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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Sep 30, 1921

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 GRAND FORKS
is   situated   in
the center of Qrand Forks valley, the
premier fruit growing district of
Southern British Columbia. Mining
snd lumbering are also important
industries in districts contiguous to
the city.
Legislative Library
•*■	
11
TWENTIETH YEAR—No. 48
Kettle Valley Orchardist
THF SniNf
X UU OCli paper 0f the citizens
of the district* It is read by more
people in the city and valley than any
other paper because it iti fearless, reliable, clean, bright and entertaining.
It is always independent but never
neutral.
GRAND FORKS   B. C, FRIDAY,   SEPTEMBER 30, 1921
"Tell me what you Know is true:
I csn auras as well aa you.
$1.00 PER YEAR
SESSION Of THE
CITY COUNCIL
Unveiling of War Memorial on Armistice Day»
Gity Auditor Appointed
-■Cement Sidewalk Bylaw
Tbe mayor and all tbe aldermen
were present at the regular session
of the city council on Monday even
ing. "
M. Frankovitch and H. Sprinthall
addressed the council in reference to
the complaint made by Mr. Lyden
at the last meoting in regard to an
obstruction on Walnut street. Tbe
council decided tnat if the neighbors
interested could not come to an agreement regarding the matter the street
would bave to be cleared.
Dr. Acres addressed tbe council
and requested tbat a committee be
appointed from the council to assist
tbe memorial committee at tbe cere
monies of the unvieling of tbe war
monument, which it is intended to
bold on November 11. Aid. Love
and McDonald were appointed, and
they will'act witb the mayor as such
oommittee.
Ad oiler of $100 from O. G. Dunn
for lot 3, block 6, map 23, wss accepted, as waa also an offer from H.
Angliss of $25 each for lots 3 and 4,
tlock 31, map 72.
A communication was received
from (be C.P H. in reference to tbe
proposed exchange of lots in the
West end. A map of tbe company's
holdings in tbat part of the city accompanied tbe letter, lleferred to
the finance committee.
A letter from Charles F. Hunter,
successor to the late J. H. Lawrence,
city auditor, offered to take over the
auditing of the city books on the
same conditions under wbich Mr.
Lawrence held the position. The
offer was accepted and Mr. Hunter
was appointed city auditor.
. The clerk was instructed to write
a letter to Mrs. J. II. Lawrence exn
pressing the sympathy of tbe counoil iu ber bereavement on the death
of her busband.
Tbe clerk was instructed to ascertain from J. A. McCollum, road superintendent, if any action bad been
taken by tbe provincial government
in connection with the rebuilding of
tbe Yale bridge.
Tbe chairman of tbe board of
works was authorized to bave a
suitable stand made for the trophy
gun.
Tbe clerk was autharized to have
2000 'copies printed of tbe small
map of the cily.
Aid. McDonald reported tbat
motorists were exceeding tbe speed
limit on Winnipeg avenue, especially in front of tbe Central school.
Referred to tbe police commissioners.
A bylaw providing for the construction of a cement sidewalk on
the north side of Winnipeg avenue,
from toe packing bouse to tbe old
opera house, was introduced and
advanced to its third reading.
Individual Permits
Need Declarations
Victoria, Sept 27.—Provision was
made today through the passing of
an order-in council for the taking of
statutory declarations from all persons securing single purchase permits for the buying of liquor at gov
ernment stores. The declaration
must be made before the official
issuing tbe permit and the permittee
must declare bis residence in British
Columbia.
Tbe object of the order, said Premier Oliver, is to prevent abuse of
tbe act by American visitors, who in
the past bave occasionally abused
tbeir permit privileges by getting
Rritish Columbia residents to do the
buying of liquor over the amount
allowed an American by the law.
Another order-in-council sets the
prices to be charged for Chinese
liquor.
Gontract for Southern
Road Has Been Let
Victoria, Sept. 28.—The contract
for the grading of jhe Kettle Valley
railway extension into Oliver, the
town of the government's Osoyoos
irrigation scheme in the southern
Okanagan. bas been awarded and
the work will start at once, according to an announcement this afternoon from D. C. Coleman, president
of the Kettle Valley, through Premier Oliver.
A. E Griffin & Co., of Vancouver,
have been awarded the contract for
the work. Tbey announced tod ay
that they would have it started as
soon as they could get on the
ground,
Tbe new railway line will be between sixteen and twenty miles long
and give connection with the present line of the Kettle Valley.
Work on the new railway line will
employ a large number of men be-
t *veen now and next spring, it was
said today at the parliament buildings.
Opening of the line, tbe premier
said, will give access to the town
and the whole district and speed up
settlement there on the government's
irrigated lands.
THE WEATHER
The following is the minimum
and maximum temperature for each
day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on E. F. Law's ranch:
Max.   Min.
Sept.. 23—Friday  61        34
24—Saturday  64        30
25- Sunday  70        40
26—Monday    68        55
27—Tuesday  67      . 43
28—Wednesday.. 62 45
29- Thursday  51 28
Inches
Rainfall  0.04
Marshal Foch Goes
Into Active Training
Brest, Sept. 28,—Marshal Fosh,
who on October 22 will sail for the
United States, has gone into training for bis trip on his Brittany
estate, near here. He will stay there
for a month, getting in condition to
meet the rigors of a series of ban'
quets he expects to attend while vis*
iting the United States.
"Poor Marshal Fa voile was on the
verge of dyspepsia wben be return
ed from America," Marshal Foch is
said to bave remarked, "and he has
a much better stomach than I.
"If the Americans insist upon
banqueting me as they propose, I
am afraid the 'Battle of America'
will be my undoing."
Okanagan Grop Is
Valued at $8,000,000
Victoria, Sept. 28 —The value of
the fruit crop in the Okanagan this
year will aggregate at least 88,000,-
000, according to W. H. Lyne, provincial fruit inspector, wbo has just
returned from inspecting the fruit
quarantine stations along tbe border.
•'At every point I visited I found
heavily-laden fruit trees and optimistic growers," said Mr. Lyne.
"The farmer has been particularly
fortunate tbis year as regards frosts
and fruit pests, and many additional
trees have come into bearing this
season."
will follow this storm period and
killing frosts tre expected in northern parts of America east of Rockies
and iu middle provinces of Canada.
A tropical storm will organfze during the week centering on October
1 near tfie equator. If this October
hurricane materializes the cold wave
will begin operations not long after
Oct. 7. There are some indications
that October temperatures will average lower than usual.
Mr. Lyne added that men were
needed to harvest ad plea, pears,
plums and peaches, and tbat tbe
big ranchers in the Okanagan and
Creston districts were.working hard
to pick the fruit before tbe heavy-
frosts came.
"There is a tremendous amount
of work to he done in the fruit dis
tricts in connection with the har
vesting aud marketing of tbe crops
and the caring for tbe orchards during the winter," said tbe inspector.
Death of J. B. McLeod
The death of John Bruce McLeod, aged 41 years, occurred at tbe
Grand Forks hospital on Sunday
last after a long illness. The funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon at 2.30 b'clock, services being
held in Knox Presbyterian church
and at the grave.
The late Mr. McLeod is survived
by bis wife and a son and a daughter, all residonts of this city. He
was a pioneer of Grand Forks, and
occupied )he position of bookkeeper
for N. L. Mclnnes & Co. until a
few years ago, when he became the
senior member of tbe firm of McLeod tk Hodgson. Last spring he
underwent an operation at Rochester, Minn., for a brain affection. He
never fully recovered from the effects
pf this operation.'
Two Residences
Burned This Week
On Sunday at abovt 2 o'clock in
the afternoon the residence of F
Mohler, near the Great Northern
station in the West, caught afire
and was burned to the ground before the flames _ould be extinguished. Scarcely anything worth
mentioning was salvaged from the
flames.
