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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Dec 9, 1921

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Array >•
I
U»tolatJ„
GRAND FORKS
is   situated   in
the center of Orand Forks valley, the
premier fruit growing district of
Southern British Columbia. Mining
and lumbering are also important
industries in districts contiguous to
the oity.
Ut**ssy\
Kettle Valley Orchardist
THE SUN is tl,e fav<*"'ite Dewa*
"^ ' paper of the citizens
of the district. It is read by more
people in the city and valley than any
'•ther paper because it is fearless, reliable, "lean, bright and entertaining.
It is alwayr. independent but never
neutral.
TWENTY-FIRST YEAR—No 6
GRAND FORKS.  B. C, FRIDAY,  DECEMBER 9,  1921
"Tell me what you Know is true:
;i can iuess ss well as you.
$1.00 PER YEAR
Great Victory for Liberals
According to the Latest Summary the Liberals Have
118 Seats—Conservatives Carried Forty-eight and
Progressives Sixty-three, With Four Still in Doubtful Colum—Frank Oliver Behind in West Edmonton, While Stork Leads in Skeena—MacKelvie Is
Elected in Yale
Toronto, Deo. 8,—The following is the Dominion' election
standing as revised on the basis of dispatches received up
till 1 p.m. today:
Lib. Con.  Prog. Labor. Doubtful
Prince Edward Island .. 4
Novb Scotia  16
New Brunswick  5
Quebec  65
Ontario  22
Manitoba  2
Saskatchewan  1
Alberta .\  0
British Columbia  3
Yukon    0
Con.
Prog.
Labi
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
1
0
0
0
0
36
23
0
0
12
1
0
15
0
0
9
1
7
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
1
Totals ....118    48     63
The doubtful seats are Fort  Wil
liam Weat Calgary,  West Edmon
ton and Yukon. In the latter returns received so far give no indication of tbe result,
Changes included in the above are
as follows:
Victoria-Hallburton, Ont, shifted
from tbe Conservatsve to tbe Progressive column.
Moose Jaw shifted from Liberal
to Progressive.
West Calgary is shifted from Con-
seivative to doubtful.
West Edmonton is shifted from
Progressive to tteubiful.
Prince Rupert, Dec. 8. —Forty
nine polls in Skeena riding, including the poll at Premier mine, give
Fred Stork, Liberal, 3755; Col. Cy
Peck, Independent 2610. There are
thirty-one more polls to report.
R. R. Porter—"Change here."
Scot—"There's nae changin' for me, laddie."
Mr. Sutherland's borne being in Ke
lowna. In the provincial riding of
Grand Eorks the Liberal' candidate
got exaetl^whot he had been led to
believe he #ould get—an even
break.
Locally, the weather cou'd not
have been improved upon for an
election day, and a very heavy vote
was polled. The following was the
result of the voting in this district:
MacKelvie. Sutherland
Grand Forks
. 425
327
77
Fife....	
Totals	
19
21
444
Calgary, Dec. 8.—The election in
West Calgary is still in doubt. At 1
o' lock this afternoon returns received by thc Herald give the min
ister of justice a majority over the
independent candidate of five votes.
At that time neither of tbe candidates bad r^ce.ved tbeir official notification from tbe deputy returning
officers for thirteen polls, most of
them in tbe country.
Tbe presen  totals  are:   Bennett,
7372; Shaw, 7367.
Fernie, Deo. 8—East Kootenay
complete: Beattie, Liberal, 2361;
Bonnell, Conservative, 2130; McDonald, Farmer Labor, 1532
T
CONCRETE PIPE
If That Material Is Used
for the Irrigation System the Pipe Will Be
Made Here by Local
Labor
APPLES SHIPPED
TOTHEANT
Auckland F'ruit Inspector
Speaks Very Highly of a
each end. The new departure saved
a considerable expense on tbe
wharves, as when large cargoes of
fruit are landed under oridnary conditions six or eight men bave
to be employed nailing up broken
cases, the cost in many instances
being'from £50 to £80."
PERFECT ATTENDANCE
Fort William, Deo. 8 —Returns,
incomplete, at noon today give Ma
nion, Conservative. 5400; Garver,
Progressive' 4878.
Edmonton, Dec. 8 —At 10 o'clock
this morning, aftet recbecking all returns received by it in the West
Edmonton riding, the- Edmonton
Journal shows D M. Kennedy, the
Farmer candidate, leading by 136.
votes. The figures are: 225 polls out
of 372 give Kennedy, Farmer, 7891;
Oliver, Liberal, 7755, and Campbell
Conservative, 3394.
The Best Christmas Gift
Can you remember that Christ
mas when you first received The
Youth's Companion amoung your
Christmas presents'! You can per
haps recall tbe titles of som? of tt).e
serial stories in those early num>
bers, and you can well remember
how every one in the family wanted
to read your paper. «
Today Tha Companion makes the
ideal Christmas present. No family,
especially one with growing boys
and girls, should be without the
tried and true Youth's Companion
—the friend and enteitainer of hosts
of people, old and young.
The Companion is true to the
best American ideals of life, giving
every week a generous supply of the
best stories, current events, comments on tbe world's doings, with
special pages for Boys, for Girls and
for the Family.
The 62 issues of 1922 will be
crowded with serial stories, short
storfes.Jeditorials, poetry, facts and
fun. Subscribe'now and receive:
1. The Youth's Companion—52
issues in 1922.
2. All tbe remaining issues of 1921
3. Tbe Companion Home Calep
dar for 1922. All for $2.50.
4. Or include McCall's Magazine,
lthe monthly authority on fashions
Both publications only 13.00.
