TAOI  ������EE THAT TRADE MARKED WORD 'THERAPION IS O*  8RIT. GOVT   STAMP AFJ-IXEO TO ALL GENUINE fACK&Tlt.  The Soul of a Piant  Action.    Insist on  Otto Ifigel Piano  ������ is the  the  Action  Dragged Down by Asthma.      The  man    or woman    who .is continual!;-  subject  to asthma  is unfitted   for  his  or  her life's work.    Strength  departs  and   energy  is   taken   away   until   bfcj  becomes a dreary existence.    And yet |  this is needless.    Dr   J    D.  Kcllogg's,  Asthma' Kcmcdy hasvbroughi a great \  change  to an   army  of   sufferers.    It  relieves the restricted ait   tubes    and  guards against   future  trouble.      Try  it.  It Doesn't Pay  To buy inferior articles  for home use, no matter  how small the article is.  With matches, as with  everything else, it pays  to buy the best.  The head of the firm was consulting Nelson, the janitor, relative to the  qualifications of an applicant for a  place as assistant janitor.  "Do you know this btf'y's reputation  for truth  and veracity?" he asked.  "Yas, sub, yas, suh, I guess 1 do,"  responded  Nelson.  "Well,  what  is it?"  "Well, suh, he always tells de trufc,  I reckon, dat is, I neyah is ketched  him in flo lie, lull 'bout- dis here  v'ras'ty bizness. I'm gwintcr be fair  wid you. some say he will an' some-  say he won't."  ���������'SILEiNT PARLOR"  Will save your time and  temper, for they are gx>od  strikers, safs, suri;, and  Sixii-NT.  ALWAYS ASK FOR  e= EDDY'S ��������� THE     GAZETTE,     HEDLEY,     B.      C.  Goleman&Go.  ������ ������ ������  "The Big Store"  General  Merchants  KEREMEOS, B.C.  SING LEE  Laundry, Contracting of all  kinds, Ditch digging, Wood  Sawing, Clearing lana, Cooking and all kinds of Chinese  Labor.c  Keremeos, B.C.  and  Similkameen Advertiser.  Subscriptions in Advance  Per Year.. ..���������...' $2.00  ''   fUnitodStatos)..  2.50  Advertising Rates  "Measurement, li lines to the inch.  Transient Advertisements���������not exceeding one  inch, $1.25 for ono insertion, 25 cents for  ench subsequent insertion. Ovor one inch,  12 'cents net- lino for lirst insertion and 8  centa per line for each subsequent insertion.  Transients payable in advance.  Contract Advertisements���������One inch per month  $1.25;,ovor 1 inch and up to 4 inchos, $1.00  por inch pel-month. To constant advertisers  taking larger spnce than four inches, on  application, rates will bo givon of reduced  charges, based on size of space and length  of time.  Cer-tlflcato of Improvements  .$10.00  (Where more than one claim appears  in notice,  chum.)  $2.50 for ench additional  Jas. "VV. Giueti. Publisher.  Hedley, B. C.. Dec. 14, 1916.  ** He who does me once, shame on him;  He who does me twice, shame on me."  Commencing  this issue   The  Gazette has   been   reduced   in  size  to  meet existing business  conditions.    For six months the  nowspaper part of the business  has been.run at a loss of over  thirty dollars a month, so more  time will have to be devoted to  the   job   printing   department  and   less   to the paper.   It is  needless to say that the commercial advertising in the paper  has   been    disappointing.      On  taking over the plant we found  that about half of the advertising was padded.   We should  have gone  more fully into the  business details, so it is a case  of "stung again  through  carelessness."     Then  the  subscription  list was in a sad muddle.  Some never subscribed, others  who subscribed never intended  to pay.     All subscriptions not  paid in advance  will  be struck  oil! the first of the year. A statement will bc sent to  each subscriber within the next ten days.  No further notice will be given.  