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The Evening Sun Aug 28, 1908

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Array Grand Forks, B. C, Friday. August 28, 1908.
$1.00 Per Year in Advance.
"DRY mp
9
A great deal of attention is being
attracted at this time to a system of
agriculture known ns "dry funning,"
which is being successfully used in
the semi-arid districts of Colorado
and other western states in place of
extensive schemes of irrigation. By
"semi-arid" is meant a territory in
which the annual rainfall is Icsb
than twenty and more than eight
inches. By dry farming many thousands of acres which, on account of
their location, could never be reached by irrigation ditches, are reclaimed. Some of this acreage has
long been styled "grazing lands,"
and considered useless for nothing
else.
"Dry farming," briefly stated,
consists in so preparing the soil in
semi-arid regions that it will catch
what little annual rainfall there is,
and store it within reach of the
roots of the plants to be grown.
This, as might be supposed, requires a firm, solid foundation beneath the soil. The soil above is
kept firm and loose and act as a
nuiich, keeping the moisture from
escaping into the atmosphere, much
as a brick or plank keeps the ground
directly under it moist even in a
beating 6Un, With such • preparation of the soil, grazing lands will
often yield as high as 40 to 50
bushels of wheat to the acre, or
more than the yield of the Eastern
states, where the natural rainfall is
adequate.
The last two years have witriessed
the greatest progress in tbe new plan
of reclamation. Not only is "dry
farming" being extensively employed
in Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska,
where it was first introduced, but in
c islorii Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Idaho and Utah, where heretofore great tracts of prairie land could
in ninny instances be bought as low
as fifty cents an acre.
The first experiments in this line
date liuek more than a decade. The
founder of the method is Prof. H.
W. C'impbell, of Nebraska, under
whose personal direction today are
some large model farms in the west,
illustrating the marvelous accomplishments of "dry farming." Five
years ago the department of agriculture began to lend its assistance in
the matter, carrying on investigations ns to the localties in which
"dry fanning" will bring the best
results. The department is also
searching in many parts of the world
for kinds of alfalfa and wheat and
other plants which will yield the
largest returns with a rainfall of less
than twenty inches.
As to land, it may be stated that
high plateaus or rolling hills afford a
better supply of ruin to he stored by
"dry forming" methods than dc the
valleys, and they are therefore usually chosen first.
Colorado, where many thousands
of acres are now under cultivation, is
taking particular interest in development along these lines. Within the
past year Gov. McDonald called together a congress of "dry farmers."
Many ranches ure being broken up
ti give place to the new system of
f i.'ming, for it does not pay to rnjse
cittle ut tin' present prices at which
t lis land is selling. In fact, much
of the upland country is being
turned into a veritable garden.
The first operation in the preparation ,of the soil is plowing. This
must be deep. A disk or mold-board
plow may be used, depending on the
character of the ground. One object
of the deep plowing is to provide an
adequate reservoir for the storage of
the rainfall. Gang plows with twelve
to sixteen plowshares in eaoh are a
common sight. These- plows are
drawn by traction engines. Steam
plowing helps out wonderfully in
this work. In some of the Western
states it would be out of the question to secure sufficient men and
teams to accomplish the plowing of
the hundreds of thousands of acres
annually being reclaimed by "dry
farming." Steam plowing costs leas
than half as much as plowing with
teams. It is not unusual for one
plowing outfit to turn 3000 acres of
sod into cultivated land in one season. Two men are needed to operate the engine, besides a teamster
and team for hauling fuel.
A sub surface packer follows the
plow, drawn by the same traction
engine as the plow. This packer is
similar in shape as a disk plow, except that it has ten wheels. These
weilge-shnped wheels or disks aro 18
inches in diameter, and are arranged
vertically on a shaft six inches apart.
The object of the sub-surface packer
is to firm the soil. A smooth roller if
used for this purpose would have
the effect of packing the surface soil
rather than that of the sub-surface.
Thc wneels of the packer, however,
are so arranged that they firm the
soil in the lower portions of the fur-!
row, restoring capillarity where I
plowing has arrested it. A smoothing harrow next follows, leaving a
pulverized layer on top, which pre
vents tbe moisture from below from
reaching the surface and evaporating!
The constant care and working of
the soil on which the crops are to be
raised is said to he equally important with the rainfall itself. The
pulverized ground must not be allowed to pack or break in any event.
To prevent this, the harrow is run
over it after each rain. The working
of the soil begins seveial months before seeding, and must be continued
after seeding.
A great many people* cultivating
their land under the new system,
aim to raise but one crop from the
same ground in two years. They
divide this land into two equal parts,
and use one part for crops one year,
and the other the next. This admits of what is known as "summer
culture" on the part not in uso, and
the storing of a season's rain in the
soil reservoir. Again, it may be feasible to allow the land to produce
crops for two years, and alternute
one year of "summer culture!"
W'here crops are planted every year,
plowing must quickly follow the
operation of harvesting, the aim being to save all possibly moisture in
the ground and simultaneously prepare the soil for the next rains.
It is confidently expected that the
time will come when land on which
but a ten-inch rainfall is now recorded will be made to blossom as
the rose. This will be accomplished
by further advances in 'scientific
discovery. At present, districts
having less than fourteen inches
rainfall are not regarded ns profitable. An educational movement for
the scientific study of "dry farming" '
has already been talked of. Not all
attempts at "dry farming" arc a success, nor will be until ihe muss of
the people using it under land the
principles on which il. must bo carried out. The rainfall varies in different years, and this emergency
must be met in n scientific way.
Conditions differ also in different localities.
The establishment of more gov-,
stations will j
giving all the hotel men un opportunity  to  rebuild, as the city needed all
^^^^^^^^^ the revenue 'it could   get.    He hud
  e   , mingled with the ratepayers to a con-1
A distressing drowning accident siderableextent during the past week.
SHOT BY BIIIS
occurred in the"citv between 10 and md tht'.v wm' "1I aWM t0 " ''"->*" '"
12 o'clook last Tuesday morning, Ration rates. ,
when Mr. and Mrs. Frank Verzuh J-be mayor said he did not take ns
lost their two little children, Joseph, pwiuitatio a view of the city's iiiiiinues
aged 0 years, and Emma, aged 4 ;'ls so'"e PeoPle did' He <■'""■
|years, while they were engaged in
their customiiry pastime of  plaving
on the banks of the North Kork near]°?use,they were lwse'1 °" tl,e fts8uraF
Mr. Curran's store in the North   ad-! ll°" that none of the business  houses
dition.    No one witnessed  the   ac-! -destroyed   by the fire would rebuild,
cident, and any statement as to  the
manner   in   which   it   occurred  is
necessarily   based   merely on con
jeeture.    It   is supposed, however,
that they had ventured out on   the
W. B. Bower,ol the Eastern Townships bank in this city, has returned
from Midway, and gives a graphic
account of the hold-up of the Com-
mercia!   house in thnt town by two
,  ,   .      ,   ,. .,, i masked bandits last Tuesday  niftht,
tended that the figuresquoted by Aid,! „.,,;,.,, ,.„sl|l|(,(| jn ||u, „„„.,,;.,. „f th
Clark wee lai'gely   problematical, be-| pr„prielor; (;,	
footbridge near Mr. Wiseman's place,
and that one of them accidentally
fell into the stream, and the other
attempted to save the life of the unfortunate one, and iu this manner
both of them undoubtedly perished.