Tbe Youth's Companion,   Com
monwealth Ave. and St.  Paul St.,
Boston,  Mass.   New  subscriptions
received at this office.
Tbere seems to be a strong probability that concrete pipe will finally
be adopted for the local irrigation
eystem. It is stated that the government engineers will not consent
to an iron pipe as ligbt as that used
in the Big Y ranch system being
laid, and a heavier grade would be
more expensive and less durable
than concrete pipe. Engineer Groves
of tbe irrigation municipality is now
down in Washington state inspecting some of tbe systems wbere concrete pipe is used.
If tbe concrete pipe is adopted,
a big concrete manufacturing concern wil), it is said, install a plant
bers and make the pipe on tbe
ground, employing all local labor
wiih the exception of the skilled
belp.
The follow.lis; pupils of tlie Qrand
Forks public school were neither late
nor absent during the month of
November:
I'HINCIl'AI.'s  (.'LASS
Eleanor Bradley, Gertrude Cook,
Leslie Earner, Blanch Ellis, Earl
Fitzpatiick, William Foote, Frank
Gordon, Lizzie Gordon, Ernest Hadden, Isabell Innis, Jeannette Kidd,
William Lucas, Vera Lyden, Maurice
McArthur, John McArthnr, Gordon
McCallum, Kenneth Murray, Hazel
Nystrom, Louis O'Keefe, Edna Reid.
DIVISION   II.
Harry Acres, Darwin Ahern, Albert Colarch, , Marjorie Cook, Edith
Eureby, Edgar * Galipeau, ptec\ Galipeau, Alice George, John Graham,
Dorothy Grey, Genevieve Harkness,
Ruth Helmer, Arthur. Hesse, James
Innis,Paul Kingston, Kenneth Massie,
Edith Matthews, Helen Mills,Pauline
Mohler, Bertha Mulford, George Mc
Arthur, Ellen McPherson, Francis
Otterbine, Florence Pyrah, Henry
Beid, Phyllis Smyth, Clarence Truax,
Faye Walker, Jack Crause.
DIVISION III.
Jessie Allan, Walter Anderson,
Pauline Baker, Bruce Brown, Edmund Crosby, Aubrey Dinsmore,
Eugene Fitzpatrick, Thelma Hanson,
Theresa Hellmen, Marion Kerby,
Francis Larama, Margaret Luscombe,
Joe Lyden, Blanche Mason, Alex Mc-
iDougall, Donald McKinnon, Martha
Shipment From British Otterbine, Buth   Pyrah, Jessie Boss,
John  Santano,  Peter  Santano,    Joe
USE CERTIFIED
POTATO SEED
Yield and Value of Crop
Can Be Greatly Increased, Says a Provincial Authority
Columbia
Winnifred. Smith.   Walton
The Result in Yale
In Yale constituency^. A. Mao
Kelvie, government candidate, was
re elected by a majority at present
estimated at between 600 and 700.
Penticton wae tbe main factor in
swelling tbe victor's majority, the
vote in that town being 906 for MacKelvie and 515Jfor Sutherland. It is
surmised tbat this result was largely
dne to local jealousies between Pen-
W. Miller, of Rock Creek, appeared before Stipendiary Magistrate
W. K. Dewdney and Justice of the
Peace J. R. Ferguson, in Greenwood
last Friday, charged witb stealing
double-trees from E. Sommers. of
Westbridge. He was fined $25 and
costs or one month's imprisonment.
Frederic Keffer, mining engineer,
of Spokane, examined the Riverside
.ifton and Penticton and  Kelowna,' mine at Bock Creek this week.
Experimental Aerial
Service From Halifax
to Newfoundland
A trip by airplane from Halifax
to Newfoundland is being arranged
for about tbe 10th of December, and
the postal department has been
asked to encourage the venture by
despatching a letter mail from Halifax on the flight in question. It bas
agreed to cooperate in tbis way provided those sending the mail matter
assume the risk.
The requirements for this mail
are:
First—"By aerial mail" to be
prominently written on tbe address
side of the envelope.
Second—The usual 4 cents post*
age for a one ounce letter to be affixed on the address side of the envelope.
Third—Additional postage stamps
to tbe value of 31 cents to be placed
on tbe address Bide of the envelope,
in payment of the special charge
for transmission by the aerial
service which has been fixed by
those making the fight.
Greenwood riding gave   Sutherland 304 votes and MacKelvie   301.
Vancouver, Dec. 7.—Chief Dominion Fruit Inspector B. G. L.
Clarke, of Vancouver, has received
from G. Harnett, fruit inspector of
tbe New Zealand department of
agriculture, industries and commerce, a letter telling of the highly
satisfactory condition in which the
recent shipment of 11,000 boxes of
British Columbia apples arrived at
Auckland on the R. M.S. Makura.
Mr. Harnett was particularly
pleased with tbe pieparation of tbe
apples on the coast for shipment,
each box being strapped with wire
or steel bands. He issues a mild
complaint, however, as to the grading of the apple?, fruit of various
sizes being packed in the same box.
Following is tbe text of Mr. Harnett's letter:
"The apples arrived in good condition, and oponed up well. All va.
rieties were good and of fine quality,
but the grading of some lines was
not as good as might be—too many
sizes in a single case. In fact tbe
grading was not as good as usual.
"This being the firstconsignment
of British Columbia apples to arrive
at this port, the cases of which were
fastened with wire or steel bands,
tbe result is more than interesting.
