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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Oct 7, 1927

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Array IS
it*
Disappointment should never discourage
BY-ELECTION III.
fiELSi CALLED
Fid OCT. 1/
VICTORIA, Oct. B.—Nelson's
long-expected by-election wil be
aeld    on    October  17,  Premier
in Lean announced today after
writs had been Issued. Nomination
day ls netlor October 14.
After arranging for tbe election,
the government cleared Its decks
for a quick campaign ln the Interior
riding. Attorney-General Manson
left lor Nelson this afternoon to
.participate in the contest and he will
be followed by other ministers later.
The premier himself expects to take
a leading part in the fight before tits
conclusion, -ind a keen contest ls ex-J
pected.
iHon. S. F. Tolmie, Conservative
party leader, who cancelled his plans
for attending the Conservative oon
volition in 'Winnipeg this month, will
go to Nelson during the next tew
days to lead opposition forces there.
Only ten days remain for the whole
Nelson campaign, after two Sundays
hiave been deducted from the time
•between now and October 17. This
Us about the same space allowed ln
the New Westminster campaign a
short time   ago.
In announcing the election, the
premier said: "It is desirable that
the election" should take place as
early as possible as I am compelled
to attend the intenprovinclal conference at Ottawa on November 3, and
there tis a great dea olt preparatory
work to be dont in this connection."
Between now and the end of November the premier will be a ibusy
man. Plans for a conference of -Canadian premiers a few days tn advance of the interprovinclal conference ot November 3 were approved
by Dr. 'MacLean today after he had
received this (proposal from Premier
Ferguson of Ontario. In order to attend this preliminary gathering, Dr.
MacLean Is preparing to leave here
for Ottawa in the latter part of this
month, probalbly on October 27 or be-
fire.
The purpose of the meeting in advance of the the conference, as outlined by Mr. Ferguson and approved
by Dr. MacLean, is to facilitate the
conference proceedings. It is hoped
that by round-table, Informal discussion the premiers will be able to
reach an agreement on many points
to be considered formally later. This
will save time at the conference. In
addition lt lg thought they will be
able to agree on certain general lines
which the conference should follow
.when it gets down to actual business.
Premier MacLean expect to bse absent from his office at least three
weeks attending the conterence and
possibly a full month. Tbe conference itself will laBt from ten days to
two weeks, he   understands.
The premier will .e accompanied
by Attorney-General Manson, lt was
announced definitely. The two ministers will form British Columbia's
official delegation to tbe conference.
In addition, the premier, as minister
of finance, will take with him B. D.
Johnson, deputy minister ot finance,
leading authority on the province's
financial relations with the Dominion,, which will form an Important
part of Dr. MacLean's case.
QtLAna KETTLE VALLEY ORCHARDIST
TWENTY-STXTH YEAR—No  49
**Tel! me what tou Know It tru*
! can fiueas •• well tu y<a."
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 7, 1927
Maintaining
Soil Fertility
inthe Orchard
THERE ts now a great deal of
experimental evidence in support of the statement that humus and nitrogen are the only elements ot fertility in which orchard
soils are commonly deficient. At the
experimental station for the Okanagan valley, Summerland, B.C., several methods of orchard culture have
been devised with a view to providing these essential elementsat the
minimum expense.
Where irrigation water is available
in sufficient quantity to permit the
growing of legume cover crops
throughout the year no difficulty has
been experienced in maintaining an
adequate supply of nitrogen and humus. Alfalfa, ha|iry vetch and sweet
clover have all been used with very
satisfactory results. 'Alfalfa is best
adapted for use on deep soils which
are retentive of moisture. Hairy
vetch is the safest cover crop to use
on   shallow   soils   underlaid     with
grilvel, while sweet clover ls useful
for breaking up heavy clay.
In districts where irrigation water
is less plentiful a modified system
of cover cropping involving cultivation of ttae liand during a portion of
the summer may be used to advantage. Hairy vetch sown ln lajte July
or early August can be counted on
to make a good cover before winter
sets ln. Tf there is not sufficient
moisture in the soil to germinate
seed until late August or early September lt Us safer to sow a fast-growing cereal such as rye. In ct*£e a
non-legume ot this kind is used lt fs
often advisable to supplement the
crop with a liberal application of
some fertilizer blgh In nitrogen. Recent experiments indicate that, in
irrigated districts where spring rainfall ls light, best results are secured when these nitrogen carrying
fertilizers are applied In the late
fall.
Orchardists in non-irrigated areas
sometimes find it necessary to plow
under the cover crop very early ln
the spring ln order to conserve moisture. In many sections, however.the
water supply is ample until June, in
which case the cover crop muff be
permitted to make a good growth
before turning under, thus Increasing the supply of organic matter. In
this connection, howevtr, It may be
well to mention that rye should be
turned under before It "Becomes too
rank or Ht will be very slow In decomposing. It Is also worthy of note
that by June hairy vetch usually
makes a| tangled growth which would
discourage the most expert plowman,
but yields readily to the action of
a good disc
For the beneflt of those orchardists who are fortunote enough to be
alble to secure barnyard manure at
a reasonable price, lt may be said
that there ls no more satisfactory
source of soil fertility. Wbere moisture conditions are such that it is
impossible to grow sufficient humus
in the form, of cover crops, this deficiency may well be supplied by the
-application of stable manure. Indeed, there ls good reason to believe
that even where cover crops are
grown at light application ot barnyard manure Is of great benefit trom
the bacterial action whioh it stimulates In the soil.—«. C. palmer.
What to See in Tokyo
8UN'8 WEEKLY TRAVELOGUE
TO GET get a mental picture of
Tokyo one must hoold    clecrly
> in mind that Japan's capital In
I not really a city but a collection of
; towns and villages, grown together.