Wednesday evening at about 7
o'clock H. Strcey's house on Victoria
avenue was discovered to bo on fire.
Very little of tbe household effects
were saved, and the bvilding was a
total loss,
Date of Thanksgiving
Is Fixed by Statute
Ottawa, Sept. 28.—The date of
Thanksgiving bas been fixed by
statute and falls on tbe Monday of
the week in which Armistice day,
November 11, occurs. Thanksgiving
tbus falls on November 7 this year.
Where Did She
Gome From?
New Westminster, Sept. 28.—She
was petite and vivacious, with an
engaging suspfcion of embonpoint,
and sbe was witb a party "seeing tbe
exhibition" here last week on the
day Premier Oliver graced the proceedings witb his presenile.
Included in ber party was Ho n
E. Dudley Barrow, minister of agriculture.
As the little group sauntered up
the central driveway, a stout be-
whiskered man, with a heavy rolling
gait, passed.
"There goes Jobn Oliver," one of
the group remarked.
There.was some further comment,
and the vivacious one was frankly
puzzled.
Suddenly sbe stepped to the side
of the minister of agriculture.
"I don't want to air my ignorance
before everyone," she softly cooed,
"but, tell me, who is John Oliver?"
Preliminary Announcement of Population
The Dominion statistician an
nounces the population of the following cities and towns as shown
by a preliminary count, subject to
correction, of tbe returns of tbe
sixth census, 1921:
1921.
Vernon, B. C  3,649
Fernie,  B. C  4,343
Yorkton, SaBk  5,153
Brandon, Man 15,359
Port Arthur, Ont....16,134
Petrolia, Ont  3,139
Kitchener, Ont 21,605
Guelph, Ont ! 18,019
St. Mary's, Ont  3,843
Dunville, Ont 3,210
Pembroke, Ont  7,871-
Napanee, Ont  3,018
Rockland, Ont  3,495
Hawkesbury Town... 3,531
Valley Field, Que.... 9,180
St. Lambert, Que  3,8H
Longueil, Que  4,7gG
St. Jean, Que  9,859
Magog, Que..'.  5,145
Fraserville, Que  7,714
Village of Matane...   3,050
Joliette, Que  9,036
New Glasgow, N.S... 8,959
Tbe Dominion bureau of statistics
points out that it is the duty of anyone who thinks he or she has been
omitted from tbe censur to notify
the bureau to tbis effect, wben an
investigation will be made.
19111
2,676
4,139
2,300
13,838
11.226
3,518
15,199
17,160
3,388
2,861
5,626
2,807
3,397
4,100
9,449
3,344
3,972
5,903
3,978
6,774
2,059
6,346
6,383
FOSTER'S FORECAST
Washington, Sept. 26.—During
last days of September temperatures
will be moderate in all the northern
Rocky, northern Pacific slope and
northern plains sections, reaching
highest degrees near September 29
Conditions -will favor about average
rains in places where fair amount of
moisiure has occurred the past sum
mor,'and tbese conditions, moving
eastward will cross continent in four
pr five days. Wbile great storms are
not expected a sharp increase in the
storm forces may be looked, for near
October 3 to 6 and most rains near
those dales.
A sharp cold wave—considering
tbe early season for cold waves—
Who Will Oppose
McKelvie_.in Yale?
Acco-iding to the Penticton Herald,
the chief political question asked in
Yale riding these days is, "Who
will oppose J. A. McKelvie?"
It is said that friends of Col. Ed-
gett met him last Saturday night
with a reqoeBt that he take the
field, but the reply that tbey are
said to have received was to the
effect that any independent candidate sbould have a campaign fund
raised in advance in order to free
him from personal expense. Col.
Edgett ran as the soldier-farmer
candidate against Mr. McKelvie in
the by-election.
Mr. Howe,a farmer living midway
between Vernon and Kelowna, and
one of the big Mackintosh apple
growers of tba valley, bas also been
mentioned as a farmer canbidate
possibility. v
It is stated that a deputation of
soldiers and Liberals approached
Capt. Brown of the soldier settlement board, Vernon, asking him to
throw bis hat in tbe ring. Up to the
present nothiug bas been heard of
any opposition possibilities in the'
southern end of tbe riding. »
The expectation is tbat an opposi
tion convention will be held in Pen-
ticton shortly for the whole riding,
T
Vast Amount of Apples
Blown Off Trees—Damage Not Known, But
Will Be Gons^derable
Vjrnon, Setpt. 29,—High winds
in tbe Okanagan valley during the
past five da/s days have blown
uuny hundreds of pounds of apples
from tbe trees. Reports from nearly
every section of the valley tell of
tbe damage tbat ha. been dole to
the fruit.
M-jInCosh Reds have suffered
most because they were just ready
to pick. Wagaera in some sections have al3i been bit. Tbe
amount of the danaige is nit ye (
known, but that it will be considerable is oertain.
New Dominion Cabinet
Right non. Arthur Meighen,
prime minister.ind minister of external affairs.
•J. A. Stewart, Ontario, minister
of railways and canals. (New).
H. H. Stevens, British Columbia,
minister of trade and commerce.
(New).
R. B. Bennett,Alberta,minister of
justice.    (New).
L. G. Belley, K.C, Quebec, postmaster-general. (New).
Rodolphe Monty, Quebec, secretary of state. (New).
Dr. J. W. Edwards,' Quebec,
'minister of health, immigration and
colonization. (New).
. R. J. Manion, Ontario, minister
of soldiers' civil re-establishment.
(New).
J. B. M. Baxter. New Brunswick,
minister of customs and excise.
(New).
F. B. McCurdy, Nova Scotia,
minister of public works.
Sir George Drayton, Ontario,
minister of finance.
Dr. L. G. Norland, Quebec
president of privy coancil.   (New).
S. F. Tolmie, British Colnmbia,
minister of agriculture.
Senator G. D, Robertson, Quebec,
minister of labor.
C. C. Ballantyne, Quebec, minis*
ter of marine.
Sir James Lougheed, Alberta,
minister of the interjor.
Hugh Guthrie, Ontario, minister
of militia and defense.
Ministers without portfolio: E. K.
Spinney, Nova Scotia; Sir Edward
Kemp, Ontario; James»Wilson, Sas-
katchwan (new), and Edmund Bristol, K.C, Ontario (now).
Portfolio of solicitor general remains to be filled later. C. J. Do
herty, K.C. will probably receive
an appoinment to some otber oflice.
Figures Don't Lie
An Irishman was working for a
Dutchman, anil wanted a raise in
wages. Said the Dutchman:
"Pat, if you are worth it, I will
give it to you; bnt listen, Pat, vou
know there are 365 days in the year?"
"Yes," said Pat.
"Now, you eleep eight hours each
day; that equals 122 days you sleep.
Figures don't lie, Pat. Take that off
365 days and you have left only 243
days."
"Yess," said Pat.
Now, Pat you have eight hours for
recreation and devotion. That is
equally 122 days. Now take that off
243 days and you have 121 days left.
There are 52 Sundays in the year.
You must take tliat off, for you don't
work on Sundays, and that leaves you
69 days.
"You know I always give you 14
days vacation each yeart"
"Yes," said Pat.
'That leaves 55 days. Now, Pat,
there are 52 Saturday half holinays
in the year. You kfiow you don't
work Saturnay afternoon, That makes
26 days, Now, tako that off, and that
leaves 29 days. Now, Pat, you have
about two hours for meals each day."
"Yes," said Pat.
"That mako*. 28 days. Now you
must tako that olF. That leaves one
day, and Qguros don't lio, Pat!"
"Now, Pat,  you  know   I   always
give you overy St. Patrick's   day   off.'
Now, Pat, I want lo ask you, do  you
think you arc worth a raise."
Said Pat—"What tlio h—1 have I
boon doing ull this time!"