Witb previous shipments of apples
a large number of cases were lauded
in a damaged condition, split and
broken, and six or eight men were
employed to nail up and mend the
cases. On this particular occasion,
although 11,000 cases of apples were
landed bere, not a single casa was
broken, or in tbe least way damaged
This is worthy of note, as tbe financial saving in wages and repairs was
considerable, about £80."
Tbe following observation about
lbe shipment was made by the New
Zealand Herald of November 3:
"A particularly noticeable feature
in connection with the large con
signment of apples, totalling 11,000
cases, brought from Vanconver by
tbe Makura last week, was the fact
tbat every case was landed intact.
This was due to tbe fact that each
case wr.a bound with wire   bands at
Simmons,
Vant.
DIVISION IV.
Linden Benson,Eric Clurk, Edward
Cook, Parma Cooper, Alice Dacre,
Wilhelmina DeWilde, Clarence Fowler, Oscar Hellmen, Willie Henniger
John Kingston, Laird McCallum,
Daniel McDougail* James McKenzie,
Helen McKinnon, Ethel Mayo, Arta
Montgomery, Arthur Morrison, Fran
cis O'Keefe, Mabel Hobbins, Vera
Boots.
division v,
Charlotte Acres, Grace Brau, fc lot-
once «Brau, Ian Clark, Patsy Cook,
Norman Cooke,Alioe Deporter, Lillian
Dunn, Bobert Foote, Helen Hansen,
Albert Kinnie, Delbert Kirkpatrick,
fc>eda Lyden, Fred Mason, Gordon
Massie, Elizabeth Mooyboer, Betty
McCalium, Lily McDonald, Frances
Newman,Lillian Pell, Charlie Robertson, Ruth   Wobstor, Glaiiys Pearson,
DIVISION VI.
Marvin Bailey, Beverly Benson,
El vora Colarch, Roy Cooper, Ernest
Danielson, Raymond Dinsmore, Hazel
Elliott, Colin Graham, Katherine
Honniger, Ernest Hutton, Evelyn
Innes, Joan Love, Dorothy Lucas,
Anna McKinnon, Lydia Mudie, Mildred Patterson, Louis Santano, Bruce
Smith, Frod Smith, Gladys Smith,
Marjorie Taylor,
DIVISION VII.
Ernest Crosby, Molvin Glaspell,
Charles Harkness, Scrota Hutton,
Harold Jackson, Margaret Kingston,
Stephen Kleman, Donald Lucas, Ed-
mond Miller, Bruce McDonald,Madeline McDongall, Marjorie Otterbine,
Donald Ross, Aleck Bobbins-
DIVISION   VIII.
James Allan, Chester Bonthron,
Huth Boyce, Carl Brau, Peter De
Wilde, Ernest l?itzspatr.ck, Maisie
Henderson, Peter Jinayoff, Mary
Kleman, George Hugin. Daisy Malm,
Hazel Mason, Ethel Massie, Margaret
McCallum, John McDonald, Florence
McDougail, Bonald McKinnon, Min
nie McNiveu, Helen Pell, Andy Pisacreta, Mary Pisereta, Mildred Smith,
Winnifred Truax, Fred Wenzel, Lura
Canfield.
DIVISION IX,
Agnes Ahern, John Berry, Evelyn
Cooper, Albert Deporter, Catherine
Davis, Ethel Graham, Bessie Hendre
son, Juno Chew, Jack Love, Jack
Mulford, Clarence McDougail, Mary
McKinnon, George O'Koefe, Willie
Prendergast, Nick Pisacreta, James
Robertson, Tony  Santano.
DIVISION x.
Ernest Angliss, Jewel Baker, Wil-
C. lice, of the provincial department of agriculture, hiving charge
ofthe inspection of certified potato
seed, arrivec in the city on Tuesday
from Victoria and spent a eourJle of
days in the city. He left this morning for Spokane, wbere he will attend a conference of the Pacific
Northwest certified potato seed
growers.
Wednesday evening Mr. Tice ad»
dressed a number of ranchers in tbe
office of ibe central packing house
on the subject of certified potato
seed.
The speaker illustrated the  value
of the potato crop in the province
by making a striking  comparison.
For a number of years   the average
value of the potato  crop   had been
$2,680,000 per year,from an acreage
of 15,000 acres. Tbe yearly value of
tbe hay and clover crop   was  about
16,000,000, and of fruit 83,000,000.
Mr. Tice stated that this  valley
is  admirably  adapted for  growing
certified potato seed, aud the ranchers sbould engage in th_H branch  of
farming more extensively in the future   than they have   in  tbe   past.
The v»lue of growing certified seed, .
aside from  the   educational  standpoint, lay in the fact  that certified
seed potatoes  usually brought #20
per ton more than   tbe  commercial
crop.
In Ontario, slid the speaker, the
average yield per ucre h id boen 218
bushels from certified seed, and l<_9
bushels from ordinary seed, of Green
Mountains; 210 bushels per acre
from certified seed, and 164 bushels
per acre from ordinary seed, of Irish
Cobblers.
Tbe speaker dwolt on tbe impor»
tance of communities standardizing
on certain varities. fcor this valley
he recomuieuded Green Mountain,
Irish Cobbler, Gold Coin, Kmpire
State, Netted Gem, Early Rose,
Burbank and Carmen No, 1.
Tbe average of potatoes in British
Columbia this year bad been 6.1
tons per acre; in this valley the
yield was but 2 tons per acre. Tbis
showed the necessity changing varieties here and planting certified seed.
When certified is planted, from 50
to 75 per cent of tbe crop will grade
as certified seed potatoes, he said.
THE WEATI1KK
The following i.s the minimum
and maximum temperature for each
day >luring the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer ou E. fc". Law's ranch:
Max.
Min.