The bodies were not discovered
until 5 o'clock in the evening, when
a smelter employee, returning to the
city after his day's labor at the smel
ter, noticed the body of the girl
Moating in the water near the river
bank. He immediately gave an
alarm, and a search resulted in the
findingof tho boy's body close to that
of the little girl. Coroner Kingston
was summoned, but he decided that
an inquest would be unnecessary.
Mr. Kingston gave it as bis opinion
that the children had evidently died
five hours prior to the finding of the
bodies. The double funeral was
held yesterday morning.
.Mr. Verzuh, father of the children,
is an employee at the Granby smelter. Deceased bad been in the habit
uf playing on the river bank all
day on previous occasions, and their
| non-appearance at the house on
Tuesday gave the family no uneasiness.
tl
The water and light rates would gradually come back tn the city treasury,
as the people would have to be housed
somewhere, and the shrinkage caused
by the fire could be made up without
tesortiug to increased taxation. The
commissioners had acted on principle
when they cancelled the licenses.
There had been no evidence submitted to the board that Mr. Russell intended to rebuild, and the Valhalla
license had been cancelled for cause.
Aid. Rutherford offered a resolution
to endorse the action of the commissioners, but after further discussion it
was decided to defer action until the
next regular meeting of the couneil,
when it is hoped all the members will
be present.
New Strike at Golden Eagle
An important ore body has been
encountered nt the Golden Eagle
mine, located nn Volcanic mountain,
and adjoining R. A. Brown's famous
Volcanic mine, near Bannock City,
on the North Fork of Kettle river.
According to a recent report to tbe
head office in Vancouver by J. A.
Thompson, M. E., manager of the
Golden Eagle, the new strike was
made at a point Kill feet from the
surface in a crosscut tunnel, which
was driven to tup below the lowest
level of the 150-foot shaft. The find
has every indication of permanency,
as three shifts per day are still drift-
j ing on tbis ore body, which averages
four feet between walls, and assays
good pay values, principally in gold.
This ledge is trending across the
strike of two other ore bodies, from
four to ten feet wide, which bus
been ripened up by shafts. Tho tunnel will open up the three ore bodies
referred to at a depth of about 175
feel. There are ten feet of pay ore
in    the   main   shaft.    About   500
^_^_ ,, tuns of ore1, giving good returns, have
ernment  experiment  stations will b( shipped from the mine to the
greatly  assist   different    sections. 8meiUra „„d there are now over 4001 <M  excursion   will
Several   are to  be established, it is ton8   „„   the dump from tho cross-1 »• H. i N. from Win
understood, this year.  At Cheyenne, |,,|ge already struck.    Thc  mine  i,' mediate point
Wyo., the board of trade not   l°'<g| under bond to a svndioate of   V
ago established an experiment sta
tion, assisted by the government and
the   railroads.    It was  here found
that, although Cheyenne   is   at  an
elevation of (J0OO feet above sea level,
wheal, rye, barley, oats, alfalfa,field
peas and sugar beets can   be  grown ;
profitably.    Ab a result of the   ex- j
periments the ranchmen in   Wyom-
ing are buying (houtonds of dollars'!
worth   of  farming machinery, ind
are breaking up large acreages' and
sowing alfalfa and other grasses and
grains. Ranches are also being sold
for colonization purposes.—W.Frank
McClure in Scientific American.
lone
cnuver people.
Postoffice Site
Wm. Henderson, of the postoffice
department, Vancouver, was in the
city on Tuesday for the purpose of inspecting the numerous sites availably
for a government building. He was
piloted over the ground by a committee from the Liberal association.
The site on the corner of First and
Winnipeg he refused to consider on
account of lack of drainage and because it is too low for a basement under the building, stilting that it >vu"
impossible to successfully constrv'i
basements below high-yiiter mark.
With the sites at Winnipeg and Second, Winnipeg and Fourth and the
triangular block at the head of Bridge
street he was more favorably impressed, and although he made no
open avowal us to his intentions, it is
understood he will recommend one of
these locutions to the government for
the building. Mr. Henderson left'l
Tuesday evening for Greenwood,where
he had a similar duty to perform.
Special Days at Fair
Monday, October 5, will be automobile day at the Spokane Interstate
fair; Tuesday, derby day; Wednesday,
Canadian day; Thursday, Idaho duy;
Friday, livestock day; Saturday, Bolster duy. These are to be the special
dnys, as arranged by Manager Cosgrove. The big fair will be opened
with an automobile parade on Monday. Tuesday the Spokane derby,
the crack running race of the fair,
will be run for a §1000 purse suspended iu the centre uf the track on u
rope of ribbons. Wednesday, Cana
diiin day, special excursions may he
run from all British Columbia points
via the Spokane International uud the
Spokane Fulls .v Northern. The next
day, which will be Idoho day, u spe
be run over the
luce and intermediate points, and u special service
will be put on from C icur d'Alene
City by the Spoknne .V Inland. Fri
day afternoon there will bu u livestock
parade of all prize winners urounil the
nice track.' Saturday has been dedicated    to    Herbert Holster, the father
At the general meeting of the fire
department in the central fire hall
Tuesday evening routine business
was transacted. A resolutian was
also adopted asking the city council
to appropriate #75 to defray tho expenses of the chief to the firemen's
convention in New Westminster.
The City Council
At the request of three  of  the  al      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
dernicn,  the   mayor   called a special ( of the Spokane Interstate fair.
meeting of the oity council last Tues- 	
day   evoning for  tho purpose of con- j    Sir   Wilfrid   Laurier;   premier
sidering   the   action  of the licensing Canada, will
commissioners in cancelling' three of; bin this full,
the liquor licenses.    Mayor Fripp and
Aid. Clark, Miller,   McCullum, Rutherford and Woodland were present.
Aid. Clark stated  that the   recent
(ire bad greatly decreased the value of
833,050  worth   of  realty   and    destroyed 850,000   worth   of
ments. , The  loss  of rev
of
line to British Coluin-
This is the substunce of
a communication received from Sir
Wilfrid lust week by Mr. Thomas It.
Mackay, secretary of the Vancouver
Liberal association, On August 3,
following a meeting of the association,
L. Thoiliet.
There were four men in the room
when the attempted holdup was
made—Mr. Thomet, the proprietor,
Mr. Bower, nnd two men under the
influence of liquor. Mr. Bower
says the thing happened so quickly that he did not have time to realize thc seriousness of the affair until it was over. He was standing with
his buck towards the door, and on
turning around he noticed that two
masked men had noiselessly entered
the room. One of the bandits had a
a gun pointed at him, while the
other covered Mr. Thomet. Mr.
Bower's lirst impression was to treat
the affair as a huge joke, and he was
just on the point of "joshing" Mr.