Mr. Cagnon has disposed of his
interest in the Imperial Billiard Par
ors to his partner, K Soheer.
The Resources of thc
West Are Immense
Montreal, Sept. 28.—Que_.ec is
still much ahead of the west in practically every way, particularly as regards its provincial administration,
declared Hon. Joseph E. Perrault,
minister of colonization, mines and
fisheries, of the province of Quebec,
who has just returned from an extended trip throughout the Canadian
west.
"The resources of the west are
immense," he continued,"but nevertheless I think that the farmers of
tbis province have the* advantage
over the western farmers in that
tbey are not dependent on the sue*
cess of one crop, but enjoy the benefits of mixed farming."
Speaking of the farmers' party,
tbe minister said: "I think it will
die a natural death."
H. A. Glaspell is improving his
residence west of town by adding a
brick veneer. THE   SUH,   GRAND   FORKS,   B.C.
\J\\t <Krm& Sfarka g>tttt
AN INDEPENDENT NEW3PAPEB
Q. A. EVAN8, EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
cent estimate has it that there are in the central and lake states twenty-three million acres
of idle forest land producing neither farm
crops nor timher.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Qreat Britain) 11.00
One Year (in the United States)  1.50
Addresr • " *-****-*»—fcations to
The Grand Forks Son,
Phohb 101R Giuno Forics, B. C.
OFFICE:    CbLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1921
The definite announcement that Hon. Mary
Ellen Smith, minister without portfolio in the
Oliver cabinet, will not not enter the fede-ial
field, has been received in Victoria as a strong
tribute to the premier. She has been strongly
influential in having legislation-enacted bettering conditions for women and children in
British Columbia, and her work in this province has not been finish. During the coming
session Hon. Mrs. Smith is expected to sponsor several important measures dealing with
social questions.
Municipal financing, -Bccording to reports
from Victoria, is the most engrossing business
now being considered in government official
circles.   Conferences with Premier Oliver and
the members of the executive council have
been had this week by representatives of various municipalities throughout the province,
and while nothing definite has been decided
upon in the way of relieving municipal taxa
tion problems, still it is known that important
steps will be taken by the government to meet
the more or less critical situation.  Hon. John
Hart, miuister  of finance, has had officials
working upon the question for the past five
months, and it is hoped to be able to secure
sufficient funds without the necessity of raising the tax rate.   Other   questions to be considered  by  the members of the legislature,
which opens on Tuesday, October 18, relate to
the liquor control act and highway extension.
It is not expected that a great deal of new
legislation will be enacted.
There is room for a straignt Liberal candidate in Yale. A three-cornered fight would
be better than to sacrifice principle by combining with some other party. The people are
weary of combines and coalitions.
Mayor Gale is prominently mentioned as a
Liberal candidate in Vancouver.   In a whirlwind campaign he should prove an easy vie
tor.
It is the fellow that has to be told again
■end again to do the right thing that needs to
worry about his job. The man that has to be
sold only once is safe, and the man that can
do it without being told at all will be at the
head of his department.
If any evidence were needed of the feeling
of uneasiness and apprehension that possesses
the government at Moscow it would be furnished by the news that the all-Russian committee foe the relief of famine has been disbanded and its members arrested by order of
the soviet government. Maxim Gorky, the
eminent author, who has for some time been
working under the orders of Lenine, was the
organizer and chairman of the committee,
which contained representatives of the Social
Democratic and Social Revolutionary parties
as well as the Bolsheviki. The soviet government took its surprising action, so we are
informed, because it feared that the committee planned to overthrow the Bolshevist
regime and establish a Russian government of
its own. ^|      ■
England has an unemployment problem
worse than ours. Among the untoward re
suits of the condition is the further confusion
of municipal finances in the larger cities. Payments for unemployment relief are being made
on a comparatively liberal scale; some of the
London boroughs are paying twenty or twenty-
two dollars a week to heads of families, which
is in many cases more than the man would be
earning if he were at work. That has of course!
a tendency to encourage idleness, even when
work can be had, and it means either heavily
increased tax levies or a default of the boroughs on the money they are under obligation]
to pay to the London county council for mu-!
nicipal purposes. The borough of Poplar in
eastern London is some $1,500,000 in arrears,
and the members of the borough council are
under jail sentsnee for failure to pay its
share of the municipal expenses.
The word snob is not, as most persons suppose, mere slang, but is of respectable, even
distinguished, origin, for it is the abbreviation
of sine nobilitate, once the designation of
English university members who were not of
tlie nobility. It was the pretensions of those
men that brought the word into ill favor, for
they aped the manners and clothes of the
nobs. Tliere are nobs and snobs in the schools
today, not by ace dent of ^birth, j but because
some boys and some girls recognize" the true
standards of gentility and soms do not.
A special program te inculcate the humane
treatment of animals by children has been
launched in thirty-five public schools of the
lower East side of New York city. Instruction
in humane treatment of animals and
birds became compulsory in the curriculum of
the public schools of New York state by an
act passed in April, 1917. The special program
in the thirty-five schools was arranged by the
board of education with the cooperation of the
S. P. U. A. In the fall a first prize and two
second prizes will be given to each school for
the best ompositions on what the writer has
been able to do to help animals during the
snmmer. The older people are absolutely irresponsible. But the children, ah, that's a different matter! It has been traditional that children at a certain age will rob birds' nests, torture cats, tie cans to dogs' tails, etc. It has
been found that that age in childhood responds just as eagerly, inquisitively, productively to the opposite ofthe old tradition, i.e.,
humaneness to animals instead inhumaneness.
OTHER TABLETS NOT
ASPIRIN AT AU
Only Tablets with "Bayer Cross"
are Genuine Aspirin
If yon don't see the "Bayer Crow"
on the tablets, you are not getting
Aspirin—only an acid imitation. ■
The "Bayer Cross" is your only way
of knowing that you are getting genuine
Aspirin, prescribed by physicians for
over nineteen years and proved safe by
millions for Headache, Neuralgia, Colds,
Rheumatism, Lumbago, Neuritis, and for
Pain generally. Made in Canada,
r Handy tin boxes of 12 tablets—•ho
larger sized "Bayer" packages can bo
had at drug stores.
Aspirin is the trade mark (registered
in Canada), of Bayer Manufacture of
Monoaceticacidester of Salicylicacid.
While It is well known that Aspirin
means Bayer manufacture, to assist the
public against imitations, the Tablets of
Bayer Company, Ltd., will be stamped
with their general trade mark,' the
"Bayer Cross,"
Bring or Send lis
the Pieces
when you break glasses
and our experienced repair department will
make a lense or a pair of
lenses that will exactly
"match" the damaged
ones. Ours is an eye
glas service that is dependable in every way
from the testing to the
adjusting of the finished
article.
J. C. TAYLOR
Jeweller and Optician
Bridge Street Grand Forka
Aerial photography has entered the real
estate field. Now, if you wish to buy a suburban residence, a downtown property or a
country house, you can go to a broker's office
and examine, probably with a reading glass,
a most interesting and detailed aerial photograph of the neighborhood that you have in
mind. The aerial picture very quickly brings
the customer to a decisfon either to see the
property or to look elsewhere. It saves time
and the expense of long and often futile
trips.
E. G. HENNIGER
Grain, Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cement
and
Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks.B.C.
PLANT B. C. GROWN TREES ONLY
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO., LTD.
Havo by careful and efficient management built up a large
business daring the past ten years, and are tbe lajgest
growers of nursery stock in Western Canada.
A LARGE ASSORTMENT of very fine Fruit Trees and
Small Fruit Plahts are now growing in our Nurseries at
Sardis, which are being offered to planters at very Reasonable Prices.
THE QUALITY of these trees and plants are ot high order
being propagated from specially selected trees of known
productiveness.