Dec.    2—Friday	
42
33
,'j—Saturday	
27
15
4- Suiulify	
29
15
24
13
6—Tuesday	
30
13
m   7—Wednesday.
31
18
•is
23
Inches
Rainfall	
.. 0.17
W. J. E. Biker and Howard Bush
have returned to Nelson after a successful hunting outing at Steeves'
ranch, main Kettle river. Tbey got
three bucks eacb.
bert Cooper, Genevieve Dacre, John
Elosoff, Albert l-iu-cby.Loilull Hacking, Bruce Harkness,Isabel Huffman,
Chester Hutton,Hilda Lucas. Norman
McDnonuUl, Winni tree I O'Keefe* Victor Bella, Ail(!eii Smith, Alexander
Wood, Ethel Boots. THE   SUR,   GRAND   FORKS.   B. C.
5tte (Btwxi SfarJta &im
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
G. A. EVAN8. EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britaiu) 11.00
One Year (in the United States)    1.50
Addresr •■** *********—'cat'0"8 to
The Gbamd Forks Sum,
Phonb W»» Giuvd Font., B. C.
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1021
So many great events have occurred during
the past week that it is difficult to classify
their importance. The Iirish question has been
settled and the Irish Free' State as an integral
unit of the British empire born; the Liberal
party of Canada has gained a sweeping victory,
and the arms conference at Washington has arrived at a number of important agreements.
However great may be the divergance of opinion among the people of other nations as to
which of these occurrences should take precedence, Britishers the world over will have
no hesitancy in according that honor to the
settlement of thn long-standing quarrels between Britain and Ireland. The achievement
is perhaps most tersely summed up in Mr,
Lloyd George's own words, when he regards
it as his greatest diplomatic triumph.
Dr. Rose of Nelson was one of the Unionist
candidates who counted his chicks before they
came out of the incubator. If his election
would have made no difference in his professional practice, surely his defeat should not
affect it to any appreciable extent.
they increa.se immensely the weight of the
train. The Canadian National railways operate a greater proportion of steel coaches than
any other Canadian railway. The steel car is
so heavy that it is generally confined to main
line use on transcontinental runs. Canada.
whether certain individuals approve or not,
is the owner of 22,000 miles of railways, together witb all the roiling stock and equipment necessary to operate the same. This
gigantic plant can be rapidly and permanently
changed from a losing to a paying venture, if
economically and efficiently operated.and wben
the Canadian people decide that they will give
their own railroad a fair share and equitable
share of the existing passenger and freight
traffic of the country.
It is one thing for the man whose business
or private requirements are served by a network of railroads to discuss casually the importance of the Canadian National railways,
bui to the farmer or dweller in the small towns
the development and success of Canada's railways is a matter of transcending importance
It is a puzzling question whether the
Unionists of British Columbia were more sur •
prised at finding themselves at the bottom of
the political ladder on election night or at
winning the three Vancouver seats. Both
events surprised them greatly. But even at
that their surprise could not have exceeded
that of the Liberal candidates in the Terminal
City.
Eastern people, as a rule, do not know what
"hauling to market" means. Many western
farmers, located miles from a railway, start
out at dawn to draw a load of grain to an ele
vator. Arriving in town after dark, they have
to board themselves and their team for the
night at some expense. Next morning they
deliver their grain to the elevator, do some
necessary shopping and arrive back home after
dark again—having been on the road some
thirty-six hours. The construction of railways
in the west was a tremendous boon to thousands of such farmers by bringing shipping fa-
oilities much closer to their farms—literally
cutting down the time necessary to deliver a
oad of grain from days to hours.
With the adoption of steel passenger coaches
came greater safety and greater riding comfort, but also greater operating expenses. Steel
cars are not only more costly to construct but
also cost more to haul because of the fact that
WHAT CANADA NEEDS MOST
There are too many people in the British
isles. There are vast empty spaces in Canada
which, given human occupation and human
endeavor, will blossom like the rose. Canada's
problem is to establish a connection between
the people who have no land and the land that
has no people. The action of Hon. T. D. Pattullo in going to England in an effort to obtain
settlers for 2,000,000 acres on the British Columbia lines of the Grand Trunk Pacific is the
kind of action which will have the most rapid
and far-reaching effect on the future of Canada generally, aud the prosperity of our nationally owned railways. In Great Britain Che
Canadian National railways have recently
made a wide distribution of a booklet specially prepared for women, pointing out the advantages for the proper kind of women to
make their homes in Canada.
TRADE PROSPECTS WITH MEXICO
Canada's influence in Mexico has for years
taken the form of branch banks and the financ
ing and management of many industrial and
public utility plants.
Major Chisholm, former Canadian trade
commissioner, stated recently that Mexico is
now heading quickly back to her former state
of .prosperity a: d presents an exceedingly attractive market for Canadian products.
Mexico should be added to the list of foreign
markets made available through the operation
of the Canadian merchant marine. As a matter of fact, the Canadian National railways
management has sent a special representative
to make an investigation of traffic conditions
thero in respect to services on both tha east
and west coast. Canadians are well regarded
in Mexico, and it only needs the practice of
salesmanship and proper shipping facilities to
establish very extensive and profitable trade
in natural and manufactured products of the
two countries.
MOSCOW'S BUSINESS CORNER
—By courtesy G-P.B.
Comer of one of the Moscow railway stations waiting for the ticket office io open
bo that they may obtain Government tickets, which will permit them to leave
. the eity.    Note the Canadian Pacific Railway sign in the window.
E. C. HENNIGER
Grain* If ay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cement
and
Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks.B-C.
