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The Evening Sun Sep 4, 1909

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 Sun.
Eighth Year—No. 44.
Grand Forks, B. C, Saturday. September 4, 1909.
$1.00 Per Year in Advance.
AN ABLE LECTURE
Prof. Craig Gives Much Valuable Advice to Fruit
Growers
The lecture delivered by Prof.
Craig, of Cornell university, before
the members of the Kettle Valley
Farmers' Institute in the city hall
on Tuesday evening was very largely
attended, and proved to be one of
the most practical addresses dealing
with agricultural matters heard in
thiB city.
Martin Burrell, M.P., was called
to the chair by the president of the
institute. Mr. Burrell, in introduc
ing Prof. Craig, spoke briefly on the
fruit growing industry, but disclaimed all astern pts at making a
speech, contending tbat on the present tour he merely acted in the capacity of a curtain-raiser. Prof.
Craig, he said, had devoted his entire life to the study of horticulture,
and his lecture would be of no small
benefit to the fruit growers of the
valley. At Vernon Hon. Sydney
Fisher, minister of agriculture, had
attended the meeting. Mr. Fisher
had stated on tbe public platform
that farming and fruit growing in
what is known as the dry
belt of British Columbia had
now advanced to the stage where
the establishment of an experimental farm in this province was justified.
Prof. Craig, in his apening remarks, said he bad no intention of
following up the oratorical gait set
by the "curtain-raiser." He complimented the fruit growers by saying there were more mutual ties ind
good fellowship among them than is
to be found among any other class
of farmers. Concerning his lecture,
he warned the audience that he did
not wish to be understood ns speaking dogmatically, as he was not sufficiently well acquainted with the
local conditions iu tbis district.
Regarding the relationship of temperature to fruit growing, the speaker said the apple tree withstood a
wider range of beat and cold than
any oth,er tree. A northeastern slope
to an orchard was preferable, as it
ensured a more even temperature.
The less climatic fluctuations there
were iu an orchard the better, as
plants did not like these changes.
Cold sometimes affects the trees injuriously. There are two forms of
winter killing of the tops of trees,
one being caused by immature
growth If winter came on beforo
the tree was properly matured, the
liquid matter of the tree transformed
into crystals of ice. Cultivation of
the trees should cease early in autumn in order to allow of the tree
ripening. Ordinary fall or spring
frosts would not affect a properly
matured tree. But even when sufficiently matured, trees were sometimes killed from dry freezing. This
occurred during a protracted period
of cold weaiher, and when the liquid
cells of the trees were dried up from
drouth. Sun scalding was prevented
by actually shading the trees. This
condition conld be recognized by
thc bark separating from the tree I
and curling back. It was injurious |
to leave tree protectors on   indefin-'
itely.   A   light   material   for   this
purpose was most suitable.
In referenee to root killing, Prof.
Craig said it was as unwise to allow
the rootB of trees to become too dry
in fall as it was to have too much
water. RootB were as easily killed
with too much moisture in autumn
as with too little. The thing wa« to
strike a happy medium by keeping
the ground in moderate moisture.
Root-killed trees would start growing in the spring, perhaps blossom,
and then die. Water going into the
ground released the plant food. Cultivation also accomplished the same
object, as well as killed the weeds.
The speaker emphasized tho im
portance of cover cropB during the
winter season. He was not prepared
to say when Buch a crop Bhould be
put in in this locality, but he was
certain that the crop was needed.
The ground did not require much
fertilizing if this was done. There
was nothing better than a good snow
covering in orchards, as it acted as
a protective agent for the roots. He
would rather see an orchard go into
winter covered witb weeds than spec
and clean, because the more humus
there was in the soil the more particles of water it would hold. Clover
was one of the best crops. Winter
vetch was also good. The seed of
the latter was rather expensive, but
there was no reason why the farmers
here could not raise their own seed.
Rye, barley, field peas and buckwheat could also be used as substitutes—but there was nothing better
than red clover. Tbe orop should
be turned under as early in the
spring as it is possible to work the
ground, in order tbat there might
be nothing in the orchard to compete with the growth of the trees.
No region, he said, was free from
the possibility of a severe winter,
and be urged those engaged in the
industry in this locality to be prepared, although he understood the
winters here were mild in comparison with those of tbe east. But
there was danger of the snow leaving
before the frosts were over. A good
covering of vegetation would greatly
assist in preventing damage to trees
in this respect, as frost penetrated
twice as deep in bare soil as in thnt
covered by vegetation.
The mineral elements—potash
and phosphorus—of the soil determines the quality of fruit, and nitrogen developes the tree. During tbe
developing period of an orchard
more nitrogen is needed; and there
is no better agent than red clover
for extracting nitrogen from the air.
After an orchard is fully developed
about equal parts of nitrogen and
the mineral foods are required, and
the successful fruit grower will endeavor to keep his orchard in this
condition.
Mr. Craig congratulated the fruit
growers of British Columbia on being free from nearly all insect enemies. Keep these out, he continued,
and you will be in a fruit growers'
paradise. In the east it costs 20
per cent of the crop to fight these
pests, and the fruit grower considers
himself fortunate if he secures 70
per cent of No. 1 apples. At present your orchards are entirely free
from San Jose scale, pear blight
and apple spot. One of the best
methods of fighting these enemies
was to plant native grown stock.thus
preventing their importation. A
rigid inspection of imported fruit
was also necessary.
Your orchards, however, are not
entirely free from disease. "This
tree," he said, as he picked up an
apple tree which had been brought
to the hall for his inspection, "is
badly infected with a disease called
Oregon   cank-    ;■- all   parts of the
world e*eipt forfjlp>Q; The .l)r°P'
er treating., vKn.j.-iiis disease,  in its
incipiency, is _o spray with Bordeaux mixture in the autumn after
the leaves have fallen, and also by
amputating and burning affected
branches. For a tree as badly diseased as this, however, the only
remedy is fo dig it up and burn it."
No one single treatment would kill
aphis. The best remedy was to
spray early in the spring with quassia chips and whale oil soap, mak
ing three applications at intervals of
four days. At this time of the year
it was not worth while to treat for
tbis disease.
Trees should be planted about four
inches deeper than they stood in the
nursery.
Mr. Craig took an optimistic view
of the fruit growing industry n this
province on account of the splendid
marketB in the Orient, in the northwest and in the old country. There
was no danger of an overproduction.
This had been proven in the case of
the United States. In that country
iu 1909 the total production of apples was 65,000,000 barrels. This,
however, was a record. The average
for the past ten years was 38,000,-
000 barrels. How does the increase
in markets 'compare with the increase in production? The Inland
Empire alone has increased its population in the past three years by
300,000, now making a total of
1,200,000 inhabitants. The increase
in production does not nearly compare with this.
Mr. Craig could see no reason why
fruit growing should not develop into an important industry in this
valley. Success was certain to attend the intelligent, energetic and
vigorous fruit grower. There were
failures among the fruit growers as
jvell as in other lines of business,
however, but those who studied
the general and local c mditions of
horticulture invariably mod.! a success of it.
At the conclusion of thc address,
I'rof. Craig replied to several questions from his audience at his invitation. Regarding pruning, he said
the main portion of it should be
done in winter, but some summer
pruning was also advisable. The
Northern Spy was a long time
in coming into bearing, but after it
once started it was the longest bearing tree.
On motion of the mayor, a hearty
vote of thanks waa tendered I'rof.
Craig.	
Married
On Wednesday, September 1st,
in the Catholic church, the marriage was solemnized of Miss Mamie
| Agues Barrett, daughter of .Mr. and
Mrs. Miles Barrett, to Air. John A.
McDougail, an employee of the
Granby smelter, Rev. Father   Hart-
' minn performing the ceremony,
Mr. and Mrs. McDougail left on
the morning train for a  short wed-
! ding tour to the coast cities. On
their return they will take up their
residence in this city.
NEWS OF THE CITY
Born—In Grand Forks, on Wednesday, September 1, to Mr. and
Mrs. W. H. Itter, a son.
The first carload of fruit shipped
from the Covert estate this season
was forwarded to Cranbrook yesterday. It consisted of mixed fruit,
principally Duchess and crab apples.
James Mellor, a rancher living
four miles from Curlew, and Miss
Charlotte W. Gregg, of Grand Forks,
were married in Republic last week.
Lutley & Galipeau have erected
another drying shed at their cement
block works in the West end. This
will enable them to operate two sets
of moulds.