We arge growing a very fine lot of Roses of leading varieties which have bloomed this season in the Nurserias aad
will give good results when transplanted in your garden
or lawn.
We Solicit Correspondence from ' intending planters and
urge the placing orders early in the season. WRITE TODAY
Address
The British Columbia Nurseries Co. Ltd
.     Sardis. B. C. Department C.
Clinton A. S. Atwood, Salesman, Grand Forks, B. C.
Floor Coverings * »w* Prices
When in need of Floor Coverings do not forget that we carry a good range of patterns in
Linoleum,   Linoleum  Rugs
r Also Regular Rugs and Mats
We have the kind that give lasting service
and are pleasant to the eye.   Our prices are right.
oMiller <& Gardner
Home Furnishers
Meeting Provincial Needs
The great increase in the number of telephone stations in this province means that
the telephone subscriber is able to reach
many more people by wire, and consequently his service is of greater value.
During the past year or two expansion
has been marked in all parts of Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland,
but adequate facilities have been installed
both in regard to outside plant and inside
equipment to meet the needs of the various
communities. The object of the company is to give a telephone service second
to none. The B. C. Telephone Company
being a British Columbia concern all
through, has a real interest in provincial
progress, and every effort is made not
only to meet the needs of development
bnt to anticipate them.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
No matter how good the book, it can't do
all the work. To reap from its sowing you
must do more than merely read it.
The forestry problem does not result from
the liberal use of forests, but from the failure
to use forest growing land. There is on this
continent area of untillable land able to support all our timber requiroments, all our wood
manufactures, all our home building and an
even larger export than at present, if that land
could be kept at work growing timber.   A re-
Will we scientists sailing for Chili bring
back with us, when we come out of the CO'
lombian wilderness after two years of explor
ation, some precious medicinal plant, growing
obscurely now on the mountain peaks of Bo
livia or among the jungles of western Brazil?
—some other plant as priceless, therapeutically, as the cinchona shrub of the Andes, whose
bark gives us quinine; or the root of the ipecacuanha, brought long ago from Brazil? Dr.
Henry H. Rusby, of Columbia uuiversity asks
these questions. The qnestions can be answered only by conjectures. Are the stories of J
strange native cures true? That's just what
we are going to try to find out, says Dr. Riis-
by. For myself, I believe that unquestionably
the Sonth American Indians understand the
uses of rare plants which are unknown to our
materia medica. Superstition witchcraft,
legend are so entangied with their actual and
beneficial powers that a white can not hope to
get at the truth of the thousand tales he hears
except by long study. If among all the miracles we can find a few real remedies, that will
be as much as I expect.
Counter
CheckBooks
We have secured the
agency for Grand
Forks of a large
Western Publishing
House which manufactures a superior
grade of Counter
Check Books—carbon back and carbon
leaf styles.
Prices Are Right
Encourage Western
enterprises and keep
Western money in
the West.
Any Quantity
from 100 up to 2500
books.        t
The Sun
Job Department
AUTO LIVERY
AT YOUR
SERVICE
tan
Modern Rigs and Good
Horses at All Hours at
the
Model Livery Barn
M. H. Barns, Prop.
Phone 68 Second Street
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty"
C.V. Meggitt
Beal Estate and Insurance
ORCHARDS, FABM  LANDS   AND CITY
PROPERTY
Excellent facilities for selling your farms
We have agents at all Coast and Prairie
Points
WE CARRY AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE.
DEALER IN POLES, POSTS AJ.D TIES.
AND FABM PRODUCE
Sellable Information regarding this dlstrct
cheerfully furnished. We solicit your inquiries.
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Yale Hotel, First Shiest
GRAND FORKS
Transfer Company
DAVIS 8 HANSEN, Prop.
Those wishing neat sign painting
to ornament their business places
should call on W. F. O'Connor, a
returned soldier.
Padlock Safety Paper.for private
bankchecks, kept in stock by The
Sun Job Department.
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Coal, Wood and' Ice
for Sale
Office at R. E.  Petrie'i Store
FboMM THE   SUN,   GRAND   FORKS,   B. G.
Rossland Assessment District.
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that, on Wednesday, the 12th day of October, 1921, at the hour of 10 a. m., at
the Court House, Rossland, B. C, I will sell at public auction the lands in the list hereinafter set out, of the
persons in said list hereinafter set out, for delinquent taxes unpaid by said persons on the 31st day of December,
1920, and for interest, costs, and expenses, including the cost of advertising said sale, if the total amount due
for period ending December 31st, 1919, is not sooner paid.
The Collector will be pleased to receive any information respecting the list where the owner is a member
of the Allied Forces and entitled to the benefits of section 29 of the "Taxation Act Amendment Act, 1918," and
amendments thereto.
Dated at Rossland, B. C, this 17th day of September, 1921.
H. R. TOWNSEND,
Provincial Collector.
LIST OF PROPERTIES. i
Name of Person Assessed.
Short Description of
Property.
Arrears
of all
Taxes
Int.
Costs
and
Expenses    Total
Oliver, William Estate of
Bertois, J. A	
Hull, Mrs. Elsie 	
Carson, N. J	
Hall, C. B	
Rumberger, G. W	
Holford, George 	
Rumberger, G. W	
Ditto 	
Gaw, Robert 	
Talarico, Rosy	
Tedesco, Eugenia 	
Mclntyre, T. A.
Massie, Geo. E.
Woodward, E. C. ..
Morrison, Kenneth
Shaw, M. T.
Cowper Bros.
Ditto 	
Cox, John Estate of	
International Securities Co.
Ditto   	
Ditto   	
Ditto   	
Ditto   	
Cox, John, Estate of 	
Bowes, J. E.
Durieux, Mrs. Anita
Meggitt, Chas. V	
Ditto   	
Mann, H. M	
McMillan, David .
Gaw, Robert	
Ditto   	
Shorstobitove, A.
Ditto   	
Endersby, Alfred 	
Mauro, F, and Albo, F.
Warren, F. W	
Ditto   	
Ditto   	
Endersby, Alfred 	
Ditto   	
Endersby, Alfred 	
Watt, E. E	
Fisher, Hamilton & Co	
Warren, F. W. 	
McKenzie, A. B. and Hall, H.
Henry, W. S., and Cook, W. D...
Mallch,  M	
Warren, F. W	
Ditto   	
Hagstrom, J. B.
•Roimer, Jacob W.
Sprinthall, Mrs. Jessie 	
Patterson, Norman, M. W.
Tye, C. H	
Craigie,  Minto  	
JLord,  E.  G	
Stevens, John, Estate of
Garland, A. T	
Johnson, Arthur 	
Fraser, Alex 	
Garland, Mary 	
Ryan, Peter 	
Hamilton, L. A	
Flood & McDonald
Kelleher, P. H	
Bertois, J. A	
Smith, James P	
Cameron, Angus 	
Willcox, W. B	
McLaren, D. C.
Miller, W. S	
Roberts, James 	
Denoro Mines, Ltd.
Rendell & Co	
Gowans,  Lavinia
Rendell & Co	
Holland, John M.
Carney, Laura	
Gulbikson,  O	
McLaughlin, J. A.
Holland, Ella J.
Ditto   	
Downey, F .".....
Russell, F. W  	
Allan, Chas. G	
Anderson, Aaron V. .
Baker, W. A	
McDougail, Angus E.'
Fitzmaurice, Wm	
Galipeau, W. J	
Wright, T. A	
Lane, J. W. 	
Crown  Granted  Lands,    Similkameen
Division of Yale District.
.. 320 acres, Lot 690	
..1.50 acres, pt. Lot 970	
.. 1 acre, pt. Lot 970  '
..0.60 acre, pt. Lot 970	
..48 acres, Lot 1112 	
..41.42 acres, Lot 1264 	
..25.87 acres, Pt. Lot 1494 	
..7.20 acres, Lot 1692 	
..7.30 acres, Lot 1693.	