We should apologize for all this  shop talk, but we aro in the hole  about $500 and six months lost  ainco coming here.   Wo pay our  accounts promptly, and we ask  those owing us to do the same.  If wo could "get from  under" it  wouldn't bc necessary to publish this notice  est position in the empire. It has  taken Britain nea rly three years  to place a man of action at tiie  head of the government. There  must be in the army a man  of action resourceful enough to  lead six million of the bravest  troops in the world to victory.  It is not improbable, that Lloyd  George will find the man or  men best fitted to do the work,  and do it quicdly.  The Kamloops Standard-Sentinel is, guilty of a 28-page  special issue. This splurge is  unpardonable considering the  present price of-;paper, uuless  the outfit is owned by a stock  company or politicians. However the issue, is a very creditable one even for Old Man  Simpson, who is an expert, and  who boosted Cranbrook until  there was nothing left but a  hole in the 'ground,-'��������� where.the  town once was. Kamloops has  had two booms in thirty years,  both the result of railway construction. It is doubtful if there  is as large- a business turnover annually in Kamloops how  as there was previous to the  advent of the railway. It is  the same with dozens of other  B. C. and prairie towns. 7Nb  boosting on earth can keep the  price of 50 cents an acre grazing  land up to $10 a front foot.  It takes something more permanent than a gang of navvies  to make a town. What is ueeded  in British Columbia is government laud at 50 cents or a dollar an acre to bona fide settlers,  title to be granted at the end of  five years without extra cost  if sufficient improvements have  been made to warrant a certificate of title being granted.  Today the inducements to  settlers on the land .are greater  in New Brunswick and Nova  Scota than in British Columbia.  This week a letter was received  in town from a former resident  of Hedly, au Englishman who  had worked a. number of.years  in the Daly Reduction company's mill, stating that he and  family had settled on a farm in.  New Brunswick. He had sufficient money to buy and make  necessary improvements on a  home here, but the best land is  in the hands of speculators in  this province who ask about  ten times the actval value,  and there aro so many extra  charges and so much official red  tape in obtaining a title, that  it was much cheaper to purchase an improved farm in New  Brunswick. Aud, apparently,  more important to him than  the money consideration was  the fact that his children would  grow up among British with  British ideals���������U. E. Loyalists.  ^ The Kamloops Standard-Sentinel asks this pertinent question: "If 3tou send east for your  printing and we send east for  our hardware, groceries, shoes,  clothing and other necessities,  what will become of our town?"  This is a question that the merchants of other towns than  Kamloops are planning to find  an answer for.  PAINTING  PAPER-HANGING  KALS0MINING  TERMS MODERATE  DALY AVE.   -   -   HEDLEY, B.C.  Be Nickel Plate  BarDer_SliOD  SATISFACTORY, SANITARY  TONSORIflL SERVICE  This shop it equipped with  Baths and all the latest  Electrical Appliances.  f. T.BUTLER, -  Prop.  fiefliey Trading 60, lm i  89*  To-Day  Saturday, Dec. 16th.  AllToys  Including Sleighs and Children's Furniture  F*&\r Cent-lO  A  A. F. & A. M.  ItEGULAR monthly meetings of  Hedley Lodge No. 43, A. F. & A. M.,  aro held on tho socond Friday in  saoh month in Fraternity hall, Hedley. Visiting  brethron are cordially invited to attend.  0. H. SPROULE,  W. M  S. E. HAMILTON  Secretary  L. O. L.  The Regular meetings of  Hedley Lodge 1714 are held on  the lli-rit and third Monday in  every month in the Orange Hall  Ladies meet 2nd and i Mondays  Visiting brothern are cordially invited  W. LONSDALE. W. M.  