S. T. HULL
.     {Established 1910
Real Estate and Insurance
Baildent-Agent Qn_Mil Forks Towniito
Company. Limited
Farms    {Orchards    City Property
Agents at; Nelson, Calgary, Wlh-ilpeg and**
otlier Prairie polnta. Vanoouver Agents:
PBNDKR INVESTMENTS
BATTKNBURY LANDS LTD.
Httabllshed In 1910. we are inn position to
furnish reliable information uouoerninar this
district.
Write for free literature
GRAND FORKS
Transfer Company
DAVIS 8 HANSEN, Props
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Coal,   Wood and Ice
for Sale
Office at R. t. Petrie's Store
Phone 64
C.V. Meggitt
Real Estate and Insurance
OHCHAKDS, FARM   LANDS   AND CITY
PROPERTY
Excellent facilities for selling your farms
We have ageuta at all Coast and Prairie
Poiuts
WB CABBY AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE.
DEALBR IN POLES, POSTS AND TIES,
AND FARM PRODUCE
Sellable Inform ation re-ranll ii-{ this dlstro t
oUeerfnlly furnished. We xoilolt your in
quisles.
auto mm z™
Modern Rigs and Good
Horses at All Hours at
the
Model Livery Barn
M. H. Barns, Prop.
Phone 68 Second Street
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Yalb Hotkl, Fikst Sturkt
DON'T HESITATE!
PHONE 101R
F0RFINEPRINTIN6
PLANT B. C. GROWN TREES ONLY
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO., LTD.
Hava by careful and efficient management built up a large
business during the past ten years, and are the lajgest
growers of nursery stock in Western Canada.
A LARGE ASSORTMENT of very fine Fruit Trees and '
Small Fruit Plahts are now growing in our Nurseries at
Sardis, which are being offered to planters at very Reason-
able Prices.
THB QUALITY of these trees and plants are of high order
being propagated from specially selected trees of known
productiveness.
We arge growing a very fine lot of Roses of leading varieties which have bloomed this season in the Nurserias and
will give good results when transplanted in your garden
or lawn.
We Solicit Correspondence from intending planters and
urge the |
Address
urge the placing orders early in the season
ling pi
. WR
ITE TOU AY
The British Columbia Nurseries Co. Ltd
Sardis, B. C. Department C.
Clinton A. S. Atwood, Salesman, Grand Forks, B. C.
Call and Inspect Our Large Stock of
CHRISTMAS ROODS
We have everything for the Kiddies—the things they like add that
will make them happy.
Safety Flyer Sleds, Skates, Pocket Knives, Toys,
Kindergarten Sets, Rockers, Doll Cabs and Wagons
See our large line of Dolls—the ones with real hair and that close
their eyes. Fine range of the best procurable, priced at from $1.50
to $8.00.
Eden and Bluebird Electric Wash •
ing Machines	
$190.00
on terms
MILLER & GARDNER
Complete Home Furnishers
The signals of the traffic officer are
obeyed instantly by the intelligent citizen, as he realizes that difference means
confusion and congestion. ,- ...
Over the telephone wires and through
the switchboards there is constant vol- ■
urne of traffic. There is also a signal—
the ringing of the telephone bell. A
great obstacle in the flow of this traffic
is delay in answering the bell.
Answer your telephone bell promptly.
You will accommodate the party calling.
Your own line will be more quickly
cleared for other business.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
6
FUSLOOIff
Great Clearance Sale of 100,000 Good Story Books at Half Price
6 Volumes of Splendid Stories for only SI.OO
Stories of Love, Adventure, Mystery, Dramatic, Vital, Thrilling Stories
as originally issued by tha celebrated "House of Oas-iell" in their famons
"Story Teller," a collection of Fascinating Fiction by World Famous
Writers, »hicli is now sold throughout Canada at 35o pur volume These
books ware printed bat it. tlm pro .ont high cost of paper and labor pre
vailed, and we are olearing tham at less than one-half present retail price.
While they last we will send
BI6    mnn 6x91" QA SHORT   CCOMPLI
BOOKS IUUU PAGES Vt STORIES 0 NOVELETTES
Sample Book, 25o; 3 for OOc, 0 for 11.00, or I'i books, all different
for $2.0), postpaid to any address. Not more than 12 to a customer '
With eaeh order for G or more books we will send a 20o copy of the
CANADIAN HOME JOURNAL FREE. Canada's leading Magazine
for the Canadian Woman and her entire household. We know you will
subscribe. Ouly $2,00 a year.
Whether on a silver screen or in plain print, no matter wnen, where,
or in what form published, printed today or twenty years since, a good
story is a good story, about as enjoyable a thing as there is in the world
—.never out of date and always a source of genuine pleasure. Many of
the best short stories published appear in the collection .we offer.
"EVERSHARP," tha Perfeot Penoil. Its 18 inches of lead writes a
quarter million pariect pointed words, and then replenishes for 25c.
Never require, sharpaning. A thing of beauty and of use forever. Our
standard Na. 20 silver plated "Eversharp" with eraser and clip complete, sant for only $1.50. Other styles and finishes up to $30.00.
Complete list, with prices, sent on request.
Send Your Order To-day and make sure of getting your share of these
genuine Story Book Bargains. A Veritable Library of Fascinating Fio-
tion by world faanus writers for $1.03. Dm't overlook the "Eversharp"
for personal usa or as a Christmas pra.ant to a frian 1. Catalog listing
1,000 Books frea with the orJar. Nithin? like Bn'n lot Christmas
Presents. Address, namiug this paper,
DIRECT SALES SERVICE (Bjok Dapartmant) TQR0NK), ONTARIO
Those wishing neat sign painting
to ornament their business places
sbould call oo W. P. O'Connor, a
returned soldier.