..80 acres, Lot 2028 	
..85.80 acres, pt. Lot 2885	
..23.54 acres, pt. Lot 1138 	
Subdiv. Pt Lots 152, 153, 184, Map 567,
Similkameen Division of Yale District.
..Lot 2, Block 1 	
..Lots 1, 2, Block 3 	
Subdiv. of Pt. Lot 152, Map 888, Similkameen Division of Yale District.
„N>^ Lot 1, Block 3 	
..Lots 6, 7, Block 3 	
Subdiv. of PL Lot 334, Map 523, Similkameen Division of Yale District.
..6.50 acres, Block 2 	
Subdiv. of Pt Lot 500, Map 77, Similkameen l!)iv. of Yale District
..8 acres, Block,8 	
..3.79 acres, W. pt. Block 9 	
Subdivision of Pt Lot 534,   Map   76,
Similkameen Div. of Yale District
..1 acre, Block 2 	
..0.10 acre, S. Pt. Block 10	
.0.56 acres, S. Pt. Block 11 	
. 0.82 acre, S. Pt. Block 12	
. 1 acre, Block 13 	
. 0.37 acre, S. Pt. Block 14	
..1 acre, Block 15 	
Subdivision of Pt. Lot 535, Map 110,
Similkameen Division of Yale District
..9.67 acre, Block 9 	
Subdiv. of Pt. Lot 700, Map 38, Similkameen Division of Yale District
..Lots 1 to 4, Block 19	
..Lots 1 to 4, Block 20 	
..Lots 1 to 4, Block 21 	
Subdivision of Lot 1475, Map 817, Similkameen Division of Yale District
..13.80 acres, Block 10 	
..5.40 acres, Block 16  *.	
..8.80 acres, Block 17 	
. 9.60 acres, Block 18 	
..10 acres,'Block 20 	
.. 62.30 acres, Block 21 	
Nelson and Ft Sheppard Ry. Subsidy
Lands, West Kootenay District
...160 acres, Pt. Sec. 23, Tp. 9A 	
..17.84 acres, Pt. S% Sec. 26, ,Tp. 9A	
...56.97 acres, S. E. % Sec. 26, Tp. 9A...
,. 88.96 acres, Pt. Sec. 28, Tp. 9A 	
.. 7 acres, Pt. Sec. 33, Tp. 9A 	
..15 acres, Pt. Sec. 36, Tp. 9A	
. 7.80 acres, Pt. Sec. 36, Tp. 9A	
Crown Granted Lands, West Kootenay
District.
...189.52 acres, Lot 931 	
...106 acres, Lot 6591 	
...80 acres, Lot 6592 	
...50 acres, Lot 6976 	
...237.66 acres, Lot 8073 	
...120 acres, Lot 8635	
...64.80 acres, Lot 8650  _.	
...160 acres, Lot 9406 	
.. 96.61 acres, Lot 9407 	
Si<bdiv. of Pt. of Bk. "A," Lot-367, Tp.
1, Map 1353, West Kootenay District
..Lots 48, 49  :	
Subdiv. of Lot 8069, Pt of Lot 6547,
Sub Lots 10, 18 and 37, of Lot 5817,
Gp.    1,    Map   824,   West    Kootenay
District.
7.911 acres, W% of E%, Block 4 	
Subdivision of Pt Lot 7159,    Gp.    1,
Map 37, West Kootenay District.
20 acres, N% of NE% of NE ti, Sub- -
lot   149    .-.	
...40 acres, NE>4 of SE'4, Sublot 149 ....
Townsite of Anaconda, Map 24.
Lot 13, Block 1 	
Lots 5, 10, Block 3 	
...Lot 3, Block 4 	
Lot 3, Block 18 	
Lot 11, Block 18  _.
Lot 8, Block 19	
.. Lot 2, Block 23 	
...Lot 12, Block 26 	
Townsite of Boundary Falls, Map 19.
...Lot 16, Block 3	
Townsite of Cascade, Map 8.
...Lot 7, Block 6 	
-Lot 10, Block 7 	
...ll*A Lot 4. Block 8 	
...N"Vis Lots 1, 2, Lot 3, Block 20	
...Lots 3, 4, Block 24 	
...Lot 4, Block 29 	
...Lot 11, Block 32 	
Townsite of Deadwood, Map 73.
...Lot 11, Block 19	
Townsite of Denoro, Map 103.
...Lots 1 to 10, Block 1 	
—Lots 23, 24, Block 7 	
...Lot 6, Block  13 	
Townsite of Eholt, Map 71.
.... Lots 1, 2, Block 3 	
....Lot 5, Block 14 	
...Lots 15, 16, Block 23 	
Townsite of Grand Forks, Henderson
Addition, Map 156. ,
....Let 18, Block 10 	
Townsite of Grand Forks, Manly and
Ruckle Addition,  Map 108.
....Lots 4, 5, Block 33 	
....Lot 4, Block 34 	
....Lot 10, Block 37 	
Townsite of Grand    Forks,   McNee's
Addition, Map 128.
....Lots 1 to 13, Block 4 	
....Lots 1 to 3, Block 6 	
Townsite of Grand Forks, Ruckle Addition, Map 36.
....Lots 10 to 13, 23 to 27, Block 10	
...Lot 22, Block 10 	
....Lot 9, Block 11  ....
....Lot 1, Block 16	
....Lots 1 to 3, Block 21  ....
....Lot 1, Block 22 	
....Lots 2 to 4, Block 22 	
....Lots 1 to 6, Block 24 	
 Lots 19, 20, Block 26 	
..-Lota 1 to 3, */t ot 4, 11, Block 30	
$ 90.40
$12.03
$3.76
$106.18
61.40
7.80
3.76
72.96
3.07
.25
3.75
7.07
6.14
.49
3.76
10.38
57.60
9.22
3.75
70.57
30.00
2.26
3.75
36.01
144.74
31.96
3.75
180.45
4.00
.30
3.75
8.05
6.00
.39
3.76
9.14
34.33
2.54
3.76
40.62
44.30
3.41
3.75
51.46
5.00
.39
3.75
9.14
42.77
11.71  '
.3.75
68.23
46.15
3.80
3.76
63.70
20.97
1.74
3.75
26.46
16.50
1.74
3.75
21.99
5.92
22.73
4.80
12.13
6.60
28.10
3.87
10.50
11.64
12.50
16.91
40.00
24.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
22.00
40.00
100.00
40.00
24.00
37.50
70.00
60.00
25.00
90.00
45.00
6.00
25.30
10.00
20.00
2.20
8.01
3.92
2.10
7.62
5.96
10.04
2.84
3.24
2.35
2.51
3.64
73.21
2.91
2.83
2.34
2.00
3.00
12.00
2.00
3.83
6.78
2.81
1.00
7.18
5.58
.77
20.80
5.30
26.33
.75
.64
.78
8.66
2.05
21.87
14.06
6.07
12.06
.29
3.76
.35
1.06
.54
1.69
.62
1.01
1.07
1.07
1.49
3.00
1.80
2.26
3.15
1.59
1.66
3.00
7.60
3.00
1.80
3.96
5.26
4.50
1.89
9.45
4.74
.46
1.90
.76
1.50
.19
.64
.32
.17
.82
.47
.67
.29
.19
5.85
.24
.13
.20
.16
.33
1.26
.16
.60
.71
.30
.16
1.79
1.09
.33'
1.92
.49
2.06
.13
.09
.21
1.17
.23
1.27
1.31
.58
3.81
3.76
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75.