H. K. HANSON, Sec't.  MONTHLY REPORT  Hedley Patriotic Fund Committee  The Hedley Patriotic Funds  committee submit the following  report covering collections made  for the month of Oct., If your  name does not appear your  subscription has not been received during the mouth. In  some cases subscriptions are  paid in advance and have previously been acknowledged. If  you are in arrears please hand  your subscription to the Treasurer. Collections made as per  list, month of Oct., $933.55. Of  this amount $158.65 was subscribed for the Hedley Enlisted  Men's Fund. The balance,  $77490, was subscribed for the  Canadian Patriotic Fund.  Following    will    show,  the  amounts remitted  to the Canadian Patriotic Fund:  October, 191-1..... $1001 75  January, 1910. 597 00  February, 1016....      772 00  March, 1916.......     752 75  April, 1916........      747 50  May. 1916     747 95  June. 1936.       791 85  July, 1916.........      737 15  August, 1916.       747 50  September, 1910...      776 10  October, 1916       774 90  Special Display  Gifts may be left till Christmas Eve  if desired.  tiedley Trading 6o. Ltd.  XMAS GIFTS  u  Now is the time to choose while the good assortment las;-;  Toys for the Children, Nice Boxes of Candy for the Ladic ���������-.  Smokers' Sundries for the Men, Gramophones   for   tiiv  ."*-���������������������������'',' :* -      Home, at  ROTHERHAM'g  3  J. G. Webster.  5,00  R. Clare..  4.00  J. Hardman  4.00  M. MoLeod.; :  4.50  R. L. Jones..:  3.50  A. P. LoouierV.  3.75  A. J. King..  4.00  A. B&im....................... 4.00  F. Bentley  3.50  A. W. Harper.......  3.50  J. Giuiie.... .7 ..   3.50  J. Jainieson....-.....-.... ... 3.50  VV. Knowles .-........ . 5.00  W. W. McDougall'.-  3.50  J. Donnelly ......   3.75  T. L. Terry.  3.50  Nothing startling has occurred in the war zone in the past  week. The Roumanians have  been able to check the German  advance to some extent. The  Russians are pressing forward  in the north, and the Serbs and  French in the south. On the  west it is a huge pebble mill  with thcTFreneh and British as  pebbles and the Germans tho  material being reduced. It is  simply a question of pebble  supply, and which wljl last tho  longer, the grinders or the  ground.  C.  Tho rearrangement of the  British cabinet, with Lloyd  George at its head will probably  mean a more vigorous prosecution of the waiv Thero must  be something more than ordinary in tho little chunk of Welsh  energy or he would not have  been able to overcome caste  prejudices and attain the high-  Trade Mark*  Designs  Copyrights Ac  Anyone sending a sketch and description may  quickly ascertain our opinion froa whether an  Inrentton Is p������obably patentable.   Communica  tions strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents  intfree. Oldest agency for securing.patents.  Patents taken throiifjh Mann Sl Co. recelT*  sent free. Oldest agency for securing  (alien throiifjh Mann Sl "  tpec.ial notice, without clmree, in the  Scientific Jftnericait.  Ahandsomoly illustrated weekly.  cnlatl  ���������   year:  eolation of any scientist! Journal.     ,   -    : four months, *L Bold by all newsdealers.  I.nriett clr-  Terms, S3 a  MUNN & Co.36-8���������-1*--"- New Yorfc  Branch Offlcr. 6Zb V 8U Washington. D. C.  $8446 45  P. Dai/ton,  Sec.-Treas.  We  hereby certify that   we  have  examined thc books and  accounts of the Hedley Patriotic  Funds  Committee and find the  above statement to be correct.  H. D. Barnes   1 a   ,.,  F. M. Gillespie/Aut,,to^-  J-AYI'OT.r. OI*I)L.'CTION*S,  SKI'T,  1910.  W. Sampson $ 5.00  ���������Ar. L. Ge/.on         5.00  Friend       8.00  D. \V. Knowles       5.00  Will.  