Padlock Safety P.ip?r,for private
bankoWts, k^pi in stoik by T!ia
Sun Job Dapirtraent. THE SUN, GRAND FORKS, B. C.
INTERESTING    SCENES    FROM   MANY    PARTS   OF    THE    WORLD
*I»e story of Mr. Bos-wortM. rise
is one ol steady progress. Hard work
was hia program and promotion his
objective. Born in tibe States, Ira
crossed to Canada In 1882 to become
Assistant Freight Agent of the On-
Itario and Quebec lines of the Can.
adian Pacific. Promotions followed
steadily until he now fills the highest post hi the Company'* steamship
service, aa chairman of thc Canadian
i Pacific Steamships, Limited.
Under his administration the
Canadian Pacific boats did splendid
war service, carrying troops —
Anzacs, Americans and Canadians,
to say nothing of hordes of Chinese
laborers to work behind the lines—
and vaat stores of munitions and
foods. A number were sunk but
the Canadian Pacific quickly replaced them and has since augmented its fleet until Mr. Bosworth
has to-day thirty-two In operation
and two building. Among those re-
! cently acquired are four ex-German
•HjPS  H»   f*«sm  Ife***   emxr-
*>. *:.. ^''/'Gl'teMAN
J .. :\><Z/'A/£7£>   SJOtV
.     ..J^ONOScS?   A2SO _»w
gust, 9,500 tons, renamed the Montreal, operated in the Mediterranean
service; the Print Friedrich Wi.
helm, 17,500 tens, and the Kaiserin
Augusts Victoria, 25,000 tons, renamed the Empress of India and
the Empress of Scotland, both being operated in the Atlantic service,
and the Tirpits, 19,300, renamed
Empress of Australia, now being converted into an oil-burner, whieh will
bs placed tn the Pacific service together with the Empress of Canada, Empress of Asia and Empress
of Russia, which will enable the
n_._fl___._i._.    i-M^jffc   Le
**m***mamamamammmtm *w **.************- — -
fortnipht'y service between Va***-
couver and the Orient.
Mr. Bosworth is a great believer
in oil-fuel; all of thc new ships burn
oil and the other large passenger
carriers are being converted into
oil-burners.
Tho steady increase in the tonnage? of the Cnnadian Pacific fleets
on both Atlantic ami Pacific Oceans
with thc addition of great liners
such as the Empress of Scotland,
the Empress of Canada and the Empress of Australia draws attention
to Mr. Oeorpe M. Boswortti, Chairman of thc Company, which oper .tes
this   part  .-   li.-   Cunadian   Pauifia
mXalmmlml. j THE   SUN.   GRAND   FORKS,   1. O.
How Are You -
Getting Along?
Ask yourself as to how you
are getting along. You
have a pretty good idea
whether or not your eyes
are working vigorously
and properly transmitting the world's sight
messages to yonr brain.
If you suffer from any
kind of eye defection or
fatigue you should at
once have your eyes test-.
ed by our optometrist,
His advice is absolutely
dependable.
J. C. TAYLOR
Jeweller and Optician
Bridge Street Grand Forks
of tbe disposal of the surplus can-
en n funds, amounting to over Iwj
million dollars. Ballot postcards
can bc had at all post offices.
W. M. McKay, of Cascade, visited
the city on Wednesday.
I. H. Hallett and A. N. Docksteader, of Greenwood, were in tbe
city laat Saturday.
News of tlie Gity
Miss A. Uradock, matron of the
Grand Forks hospital, is visiting
ber brother at the coast.
Osborn Allen and bride returned
home tbis week from their honeymoon trip.
Frank Timberlake, of Fife   was
iu the city tbis week.
Geo. C.  Egg, of this  city,
been appointed a notary public,
has
After residing in Greenwood for
twenty two years, Mrs. G. Swayne
is moving to Milltown, Mont,
James Moriarity, of Bridesville,
was found guilty before Justices of
the Peace J. K. Ferguson and W.
II. Norris, in Midway on Monday,
of branding a colt owned by li. G.
Sidley, of Sidley. He was fined (200
and costs, or deault in payment
six months imprisonment.
DON'T WORRY ABOUT CHRISTMAS
We  have everything you  need for
your baking or cooking.
jap Oranges       Table Nuts       Xmas Stocking s
Navel Oranges   Table Raisins Figs        Candies
A complete line of fresh Groceries, Vegetables
and Canned Goods always carried in stock. _^__^
THE CITY GROCERY
R. M. McLeod     | Phone 25 |    H. H. Henderson
City Property For Sale
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the Gity, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Prices:—From $25.00 per lot upwards.
Terms:—Cash and approved payments.
List of lots and prices may be seen at the
City Office.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
Taken Up—One strange two year-
old heifer. Owner can bave same by
proving property   and paying ex .  .
penses incurred. Joseph Trombley,-.ttie whole Dominion. It is wonderful
* * I ma*. l_i_a     anrl     nrrwinaa  airorn     mamKon
Eholt.
Canada's New
Goat of Arms
Every bome in Canada,every Canadian school boy and girl should
know the new Canadian coat of arms.
It is » most beautiful plate and
should occupy a prominent place in
all true Canadian homes. The people of Canada are indebted to the
Family Herald and Weekly Star of
Montreal for reproducing the new
coat of arms in all its true heraldic
colors and presenting a copy, 14x17
inches, to all readers of that great
paper.