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
2.76
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.76
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.76
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.76
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.76
2.76
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.76
9.96
20.88
1.28
3.76
26.91
10.03
.62
3.75
14.40
20.76
1.41
3.75
25.92
7.17
.88
3.75
11.80
8.28
1.09
3.75
13.12
9.92
1.53
3.76
15.20
10.08
1.60
3.75
16.43
5.65
.75
3.76
10.05
4.21
.33
3.75
8.29
■m
27.77
8.90
16.94
10.89
33.54
8.14
15.26
16.46
17.32
22.15
46.75
29.56
36.01
36.90
20.34
27.41
46.76
111.26
46.76
29.65
46.21
79.01
68.25
30.64
103.20
53.49
8.21
30.95
14.51
25.25
6.14
11.40
6.99
5.02
11.19
9.18
13.46
5.88
6.28
5.29
5.48
6.68
81.81
5.90
6.71
6.29
4.91
6.08
16.01
4.91
7.08
10.24
6.86
4.91
11.72
9.42
3.85
26.47
8.64
31.14
3.63
3.48
3.74
12.68
6.03
25.89
18.12
9.30
18.62
Wright, Percy   Lots 9, 10, Block 30 	
Burr, A. C Lots 5, 6, Block 31  -	
Burr, Minnie C Lots 7, 8, Block 31 	
Subdiv. of Pt. Lot 382, Map 1363, Similkameen Division of Yale District
Crawford, H. A Lots 12, 13, Block 3 	
Aikman, Chas. A ..Lots 9 to 14, Block 4 	
Home, Phoebe T Lots 10, 11, Block 6 	
Subdiv. of Pt. Lot 534, Map 1254, Similkameen Division of Yale District
Woolacot, Eva J Lot 13, Block 5 	
Nicholson, James Beattie  Lot 7, Block 8 _	
Barker, Mabel and Minnie  Lots 12, 13 Block 12 	
Mallas, A. G Lot 11, Block 16 	
Nicholson, James Beattie  Lot 8, Block 16 	
Friedman & Lleberman  Lot 12, Block 17 	
Mallas, A. G Block 20 	
Nicholson, James Beattie  Lot 12, Block 22	
flLevy,  E Lot 2, Block 24 	
Nicholson, James Beattie  _Lot 7, Block 24 	
Kerby, F. M Lot 9,' Block 24 	
Nicholson, James Beattie  Lot 11, Block 25 _	
Subdivision of Pt. Lot 534, Map 1457
8!milkameen   Division   of Yale   Dist
Wolfe, Louis L Lot 4, Block 2 	
8ubdlv. of Pt. Lot 534, Map 1455, Similkameen Division of Yale District.
Blanchfield, A. B Lots 15 to 20, Block 14 _	
Ditto Lots 1 to 9, Block 22 	
Ross, Margaret  Lot 27, Block 24 	
Moran, Mrs. Margarite  Lot 23, Block 38 	
McCoyd, Robert  _. Lot 9, Block 39 	
Townsite of Midway, Map 3.
Masloiika, Katrina  Lot 14, Block 32 	
Denton, Mrs. E Lot 12, Block 8 	
Elson, Wm Lot 7, Block 34 	
Smith, Jos. P Lot 8, Block 35 	
Jones, Frank R Lots 15, 16, Block 43	
Guess, H. A :. Lot 18, Block 45 	
Evans, Evan   „ „ Lot 3, Block 47 	
Townsite of Midway, Western    Addition, Map 87.
Mee, Mrs. Lizzie  Lot 9, Block 4 	
Stewart, Ernest T Lots 6, 7, Block 16 	
Townsite of Niagara, Map 53.
Oats, Mark  Lots 9, 12, 14, to 16, Block 6	
Townsite of Phoenix,   Granby    Addition, Map 60.
Clarke, J Lot 5, Block 26 	
Shea, Eugene P., Estate of  S*A Lots 9, 10, Block 27	
Thompson and Matheson Lot 1, Block 31 	
Forslund, John  Lot 8, Block 31 	
Tufts, Sarah, EBtate of  Lot 10, Block 31 	
Owen, Evan W Lot 15, Block 31  r	
Townsite of Phoenix, New York Addition, Map 58.
Jacobson,  Adolph   Lot 5, Block 2 	
McAuliffe, Mrs. J. E Lots 7, 8, Block 7 	
Townsite of Phoenix,   Golden    Eagle
Addition, Map 184.
Black, Joseph -• Lot 9, Block 1 	
Blundell, Mrs. C. M Lot 1, Block 2  .:	
McGillivray, W Lot 28, Block 2 	
Townsite of Summit, Map 79.
McLaughlin, J. W. Lots 23,24, Block 43 	
Dinsmore, W. H Lot 3, Block 45 	
McLaughlin, J. W Lots 7, 8, Block 63 	
2.65
.33
2.75
5.73
3.93
.29
2.75
6.97
2.58
.37
2.75
5.70
2.00
.28
2.75
6.03
7.37
.86
2.75    .
10.98
8.47
.90
2.75
12.18
2.00
.16
2.75
4.91
2.00
.16
, 2.75
4.91
2.00
.16
2.75
4.91
2.00
.16
2.75
4.91
2.00
.16
2.76
4.91
2.00
.16
2.76
4.91
2.00
.16
2.75
4.91
2.00
.16
2.75
4.11
2.00
.16
2.76
4.91
2.00
.16
2.76
4.91
2.00
.16
2.75
4.91
2.00
.16
2.75
4.91
1.05
.16
2.76
3.96
7.95
1.22
2.75
11.92
11.52
2.02
2.75
16.29
3.31
.60
2.75
6.56
1.37
.14
2.75
4.J6
1.78
.26
2.75
4.79
6.64
.35
2.75
8.74
7.20
.56
2.75
10.51
2.99
.24
2.75
5.98
2.78
.23
2.76
5.76
12.16
2.40
2.75
17.30
2.77
.23
2.75
5.75
3.22
.28
2.75
6.25
14.40
1.10
2.76
18.25
57.60
4.34
2.76
64.69
11.41
3.13
2.76
17.29
12.00
.90 '
2.75
15.65
20.00
1.50
2.75
24.25
6.00
.46
2.75
9.21
8.00
.60
2.75
11.35
8.00
.60
2.75
11.35
10.00
.76
2.75
13.61
10.00
.76
2.75
13.61
12.00
.90
2.75
15.65
18.00
1.36
2.75
22.11
18.00
1.36
2.75
22.11
10.00
.76
2.75
13.51
2.00
.16
2.76
4.91
2.00
.16
2.76
4.91
2.00
.16
2.75
4.91
An FCxtilbitlon from France
At the inauguration of the French train at Place Viger
Station, Montreal. Amongst the officials shown in this photo
are Prime Minister Meighen, Senator C. P. Beaubien, Senator
Smeaton White, Senator Dandurand, Count d'Arnaud, president of the train; M. de Lalande, vice-consul of France in
Montreal; Mr. E. Hebert, of the C,P,R., and Mr. Morrison, of
the C.N.R.
Geo. Clemenceauta head by Rodin, the famous sculptor,
which is on exhibit in the French train.
A Made-in-France exhibition train
Is now touring; Canada, over the
Canadian Pacific Railway. It was
opened at the C. P. R. Place Viger
Station, Montreal, on August 29th,
amongst those present being Premier Arthur Meighen, Mayor Martin
of Montreal, and Senator C. P. Beaubien, who organized the bringing of
the French exhibition goods to Canada and the tour of the train
throughout the Dominion.
The object of the train carrying
French goods is to promote cordial,
social, and commercial relations,
reciprocally advantageous to both
countries.
The train consists of a baggage
car, eight exhibition ears, a tourist,
a diner, and two sleeping cars. Ths
olght coaches of ths train carry
goods representative of I
(1) The   Intellectual  development
of Francs)
(2) Industries,    oommsws    sua
tours:
(8) French styles;
(4) Leather Industries;
(Bl Chemical  goods, perfumery;
(6) Instruments of various kinds,
electrical goods, toys;
(7) Agriculture, horticulture,
food;
(8) Jewellery,    objects    of    arti
clocks, watches.