Bert Campbell, of Danville, is
showing some fine free gold quartz
specimens, valued at $10 per pound.
The gold shows along tbe ledge for
about 100 feet in the old Paulson
tunnel on the Faithful-Surprise
group, known as the Knob Hill
mine. Mr. Campbell is stripping the
ledge and preparing to ship a carload of ore.
500,000 acres of the richest land in
the world for sale at S6.50 to $20
per acre. We have a colony plan
whereby we Bell a town lot and a
farm for S100 at Sanborn, Old Mexico, payable $10 cash and $ 10 per
month for nine months, and no interest. For further particulars call or
write A. A. Morgan, Province Hotel,
Grand Forks, B. C.
Definite announcement of the
merging of the British Columbia
Copper company .and New Dominion Copper company is made from
New York, though plans are not
given. Meanwhile B. W. Lincoln,
chairman of the minority committee, is inspecting the property sold
to the New Dominion reorganization, and declares there 1b trouble
ahead unless the minority he represents get justice.
J. C. MacDonald, of the Grand
B'orks Steel and Structural Iron
Works, returned from Vancouver
last Tuesday. The MacDonalds
have been awarded the waterworks
contract for the city of New West-
ster, amounting to about a quarter
of a million, and tbey will remove
their plant to the coast and start
operations there at an early date.
E. Barron left on Tuesday for
Manitoba to look after his farming
interests there.
M. F. Sloper hns sold his residence
here to A. S. McKim, who took possession of the property this week.
Mi'. Sloper will move to the const.
Miss Hazel Hall, C.P.R, telegraph
operator at Nelson, visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Hall, iu
this city this week.
Percy Clark has returned from a
two weeks' vacation trip to tbe coast
cities.
J. S. Jost, local manager of the
British Columbia Telephone company, returned this week from a vacation trip to the coast cities.
The young son of Mr. nnd .Mrs.
A. J. MacDonald is still seriously ill.
Mr. Jones, an electrician nt tbe
Granby smelter, left on Tuesday (or
Nanaimo.
Special Rates for Ten Days
A round trip rate of a fare and a
third has been granted by all railroads for visitors to Spokane during
the Interstate Fair, from September
18 to 28, although the fair runs but
for the week September 20 to 25,
Last yenr the special rate only applied to the week of the fair. But
President Taft will be in Spoknne
September 28. Efforts, which at
first seemed likelv of success, were
made to have the president open the
Interstate fair, but these proving
unavailing, Manager Cosgrove made
the request of the railroads that the
special rate extend to the time of the
president's nrrivnl in Spokane,
which wns granted.
A CURLING CLUB
Organized Last Friday—Call
for Plans ane Specifica-
■ tions for Rink
A meeting of the curling enthusiasts of the city was held in the city
hall on Friday evening last, when
the organization of a club was perfected. The committee appointed at
a previous mreting to solicit subscriptions, reported having secured
thirty-six guarantees of 825 each.
Those present were of the opinion
that this showing justified a permanent organization, and the formation of a curling club was proceeded
with by the election of the following officers: President, N. L. Mclnnes; vice-president, D. D. Munro;
secretary-treasurer, W. B. Bower;
executive, Geo. Hull, J. A. McCallum nnd A. B. Hood.
The club authorized the executive
to purchase a site, preferably that
back of Geo. Clark's residence on
Fifth street, providing arrangements
can be made with the city to secure
a portion of the street, the lots not
being of sufficient depth. The executive was also instructed to call
or plans and specifications and to
award a contract for the construction of a rink. Authority was given
for the purchase of twenty-four pairs
of stones, which have already been
ordered from Scotland.
The subscription committee was
enlarged by the addition of severnl
members, and instructed to continue its work in securing subscriptions nnd new members for the club.
It is hoped tbat the citizens will respond liberally, as the money will be
used for the promotion of a clean,
healthy winter sport.
It is understood that the club intends to erect a (iOx 100 building,
with three rinks.
An Up-to-Date Plant
The coolest place ill tbe city at
present is P. Burns & Co.'s cold
storage plant, On a warm day it is
quite refreshing to inspect this modern method of kcjp meals nnd game
in prime condition. The plant consists of two rooms, and both are kept
scrupulously clean. The temperature
is generally kept at -10 deg., but by
simply pressing a button the mercury will drop to such an extent
thnt the ment will freeze solid in a
few minutes. The motive power
employed is an electric motor, and
the freezing agent is ammonia, the
cold waves being manufactured by
pumping the volatile alkali through
pipes, much on tbe  same  principle
as artificial  ice  is manufactured in
the south.    Not a  single  pound  of
ice is used in the whole establishment Besides operating the cold
storage plant, the motor also operates the sausnge machine, with a rapacity of' chopping 40 pounds of
meat every three minutes. The
policy of the company is to employ
every means available to provide ils
customers with the best good", handled under the best possible condi
tions.
On Sunday evening, September 5,
in the Baptist church, the pastor,
Rev, F. W. Auvache, will begin n
series of addresses on the teaching
of "Christian Science and the Bible. ftbe
Sun.
Eighth Year---No. 44.
Grand Forks, B. C, Saturday. September 4, 1909.
$1.00 Per Year in Advance.
AN ABLE LECTURE
Prof. Craig Gives Much Valuable Advice to Fruit
Growers
The lecture delivered by Prof.
Craig, of Cornell university, before
the members of the Kettle Valley
Farmers' Institute in the city hall
on Tuesday evening was very largely
attended, and proved to be one of
the most practical addresses dealing
with agricultural matters heard in
this city.
Martin Burrell, M.P., was called
to the chair by the president of the
institute. MivBurrell, in introduc
ing Prof. Craig, spoke briefly on the
fruit growing industry, but dis
claimed all astempts at making a
speech, contending tbat on the present tour he merely acted in the capacity of a curtain-raiser. Prof.
Craig, he said, had devoted his entire life to the study of horticulture,
and his lecture would be of no small
benefit to the fruit growers of the
valley. At Vernon Hon. Sydney
Fisher, minister of agriculture, had
attended the meeting. Mr. Fisher
had stated on tbe public platform
that farming and fruit growing in
what is known as the dry
belt of British Columbia had
now advanced to the stage where
tbe establishment of an experimental farm in this province was justified.
Prof. Craig, in his apening remarks, snid he had no intention of
following up the oratorical gait set
by the "curtain-raiser." He complimented the fruit growers by saying there were more mutual ties and
good fellowship among them than is
to be found among any other class
of farmers. Concerning his lecture,
he warned the audience that he did
not wish to be understood as speaking dogmatically, as he was not sufficiently well acquainted with the
local conditions in thiB district.
Regarding the relationship of temperature to fruit growing, the speaker said the apple tree withstood a
wider range of heat and cold than
any otber tree. A northeastern slope
to an orchard was preferable, as it
ensured a more even temperature.
The less climatic fluctuations there
were in an orchard the better, as
plants did not like these changes.
Cold sometimes affects the trees injuriously. There are two forms of
winter killing of tbe tops of trees,
one being caused by immature
growth If winter came on before
the tree was properly matured, the
liquid matter of the tree transformed
into crystals of ice. Cultivation of
the trees should cease early in autumn in order to allow of the tree
ripening. Ordinary fall or spring
frosts would not affect a properly
matured tree. But even when sufficiently matured, trees were sometimes killed from dry freezing. This
occurred during a protracted period
of cold weaiher, and when the liquid
cells of the trees were dried up from
drouth. Sun scalding was prevented
by actually shading the trees. This
condition conld be recognized by
the bark separating from the tree
and curling back. It was injurious
to leave tree protectors on   indefin
itely.   A   light   material   for   this
purpose was most suitable.
In referenee to root killing, Prof.
Craig said it was as unwise to allow
the roots of trees to become too dry
in fall as it was to have too much
water. Roots were as easily killed
with too much moisture in autumn
as with too little. The thing wa« to
strike a happy medium by keeping
the ground in moderate moisture.
Root-killed trees would start growing in the spring, perhaps blossom,
and then die. Water going into the
ground released the plant food. Cultivation also accomplished the same
object, as well as killed the weeds.
The Bpeaker emphasized thc im
portance of cover crops during the
winter season. He waa not prepared
to say when such a crop should be
put in in this locality, but he was
certain that the crop was needed.