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star is Canada's greatest family and
farm paper and is known throughout
FERNIE REER Ml ?»>* *■■■ °n Cleveland
THE BEER THAT HAS NO EQUAL
CAN BE SUPPLIED YOU
THROUGH
* Y0UR*VENDOR
Be Sure You Get Fernie Beer on Your
Next Order
FERNIE-FORT STEELE BREWING CO
LIMITED
The ranchers are giving an entertainment and dance in the Davis
ball tonight.
Norman Morrison, an old timer
of Greenwood, died in Vancouver
last Tuesday.
Mrs. L. Lyons and Miss C. L.
McDonald, of Greenwood, were visitors in the city on Saturday.
v&lue and provides every member
ot the family with clean, wholesome,
instructive reading. It is a great
money saver for the farmers of Canada and repays the subscription
price one hundred fold each year.
Canada is proud of the big weekly.
It bas no superior the world over
and is improving year after year. It
costs only two dollars a year and
each reader for 19J22 will receive
free a copy of the ' 'Coat of Arms."
IT brings the whole country for miles around within easy reach.
Have you seen the new models] They're as graceful as swallows! Ab
bright as new coin! As weatherproof as a duck) Automobile Stoel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Real Quality. Real
Value. Easy Terms. We are tbe people'to mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER g&andWrks,b."c!
Open Saturday Evenings Till 10 o'Clock
Nothing Else is Aspirin—say "Bayer"
E. C. Henniger, M.L.A, and
Mrs. Henniger are expected to return home from Victoria tomorrow
night.
F. Mobler is rebuilding his residence, recently destroyed by fire,
near the Great Northern station.
A plebiscite is being taken from
al' ex-service men on   the question
FOSTER'S FORECAST
Washington, Dec. 5.—The week
centering on December 7 is expected
to avetage colder than us,ual on meridian 90. A cold wave will reach
that longitude on December 4 and
several days of cold weather is expected to follow along that line from
far north to the Gulf of Mexico.
This cold wave will follow the
first severe storms of December.
Near December 12 a high  temper >-
Warning! Unless you see name
"Bayer" on tablets, you are not getting Aspirin at all. Why take chancesl
Accept only an unbroken "Bayer"
package which contains directions
worked out by physicians during 21
years and proved safe by millions for
Colds, Headache, Earache, Tootache,
Neuralgia, Rheumatism, Neuritis,
Lumbago, and Pain. Made in Canada.
All druggists sell Bayer Tablets of
Aspirin in handy tin boxes of 12 tab'
lots, and in bottles ci 24a nd 100.
Aspirin is the trade mark (registered
in Canada) of Bayer Manufacture of
Monoaceticacidester of Salicylicacid.
While it is well knowh that Aspirin
means Bayer m-iuufacture, to assist
the public against imitations, the
Tablets of Bayer Company will be
stamp-id with their general trade
mark, the "Bayer Ci'osi."
\
ture wave will be on meridian 90
from Gulf of Mexico to far north. Two
or three days of severe storms will
follow and as the temporature rises
rains are expected, followed by
snows in northern sections.
These weather events will control
the weather for the week centering
on December 12, on meridian 90.
About two dayB earlier tbty will Be
in Alaska,and western Canada; two
days later than the meridian 90
dates they will be in latitude of Ohio
and Ontario, and three- days l*er
they will cover the eostern coast to
tbe continent. /
Mc Gill a Hundred Years Old
**rtmm*mtit !_.*«. .
McGill University, as it will appear when the proposed extensions are completed.
Montreal will witness an historic
event for five days, commencing
Wednesday, October tho twelfth,
when the one hundredth anniversary
of the founding of McGill University
will be celebrated, a reunion of for
mer graduates and under-graduates.,
For 'a year and a half arrangements
have bcen underway by a special
committee of the McGill Graduates
Society in charge of thc details of
the unique event.
From all over the world McGill
Graduates have signified their intention of taking part in this monror-
able gathering. At the present time
there are some on the high seas
from Japan, China, and India, from
Australia, South Africa and South
America, to be followed by those
from Great Britain and Europe,
eager to be present to celebrate the
one hundredth anniversary of their
alma mater, and to revive the memories of student days.
Invitations have been issued to
every recognized university in the
world to send a representative.
Many digtinguished men will receive
degrees at a special convocation.
Following registration which will
[take plj.ee in Strathcona Hall, the
Initial event will be a garden party
un the campus, followed in the even-
ig by a fete de nuit. The mornings
of the week will be devoted to special lecture.-, and demonstrations in
the various faculties of Medicine,
Science, Arts,   Law   and   Theology.
At eleven a.m., on the second day, a
general meeting of all McGill graduates will be held at the Capitol theatre and in the afternoon there will
be a convocation. Class Dinners are
planned for the evening at which
all classes wil) meet as units, and
later all male graduates will gather
for a general smoker, the lady
graduates having a dinner in the
Koyal Victoria College. University
sports will bo held at the Percival
Molson Memorial Stadium in the
afternoon of the third day, and in
the evening a University reception
and dance will be given by the President and the Board of Governors.
On the morning of October the fifteenth an excursion' to the MacDonald Agricultural College, St.
Anne de Bellevue has been arranged,
followed hy luncheon, returning in
time for the championship rugby
match between McGill and Toronto
Varsity. On Sunday, October the
sixteenth, a general church service
will be held at St. James Methodist
Church.
X special souvenir button has
been designed in honor of the
occasion,—another of the many important events associated with the
history of Montreal.
The special committee in charge
of ihe reunion include: Chairman,
Brig.-General G. E. McCuaig, Sc.
'06; Vice-Chairman, Captain J. G.
Ross, Sc. '03; Secretary, E. B. Tilt,
Sc. '03; Ladies' Committee, Miss L.