Thomet ubout it. when the latter
renclied for his gun and the shooting
commenced; Two bullets struck
Thomet, one in the neck and the
other in the right breast. One of
tbe bandits warn wounded. The
hold-ups then left the room as
quickly and noiselessly as they had
entered it. Thomet died a few minutes later, without having uttered a
word or a groan after being struck
by the assassin's bullets. The following is the evidence given nt the
coroner's inqucst.held Wednesday by
Coroner Black, with the following
jury: T. J. Hardy, foreman: Jas.
Kerr, W. L. Melville, Win. Tippie,
Geo. Sehulli and A. S. Crowell:
W. B. Bower, sworn—;Am a banker; reside in Grand Korks. Was at
fhomet's hotel close to or a lew
minutes earlier than 9:30 o'loek iu
the evening. Deceased, Archie Mc-
Dougall and George Henderson were
in room. I was standing at north
end of bar looking from door. I
casually turned and saw two masked
men. They had blue masks on.
Each bad gun pointed towards deceased. Deceased was standing at
end of'bar about eighteen feet from
me, I saw a motion of deceased to
pick up pistol, which was near his
hand. Deceased picked up snme
and fired instantaneously in direction of two masked men, who returned the lire instantaneously by
two shots. Can't Bay which man
fired or whether both tired The innn
nearest mc covered me lirst lor a
moment, then dropped his gun to
his side, then both men went out of
the door ns quietly as they came iu.
I made for the wall nearest tbe
street, so that if they shot back into
the room J would not be exposed to
fire. Siw that they might still pot
me, und hurried lo dining room, deceased being crouched beside door,
1 presumed in position to lire if tbey
showed up again. I went into room
past him. and said, "Doli'l shoot; it
is nie." He didn't answer.. Alter
passing him I went around lu back
of sideboard, thinking it a place of
safety, and deceased was on nis baek
bleeding Irom wound in neck. Mc-
Dougall and Mrs. Thomet then
rushed in.
To Jury—Thomet wus partly
covered by bar. Think Thomet Bred
another shot, but it bad no effect, as
the men hud gone. After the two
shots fired by masked men Thomet
crouched down behind the bar where
he was standing, and, 1 belicvc.tircd
a shot from that position. Then he
backed into the dining room door,
crouching down. The shot in dining
room wns fired before I left wall.
Deceased did not sjicak after masked
men appeared, Deceased did not
speak to men nnd men did not speak
a telegram wus despatched to Sir Wil-
...prove-! frill expressing every confidence in his I £"yV      ])()   ^   knQw jf  ]mHM
.,   ,    f. „ ,.       'J"0,.10 tho «ln"n'»tr..tio.i   a'"1  "ivmng   ".'"  t(>i men went round to  front  part   and
city by the cancellation  of   licenses . come to  V ancouver.    Sir Wilfrid in , ghot inl() (lini m_ ]J(,'not know
decreased water and light rates and his letter to the association thanked | who maske|, n)en Wwe „()lh nbuul
taxation would amount to,.bou 85000 the members for the invitation, and Lflme 8,ze Seemwl we„.9izell mcn
a year. He was in favor of a loWmg snid lhat it was Ins intention to visitk, d.,rk clothei(. Eye-holes in line
all   the   licensees   who wanted to re-  British Columbia in the autumn, and I an(,       J ffe„ jn H|]c;  Deceaaed had
build to do so.
Aid. Miller wa»
he   would   do so if  his arrangements
also in   favor   of  were not interfered with.
(Continued on Paije, Tuo.)'^, HAVE YOU
HEARD
That we are selling
all our
Crockery
AT
COST
Come in and  see  if there isn't
something you want.
John Donaldson
Phone A30
Columbia Avenue
ulijp Btntituj i$im
Published at Grniul Forks, British Columbia
G. A. EVAHB Editor nnd Publisher
A lllp nf this paper oan be Been at the office
of Messrs. B, & J. Hardy A Co., 80,81 and 82,
Fleet Street, K.C., Loudon. Buffliind, free of
charge, und that firm will be irhul to receive
subscriptions and advertl.entente oil our behalf.
8UH8CHIFTION BATES :
One Year ... $1.50
One Year (tu advance)  1.00
Advertising rates furnished on ipii
Legal notices, 10 and 5 cents per line.
Address all communications to
Thb Evening Sun,
Phonb 0 74 Grand Fohks, B.C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 1908
OOMB people appear to have gained
^ the impression that nothing can
grown in the Kettle Valley without irrigation. This' is entirely erroneous. There is a sufficient rainfall hei e
to successfully grow all kinds of farm
produce uud vegetables, and nearly ul
varieties of fruit. About the only
variety that does not seem to thrive
well here without irrigation is prunes,
which require the whole season for
maturing, A few days ago The Sun
mnn made a circuit of the fruit
ranches across the river, near Cooper
Bros', place, which is generally conceded the dryest locality in the valley, and found the winter apple trees
loaded with a splendid quality of fruit,
notwithstanding the fact that tins'
has been the dryest season ever experienced here. Some of the ranchers stated that they have raised three
or four successive fruit crops of a good
quaility and yield without artificial
watering,and that last year the natural
rainfall was heavy enough to even ma
ture an average crop of prunes. The
fact that we are being advertised as
living in the arid belt is due largely to
the enterprising real estate agents of
other localities who have inferior lands
to dispose of The impression should
be checked before it travels too far.
The new hotel in tho West end recently opened to the public.
P. BURNS <& CO.
LIMITED.
trip to Scotland. Miss Nellie Henderson is acting as her substitute until she returns.
(F
BREVITIES
rPIIK prediction of a general elec-
\ tion within a month or two is
now being generally made by
the Conservative press of the country, and it is therefore reasonably
certain to assert that that event will
eventuate within the next four years.
PERSONAL
W, II. Dookstooder, provincial police ut I'hoenix, whs in tho city on
Tuesday.
Fred Starkey, the Nelson politician
and merchant, was a visitor in the
last Saturday.
Dan McKinnon, bookkeeper for
Jeff Davis ia Co., returned home on
Monday from an extended eastern
trip.
Mrs. David Whiteside and ckngh-j
ter have returned home from au extended vacation trip with friends at
the coast.
J. W, Rutherford left on Monday
for Fort Elgin, Out., where his family
have been visiting during the past
two months.    They will return home
with bim.
Nearly all the public school tench
ers returned to the city on Saturday.
Misses Olding and Dalby arrived from
Vancouver, and Miss Bruce from her
home near Calgary. Miss Inglis has
not   yet   returned  from her vacation
The three-year-old son of Mr. and
Mrs. Peter B, Nelson, of the West
end, is critically ill.
The 6ontract to repair the Baptist
church, recently damaged by fire,has
been awarded to Dave Shannon.
Died—In Grand Forks, on Saturday, August 22, Laurine, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Morrell, aged
13 months. The funeral was held
on Monday from the family residence.
Rev. D. E. Hatt, general missionary for Baptist missions in British
Columbia, will be in Grand Forks
Sunday, August 30th, and will conduct services in the Presbyterian
church: Morning, 11 a.m.; evening,
7:30 p.in.
Died—In Grand Forks, on Wednesday, August 2G, Jasper, eight
months' old son of Mr. and Mrs.
Marry Jackson, of Wallace, Idaho.
The remains will be shipped to
Wal|ace tomorrow for burial.