The ground did not require much
fertilizing if this was done. There
was nothing better than a good snow
covering in orchards, as it acted as
a protective agent for the roots. He
would rather see an orchard go into
winter covered witb weeds than spec
and clean, because the more humus
there was in the soil the more particles of water it would hold. Clover
was one of the best crops. Winter
vetch was also good. The seed of
the latter was rather expensive, but
there was no reason why the farmers
here could not raise their own seed,
Rye, barley, field peas and buck
wheat could also be used as substi
tutes—but there was nothing better
than red clover. The orop should
be turned under as early in the
spring as it is possible to work the
ground, in order that there might
be nothing in the orchard to compete with the growth of the trees.
No region, he said, was free from
the possibility of a severe winter,
and be urged those engaged in the
industry in this locality to be prepared, although be understood the
winters here were mild in comparison with those of the east. But
there was danger of the snow leaving
before the frosts were over. A good
covering of vegetation would greatly
assist in preventing damage to trees
in this respect, as frost penetrated
twice as deep in bare soil as in that
covered by vegetation.
The mineral elements—potash
and phosphorus—of the soil determines the quality of fruit, and nitrogen developes the tree. During the
developing period of an orchard
more nitrogen is needed; and there
is no better agent than red clover
for extracting nitrogen from the air.
After an orchard is fully developed
about equal parts of nitrogen and
the mineral foods are required, and
the successful fruit grower will endeavor to keep his orchard in this
condition.
Mr. Craig congratulated the fruit
growers of British Columbia on being free from nearly all insect enemies. Keep these out, he continued,
and you will be in a fruit growers'
paradise. In the east it costs 20
per cent of the crop to fight these
pests, and the fruit grower considers
himself fortunate if he secures 70
per cent of No. 1 apples. At present your orchards are entirely free
from San Jose scale, pear blight
and apple spot. One of the best
methods of fighting these enemies
was to plant native grown stock,thus
preventing their importation. A
rigid inspection of imported fruit
was also necessary.
Your orchards, however, are not
entirely free from disease. "This
tree," he said, as he picked up an
apple tree whicb had been brought
to the hall for his inspection, "is
badly infected..with a disease called
Oregon canker ;in all parts of the
world ex.oept in Oregon. The proper treatment for thiB disease, in its
incipiency, is to spray with Bordeaux mixture in the autumn after
the leaves have fallen, and also by
amputating and burning affected
branches. For a tree as badly diseased as this, however, the only
remedy is fo dig it up and burn it."
No one single treatment would kill
aphis. The beBt remedy was to
spray early in the spring with quassia chips and whale oil soap, mak
ing three applications at intervals of
four days. At tbis time of the year
it was not worth while to treat for
this disease.
Trees should be planted about four
inches deeper than tbey stood in the
nursery.
Mr. Craig took an optimistic view
of the fruit growing industry n this
province on account of the splendid
markets in the Orient, in the northwest and in the old country. There
was no danger of an overproduction.
This had been proven in the case of
the United States. In that country
in 1909 the total production of apples was 65,000,000 barrels. This,
however, was a record. The average
for the past ten years was 38,000,
000 barrels. How does the increase
in 'narkets 'compare with the increase in production? The Inland
Empire alone has increased its population in the past three years by
300,000, now making a total of
1,200,000 inhabitants. The increase
in production does not nearly compare with this.
Mr. Craig could see no reason why
fruitgrowing should not develop into an important industry in this
valley. Success was certain to attend the intelligent, energetic and
vigorous fruit grower. There were
failures among the fruit growers as
veil as in otber lines of business,
however, but those who studied
tbe general and local conditions of
horticulture invariably mnde a success of it,
At the conclusion of the address,
Prof. Craig replied to several questions from his audience at his invitation. Regarding pruning, he said
the main portion of it should be
done in winter, but some summer
pruning was also advisable. The
Northern Spy was a long time
in coming into bearing, but after it
once startcil it was the longest bearing tree.
Ou motion of the mayor, a hearty
vote of thanks was tendered Prof.
Craig.
Married
On Wednesday, September 1st,
in the Catholic church, the marriage was solemnized of Miss Mamie
Agnes Barrett, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Miles Barrett, to Mr. John A.
McDougail, an employee of the
Granby smelter, Rev. Father   Hart-
i minn   performing   the   ceremony.
! Mr. and Mrs. McDougail left on
the morning train for a short wedding tour to the coast cities. On
their return they will take up tbeir
residence in this city.
NEWS OF THE CITY
The first carload of fruit shipped
from the Covert estate this season
was forwarded to Cranbrook yesterday. It consisted of mixed fruit,
principally Duchess and crab apples.
James Mellor, a rancher living
four miles from Curlew, and MiBs
Charlotte W. Gregg, of Grand Forks,
were married in Republic last week.
Lutley <__ Galipeau have erected
another drying shed at their cement
block works in the West end. This
will enable them to operate two sets
of moulds.
Bert Campbell, of Danville, is
showing some fine free gold quartz
specimens, valued at $10 per pound.
The gold shows along the ledge for
about 100 feet in the old Paulson
tunnel on the Faithful-Surprise
group, known as the Knob Hill
mine. Mr. Campbell is stripping the
ledge and preparing to ship a carload of ore.
500,000 acres of the richest land in
the world for sale at $6.50 to 820
per acre. We have a colony plan
whereby we sell a town lot and a
farm for S100 at Sanborn, Old Mexico, payable $10 cash and $10 per
month for nine months, and no interest. For further particulars call or
write A. A. Morgan, Province Hotel,
Grand Forks, B. C.
Definite announcement of the
merging of the British Columbin
Copper company and New Dominion Copper company is made from
New York, though plans are not
given. Meanwhile B. W. Lincoln,
chairman of the minority committee, is inspecting the property sold
to the New Dominion reorganization, and declares there is trouble
ahead unless the minority he represents get justice.
I. C. MacDonald, of the Grand
B'orks Steel and Structural Iron
Works, returned from Vancouver
last Tuesday. The MacDonalds
have been awarded tbe waterworks
contract for the city of New West-
ster, amounting to about a quarter
of a million, and tbey will remove
their plant to the coast and start
operations there at an early date.
E. Barron left on Tuesday for
Manitoba to look after his farming
interests there.
M. F. Sloper has sold his residence
here to A. S. McKim, who took possession of the property this week.
Mi'. Sloper will move to the coast.
Miss Hazel Hall, C.P.R. telegraph
operator at Nelson, visited her par-
euts, Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Hull, in
tbis city this week.
Percy Clark has returned from a
two weeks' vacation trip to the coast
cities.
J. S. Jost, local manager of the
British Columbia Telephone company, returned this week from a vacation trip to tbe coast cities.
The young son ot Mr. and Mrs.
A. J. MacDonald is still seriously ill.
Mr. Jones, an electrician nt the
Granby smelter, left on Tuesday for
Nanaimo.
A CURLING CLUB
Organized Last Friday—Call
for Plans ane Specifications for Rink
A meeting of the curling enthusiasts of the city was held in the city
hall on Friday evening last, when
the organization of a club was perfected. The committee appointed at
a previous mreting to solicit subscriptions, reported having secured
thirty-six guarantees of $25 each.
Those present were of the opinion
that tbis showing justified a permanent organization, and the formation of a curling club was proceeded
with by the election of the following officers: President, N. L. Mclnnes; vice-president, D. D. Munro;
secretary-treasurer, W. B. Bower;
executive, Geo. Hull, J. A. McCallum and A. B. Hood.
The club authorized the executive
to purchase a site, preferably tbat
back of Geo. Clark's residence on
Fifth street, providing arrangements
can be made with the city to secure
a portion of the street, tbe lots not
being of sufficient depth. The executive was also instructed to call
or plans and specifications and to
award a contract for the construction of a rink. Authority was given
forthe purchase of twenty-four pairs
of stones, which have already been
ordered from Scotland.
The subscription committee was
enlarged by the addition of several
members, nnd instructed to continue its work in securing subscriptions and new members for the club.
It is hoped that the citizens will respond liberally, as the money will be
used for the promotion of a clean,
healthy winter sport.
It 18 understood that the club intends to erect a 00x160 building,
with three rinks.
Born—In Grand Forks, on Wednesday, September I. to Mr. and
Mrs. W. H. Itter, a son.
Special Rates for Ten Days
A round trip rate of a fare and a
third has been granted by all railroads for visitors to Spokane during
the Interstate Fair, from September
18 to 28, although the fair runs but
for the week September 20 to 25.