Lonsdale     10.00  A. Oli.re       5.00  8. L. .Smith, ~....       5.00  G. E. French       3.50  John Smith       4.50  P. Murray       3.00  P. G. Wright       4.00  C. A. Brown   V. Zackerson   H, P.. Hanson   W. Mat hew   R. S. Collin   J. W. Wirth   W. W. Corrigan   L. C. Rolls   R. Boyd   P. Millett   H. F. Jones   T. O. Porteous.   G. VV. Wirtanen       4,50  S. O. Knowles      4.00  T. Henderson 4.00  H. T. Rainhow ;...     4.50  G. Knowles      5.00  G. Stevens      4.75  T. B. Willoy 7,      4.00  Leo Brown.  G. E. McClure.  D. Curry......  W. Robertson.  F. Decario.....,,  A. Appleton...  N. Stechishin..  T. Bysouth....  L. Bhsso   J.'R. Brown...  E. Berg.   J. Coulthard...  J. Grieve.....;.  J. Galitzky....  M. Gillis   R. Humbly   J. A. Holland...  J. Hancock. ...  3.50  4.00  3.50  3.75  3.50  3.50  3.75  4.25  3.75  4.25  4.25  4.25  4.25  4.25  4.25  4.25  5.00  4.25  4.50  4.00  4.00  ���������1,00  5.00  4.50  4.50  3.75  3.75  3.75  5.00  4.50  J. Hossaok  3.75  P. Johnson  4.52  S. Johns  2.50  P. R. Johnson  3.75  0. G. Johnson.  4.25  O. Lindgren..  4.25  L. S. Morrison  5.00  H. H. Messinger  4.25  G. Malm   4.00  J. Martin  4.25  K. O. Peterson  5.00  G. Prideaux".  5.00  Prod Pearee  4.25  A. Rawnsley.    4.00  B. Rewcorl  4.25  Geo. Ransom  1.25  W.Ray       4.00  C. Ratise.,  4.75  J. Roden >  2.75  W. J. Stewai t .'  5.75  C. A. Melquist  3.75  Casper Steen  3.75  W. XV. Savage  3.50  A. W. Vance  4.75  J. Williamson  4.00  8 DogH("lin  3.75  C K Ericson  4.25  W. T. Grieves  -1.25  A. Nyborg  3.75  T D Morrison .'-.,  T. Olson..   C Olson '.'   F Peterson   TE Rouse   VV Snyder................   w "wnis. :.:,...  Richard Clare............."...,  ti. I. Jones v .'.  G G Bowerman..   RSedlund...   J. Watson.... 7................  VV C Graham.............7 ....  VVTims ...............:...  D Winger. .'.'���������'  .....  P Williiims.   J Fife......   J'Njiff....   D Henderson.....    D Miner.....   E Hossiick....................  Thos* Browii, two months   K Steffason     ..  ....  A Smith ...: ;  JScutt     D Rankin ..."   C Nelson.   E Medicli.......   E Johnson   H Jackson ......'..'.;...:.  N Eglt....   JDeGroe..   HEOLKY���������TOWN I,IST.  W. J. Coiniack   J. K, Fraser.   G. P. Jones      1M.00.J  ���������>    li'.!  .',. IC.J  ���������-������������������:7L  7';.;.ua  i 2**T  ���������   '-2.-'|  ,"..7iJ  ,-i:oiI  '���������'��������� oQl  "> 7.?i  !.0<)]  3.7c  .'.OGl  ���������:.ooi  !.oc;j  ���������������������������so]  KWi:  :;*.50."|  S'.OO  :;.75a  1.251  :i.75'J  ������]0'J  1.25. f  1.25  2.K/  1.25 i  1.25)  .!:50l  ;00i  XV. Trezonn.  T Baird   K Jackson....,  J AlcCaulay..,  Joe Gerules...  OT Norman...  GR Allen   J Thomas   A Amey.   L Barlow   Otto Johnson.  4.25  2.00  4,25  4.25  2.10  3.75  4.50  4.25  4.25  3.75  4.25  Miss A AIcKiniion.  W J Forbes   G. A. Riddle   H, D. Barnes   C. P. Dalton   A, T. Hoi-swell   F, M. Gillespie.   A. Winkler.   J. Jackson   T. H. Rotherham   VV, T. Butler   C. Barnuiii   G. AloEachren    Miss Roche   J. .1"). Brass   R. J. Edinond   F. H. French   W. A. McLean   Jas. Stewart   MissL,. Buale   John Alairhofer   MissE. Clare   James Clarke   James Ci itehlev   The Daly Reduction Co..  R. J. Corrigan   G Lyon    F Lyon   A. J. McGibhon......   ...  Friend   Miss M Beale   E D Boeing   J Murdoch   J Beale   Bruce Rolls   Geo Shelder   PHeldstab   S E Hamilton   2.0'r  1.50-  3.00'  .y.oo  1.50,  3.00  10.00.  5.00,  5.00.;  5.00!  3.00  l'.wi:  5.00:  2.0(1  5.00  .'UK),'  5.00  5.00-  2.(K)  1.00 j  .3.00,'  2.00'  2.50  t.oo;  iO.OOi  1.00:  5.00 i  3.00)  2.50 j  5.00 j  2.00  5.00',  1.00  3.00  2.50  3.00  4.50  5.00  ���������������II

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