Pribilsky's new barber shop has
been fitted up in lavish style, and he
is now prepared to serve his customers in his customary efficient manner. First-class bath rooms have
recently been added to the shop.
Died—In Grand Forks, on Monday, August 24, C. N. Chatham, sou
of Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Chatham, aged
two years and one month. The funeral took place from the family residence oil Tuesday, the 24th inst.
The No. 3 fire department Jius up
pointed E. C. Heniiinger captain, to
fill the vacancy caused by the recent
resignation of I. A. Dinsmore, and
Frank Miller assistant captain. Mr.
Dinsmore has been elected an honorary member of the biigade in appreciation of his services as captain ever
since the organization of the department.
William D. Jones, who received
serious injuries to his spinal column
in an accident at the Granby smelter
a couple of months ago, died at the
Grand Forks hospital at 9 o'clock last
Friday morning. The funeral was
held at 3 o'clook Saturday afternoon
from Holy Trinity church, llev.Hetiry
Steele conducting the service. Deceased was about twenty-eight years
of age, unmarried, and a native of
London, England.
The man arrested in Spokane a
couple of weeks ugo for smuggling 170
pounds of opium across the line at
this point, has been taken to Port
laud, where he was badly wanted for
having jumped a S100U bail. The
arrest appears to have been uu important one, the smuggler being an
old offender against the law. It is
understood that Chief Savage will receive a portion of the reward money
for furnishing the American ollicers
with valuable information.
Joseph L.  Manly on  Monday lust
brought Into the city a do/en boxes of
very   fine peaches grown on   his   fruit
ranch  on  the  Covert  estate.      The
peaches were of extraordinary size and
excellent  flavor,    Mr.   Manly states
that this is the fourth successive crop I
he bus grown since he  purchased  the i
ranch, uud that the fruit has brought I
him in 8IU per tree per year.    All of
which would tend to show that peach j
raising in this valley is   not quite   us!
hazardous an  undertaking   as   some
people imagine.
enuine
AG
Bargain
J. Hammar offers
his House and Lots
on Fourth Street for
sale for
$3,500
Terms to Suit.
^
Dealers in all Kinds tf
FRESH AND
CURED MEATS
Pish and Game in Season
FIRST ST.,  GRAND FORKS, B. C
third and fourth ribs, and the other
on left side through the neck just
above the collar bone. The latter
was the cause of death.
A number of the town residents
were on the spot a few minutes after
the shooting, Will Melville being the
first. He saw the bandits as they
made their escape. They have been
traced four miles up Rock creek by
the blood stains of the .wounded
man. About four miles up the
creek qu te a puddle of blood was
found, from which it is inferred that
the man is badly wounded.
Chief Davitt, of Nelson, passed
through the eity on Wednesday for
Midway with one of his bloodhounds, and the capture of the outlaws is regarded as merely a question of a few days.
The crime, following on so many
other of a similar character in Midway of recent date, has cast a gloom
over the town. The deceased, Chas.
Thomet. wns very popular in Midway. He was about 47 years of
age, and leaves a widow and five
children, the oldest of whom is only
10 years of age. Thomet was formerly actng provincial police of Midway, and has always been regarded
>as a man of more than ordinary
bravery.
KODAKS
A Kodak is always a pleasure. With all the
modern improvements any one can readily
learn to use one. We do development work
and printing if you do not care to do it
yourself.
Brownie Kodaks, $2 and $3
Folding Kodaks, $12 to $20
For Sale by
H.   E.  WOODLAND, Druggist
Good paying business for sale,
quire at Sun otlice.
In-
For Rent—Furnished or unfurnished modern house of eight rooms.
E. G. Dahl, Phone B91.
ORE SHIPMENTS
1908.
Gr nby Mine;  072,374
Snowsuoe         357
Motner LuUe  108,559
Oro Denoro    36.308
Urouklyn-Sieti'winder     5,020
Rawhide -..   10,520
Sunset      8,802
Mountain Rose        490
AJielstan  120
S liy  80
Cr.Bceni....  50
Totals 828.310
Sunlter rtutm nl—
G,..uliy io 048.750
li. C Copper Ci 140,293
Oominiuti - oppei- Co... £2.000
Total rulucid 817,715
Past
Week
15.709
9,374
3,520
500
1,290
303
14U
28,003
14.130
13,018
17.740
SHOT BY BANDITS
(Concluded from Page One)
gun in bis hand when I passed him
going into dining room.
Dr. J. E. Spunkie examined the
body and found two bullet wounds
on it, one on the riglit side between
Mining Stock Quotations
New Yoiik, Amuit 20.—The following
. re todii''s opening quotation! fur to
sIocIkb mentioned:
Asked- Bid
Granby Consolidated, 110.00 100.00
H.C. topper      7.50 7.12^
Dominion Cupper      2.50 2.25
Metal Quotations
Nl«r Youk, Auuunt. 20 —.Silver, 51)4
electrolytic coppor, lV;^(ajS^l%
London. August 20.— iivor, 23 1116;
|e»d. .£13 6 31.
SHOPJTALK
We have*a large supply of all kinds
of visiting cards in stock, and the
most fashionable styles of type to
print tliem with.  The Sun Job Office.
Show cards for widnows and inside
are a fine form of silent salesmen.
Make them brief, terse and pointed.
Print them plainly, to be read at a
glance.
A new lot of latest designs of program and menu cards just received at
The Son job office.
The Sun and the Toronto Weekly
Globe for 81 per year.
The Sun is read by everybody because it prints all the Boundary news.
Before closing your contract for
reading matter for the coming year,
read the tempting clubbing offer we
make on the third page.
Local advertisers should make a
note of tbe fact that The Sun is the
most   widely
Forks.
read   paper   in
Grand
J.B. HENDERSON
Builder 8 Architect
Plans, Estimates, Specifications, ttc, at Reasonable
Rates.
Price Lists of Building Material on Hand.
OFFICE AND RBSIDENGBi
Winnipeg    Avenue
PHONE   18
Pnrlle! Intending to build wid il" well lo con-
still mo
LARK MINERAL CLAIM
Sltuiilo I" H" Orani Port" Ml"'"* MvHlon
\vi,teJ"i"™ted!"till Wellington eamp,south
„f and adJollil.iB the   Word   Mineral
TlUKNOTlOB that Ij R. *• Henderson, aot-
£?« mrt or 0. V. RaiilHtoii, free
il&er'i Ceil liento No. BITOT, Intend, sixty
del, from tie d«te hereof, to apply to the
En: i... Keeorder (or a Certificate of Im-
f eliienf.'-nir 'hi"urpoM, of obtal.il.i* a
fcrnwn Grant of the aboveclaim.
iffi further take notice that act on, under
motion n, must he commenced before the
Issuance of such Certllleate of  Improve-
"Sited this 15th day of A ugust, A.D. IMS.
R. A. HENDERSON.
Collection Agency
I purpose opening an office for
the collection of accounts, adjusting of books of existing
business, and also made up
preparatory to final administration of estates.