Last year the special rate only applied to tbe week of the fair. But
President Taft will be in Spokane
September 2.S. Efforts, which at
first seemed likelv of success, were
made to have the president open the
Interstate fair, but these proving
unavailing, Manager Cosgrove mnde
the request of the railroads thnt the
special rate extend to the time of the
president's arrival in Spokane,
which wns granted.
An Up-to-Date Plant
The coolest place in the city nl
present is P. Bums & Co.'b cold
storage plant. On a warm day it is
quite refreshing tu inspect this modern method of keop meats nnd game
in prime condition. The plant consists of two rooms, nnd both are kept
scrupulously clean. The temperature
is generally kept nt 40 deg., but by
simply pressing a button tbe mercury will drop to such an extent
thnt the ment will freeze solid in a
few minutes. The motive power
employed is nn electric motor, and
the freezing agent is ammonia, the
cold waves being manufactured by
pumping the volatile alkali through
pipes, much on tbe same principle
as artificial ice is manufactured in
the south. Not a single pound of
ice is used in the whole establishment. Besides operating tbe cold
storage plant, the motor also operates the sausage machine, with a capacity of chopping 40 pounds of
meat every three minutes. The
policy of the company is to employ
every means available to provide its
customers with the best good", hnn-
dled under tbe best possible condi
tions.
On Sunday evening, September 5,
in the Baptist church, the pastor,
Rev. F. W, Auvache, will begin a
series of addresses on the teaching
of "Christian Science and the Bible.'' JOHN   D, SPENCE!    school heport
BARRISTER,
SOLICITOR. ETC.
GREENWOOD. B. C
The following is the report of the
Grand   Forks public school, ns com-
Slip
Sliming frnm
Published nl
i Grand Porta. BrltlihColumbia.
piled  by   I'rinei|
month of August:
En.
Division.      roll-il.
Ono  :>")
Two  :!!l
Three  83
Four 43
Fl»e 51
s x :«i
Seven  4!l
il    May,   for  the
Actu- Aver-
nl,
Po-
cent^tro
24 71     08 85
a ir'
ami
1771.
272'4
320
:»_•<
36 "7
27.81
38.03
45 71
3357
43.50
80.92
82 70
0(1.53
80 83
93.25
88 78
A Hip of tbtl paper I'lin lie seen at tin- ijllloo
af Mp.srs. li. A .1. Kanl.v A Co., DO, 111 nml 12,
Pleol Street, B.O., London. ISturluu.l, free of
pliario'. utul tli nt film will ho i>lnil to rooelve
■llbnorl],tions ami iliIvoi tisonioittH on onr behalf.
BUHHCltll'TIOS IIATKH 1
One Yeur H...II
One Ymir (In advance) l.tll)
A.lvfrtislinr rata, titrnltho 1 on inp>
Legal notices. In nml.. pants ppr line.
Aililmss all aoininlliilaatlons to
Thk Evening Sun,
Phonb B74 IIhanii Pokkk, B.C.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1909
Here is a new definition of a non-
political organization: "If you don't
nominate n mnn thnt suits us we will
put a candidate of our own in the
field."
Total.
100S	
1728    248 80     0011
ll3301.:, 220 07     87 43
Difference... 147   W%   19.73     2.08
PERSONAL
If the report is not cnntmdictpd
within o day or two, it may be taken
for granted that Dr. Frederick Conk,
of Rrooklyn, haa discovered the
north pole.
The Fernie board of trade is protesting against the yellow correspondent. Fernie is not the only city
that is menaced by the yellow peril.
A dispatch appeared in the city papers last week under a Grand Forks
date thnt wns a pure frabrication of
lies. This city has not been in the
slightest danger from bush fires during the present season.
Dr. Averill made a business trip
to Greenwood Inst Monday.
John Coryell and bride returned
home from the east Inst night.
I!. F. Petrie has returned from a
week's outing at Christina lake.
James West nnd bride returned
from Spokane on Wednesday even-
"S-
The Misses Demuth returned
home this week from n visit to
Butte, Mont.
Mrs. Peter B. Nelson and children
returned to their home in Calgary
last Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. II. A. Sheads have
returned home from a two mouths'
vacation trip to the coast cities.
P. D. McDonald, of the Colin, is
at the Hot Lake, Ore., .sanitorium,
where be recently submitted to a
surgical operation.
Geo. A. MacLeod and Harry
Shallenberger, of Spokane, arrived
in the city on Tuesday, and left the
following morning for the McKinley
mine, in Franklin cnmp. They are
expected to return from the property
today.
EUROPEAN AGENCY
INDENTS   promptly   executed   at
lowest cash prices for all kinds of
British  and  Continental  goods,
including
Hooks and Stationery,
Boots, Shoes nnd Leather,
Chemicals nnd Druggists' Sundries,
China, Earthenware and Glassware,
Cycles, Motors and Accessories,
Drapery, Millinery nnd Piece Goods,
Fancy Goods and Perfumery,
Furniture and Upholstery,
Hardware, Machinery and Metals,
Imitation  .Jewellery and  Precious
Stones,
Jewellery, Plate nnd Watches,
Photographic nntl Optical Goods,
Provisions nnd Oilmen's Stones,
etc., etc.
Cbmmustbn 2!, to 5%,
Trade Discounts allowed.
Special Quotations mi Demnird.
Sample Cases from .£10 ypvittrda,
Corktigivments of Produce sold mi Ac
count.
WILLIAM WILSON & SONS
(Established ISM),
2f>, Abchurch Lane, London, E.C.
Cable Address: "Axxuaihk, London."
NEWS OF THE CITY
Hon. Sydney Fisher, minister of
agriculture, has ma.ie the statement
that Hritish Columbia is entitled to
an experimental farm, and every sec-1
tion in the province is making a bid
for the institution. Up to the present no attempt has been made by
the public bodies of this city to lay
before the department the advantages and suitability of the Kettle
valley for such a farm, although we
believe that quite a number of good
reasons could be advanced.
Phoenix and Hedley will celebrate Labor day next Monday.
The cement sidewalk in front of
the Bonthron block will be completed today.
Dr. Averill and son will shortly
remove to Vancouver, where they intend to engage in the real estate
business.
A total of 95 emigrants presented
themselves for entry into Canada at
62^c. per acre cash
and 62^:. once each
year for 7 years thereafter
secures you aBRITISH COLUMBIA FARM in the
British Columbia Southern; Columhia and Kootenay
and Columhia and Western Railway Companies' Land
Grants. These Farm Lands eminently suited for the
raising of
Fruit, Grain or  Stock
and may be purchased on these EASY RERMS from
CANADIAN PACIFIC  RAILWAY
who are looking for Settlers for this part.
Timber Lands of the 'highest ch iracter, situated in
these Grants, are offered for sale in blocks of from
640 acres upwards.
Shipping Facilities Unsurpassed,       Easy Transportation
Apply to the address as shown on the attached
coupon for Maps, Application Forms,
Regulations and Literature.
this   port during   August.   Ten of
these were rejected.
The provincial timber commissioners will bold a session in this city
on the 18th inst. Persons having
information to present, written or
verbal, nre invited to be present.
,T. Lewisohn, a director of both
the British Columbia Copper company and the New Dominion Copper corn pnny, nnd J. Parke Channing, consulting engineer for the
latter company, nre in the Boundary
inspecting the mines of the New
Dominion.
Hon. K. Dewdney hns left for
England on nn important mission;
one in which a host of friends in
two hemispheres will wish him every
happiness. He will tnke unto himself n wife from among the daughters of Japbeth now resident in the
British isles. On his return he will
spend a portion of the honeymoon
in tbis section. Governor Dewdney
is rising of seventy years of age, but
he is vigorous and'well preserved,
nntl like many of his old tillicums,
hns good leather in his constitution.
—Princeton Star.
For Rent—To suitable tenent,
residence of Judge W. H. P. Clement,
on lull west of city, across G. N. Ry.
tracks; partly furnished. Apply on
the premises.
J. B. HENDERSON
Builder 8 Architect
Plans, Estimates, Specifications, ttc, at Reasonable
Rates.
Price Lists of Building Material on Hand.
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE!
Winnipeg    Avenue
PHONE   18
Partlei lutendlng tu build win do well to consult mo.