But this list only gives an idea of
ths hundreds of things on exhibition.
In the tour of the Dominion tiie
train will travel a total of 7,993
miles.
During the four days which the
train remained in Montreal it was
visited by thousands of Interested
persons. It was a huge success at
the Toronto Fair and is nttrnctlnK
large numbers everywhere it goes
through the country.
A member of the staff of the Canadian Government commercial intelligence service Is travelling with tho
train, partly in order to study the
results cbtdncd fro*.!i a business
oint of view. The information
.cleaned is to be used in fixing un tha
trainload of Canadian products
which it Is stated is to be sent later
on to tour France and probably tha
United Kingdom and other European
countries.
Stimulate your business by giving it greater
publicity. An advertisement in The Sun is not a
luxury, but an investment* THI   SUN,   GRAND   FORKS,   t. 0.
News of the Gity
Od Tuesday a couple of Doukhobors from the North Fork colony
appeared befo.e Magistrate McCai-
lum on a charge of appearing in
public in less raiment than is spec i
fied by Candian law. They were
sent to Nelson for thirty days.
Wednesday about a dozen members
of tbe colony marched through the
city, singing hymns—in the Russian language. They were on their
way to Nelson, and carried commissary pack*, of raw vegetables ont heir
backs.	
Rev. Benjamin 8. Clarke, of Prestatyn, North Wales, a neweomer to
the valley, has acquired the commodious and comfortable residence
and twenty-two lots on Vancouve r
street from E, G. Eaton. The p rice
paid was #3000,  the transfer being
arranged by Geo. C. Egg. Mr, aud
Mrs. Clarke are the parents of Mrs.
P. S. Thompson.
Kettle Valley trains have been
detoured by way of Spences Bridge
during the past week owing to a
washont that occurred on Saturday
night just east of Hope. A fall of
rock at Coquihalla Pass has blocked
the line to eastbound trains. Steam
shovels and cranes have been [sent
by the C.P.R. from Penticton to
clear the way.
A. D. Morrison expects to harvest
2100 boxes of apples from his orchard ihis year. He has a good crop
of Jonathans of a very fine quality.
Some kind of a cheap John show
has been held on tbe fair grounds
during the paBt couple of days. As
we have not yet run across  anyone
Sports on the Pacific Coast
there Is no centre ia the
JMrid where one ean get mch a
Jwiiuly of Maimer sports as in Van-
B.O. Tbere are several ex-
beacbes lor bathing, there
half a dozen different lots of
tennis-courts within the city
there aie several golf-courses,
aad lacrosse, a polo-ground
at Brighouse Park when re-
the Vancouver team played
Kamloops and Calgary.
,y afternoon nearly always
a couple of cricket matches be-
played at the beautiful ground*
n at Brocston Point.
tbe most popular of all
l—MLUHJiits in Vancouver are motor-
Imcmng and yachting. The har-
lEMbr tba Yacht-club is dotted
M pliauuiu boats of every stee
aid wBdj motep-pow«r boats from
tba Btflg row-boat wjth an outboard
motor find inside it right up the
saale to tbe beautiful new launch
torn Seattle, 110 ft., built originally
for a submarine chaser.
All the sailing boats turn trot for
ths -Noattas held at various points
a.OBg tbe coast. There are 16 "kit-
HeaT**!! feetlwats of the "Cat boat"
e.ata, tbs "Sir Tom" and the "Spirit"
*t tttt «B" alt*, tha "Miiierva," a
Tins Is Preserving Time
We have a large stock of every variety of fruit for
preserving, and an abundance of sugar, at tempting prices. Also fancy fruit for the dining room
table and choice vegetables for the kitchen.
The Gity Grocery
R. M. McLeod     I Photic 25 |    H. H. Henderson
City Property For Sale
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the Gity, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Prices:—From $25.00 per lot upwards.
Terms:—Gash and approved payments.
List of lots and prices may be seen at the
Gity Office.    J
JOHN A. HUTTON.
Gity Clerk
CHRIST'S SECOND COMING
How? When?   Where? Why?
All Christians hope for, all Christians long for the second
coming of our Lord.  Because of the many conflicting creeds,
few have Scriptural understanding upon the matter.
For a clear, concise, Biblical presentation
don't fail to hear
Clifford Roberts
Travelling representative of the
~"   International Bible Students Association.
Grand Forks Opera.House
Tuesday, October 4th
at 8 p. m,
Mr. Roberts  is a speaker of fascinating and pleasing]de-
livery, and all bear witness to the fairness of his presentation.
Seats Free * No Collection
I
BIDE THEBE ON CLEVELAND
IT brings the whole country for miles around within easy roach.
Have you seen the new models. They're as graceful as swallows! As
bright as new coin! As weatherproof as a duck? Automobile Steel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Real Quality. Real
Value. Easy Terms. We are tbe peoplejto mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER 8^i&fi{S&
Otfcn Saturday Eveninfts Till 10 o'Clock
witb   sufficient   temerity to admit
that tbey have seen the  exhibition
we are unable uonfte to give an extended criticism of it.
(1) The Vancouver Polo Team
at Brighouse Park.
(2) Sailing in Vancouver Harbor.
80 ft. Tfft', the "PatrWa," built
specially for the Linton Cup between
Vancouver and Seattle, ana the only
boat on the Pacific Coast that has
the Marconi tig. '
But tbese are only a few of tha
hundreds of boats that dot the blue
winters of l-urrawl Inlet or the mors
adventurous seas outside on a sum-
mar's afternoon.
Premier Meighen is discussing the
tariff in Manitoba, and Hon. Mac -
kenzie King is talking tariff in tbe
Maritime provinces. In Grant*
Forks we are paying the customai.
tariff on imports.
the John H, Jackson ranches, has
acquired the residence of J. P. McNevin, opposite tbe Central school.
The transfer was arranged by Geo,
C Egg.
Frank G. Newman, wbo has been
pending tbe past summer in   Detroit, Mich., returned tbis week to
this city, where his family resides.
F. R. S. Barlee, ad.isatait city
dark, underwent a surgical operation at the Grand Forks hospital on
Monday last. After passing through
a critical period of three or fou r
days, his condition is now report ed
to be improving.
J. C. Taylor, the jeweler, left
Tuesday evening for a business trip
to tbe Slocan country. He expects
to return home tomorrow night.
Mr. Townsend, manager  of  th
Grand Forks aod   Nelson  branche s
of  the Curlew  creamery, returned
rom the latter city oa Mi iliy.
Robert D. Daffield, who recently
purchased the Hugh McLennan an
Old Times in Western Canada
Gorgeous Caves
The Oregon cavos, which a  hunter
stumbled upon in 1874. by no means
equal the Mammoth cave of Kentucky
in extent,  but far  surpass  that of
any other known cave in this country
in natural splendor,
"water, saturated with carbonate of
lime, seeping from the ground  above,
has slowly incrusted the whole surface
of the cave.' Ceilings  and  walls are
frescoed; alaoves, balconies and corridors are fringed  with  the most im -
maculate draperies;  floors   have th e
lustre   of   silk and  look as if never
meant for the tread  of mortal feet.
The   lormations   are   curious; man y
bear actual or fancied resemblance to
objects of various kinds—weird,  fantastic, awesome. Everywhere crystal
facets   gleam   in reeponso to the ex
plorer's   light.    Here the walls glow
softly   as  with  the sheen of velvet;
there they blaze as with  the  twinkle
of distant stars reflected   in tnyriads
of mirrors;  everywhere diamond-like
points and facets scintillate with  fire
and color.