Leases and Contracts Drawn Up
Sale* of Property Negotiated
Rents Collected
Correspondence attended to immediately Financial returns
promptly made and guaranteed
S. T. HALL, J.P.
Office
C.P. Telegraph Compsny Bridge Street
BICYCLES
AND MOTOCYCLES
High grade Bicycles. A complete line of accessories. Come
in and see the 1908 models.
Wheel repairing.
GEO. CHAPPLE
FIRST STREET, BACK OF MUNRO'S STORE
■ THE WONDER
FOB
Ladles' and Children's Hosiery
The Leaders In Corsets ffiu,SUf •
styles and prices.
Hand-Embroidered Waist Drawn Work
Cushions and Braid Centers
Next to Mclnnes', Bridge Btcet.
cTWRS. IDA L. BARNUM
R. A. HENDERSON, CE. 8 M.E.
B. G. Land Surveyor
Grand Forks, B. G.
P.O.Box 811
I'll mil. Mi
Certitlcafe ot Improvements
f'nlnmMn,  Boiiftn Vlfctn und Helene Minora)
I'liiim-. sitimte In tln> timed Korku  Mining i'i-
vliionol Vale DUtrlot.
Whore Locatedt Partly on District Lot 2780
antl on .Mountain South ol Coryell Puns,
TAKE NOTIOE tliat I, Win, K. Caporn, Free
Miners' Certificate No. BS826* intend, sixty
days from dme hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder font CViiiiiriiit'iii Improvements, for
the purpose of obtaining crown grants of tho
above'olaims.
And further tnke notice thnt action, under
section 87, must be commenced hefore the issn-
mice of such Certificate of Improvements.
Duted nt Orand Korks, B.C., this 2!)rd dny of
May, A, D. 1008.
WM. E. CAPORN.
TRY   THE   NEW
Province Restaurant and Lunch Counter
™R MEALS AT ALvL HOURS
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT RIVERSIDE AVENUE
Downey's Cigar Store
A Complete Stock of
Cigars, Pipes and Tobaccos
A Fresh Consignment of
Confectionery
Received Weekly.
Postoffice   Building
i i GHUECH SERVICES
Knox Presbyterian Church—
Sabbath services at 11 a. ra. and V :30 p.
m.; Sabbath school aDd Bible class at
9:45 a. m.; Young People's Society of
Christian Endeavor, Monday, 7:30 p.
m. Mid-week prayer meeting, Wednesday at 8 p.m. All are cordially
invited; seats free.
Methodist Church, Rev. Schlich-
ter.—Services next Sunday at 11
a. m. and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday school
and Bible class at 9:45 a.m. All
are welcome.
Baptist Church, Rev. F. W. Auvache, pastor.—Services on Sunday
at 11 a. ni. and 7:30 p. m.; Sunday
school and Bible clans at 3 p.m.
Three bottles of cold  Nelson
50c.   Lion Uottling Works.
Beer,
For Sale Cheap, or Trade—Business lot on Winnipeg avenue near
•The  Sun office.    Enquire of Lew
Johnson.
Bicycles and Repair Work—A
complete line of 1908 models. A few
second-hand wheels cheap. Wheels
to rent. Geo. Chappi-e, opposite
Postoffice, First street.
When remitting money get an express order. Cash on demand of
payee. To all parts. „ S. T. HaH,
branch agent Dominion   Express  Co.
You might as well try to reach
the orb of day by walking on a sun
beam as to attempt to rpach The Sun
readers  by advertising in any other
medium.
We are still offering The Sun and
the Toronto Weekily Globe and Canada Farmer for $1 per year in advance. The illustrated supplement
that accompanies the Globs is worth
twice the money we ask for the two
papers.
We have some of the highest grade
paper   and  stationery  for up-to-date
commercial printing every brought to
' the Bounaary.   bun Job Office.
|	
The. Sun and the Toronto Weekly
• Globe for $1.00 per year.
BREVITIES
Work was started last Monday on
the new conyerter building at the
Granby smelter.
A conservative estimate places the
fruit yield on the Cevert estate this
year at twenty-five carloads.
George, the three-year-old son of
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Evans, who live
twelve miles north of this city on the
North Fork, is dangerously ill.
George Clark, formerly high school
teacher in this city, has made application for the position of principal of
the new high school at Ladysmith, on
Vancouver island.
Mr. Folger, who formerly conducted the Royal rooming house, which
was destroyed bv the recent fire, ha>
purohased the Pateman house and two
lots.   Consideration, 81000.
It is stuted that eight carloads of
fruit will be shipped from the Kettle
Valley this full tn Australia. This
will be the first fruit shipment from
the valley to the antipodes.
Thomas Mclntyre, the hardware
merchant, has purchased a plot of
fruit land in W. J. Brown's subdivision east ofthe city, and has been
camping for a week or so on his newly
acquired property.
A carload of Duchess apples was
shipped from this city direct to Winnipeg last week. Another carload is
being made up by the growers of the
valley this week for shipment to the
same destination.
W. B. Bishop, chief assayer at the
Granby smelter, has purchased a tract
of land in W. J. Brown's subdivision
a few miles east of the city, and in
future will endeavor to compete with
the Sun ranch in the fruit growing
industry.
The dining room of Mr. Al. Taaun-
weiser's new hotel was opened for
business at noon on Tuesday. In
point of furnishings, the new house
surpasses the old Yale. The only
thing lacking to make it superior to
the latter is more room, and we understand this will be forthcoming in
the near future.
|T PAYS TO DEAL AT THE
NEW DRUG STORE
For instance, we sell
cyiPENTA WALTER,
large size
HUNYADI WATER,
large size,
zAt
60
c each!.
Other things too numerous to mention at the
same ratio.
Rutherford SMann
C. R.B. Newton, Mgr.
Phone 35    P. O. Box 315
thwfe qo©o q*&£
GRAND FORKS,  %
m     M$<
PRESS       .  /   m HERALD
A'"I      ^WM and
P»,irls     >   '      VI-'.' WEEKLY
Farm-      \.1}K-.'\L STAR
J'ij: $ .Montroal
RANDOM REMARKS
Agents Wanted—16x20 crayon
portraits 40 cents, frames 10 cents
and up, sheet pictures one cent each.
You can make 400% profit or $36 per
week. Catalogue and samples free.
Frank W. Williams Co., 1208 W.
Taylor St., Chicago, 111.
THE
COPPERj
HANDBOOK
(New Edition Issued Nov. 15, 1906.)
Is a dozen books in one, covering  the
history, geography,  geology,  chemistry,  mineralogy, metallurgy, terminology, uses, statistics and  finances of
I copper.    If. is a pracieal book, useful
I to all anil necessary to most men en-
i gaged  in   any branch  of the copper
[industry.
Its facts will pass muster with the
| trained scientists, and its language is
I easily understood by the everyday
(man. It gives the plain facts in plain
|English without fear or favor.
It lists and describes 4686 copper
Imiiies and companies in all parts nf
■tlio world, descriptions running from
Two lines to sixteen pages, according
■to importance of the property.
The Copper Handbook is conceded
t be the
World's Standard Deference
Book on Copper
The mining man needs the bunk for
Ihe fuels it gives him   about   mines,
liining and the metal.
j The investor needs the book for the
jicts it gives him about  milling, niin-
|ig investments and copper  statistics.