CERTIFICATE   OF    IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE
I. X. I,. Minora! Olaim, iltuote in the
Orand I'orlis Mhiliii: Iilvislon uf Vule District.
Where locuted: in Pranltlln oamn.
TAKK NOTICK tlmt I,,liimes McArdlo Krw
Miner'. Cortlfloate No. BUOias, for myself
mid as inrrnt for Knit.lt .McKiiiliinp, Pree
Miner'sc-rtItli-aii' No, DIO8OO1 John McLaren,
Free Miner's Certtfloate No, 11108891 Peter
Wolf, (free MIner'i Certificate No. H88I85, uml
A. I., iviiitcslile. Free Miner's Cortlfloate No.
Ii.in -ii.    Intend,   sixty days from   the date
hereof, to apply to the Milling   Recorder
for 11  Certificate of Imp uveiltent* for the
purpose of olitaluiiiti:ii Crown liriitit  of tli
above claim.
1    And further take notice that actinu, uuder
section 111,   must   he eominniiceil hefore the
Issiiuiiee uf such  Certificate of   Improvement..
Dated this Uth day ot August, A.D. !!« .1.
JAMBS Mo ARDLB
CERTIFICATE OF  IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE
sliirli-v fractional Minora) Olalm.iltunto in
tl.i-Uh.nil Korku MiMiim Division ol Vulu District.
When I.OOfltpd: In Summit Camp* ltd Join*
Ins <li!> BblckihooU MiiithI  cimm tu the
Wp*t.
takk KOTJCJS that I, BlileL. Clement, Free
■ Minor*1 Certlflcmo No. HK391, Intend, sixty
dayi in-ill date horcof, tonwtly to the Minion
Kocerder for a GetiLHoateof improvement*, for
till! purpose ni nlilnfiijnt; crown  KtuntH   of   thu
abovi liniiiis.
Ami fiir_.li._r tnke notice that action, under
net'tiun 87, must bo commenced before ine iHtni-
iiiic- <<i Mich Ortllleiile nf Iniprovi'iiietMn.
Dated at Urand Forks. B.C., _i._« 28rd dny of
Au;: i»t, A. 1). I hiii.
ELSIK L. OLBMENT,
11    1.11'!: m
SAVORY
enough to whet u sick
man's appetite—any of
the moats whicli come
from our shop, if prop*
erly cooked and served.
What pleases tbe patient better than a juicy,
tender steak, or young
lamb chops') ff you cook
it right we'll send you
lhe right moat—at the
right price, too. Any-
knows us.
P.BURNS&CO.,LT
TO.    A
f
H. E. WOODLAND
■A.
W. A.   I'MHASHEH
JUST THINK
NThe Handy Ink Pencil only 75c
Propeller Lead Pencils, fine black lead • Price 25c
I il Straw Cuffs 75c per doz. pairs
w I Toilet Paper, special 4 pkqs. for 25c
N
WOODLAND & CO.   ,
PHONt 13 DRUGGISTS AND STATIONERS \
A new lot of latest designs of program and menu cards just received at
The Sun job office.
THE
COPPER^
aro urged to take up those studies regardless of the degree of their education, as the paper** are not valued
from an educational or literary standpoint, but from the point of view of
the cogency of their reasoned ideas.
FOR   SALE
HANDBOOK
New Edition Issued Nov. 15, 190(1.)
Is a dozen books in one, covering the
history, geography, geology, chemistry, mineralogy, metallurgy terminology, uses, statistics antl finances of
copper. It. is a pracical book, useful
to all and necessary to most men en
gaged in any branch of the coppes
industry.
Its facts will pass muster with the
trained scientists, and its language is
easily understood by the everyday
man. It gives the plain facts in plain
English without fear or favor.
It lists and describes -__>3(i copper
mines and companies in all parts of
the world, descriptions running from
two lines to sixteen pages, according
to importance of the pt'Opei ty.
The Copper Handbook is conceded
to be the
World's Standard Reference
Book on Copper
The mining man needs the honk for
the facts it gives him about mines,
mining and the metal.
The investor needs the book for the
facts it gives hiin abuut mining, mining investments ami copper statistics.
Hundreds of swindling companies are
exposed in plain English.
Price is $6 in Buckram with gilt
top; $7.50 in full library morocco.
Will be sent, fully prepaid, on approval, to any address ordered, and
mav be returned within a week of receipt if not found fully satisfactory.
Horace J.  Stevens,
Editor and Publisher,
453 Postoffice Elock,
Houghton, Michigan. |
OF GOOD LAN I) for
Kiil(iuhoit|i: nil oleared,
fenced nml in crop—po-
I HVHIiW tutoiis.corn, etc., etc.;
Tjn fniit iro h; simill house, Htiinii furniture,
ahlckeu house ittoubiltor mul poultry. Imrse
and Implement*, good well ittul pump. Apply this iilfioe.
7 ACRES
4l»W|4*4% -HOUSE AND LOT; lot :H)x
C   # IIll   18°t lH-Btory house, wofld
J% m Kill shed, irood well ami pump:
*l^ ■ ^s* ^F ceatrully located. l*'or
full particulars apply at Tfio Suu office.
tP?Wonder
To all my friends and patrons I
extend the felicitations of the
■seuson. An opening of Imported
Trimmed and Untrimmed Hats
will be given April 12 and 13.
A cordial invitation to all.
cTWrs. Ida Barnum
Downey's Cigar Store
A Complete Stock op
Cigars, Pipes and Tobaccos
a Fresh Consignment of
Confectionery
Received Weekly.
Postoffice   Building
1909 cTWODELS §f
Bicycles and
Indian flotocycles
Knglish Bicycles—Rambler
Bicycles. Bicycle Sundries.
Repair Shop. Second-hand
Wheels.    Wheels to  Kent.
Geo.Chapple
WINNIPEG AVE. ANII SECOND ST.
R. F. PETRIE
High-
Class
Stationery*
Fancy China ware
d2& Wall Paper
BRIDGE     STREET CHURCH SERVICES
Holy Trinity CmjRCH.Henry Steele,
Rector—Sunday services: Holy communion, 8:00 a.m.; morning prayer
and sermon, 11 a.m.; evensong and
sermon, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday school, 3
p.m. First Sunday of the month
holy communion will be celebrated at
the 11 a.m. service* as well as at 8
a.m. Week-day and special servicse
as they are announced from time to
time. You are cordially invited to
worship with us, and we would be
pleased to met you.
Knox Presbyterian Church—
Sabbath services at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p.
in.; Sabbath school and Bible clubs at
9:45 a. m.; Young People's Society of
Christian Endeavor, Monday, 7:30 p.
ni. Mid-week prayer meeting, Wednesday at 8 p.m. All are cordially
invited; seats free.
Methodist Church, Rev. Schlich
ter.—Services next Sunday at 11
a. m. and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday school
and- Bible class at _M5 a.m. Tne
Epworth League of Christian Endeavor
meet every Monday evening at 7:30;
Junior League, Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m.;
mid-week prayer meeting, Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Everybody will be welcome.
Mill LAKGE ASSORTMENT OF
IN Colgate's Toilet Goods
Their newest in Perfumes, Toilet  Waters, Talcums and Soaps.
All Prices.
BUTTERCUP   !CE CREAM
We oMANN DRUG COMPANY
Prescription Druggists
Phone 35 Night Service
Baptist Church, Rev. F. W. Auvache, pastor.—Services on Sunday
at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m.; Bible
class and Sunday school  at 2:30 p.m.
For Rent—Two-story residence on
Third street, between Bridge and
Main streets. Apply A. Traunweiser,
Yale hotel.
CYNICAL SAYINGS
The Sun and the Toronto Weekly
Globe for 81.00 per year.
Three bottles of cold  Nelson Beer,
50c.    Lion Bottling Works.
For   Sale—160   acres   of   good
timothy land.    Apply this oflice.
SALE OF LAND
For Unpaid Delinquent Taxes and Subsequent Taxes in
Arrears in the Municipality of the City of Grand
Forks, Province of British Columbia.
I HEREBY give notice that, in pursuance of the provisions of the
"Municipal Clauses Act," and of a resolution of the Municipal Council of the
Corporation of the City of Grand Forks, passed on the 2nd day of August,
A.D. 1901), I will, on Tuesday, the 14th day of September, A.D. 1909, at
the hour of 12 o'clock noon, at the City Hall, First Street, Grand Forks, B.