M. King, Arts '07 and Mrs. C. McMillan, Arts '10; Entertainment,
Gregor Barclay, Arts '06, Law '08,
and Jas. C. Kemp, Sc. '08; Transportation, Abner Kingman, Jr. Arts
'08, and H. C. Scott, Arts '06; Housing, A. G. Cameron, Law '10 and F.
B. Common, Arts 13; Programme,
Dr. W. G. Turner, Med. '00; Finance,
r. G. Ross, Sc. '08 and H. Y. Russell,
Se. '91; Registration and Publicity,
Fraser S. Keith, Sc. '08; Faculty
Representatives, Med. Dr. G. F.
Martin, Med. '92; and Dr. A. T.
Bazin, Med. '94; Cyrus MacMullln,
Arts '00; Gordon McDougail, Law
'94; General, Dr. J. A. Nicholson,
Arts '87; Henry Morgan, Arts '18;
Prof. N. N. Evans, Se. '86{ J. M.
Eakina, Sc. '09 and J. W. Jeakins,
Arts '18, Secretary, McGill Graduates Society.
A greater interest has been created in McGill University through the
special campaign inaugurated laat
fall particularly among the graduates. At this campaign over five
million dollars were subscribed to
carry on the work of old McGill, and
to supply additional buildings and
equipment commensurate with tha
-rowth of the University. This increased interest is duly reflected by
the large numbers who are coming
who assure the success of thia out-
landing event in the history of a
great university so favorably known
in every quarter of the globe.
Professor Cyrus MacMillan haa
written a history of the university
entitled "McGill and its Stories,*
which S. K Gundy, of the Oxford
University Press, Toronto, haa
published in time for the Reunion.
Thia contains extracts from man
historic records published for tM
first time and gives • wonderfully Interesting account of *Hh
progress of education in Lowtf
Canada and Quebec within til* lajl
hundred yean. j
Our
Hobby
is
Good
Printing
r**pHE value of well-
printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated; Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Bail programs
Business cards
Visiting cards
Sh'pp.ing tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
THE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ABMSON
Synopsis of
Land Act Amendments
Minimum   price  of
I to 16*
first-class land
reduced to KT an aar*; second-class to
HE0 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to wr-
veyed lands only.
Records wUl be (ranted covering only
land suitable for agricultural purpose*
and which la non-timber land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
but parties of not mor* than four may
arrant* for adjacent pre-emptions
with Joint residence, but each maklns
necessary Improvements on respective
claims. m*
Pre-emptors must occupr claims for
Bv* years and make Improvements to
value ot 110 per acre. Including clearing and cultivation of at least 6 acres,
before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor In occupation not
'— than S years, and has made pro-
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
THE SUN
Columbia Avenue and
Lake Street
1   rULBPHOXB
R101
PICTURES
AND PICTURE FRAMIN6
Furniture Mode to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds.
Upholstering Neatly   Don
r. c. McCutcheon
winning Afuoi
portlonate Improvements, he may, be
cause of Ill-health, or other cause, b*
granted Intermediate certificate of Improvement and transfer hi* claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent of
MM par annum and records same eaeh
year. Failure to make Improvements
ot record same will operate as forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained ln
lees than t years, and Improvements
ef 110.00 per acre, Including 6 acrea
cleared and. cultivated, and residence
of at least 3 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Grown grant
may record another pre-emption, if he
requires land In conjunction with hla
farm, without actual occupation, provided statutory Improvements made
and residence maintained on Crown
granted land. tg
Unsurveyed. areas, not exceeding 10
acres, may be leased as homcsTtes;
tlu* to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For graslng and Industrial purposes
ceedlng   Mt   acres   may  "
,    .__        .   be
leased by on* person or compan
Mill, factory or Industrial sites on
any.
Ing   40
lUons
Include
; *o«p* at this Aot Is enlarged te
I* an parsons Joining and nrv-
•Ith Hts Majesty* ifcnses.    The
timber land   not
may be purchased; oondli
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may b* purchased
conditional upon construction of a road
to them. Rabat* of one-half of cost of
road, not exceeding half of purchase
Price, I* mad*.
PRE-EMPTORr     PREE     QRANT*
ACT.
Th* l_
include
Ing with _      __
time within which the"heirs or devise**
of a deceased pre-emptor may apply
for title under this Aet ta extended
from for one year from th* death of
such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the present
war. This privilege ta alao mad* retroactive.
No fees relating to pre-emptions ar*
du* pr payability *oldl*r» oo preemptions recorded after Jon* b\ fill.
r*SSJS* *fgit*d ** 9*** rmaT
Provision for return cf moneys accrued due and been paid alnce August
4, 1014, on account of payments, fee*
or tax** on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or eity lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 11. 1010.
SUB-PURCHASERS  Of CROWN
LANDS.
Provision made for Issuance at
Crown grant* to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to ooraplete
purchase. Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, Interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original par-
be   distribute
whole
proportionately
Applications
over
must   be
eel, purchase price due and taxes may
"     "    ed   pr   * •
Api
mad* by May 1, 1020.
GRAZINQ.
Grazing Act, 1010, for systematic
development of livestock industry provides for graslng districts and range
administration under Commissioner.
Annual graslng permits Issued based
on numbers ranged: priority for established owners. Stock-owners may
form Associations for rang* management. Free, or partially fro*, permits
for settlers, campers er travellers, -up
to ten bead.
NEW HARNESS SHOP
I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and do all kinds of repair
work. Shop equipped with
modern machinery. All work
guaranteed:
C. A, Crawford
Neax Telephone Office

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