Ttundreds of swindling companies are
kposed in plain English.
) Price is $5 in Buckram   with  gilt
; $7.50 in  full   library   morocco.
|rill   be   sent, fully prepaid, on ap-
oval, to any address ordered,  and
liy be returned within a week of  ro-
lipt if not found fully satisfactory.
lorace J. Stevens,
Editor and Publisher,
453 Postoffice Blook,
Houghton, Michigan.
Parties in from the chase the first of
the week brought the news that Phillips, the one-armed halfbreed outlaw,
had given himself up. Becoming tired
of the chase, Phillips went to the
Omak mission and surrendered himself to Father DeRouge, the priest in
charge there. It is said that lie claims
to have witnesses to prove that Sei-
bert, the man he killed, fired several
shots before he began shooting, ami
will put in a plea of self-defense. The
account so far received is very slim,
and many refuse to believe the self-
defense story, claiming that if such
had been the case Phillips would not
have made the hard efforts to get
away. Whether Father DeRouge will
claim the reward has not been stated,
though it is said that Phillips surrendered to him with the idea that
the money would go to the church.-—
Oroville Gazette.
S2.00
THE  THREE
FOR
Regular Price S3.00
52.00
Nanbg Mothers ufld
Over-burdcni tl Women
In all stations of life, whos i vigor and
vitality may have been undermined and
broken-down by over-work, exacting
soolal duties, thc too 1'roqucnS bearing of
children, or other causes, will lind In Dr.
Pierce's Favorite Prescription tho most
potent, invigorating restorative strength-
giver ever devised for their special benefit. Nurslngjmothersi wlKJInil it especially valuable IK sustaining >hclr strength
andpromoting\n a-teiidantlNurlslinient
for the child. ^.viiVctantMpthers too
will find it a prlculcssHiu^ii'tirplsMKe tho
system for baby's coming and rSiiiidng
*lie ordeal comparatively painless/^Jl
Cftnjlipnfl Im "ii i» n"y stole, "r condition
fUlie forpaio system. -
Dclicuui, nervous, weak women, who
suffer from frequent headaches, backache, dragglng-down distress low down
Sun abdomen, or from painful or Irreg-
nr monthly periods, gnawing or distressed sensation In stomach, dl/.zy or
faint sjiells, seo Imaginary specks or spots
floating Imforo eyes, havo disagreeable,
pelvic catarrhal drain, prolapsus, iiiiie-
monts of womanl
of parts wl
version or retro-version or othor displace-
ly organs from weakness
nether thoy experience
many or only' a fow of the above symp-
"  '   'flof and a nor
y nnd  lull
. rarlte Proserin!
This world-famed specific for woman's
toms, find relief and a permanent cure by
using faithfully and fairly porsls'    "'
Dr. 1'Iorco's Favorite Proscription.
weaknesses and peculiar ailments is a
pure glyceric oxtraet of the choicest no-
tive. medicinal roots without a drop of
alcohol In its make-up. All Its ingredients printed in plain Knglish on its bottle-
wrapper and attested under oath. Dr.
Pierce thus Invites tho fullest investigation of his formula knowing that it will
bo found to contain only the best agents
known to tho most advanced medical
science of all thc different schools of practice for the cure of woman's peculiar
weaknesses and ailments. *
If you want to know moro about the
composition and professional endorsement of tlio "Favorite Prescription," send
postal card request' to Dr. B, V. Plorco,
lliili'tiln. N. Y., for his free booklet treating of same.
Vou can't afford to accept as a substitute for this remedy of hiownatmponittin,
a i,ocret nostrum of - tiiknovm oompom*
ttcn.   Don't do It.
Even a rich girl may make a poor
wife.
Follow fashion and pay heavy tribute to folly.
A foo] will play upon a harp that a
wise man cannot tune.
Being too wise is as disastrous as an
overdose of morphine.
If you want to keep your friends do
not "work" them often.
The courage of many a man lies
wholly in his.bank account.
Curb your temper yourself, but
don't allow any one to rowel it.
When the government starts out to
bust a trust we try to trust the bust.
We will never fully know life's les
son until we have finished life's journey.
Predatory wealth has a terrible
sound—when one is on the opposite
side.
So many queer things now happen
every day that people have lost faith
in miracles.
Some people envy the man who pays
his bills promptly, and some consider
him foolish.
Don't smoke better cigars than her
father if you want to strengthen j'our
position with him.
It doesn't matter if a father does
know less than his son, just so he is
able to support him.
The ducking stool is a safe means
of preventing that catchy disease
called tongue-wagging.
Everybody likes peaches, but you
have to learn the true worth of prunes
before you care for them.
The kiss one woman bestows on another is almost as meaningless as the
handshake of a hotel clerk.
It would save much guessing and
straining if the psychological moment
would always wear its label.
Mammon and Cupid ' don't work
amiably together because each is accustomed to being the whole show.
Some girls find the most distressing
thing about a broken enagement to be
tiie giving back the diamond ring.
Chronic debt breeds servility and
deception. Freedom from debt begets a
manly independence and   self-respect.
When a young man is trying to
qualify for the matrimonial race he
hates to have a millionaire pacemaker
This talk about "tainted money" is
due largely to the fact that little of it
is coining in the way of the grumblers.
When a woman gets up iu the
forties and begins to make a collection
of pink chins, she should cease to wear
frivolous hats,
A knocker is one who hates himself
ami sees no good in anybody or anything. He is better in the hands of
tlio undertaker.
Poverty is accounted a blessing by
some proverb makers, but most of us
find or imagine it is one that wc could
be happy without.
The eyes of a man looking for a
wife rest longer on the girl who can
manufacture a pie than on one whose
long is piano thumping.
A man trying to give an imitation
of a woman doing her housework may
be amusing, but it is exceedingly tu
tile, however well meant his endeavors.
Jn Otter Which Meets the Special Wants of All Classes of Readers
The Western Canadian reading public is made up chiefly of these classes
Persons who have lived in the West for a lengthy period and are out and out
Westerners, and recent arrivals from the Old Country, from the United
States and from Eastern Canada.
Perhaps no one newspaper could cater with complete satisfaction to all these
classes, but by this combination offer every special need is met
The Weekly Free Press and Prairie Farmer gives a complete record week
by week of all happenings in the Western Provinces. In addition it has spec.nl
departments for American and British settlers. The Family Herald and
Weekly Star supplies the former resident of Eastern Canada with news of the
Eastern portion ofthe Dominion in detail, and the Grand Forks Sun provides
the local and Boundary news, which you cannot do without.
.100 ,
GRAND  FORKS   SUNi
Find enclosed $2.00, for which send nie Weekly Free Press and Prairie
Farmer, Winnipeg; Family Herald and Weekly Star, Montreat; and the Grand
Forks Sun, for one year each.
R.L. MILES
SECOND-HAND STORE
FIRST ST., OPP. CITY HALL
PICTURES
AND PICTURE HUMS
Furniture Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds.
Upholstering Neatly Done.
r. McCutcheon
FIRST STREET, NEAR CITY HALL
H. A. SHEADS
CITY REAL ESTATE AND
FRUIT LANDS
iiKST nut—
London Mutual Fire rpauranceCo,
Montreal and Cnnndn>
A ngld* American,
Equity,
Ami other substantial conipnnlci
BRIDGE STREET, GRRND FORKS, B, C.