C, sell at Public Auction the lands, improvements and real property, situate
wiUiin the Municipality of the City of Grand Forks, and hereinafter set forth,
for delinquent taxes, and subsequent taxes in ai rear remaining unpaid and
payable tu the Corporation of the City of Grand Forks by the persons or assessed owners hereinafter respectively set forth; and for interest, costs,
charges and commissions, if the total amount due is not sooner paid, for the
purpose of levying such delinquent taxes and subsequent taxes in arrear, and
interest, costs, oharges and commissions.
Plan. Block. Lot.
Coryell, Frank   23 4 3
Crowe, Lillian   35 IS) 8
Chenier, J. P   23 12 5
Carpenter, W. K  22 10 6
Rice, L. M., Jint 35 10 11
do     "      35 10 7
do   35 10 8
Elmore, P. W  35 4 $61
do         35 4 1-7]
Gill, Grace   23 24 "3
Hayward, G J   23 14 1
Hanington, Charlotte   91 ... 12
Lewis Jefferson  35 8 5
Murray, J. G  23 8 19
Martin, David   89 2 5
Monk, E. W.i  67       1 10
do         67 1 11
McNee & Knight  22 3 10
McNee, William  23 8 3
McDonald.J. D 121 28        2
McMillan, Dan  52 3 22
Newman, Thomas  83 46 40
Richards, Louise   23 15 8
Wilkins  J. L  72 41 1
Williams, A. B  22 7 6
do   22 7 7
Wells, W. L   35 5 17
do   35 5 18
Young, H. W..Dist. Lot 533
Grand Forks Townsite Co,  23
do   72
Taxes and
Interest.
$48.05
8.50
54.75
4.77
32.85
32 85
73.55
20.(15
4.26
28.95
62.10
6.12
5.50
5.50
4.27
24.65
76.70
13.85
17.15
28.90
13 85
2.75
2.75
45.05
6.85
63.70
5.50
22.00
Costs and
Commission.  Total
$4 40       852 45
2.40
4.75
2.25
3.60
3.60
5.65
3.00
2.20
8.95
5.10
2.30
2.25
2.25
2.20
3.20
5.80
2.75
2.85
3.45
2 75
2.15
2.15
+.25
2.35
5.15
2.25
3.10
10.90
59.50
7.0:
36.45
38.4
79.20
23.64
6.46
32.90
67 20
8.42
7.75
7.75
6.47
27.85
82.50
16.60
20 00
32.35
16.60
4.90
4.90
49.30
9.20
68.80
7.75
25.10
10 acres
19       23
33
Doted at Grand Forks, B.C., this 14th day of August, 1909.
J. A. McCALLUM,
Collector of Taxes for the Municipality of the City of Grand Fork:
SIX
DAYS
6DPT.
2O-T0-25INC.
CHEAP
RATES
|AH INI/AND EMPIRE EXPOSITION.
KTheSiege-Jerichop^
lnationaluvt stow exhibition
^0NoDERrllL^ PROGRAM
BALLOON  RACES
CHEAP
RATES
WRITE FOR FREE /LLUSTRATED
PROGRAM TO ROBT.H.COSOROVE
Z/6 HUTTON   BLOCK
SPOKANE, WASH.
SIX
NIGHTS
Hotel Colin
Opposite Great Northern Station
P. L). McDONALD, Proprietor
Recently  eomnleteil and
newly turnUhed throughout. Conveniently located
tor ruilwuy men. HMt-
clnss accommodations Tor
transients. Hounl nnd
rooms l.y the week ut lire-
vuillnit rates, fine line or
Wines. Liquors and Ctjturs
atwayi in stock at the bar.
Grand Forks, B. C.
Fine feathers make expensive hats.
A tight for right is never wholly
lost.
A receipt for pew rent is not a passport to heaven.
When women argue, they like to
argue that they don't.
The fellow who steals a watch must
expect to wind up in jail.
Homeliness is a virtue that only
pretty girls can appreciate.
A girl can't fool a man by talking
like a middle-aged woman.
When a fellow is in a hole don't
rub it in by looking down ou him.
Charity covers a multitude of sins
that might better be exposed.
How can a man have undying love
for a woman who dyes her hair.
Before altering her complexiou a
woman always makes up her mind,
A pessimist is simply a man who is
never happy unless, he is miserable.
Don't hold it up against a man that
he is rich,    ilaybe he can't help it.
Any man can have an appreciative
eudience if he only talks to himself.
The girl who marries her ideal generally lives to realize that she   didn't.
There is one sign that is never a
forget y, and that is the sign of old
age.
Don't find fault; there is no credit
to such discovery and no reward out
for it.
Our idea of a hypocrite is a married
man v, ho pretends to feel sorry for a
bachelor.
The way a girl likes to be kissed
best is tiie way she pretends slid
doesn't.
Nothing makes a woman feel so little as the sefusal of a man to argue
with her.
It is as hard to raise a child as it is
to raise a dog, aud sometimes quite as
satisfactory.
The more a woman is set in her
ways and opinions, the more she resents being told of it.
Still, we just can't understand why
other people can't take us ou the basis
of what aij menu to do.
It is easier to tell how to do a thing
than it is to do if you don't know
anything abuut either.
Almost any man can marry money
if lie io willing to tuke a widow older
than he is i.long with it.
Even if a woman has naturally
curly hair she can always find something else to worry about.
It takes an expert to tell whether a
woman meuus it or not, and after he
has told he doesn't know.
The man who is worth while makes
enemies, but hus no time to notice
them or worry ubout tliem.
It is useless for a man to dream of a
political career when he is too proud
lo beg aud too honest to steal.
Every woman knows she is shrewd
enough to manage successfully any
kind of business she cares to engage
in
Everybody claims to sympathize
with the under dog. Htill it is noticeable that he remains just the under dog.
Its the easiest thing in the world
for a bachelor to get engaged to a
young widow; all ho has to do is to
give her half a show.
LAND ACT
FORM OF NOTICE.
Yale  LaiiiOtitrict.    District of Slmilha-
meen,
TAKE    NOTICE   tlmt    Smith    Curtis,    of'
Rosiland, B.C., occupation mine operator,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the western Bide line of the Nelson A Fort Shepherd
Railway company's Land Grant/and at the
southeast corner of Peter Shaw's prc-cn.p
tion on Hig Sheep Creek; thence west 70
chains; thence south IR chains, more or less,
to the north line of J. J. Gill's pre-emption ;
thence east 85 chains, more or less, to north-
eaRt corner of said Gill's preemption;:
thence south 15 ohains: thence east 3G chains,
more or lews, to the western line of aforesaid
Railway Land Grant; thenoe north 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160
acres, more or lets.
JAMES ROBINSON CRANSTON,
Agent for SMITH CURTIS.
Dated December 14th, 1908.
Synopsis of Canadian Homestead
Regulations
CHARLES G. WHEELER
M. Inst. H. E.
Plumber by Examination
and Sanitary Engineer
Repairs of Every Description
Shop :
Second Street
Paone B77
CUSTOMS RECEIPTS
K. K. Qilpin, oi stoms officer nt thin
port, tuakeu the following detailed repurt
of the cueti uis receipts at Ihe vuiu.ii..
hiili._ii_ni.niH otlieen, an reported to tbe
chief office in this city, for the month of
August:
Grand Korks $1,900.89
Hhoenix  1,006.42
Cascade      29222
Ca_6«n       DO H7
Total...v 18.855.60
PICTURES
AND PICTURE FRAMING
Furniture  Matle to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds.
Upholatering Neatly Done.
r. McCutcheon
FIRST STREET, HEAR CITY HALL
H.A.SHEADS
CITY REAL ESTATE AND
FRUIT LANDS
QBNT FOB—
London Mutual Fire Insurance Co,
Montreal ami cm.min,
Anglo* American,
Equity,
Ami oilier siiiifttRiiiial companies,
Ofpicb:
BRID6E STREET, 6RRND FORKS, B. C,
Prints more live Boundary news than
any other paper published in the
district, The price <'t" The Sun is
only $1.00 per year—one-half the cost
of its competitors, Thk Hun is never
on the fence regarding questions of
public ih ter est. Tiik Sun is acknowledged t<» be one of the brightest
papers published in the interior of
the province. Those who subscribe
and feel dissatisfied, will have their
money refunded by Calling at the otlies
of publication.
The Evening Sun and theToronto
Weekly Globe and Canada Fanner,
?1.00 per year in advance.