The caves have not boon wholly
explored, but tlio visitor can travel
perhaps three miles and a half underground. Tho trip takes threo hours.
The entrance to the caves is twenty-
seven miles from the nearest railway
station.
Ihis picture reproduced from an actual photograph taken in 1886 at Stony Mountain.
Manitoba, shows a group of French Journalists, the first to travel over the Canadian
Pacific Railway.    Pounclmaker, the rebel Indian chief, is seen in the centre of the picture
I To Bet first-hand knowlcdffo of
th* Kiel Rebellion and the results
[Which followed its suppression, a
warty of French journalists and
Vxsir wives arrived at Quebec in
July, 1886. They were the first
'French journalists to visit Canada
'after Confederation.
* After spending a few days In the
-historic city they went to Montreal
.where they were entertained by
Vaany French-Canadian Societies.
Leaving Montreal they travelled
,Over the Canadian Pacific Railway
Hines to Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan.
jWhere the women of the party re
aaalned while the journalists jour
'neyed to the scenes of the battles
during the Kiel Rebellion. They
visited Batoche, Cut-Knife Hill.
Frenchman's Butte and other places
They travelled by methods of transportation used by the pioneer settlers, consisting for the most part of
ox-carts.
Returning to Manitoba, the journalists visited Stony Mountain Penitentiary, where Pounclmaker, the
noted leader of a strong band of Indian Rebels was imprisoned. Pound-
maker lead the band of Rebels who
defeated CVlonel Otler'a forces at
gat-Knife Bill
Poundmaker surrendered to Col
onel Middleton on May 26, 1885, 14
days after the battle of Batoche,
The Indian lender was sentenced to
serve three years in Stony Mountain
Penitentiary. Several other Rebels,
including Kiel were hanged. When
Poundmaker was sentenced to prison,
be said he would rather be hanfjeii
than go to "that place in Manitoba."
lie died before his sentence expired.
The French journalists had the
only photograph taken of them in
Canada, during their visit to Stony
Mountain Penitentiary. Poundmaker
was brought from his cell and posed
in the middle of the group. Colonel
Samuel Lawrence Bedson, warden of
the penitentiary, stood behind Pound-
maker, holding the chain which was
attached to Poundinaker's wrist.
Poundmaker was one of the most
note! and interesting prisoners ever
imprisoned at the penitentiary. He
was the only prisoner who waa allowed to wear his hair long while
serving a* sentence.
.Journalism and literature were not
of a hiph standard when the French
journalists visited the West. The
early settlers paid almost undivided
attention to their activities is the
fields.
The journalists gathered what data!
they could regarding journalist.*
achievements   in   Western   CahadaJ
Vfiu    ™m* P"* e'Vea *° them W
William F. Luxton, editor of the
Manitoba Free Press, and tha dean
of newspaperdom in the West Ths
Free Press was established in 1872.
ind it had grown to be a political
power in Canada. It championed
the cause of the Liberal party.
The Nor' Wester, which waa tie
pioneer newspaper of the Wcet, car-)
ried the only news the settlers read
in the earlier days. It flourished for,
several years, and '.'died" shortly
after the suppression of the Riel
Rebellion. The Manitoban, and the
News Letter both had short lives.
They were followed by The Metis, a
French newspaper. It also met an
early death. The fate of The Metis
interested the visiting French journalists, who secured copies of it to
take back to France.
The journalists then went to Toronto, then to Montreal, then to Quebec over the Canadian Pacific Rail-
way linos, embarking on a steamer
at Quebec for the voyage down the
St. Lawrence River and across the
Atlantic Ocean to France, |
He—My father was killed in a
feud.
She—I never would ride in one of
those cheap cars.
He was a wise man who said he
hadn't time te worry. In the daytime he too busy and at night he was
too sleepy.
Job Printing at The Sun oflice a
practically the same prices as before
the big war.
S. T. HULL
Established 1010
RealEstate and Insurance
Realdent Agent Qrnud Forka Townsite
Company, Limited
Our
Hobby
is.
Good
Printing
mllE value of well-
■*■ printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. .Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Ball programs
Business cards
Visiting cards
Slipping tags
Letterheads
Statements J
Noteheads
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
THE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ARMSON
Synopsis of
Land Act Amendments
flrst-olnas land
second-class te
to
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
THE  SUN
Columbin Avenue and
Lake Street
TSLUP.I1VB
Farms     Orchards     City Property
Agent* at. Nelion, Calgary, Wlhnlpeg and
other Prairie polnti. Vanoouver Agents:
PENDER INVESTMENTS
RATTBNBUHY LANDS LTD.
Established in 1910. we are in a posllloti to
'urnl-ii reliable information i-onoerniug thi* I
district.
Witt* for free literature.
R101
PICTURES
AID PICTURE FRAMIN6
Furniture Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds.
Upholstering Neatly
R. C. MeCCTCHEON
WINNING J.VU0I
Don
un   prl
rwluci'il to tfi an acre;
UM an acre.
Pre-emption  now   confined
veyed lands only.
RecordB will lie granted covering only
land suitable for agricultural purpose*
and which Is non-timber land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
t_ut parties of not more than four may
'Arrange for adjacent pre-emptions
with joint residence, but each making
i Lcesaary improvements on respective
•lalm*. ta
Pre-emptors must occupy claims for
Ave years and make improvements to
value of $10 por acre. Including clearing and cultivation of at least t acrea,
before receiving Crown Grant
Whore pro-emptor in occupation not
less than 8 years, and has made proportionate Improvements, he may, because of Ill-health, or other cause, be
granted intermediate certificate of lm
; rovement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes Improvement* to extent ot
,* ti- ■) per annum and records same each
yenr. Failure to make improvements
or record snme will operate as forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained In
loss than 6 years, and improvements
ot 110.00 per acre, Including 6 acres
clearer! and cultivated, and residence
of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown grant
may record another pre-emption, If he
requires land ln conjunction with his
farm, without actual occupation, provided statutory improvements made
and residence maintained on Crown
granted land, tj,
Vt surveyed areas, not exceeding 10
acres, may bo leased as homesltes;
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding 040 acres may be
leased by one person or company.'
Mill,-factory or Industrial sites on
timber lnnd not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions Include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a road
to them. Rebate of one-half of cost of
road, not exceeding half of purchase
price, Is made.
I'RE-liMPTORS'      FREE
ACT.
The scon* ot this Aet Is enlarged to
Include all persons joining and serv-
i:ig with His Msjofltye Furces. Th*
time within which the heirs or devisees
of a deceased pre-emptor may apply
(or title under this Act ls extended
from for ono year from the death of
uuch person, as formerly, until one
year after thu conclusion ox the present
war. This prlvUege Is alao mad* retroactive.
No fees l
due or payable by soldiers on    preempt Innn recorded after June M, Ull.
Taxes are remitted for five yean.
Provision for return of money* accrue .1, due and been paid alnce August
4, 1011, on account of payments, fee*
or taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members ot
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from en-
Hutment to March 81. 1910.
8UB-PURCHA8ERS   OP  CROWN
LAND*.
Provision made for Issuance ot
Crown grants to sub-purchasers ot
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of ''conditions of purchase, Interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and taxes may
be distributed proportionately over
whole area. Applications muat be
made by May 1, 1920.
GRAZING.
Crazing Act, 1»1», for systematic
development of livestock Industry provides for grazing district! and range
administration under Commissioner.
Annual crazing permits Issued based
on numbers ranged: priority for established owners. Stock-owners may
form Associations for range management. Free, or partially free, permits
for settlers, camper* or travellers, up
to ten bead.
GRANT*
relating to pre-emptions ara
bl* by soldier* on
NEW HARNESS SHOP
I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and do all kinds of repair
work. -Shop equipped" with
modern machinery. All work
guaranteed:
C. A. Crawford
Nm* Telephone Office

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