Cnrpi'tn Cleaned and Laid.
Furniture Repaired, f.'phol-
stered and Cleaned, uud
other jobs In the hoiise-
oleanfiifrJliie. Rubber Tires
for Baby Carr laces.
Second Hand Goods
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NEW YORK
CLIPPER
IB THE BREATE8T
THEATRICAL I SHOW PAPER
IN THE WORLD.
$4.00 Per Year.   Single Copy, 10 CIs.
ISSUBn WEEKLY.
Sample Copy Free.
FRANK QUEEN PUB. CO. (Ltd),
PUBLISHERS,
47 tt'. 2stu sr., New Tout
SNpEimtfwj&iat
Prints more live Boundary news than
any other paper published in Hm
district. The price of The Son is
only * 1.00 |ier year—one-half the cost
of its competitors. Tin: Six is never
on the fence regarding questions of
public interest. The Son i.s acknowledged to he one of the brightest
papers published in the interior of
the province. Those who subscribe
and feel dissatisfied, will have their
money refunded by calling at the office
of publication.
The Evening Son and the Toronto
Weekly Globe nnd Canada Farmer,
81.00 per year in advance.
The Evening Son, The Winnipeg
Weekly Free Press and Prairie Fanner anil the Montreal Family Herald
and Weekly Star, 8-.00 per year in
advance.
PROVINCE
HOTEL
EMIL LARSEN, PROPRIETOR
Mnl and Cold Baths. Nicely Furnhdied
Stove-Heated  Booms.    [Entirely re-
furnished mul renovated throughout.
inrst.clnH  boord by dny, week or
mouth. Special ruin* tn Steady hourd*
er- American and European plant*.
Finest i in i' In < ity In Connection.
RIVERSIDE AVE.     GRAND FORKS, 6. C.
COLUMBIAN   COLLEGE
NEW WESTMINSTER,    B. C.
Receive both Ladlei and Gentlemen nn resident or day ■tudenttt has a complete Com*
nicreiiil or Business Course! prepares itu-
dontfitci irnin    Teachers'  Certificate! «f all
grades*; adves the four years' oourie for tho
. A. decree, nnd the iirttt year ofthe School
of Science oours**, In affiliation with the To-
rontoUniversity; hni a special prospectors.
course for miners who work in B.C. untrue-
Hon is also given In Art, Music, Physical Gull
ture  and Elocution.   Term
1900,   For Calendars, etc., address
* COLUMBIAN COLLEGE. SALE OF LAND
For Unpaid Delinquent Taxes in the Municipality of the
Oity of Grand Forks, Province of British Columbia
I HEREBY give notice that, in pursuance of the provisions of the
"Municipal Clauses Act," and of a resolution of the Municipal Council oi
the Corporation of the City of Grand Forks, passed on the 3rd day of
August, A. D. 1908, I will, on Monday, the 14th day of September, A. D.
1908, at tho hour of 12 o'clock noon, at the City Hall, First Street, Grand
Forks, B. C, sell at Public Auction the lands, improvements and real
property, situate within tne Municipality of the City of Grand Forks, nnd
hereinafter set forth, for delinquent taxes, which became delinquent on
the olst day of December, A.D. 1907, and remaining unpaid and payable
to the Corporation of the City of Grand Forks by the persons or assessed
owners hereinafter respectively set forth; and for interest, costs, charges
<md commissions, if the total amount due is not sooner paid, for the purpose of levying such delinquent tuxes, and interest, costs, charges and
commissions'.
Assessed Owner.    Plan. Block.
Askew, Walter  22 9
Blakeway & Urlin   52 18
do             B2 18
Beer.Mrs.E. L. (j int.) 35 10
Punlop,Mrs.J.K.(Jint.) 35 10
Carter, Wm. and Anne 91
Cameron, M   52 17
Cusson,Chas.and Philipl22 2
do                        07 8
do                        67 8
Coughlin.Mis. C  72 34
Flournoy, J. J  23 1
Fee.Mrs.J  35 13
Fee, Mrs. J  35 13
Gill, Grace  23 24
Goodeve, Harry  23 9
Henderson, Mary  72 34
Henderson, Mary R.... 72 34
Henderson, Olive  72 34
Hayward, G.J  23 H
Henbeck, John  33 23
Jewell, Albert  23 8
Kirem, Sing  35 19
Jim Yuen  23 1
Lane, Fred  52 4
Lund, A. C  35 5
Lewis, Jefferson  35 8
Morrison, W. J  23 11
Muir, Estate of J. A  86 47
McNee & Knight  22 3
McNee, Win  23 8
Prest, T 123 "B"
do        123 "B"
do        123 "B"
Jo        123 "D"
do        123 "D"
do        123 "D"
do        123 "D"
do 123 "F"
do 123 "F"
do         123 "F"
do        123 "F"
Sullivan, J. J  22 11
do         22 11
do         22 11
Spinks, W. W  22 2
Sutton,  A. C. (Administrator) '72 43
Traunweiser, Susan  23 2
Trotter, R. W  67 1
Wright, Rev. P  35 14
do         35 18
Grand Forks TownsiteCo 86 18
do             86 18
do                23 19
do             23 19
do             23 19
do             86 25
do             80 25
do            8fi 25
do             86 25
do             86 25
do             86 25
do               86 25
do              86 25
do              86 25
do              86 25
do             86 25
do               86 25
do            121 29
do            121 29
do            121 29
do             121 29
do            121 29
do            121 29
do             121 2!l
do             121 29
do             121 29
do             121 2'.)
do             121 2!)
do             121 • 29
do             121 29
do             121 . 29
do              121 29
do             121 29
do             121 29
do             121 29
do             121 31
do            121 31
do            121 31
do            121 31
do             "2 30
do             72 30
do             72 30
do              72 33
do             72 34
do              72 34
do             72 34
do             72 34
Lot.
pt.
pt.
Amount of Delinquent Taxes
and Interest to
Day of Sale.
14-151
16-17
hoi 5
6
6-7-8
6-7-8
•'A"
11
5
19
20
3
6
3
12
13
1
5
19
11
8
5
21
5
pt. 7
19
10
3
43
44
45
33
34
35
36
25
26
27
28
1
2
3
14
12
2
7
6
6
9
10
12
24
23
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
2:1
24
25
26
9
10
11
12
40
41
42
All
7
8
9
10
81.15
1.70
17.70
7.65
7.65
5.70
2.25
13.50
.90
.90
3.40
5.70
11.40
2.85
34.50
20.40
3.40
1.15
1.15
9.10
29.20
31.75
2.25
11.35
5.70
10.50
17.20
20.75
3.40
1.70
1020
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.25
.25
.25
.25
2.25
2.20
2.20
8.50
4.55
6.80
11.35
3,40
2.25
1.15
1.15
2.25
3.40
3.40
2.25
2.25
1.70
1.70
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.26
2.25
2.25
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
3.40
3.40
3.40
11.30
3.40
3.40
2.25
2.25
Costs and
Expenses Total
82.05
2.10
2.85
2.35
2.35
2.25
2.10
2.65
2.05
2.05
2.15
2.25
2.55
2,10
3.70
3.00
2.15
2.05
2.05
2.45
3.45
3.50
2.10
2.55
2.25
2.50
2.85
3.00
2.15
2.05
2.50
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.D5
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.40
2.20
2.35
2.55
2.15
2.10
2.05
i 2.05
2.10
2.15
2.15
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10 .