Thk Evening  Sun, The Winnipeg
Weekly Free Press and Prairie Farm-
r  and  the  Montreal Family Herald
and Weekly .Star, $2,00  per  year in
idvance,
Thk Sun is read  by everybdy be
cause it prints all the Boundary news
ANY available Dominion Lands within the
Railway Kelt of llritish Columhia may he
home steaded hy any person who is the head
of a family, or any main over eighteen years
of age, to the extent of one-tiuarter Bectlon
of ltlO acres, more or less.
Entry must be inmli- personally at the local
land otlice for the district in which the land
is situate.
The homesteader is required to perform
the conditions connected therewith under
one of the following plans:
(1) At least six months' residence upon and
cultivation of the land in each year for three
years. I
(2) If the father (or mother, if the father is
deceased), ofthe homesteader resides unon a
farm in the vicinity (,f the land entered for,
the requirements as to residence may he satisfied by such person residing with the father
or mother.
(3) If the settler has his permanent residence upon farming laud owned hy him in
the vicinity, of his homestead) the require*
men ts us to residence may be satisfied by
residence upon the said land .
Six months' notice iu writing should be
given the Commissioner of Dominion Lands
at Ottawa of intention to apply for patent.
Coal -Coal mining rights mav he leased
for a period of twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1,00 per acre. Not more than
li.r.iid acres shall he leased to one individual or
company. A royalty at the rate of live cents
per ton shall he collected on the merchantable coal mined,
W. W.CORY,
Deputy of the Minister of the Interior.
N.R.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid far.
R.L. MILES
SECOND-HAND STORE
FIRST ST., OPP. CITY HALL
Rubber Tires for
Baby Carriages
Second Hand Goods
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NEW YORK
CLIPPER
IS THE GREATEST
THEATRICAL £ SHOW PAPER
IN THE WORLD.
$4.00 Per Year.   Single Copy, 10 Cts.
ISSUED WEEKLY.
Sample Copy Free.
FR»NK QUEEN PUB. CO. (Ltd!,
ALBERT J. HOME,        _ Pl'BLIBUERS,
M_._li.GliK. 47 W.fflTH ST., NBWYOM,
EXPRESS, DRAYING
AND ALL KINDS OF HAULING
Furniture Moving a Specialty.
All order's receive clrompt attention.
PETER    HANSEN
Hotel Province,
COLUMBIAN    COLLEGE
NEW WESTMINSTER,    B. C,
Reoelve both Lndlefl and Gentlemen a* resident or it;i> studentsi; htii a completeConi*
morel nl or  Busineu course! prepare! itu*
iteittato oraln   Teacher*1 Certificate! of all
grades] givei the four yean' course for the
B. A. degree, and the fl rat year of the Sohool
of Science oourse, lit affiliation with the To*
routo University: ______ a special proNpectori-
oobriQ for minen who work in B.O. untrue
tion li also given In Art. Mimic, Physical Ctil«
ture   and   Klociitlou.   Term  opens Sept.   11,
mm.   For Calendars, etc., address
COLUMBIAN COLLEGE.
Special  Old   Port $1   pei
Lion Bottling Works.
gallon.
Bicycles and Rkpaib Work—A
complete line of 1909 models, A few
second-hand wheels cheap, Wheel*
to rent Geo. Chaitlk, Winnipeg
Avenue. Women s Secrets
There is one man in the United States who has perhaps heard
more women's seorets than any other man or woman in the
country* These secrets are not secrets of guilt or shame, but
the secrets of suffering, and they have been confided to Dr. *
R. V. Pierce in the hope and expectation of advice and help.
That few of these women have been disappointed in their expectations is proved by the fact that ninety-eight per cent, of
all women treated by Dr. Pierce have been absolutely and
altogether cured. Such a record would be remarkable if the
cases treated were numbered by hundreds only. But when
that record applies to the treatment of more than half-a- million women, in a practice of over 40 years, it is phenomenal,
and entitles Dr. Pierce to the gratitude accorded him by women, as the first of
specialists in the treatment of women's diseases.
Every sick woman may consult Dr. Pierce by letter, absolutely without
charge. All replies are mailed, sealed in perfectly plain envelopes, without
any printing or advertising whatever, upon them. Write without fear as without fee-, to World's Dispensary Medical Association, Dr. R. V. Pierce, Prest.,
Buffalo,  N. Y.
DR. PIERCE'S   FAVORITE   PRESCRIPTION
3VXo.ls.oiai VCTectls. "Women  Strong,
jSiclx.   Women.   OTcT.l.
NEWS OF THE CITY
A It.tler to The Sun from Mr. J.
S. Dennis, assistant to the second
vice president of the C.I', li., states
that the advertising campaign now
being carried on by the company
has heen most successful. The
range of advertising has not been
confined to British Columbia only,
but to Manitoba, Ontario and the
whole of the United states. From
the time the campaign wns inaugurated, about the 1st of July, up to
date, the company has received and
answered in the neighborhood of
51)00 enquiries relative to its holdings in British Columbia. The full
results of the campaign have nofyet
been received, and before its finality
has been reach.ed the coinpany will
in all probability have received in
the neighborhood of 10,000 inquiries
nnd sent out probably 30,000 letters
and 50,000 items of literature pertaining to British Columbia.
The work of clearing the site for
the new Royal bank building, on the
corner of Bridge and First ttreets.
was started last Tuesday. The
officials state that the work will be
carried on without cessation until
the building is completed.
The First Thought   mine has re-,'
sumed ore shipments at the rate of
a   50ton car a  day, says the Orient
Journal.    Manager A. Sharp was at
Greenwood   and Grand  Forks,  the
first of the   week, and   straightened '
out some discrepancies  in   matters
pertaining  to  transportation    and
treatment that heretofore have   not l
been     satisfactory    to    the   First:
Thought   company.   The ore   will
from now  on   be   shipped   to the j
British Columbia Copper company's
smelter at Greenwood, and it is
hoped there will be no interruption
in the regular ore shipments until
the First Thought has its own reduction plant in operation.
Mr. C. E. Lawrence, of Kamloops,
a writer well known locally on agricultural rubjects and a successful
rancher in that district, who has
heen engaged by the C.P. R to visit
some of the points in southeast
British Columbia in order to interview representative settlers, and if
possible to obtain from them their
experience in farm and ranch life,
in order that the company may
place them before the public, is ex-
pecte.i to visit this city next week.
Any information given him concerning our resources will undoubtedly
be appreciated hy the coinpany.
The postoffice department, at the
instance of the minister of agriculture, has issued a warning to postmasters to be careful to prevent the
importation of nursery stock through
the mails, except after examination
hy the customs. Much of the nursery stock thus shipped into Canada
is known to be infected wilh various insect pests, and therefore the
department of agriculture has requested the postoffice department to
take every precaution to prevent the
delivery of packages containing nursery stock until they hnve been
thoroughly inspecced, and, if necessary, fumigated by the proper authorities.
Angus McDonald, of Phoenix, B.
C, who wns released from jail in
Republic last week after having
served a thirty days' sentence on a
charge of larceny at Danville, was
arrested again   and   sentenced   to
BOUNDARY    ORE    SHIPMENTS
The following  table gives the ore
for 1905, 1906 and for the past week:
Granby Mines, Phoenix	
Snowshoe, Phoenix	
Mother Lode, Deadwood	
B. C. Mine, Snmmit	
Emma, Summit	
Oro Denoro, SummitCamp	
Bonnie Belle, Deadwood	
Brooklyn-Stemwinder, Phoenix.
Idaho, Phoenix	
Rawhide, Phoenix	
Sunset, Deadwood 	
Mountain Rose, Summit	
Athelstan	
Senator, Su mm it Camp	
Morrison, Deadwood	
Sulphur King,Summit	
Winnipeg, Wellington	
Big Copper, West Copper	
Riverside	
Carmi, West Fork	
Sally, West Fork	
Rambler, West Kork	
Butcher Boy, West Fork	
Duncan	
Providence, Greenwood	
Elkhorn, Greenwood	
Strathmore, Providence	
Golden Eagle 	
Preston, Skylark	
Prince Henry, Skylark	
Skylark, Skylark Camp	
Last Chance, Skylark Camp	
E. P. U. Mine, Skylark Camp...
Bay, Skylark	
Mavis, Skylark	
Don Pedro, Skylark	
Crescent, Skylark	
Helen, Greenwood	
Republic,Boundary Falls	
Golden Eagle	
shipments of   Boundary mines
1907
1908
Past Week
613,537
135,001
208,321
1,712
18.274
1,032,519
45,956
314,029
18,698
4,200
7,182
14,481
65,800
43,295
5,780
12,253
64,173
31,270
10,740
3.802
31,258
530
120
649
90
65
86
40
700
20
55
60
224
30
50
fourteen days in the county jail on
ihe charge of having stolen a watch
and other jewelry from E. F. Bruu
at Republic.
An expected revol uion in agriculture has been based on the discovery,
long ago made by Hellriegel, that
tbe root nodules of leguminous and
some other plants absorb nitrogen
directly from theair. Another natural method of fixing atmospheric
nitrogen has now been pointed out
by Jamieson, a British experimenter, wbo bas found that the hairs
covering many plants absorb nitrogen, convert it into albumen, and
then wither and become absorbed
into the plant. On a series of sections, treated with stains acting on
albumen, the microscope traced
very clearly the migration of the nitrogen taken up. Experiments on
various trees in Hungary confirm
the discovery and indicate that this
way of plant feeding is very general.
On Sunday, September Oth, har
vest thanksgiving services will be
held as follows in Holy Trinity
church: Holy communion, 8 a.m.;
morning prayer and holy communion, 11 a.m.; evening prayer and
sermon, 7:30 p.m.
There's No Other Way
To reach the large and ever-increasing
circle of our readers than through Tiik
Sun's advertising columns.
Large Bottle Port Wine, 75c. Lion
Bottling Works.
When you order office stationery
at The Sun job office you can rest
assured that it will be printed with
modern faces of type, and that the
workmanship will be up to the standard of metropolitan work. Our
stock of all kinds of paper and stationery is the most complete in the
Boundary.
Just received, a large consignment
of the latest patterns of spring and
summer suitings. Geo. Massie, tbe
up-to-date tailor.
You might as well try to reach
the orb of day by walking on a sunbeam as to attempt to reach The Sun
readers by advertising in any otber
medium.
We carry the most fashionable stock
of wedding stationery in the Boundary country. And we are the only
olliee in this section that have the
correct material for printing it. The
Sun job office.
HOTEL    PROVINCE
Bridge Street,
GRAND FORKS, B. G
The best mid most
Rubstantial Mre-pro<>f
building hi the Boundary country. Recently completed nnd
ii l) W 1 y furnished
throughout. Equip- '
ped with nil modern
electrical conveniences. Centrally located. Kirst-cliiss accommodations for the
travelling public.
Hot and Gold Baths
First-Class Bar, Pool
and Billiard Rooms
in Connection.
Total, tons  1,148,237 1,479,082       30,080
Smelter Treatment—
Granby Smelter  637,62G 1,031,671        17,446
B. C. Copper Co.'s Smelter  341,952 355,935          8,333
Dominion Copper Co.'s Smelter  153,439 22,666
EMIL   LARSEN,   PROP.
r
Printi n
We are prepared to do all kinds of
Commercial   Printing
On the shortest notice and in the
most up-to-date style   .
BECAUSE
We have the most modern jobbing plant
in the Boundary Country, employ competent workmen, and carry a complete
line of Stationery.
WE PRINT
Billheads and Statements,
Letterheads and Envelopes,
Posters, Dates and Dodgers,
Business and Visiting Cards,
Lodge Constitutions and By-laws,
Shipping Tags, Circulars and Placards,
Bills of Fare and Menu Cards,
Announcements and Counter Pads,
Wedding Stationery,
And everything turned out in an
Up-to-date Printery.
VJV/l/l/ LlVlLlllLlVl advertisement, and a trial order
will convince you that our stock and workmanship are of
the best. Let us estimate on your order. We guarantee
satisfaction.
■if
Total Treated      1,133,017   1,420,272
25.77S
Grand Forks Sun
Job Department
BOUNDARY  DIVIDENDS.
Authorized ^-shabes—.
Capital.    Issiii'd. Par.
-DIVIDENDS-
Paid    Total to
11)06.       Date.
Name OFCoMrANY.              Capital.    Issued. Par. 1906.       Date.      Date    Sha
Grai.liyConsollilutetl-Copper...$15,(100,000     135,000 $100 »1,0_0,000 *»,56S,6S0 Den. 1908 »8
OnrtboO McKliiiiey-Uold      1,250.000   1,250,000     $1           546,857 Feb. 1904
Pr._vldei_ee-S.lver       200000      81000     *5 16.000        38.221 Sept. 1906
»5 ... 	
 ice-Silver       200000
II.C. Copper-Copper     8,000,000
81000
•508.000
Latest      Per
Date.   Share
—.00
       .00
38.221 Sept. 1906     .50
201,200 Sept. 1901     .04
1 tie Oliver 1 ypewriter
forl7CentsaDay!
Please read the headline over again, Then its
tremendous siunilirnnce will dawn  upon  vou.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible
writer—the most highly perfected typewriter
uu tiie market—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whuaeconquest of the commercial world is a nmtter of nlBtory—yours fur
17 cents a day!
The typewriter that, is equipped with scores of
such conveniences as The Balance shift"—
"The Ruling Device"—"The Double Release"—
"Tiie Locomotive Base"— 'The Autumalie
Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The
DlBappCariuglndtcator *
-"The Adjustable 1'a-
perKhiu-er.-s"-'Tlie H.-i-
eutiile condensed Keyboard"—all
Yours for  17
Gents a Day!
We announced   this
new sales plan recently, jnst to feel the pulse of
the people Simply a small cash payment-
then 17 cents a day_ That Is tho plan in a nutshell.
The result baa been such a deiujie of applications fur machines that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of all classes,
all Hues, all occupations.
The majority or Inquiries has come from people of known financial standing wiio were at*
traotod by the novelty of the proposition. An
impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter,
A startling confirmation of our belief that
the Bra of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A  Quarter  of a Million People
are Making Money with
Tlje.
OLIVET?
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is rt money-maker
right from the word "gol" 80 easy to run that
begin 1 ers soon get In the "expert" class. Karii
as you k-.iiu. Let the machine pay the 17 cents
a day—and all above that Is yours.
Wherever you are, there is work to lie done
and money to be made by using the Oliver. The
business world is calling for Oliver operators.
There-are uot enough to supplv the demand.
Theirsalarios are count durably above those of
many classes of worker*,
An Oliver Typewriter in Every Home!
That is the battle cry today, *Ve have mude
the Oliver supreme in usefulness and absolutely
Indispensable In business. Now comes the con- •
quest of the home,
The simplicity and strength ofthe Oliver lit it
for family use. It is becoming an Important
factor lit the home training of young people.
A n educator as well as a money in ik ;r.
Our new Belling plan puts the Oliver on tho
threshold of every home lu Ameriea. Will yon
close the door of vour home or otlice on this remarkable Oliver oiler?
Write tor further details of our easy oiler and
a free copy ul the new Oliver catalog.  Address \\
The Oliver Typewriter Company,
Oliver Typewriter Building,
CHICAGO, ILL.
W, C. CHALMERS
Always Carries in Stuck
a Fresh Supply of
FRUITS, CANDIES, TOBACCOS
AND CIGARS
Ice Cream  and Summer Drinks
COR. BRIDGE AND FIRST STREETS
Palace Barber Shop
Kazor Honing a Specialty.
>3s
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
1st Door North op Granby Hotel,
First Street.
DRAYING
Heavy and Light Dray Work
Attended to Promptly. Passengers and Trunks to and
from all trains.
TelephoneAl 29
GRAND FORKS TRANSFER COMPANY
Rutherford Bros., Props.
60 YEARS'
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights 4c
Anrone lending . rtetch and description ran
alflklf ascertain our opinion free whether an
qnlcltlr ascertain onr
_i.Ten_ionUprotia_.lr
tlonaitrlctlTconlJ-—*
sent free. Oldest
loromunlc*.
Patents
' DU.
hhnupssr
■ent free. Olilost agencf for seonnnipatei
Patent, taken tbronsb Hunn 5co_n
Bx.miwtlM. without otame, lath.
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Lamest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms for
Canada, i3.75 a year, postage prepaid. Bold by
oil newsdealer*.
Branch OTlco, fe F Bt, Washington. I
Ungfoo, d. o.

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