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2 05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2 05
2.05
2.05
2.15
2.15
2.15
2.55
2.15
2.15
2.10
2.10
83.20
3.80
20.55
10.00
10.00
7.95
4.35
16.15
2.95
2/95
5.55
7.95
13.95
4.95
38.20
23.40
5.55
3.20
3.20
11.55
32.65
35.25
4.35
13.90
7.95
13.00
20.05
23.75
5 55
3.75
12 70
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.30
2.30
2.30
2.30
4.35
4.30
4.30
10.90
6.75
9.15
13.90
5.55
4.35
3.20
3.20
4.35
5.55
5.56
4.35
4.35
3.80
3 80
4.35
4.35
4.35
4.35
4.35
4.35
4.35
4.36
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
320
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
5.55
5.55
5.55
13.85
5.55
5.55
4.35
4.35
Assessed Owner.    Plan. Block.
Grand Forks TownsiteCo 72      34
35
Amount of Delinquent Taxes
and Interest to
Lot. Day of Sale.
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
da
do
do
do
do
do
d.
72
72
72
72
72
72
72
72
72
72
11
22
23
24
25
2G
27
28
29
22
5
72
36
24
72
30
25
72
36
20
72
:«;
27
72
:«i
38
72
30
20
72
38
24
72
lis
86
72
38
26
72"
38
27
72
38
28
72
38
2!)
72
40
17
72
40
18
72
46
19
72
46
20
72
40
21
. 72
72
46
46
40
23
24
12.25
1.70
1.70
1.70
170
1,70
1.70
1.70
1.70
1.70
1.70
1.70 .
I.7O
1.70
1.70
1.70
1.70
2.25
2.25
2.25
340
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
:i40
3.40
3.40
Costs and
Expenses.
82.10
2.10
2.10
210
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
210
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
210
2.10
2.10
2 10
210
2.10
2.10
210
215
215
215
2.15
2.15
2.15
2.15 .
2.15
Total
84.35
3.80
380
3 80
3.80
3 80
3.
3.80
3 80
380
3 00
380
3.80
3.80
3.80
3 80
3'80
4.35
4.35
4.35
4.35
4.35
4 35
5 55
5.55
5.55
555
5.55
5.55
5.55
Dated this Sth day of August, A. D. 1908.
J. A.
McCALLUM,
Collector of Taxes,
Municipality of the City of Grand Forks.
PRINTING
We are prepared to do all kinda of
Commercial  Printing
On the shortest notice and in the
most up-to-date style
BECAUSE
We have the most modern jobbing plant
in tbe Boundary Country, employ competent workmen, and carry a complete
line of Stationery.
•S0
WE PRINT
Billheads and Statements,
Letterheads and Envelopes,
Posters, Dates and Dodgers,
Business and Visiting Cards,
Lodge Constitutions and By-law*,
Shipping Tags, Circulars and Placards,
Bills of Fare and Menu Cards,
Announcements and Counter Pads,
Wedding Stationery,
And everything turned out in an
Up-to-date Printery,
GOOD PRINTING
-the kind we do—is in itself an
advertisement, and a trial order
will convince you tbat our stock and workmanship are of
the best. Let us estimate on your order. We guarantee
satisfaction.
•it*
Grand Forks Sun
Job Department
Pacific Hotel
0PF. C.P.R. STATION
Flrut-clnss iti every respeot.
Sample rooms for commer-
ciul travelers.
Hot ami Culil Maths.
Bar lit Connection.
Finest DramlHof Wines,
Liquor* and Uigurs.
CHAS. PETERSON, Prop
tm^/mnT"'. W+-VM
' TOMI
tab^'"^'
Y**f(MW*'''ie***l
H^^W^^:-.M
'•'Ci iWi
■iiMm
\     1
mm
1
BOUNDARY DIVIDENDS.
Name 6* Coup* HV.
Ornnby Consolidated— Copper,
Cariboo McKinney—Gold..	
Providence- Silver	
H.C. Copiier-Copper	
 dividsnds ■ .
Total to    Lnteit      Per
Date.      Date.   Share
Authorized .--shares-^ Paid
Capitol.   Issued. Par. 19(111.
. |15,(KKI,III1U     133,000  $100 SI.IHO.OOO (2,963,090 Sept. 1907  13.00
..     1,250.000   1,250,000     |1     BIIWSTlB'eb. 1904      .00
200 000      31000     $5 16.000 38.221 Sept. 1906     .00
„    8,000,01X1   303.000     |9           201,200 |Sept. 1901     .01
FRUIT
ORNAMENTAL
AND SHRUBS
TREES
For Homes Orchards and
ltesidence Grounds.
Ouit Motto: ,
SUPERIOR HIGH-GRADE NURSERY STOCK
Not tbe cheapest in price
but the best in quality.
Burbank's New Stoneless
MIRACLE PLUM
Gapital city Nursery Company
SALEM, OREGON
•
W. C. CHALMERS
Always Carries in Stock
a Fresh Supply of
FRUITS, CANDIES, TOBACCOS
AND CIGARS
Ice G:
id Su
ream  and summer
Drinks
COR. BRIDGE AND FIRST STREETS
Palace Barber Shop
Kazor Honing a Specialty.
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
1st Door North of Giianuv Hotel,
First Street.
Foo Lee
Laundry
FINE LAUNDERING.
COLLARS,   CUFFS    AND
SHIRTS WASHED CLEAN AND
NICE  AND IRONED BY
MACHINERY,    NEW
MEN EMPLOYED.
NEXT CHINESE STORE
RIVERSIDE AVENUE.
Tale Tranter Go.
Light and Heavy Transferring to and from the depots.
A. Mackintosh
Oflice:   Windsor Hotel. Phone A6S
DRAYING
Heavy and Light Dray Work
Attended to Promptly.    Passengers and Trunks  to and       *
from all trains.
TelephoneAl29
GRAND FORKS TRANSFER COMPANY]
HuTiiEitFoiin Bros., Props.
60  YEARS'
Marks   _
Designs       I
CopvriqhtsAc.
Anrone undine.» rtetob nd dMcrlptlon n»;
qnloklr eiceruln our opinion freewlieU	
noneitrurtlTconndentuu^tN
Hut (roe. OlaeK Minor to w
Patents taken through kn—
ntelalfutla, without Murge, In
Scientific Hmericati.
A haiidwiBelyUliutrated weekly. I*rftestcir< .
Tattoo of any scientlflo Journal.   Terms for 1
iatla,|3.75 a year,postage prepaid.   Bold by 'I
sclera. LB
We carry the most fashionable stocl
of wedding stationery in the BouT
dary country. And we are the on I
office in this seotion that have tlT
correct material for printing it. Ti|
Sun job office.

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