I These settlements     preserve     their
entity in the 16 "wards" frequently,
mentioned   in   dispatches     relating
events in the city.
HULL MAY BUY MORE APPLES
Hull, England, oan handle 20,000
barrels ot apples' weekly for the United Kingdom market without glutting, during the apple shipping Season, according to a statement made
in a circular issued by the Blue Star
line.
If disincinatlon ot tlie thrade to
use that port can be overcome, an
even larger amount of apples could
he moved through that Ingress port.
In respect to case apples one importer gives a shis opinion from
30,000 to 40,000 fortnightly, says the
circular. It is contended that the
Hull market would absorb a great
many more apples if t hey were
shipped there.
A MUTUAL PAIR OP GLOVES
General C. and Oeneial H. had
each lost an arm for glory ln the Civil
warw-sjr. They took lt as a nmtter
of course and were profoundly grateful for their joint good fortune it*
that aenei-al C. had lost his right
arm while General H. had sacrificed
his left.
They were neighbors and friends.
Once a year they observed at special
occasion with all suitable dignity.
On a certain morning Qeneral H.
would approach the fence ot General
C. and, having a)rrived, would lean
thereon until General C.appeared.
After a formal salute, General C.
would say to General H:
'General, isn's it about time we
went to buy ourselves tt new pair of
gloves7"
And og they would march to buy
one pair of gloves for two heroes!
8LIGHT PAVOR
Warden (to the man in the chair)
—Is there anything I can do for you
before I throw the switch?
Doomed   Convict—Tes,   take
place.
my
The shortest war was that declared by the Sultan of Zanzibar
against Great Britain ln 1893. It
lasted 40 minutes.
clqj regulation there is Infinite variety in Tokyo. Exclusive Kajimachl
ls very dlffe rent from bourgeolse
Kanda. Busy, bustling Mihom'bashl,
with its "Broadway" and "Billingsgate" is a liar cry from Shlba, village of the tower gate and giant hill,
native restaurants and distinctive
dances.
For   the   humble traveler by the
Tokyo has a peculiar sentimental tra>n, It is exceedingly difficult to get
tie with the American national capl- Iost 'n T°k/°- Baoh/ar **"* °-e
tal,    because the   Japanese   cherry number * ltB route and ,n8,de- •* «-<-
blossom trees in Potomac park, in
Washington, constituted a gift to the
nation, which was recognized by
sending to ToMyo a consignment of
American dogwood trees. There
they form an   annual   magnet    for
place where, ln Canada, one would
see hosiery and washing powder advertisements, there is a-comprehensive mt|p of the city criss-crossed and
circled iby lines of many colors corresponding to the numbered routes.
thousands of Japanese residents at A.^nowIedj!e of *e *<********_ la su-
the time of their blooming.
perfluous. From the guide-book map,
Too much money can shorten lite.
When one satis up the bay of To- or better from ^ free "-* furm8h"
kyo to Yokohama, and buys a rait ed * tne JaPan Tourlst bureau,which
road ticket to Tokyo, he senses the 8e8k8 ,0 make J<-P*«>eBe travel de-
distinctive group form of Japan's Ilghttu1' one locate8 ***-*- Dlace ne
capital. For the ticket reads "Shina- j***8 and the J>-*«-e where he stands,
gawa," or "Bbinbartil." not "Tokyo.", Thm " ,B 1 mere matter of watching
The Imperial palace Is ln the arls-! numtbers and colorB to any spotwlth-
toci-atlc war, or "Ku," known as Ko- an the clrcu,ar ral"W wnlch t0Tm*
jlmochl-Ku. In the palace, orlglna)ted ••*■» Tlm ot the transportation wheel,
by Ota Dokwan In 1456, formerly' ™8 ldea of PIacmB a maP of tne
lived the Tokugawa Shoguns. This c,ty ,n the cars themselves Instead
palace bears witness to the frequent °f °n 80me sequestered wall around
casualties of Tokyo; It often was tne 8tat,on ma**' "* the tra>reler ot
burned, the laat tlmB ln 1873. It is the cultural advaniages ot tempting
not accessible to the public. A Japan-  Dlctures   of   butter   and motor <*"•
eee guide-book naively Bcjys, "Ordinary people are allowed to approach
only as far as the end of the first
bridge outside the outer gate." The
palace grounds are surrounded by
two moats; the perimeter of the
outer one Ib about five miles. In this
ward also ls the central railway station, with buildings nccupyint; two
acres. One of four entrances ls reserved tor the use of the imperial
family.
but it makes it easy to wander from
village to village within the city
limits with the minimum of delay
and Blgn language.
Nihombflshl Is a principal business
quarter of the , city, although eaoh of
the wards ls more independent, commercially, than the various sections
of most cities. The center of Nl-
hombashi and of Tokyo is the bridge
which ln olden times was a measuring   point   for   distances   to places
The Latin quarter of Tokyo lies ln throughout the empire. Formerly It
Kanda-K. Here ls the ToMyo Higher was wood; •* WBS *■**"■■*■ '** 1911 °*M
Commercial school, the first school *ranite* » ls the thoroughfare from
of that ktad established by the gov- each end ot m* br-d«> whlch P°I>ul
ernment when lt launched upon a •**•-••' ls *novn as ''Broadway."
policy of Adopting western business' In NlhoiUbashl is the Bank of Ja-
methods. Upon the grounds of this'Pan' occupying a building especial-
sohool grow pine trees which are sur- * de8'*?ned to ■» earthquake-proof,
vivors of the grove standing there' 0n6, l**. of the building has three
when the school tract was part of 8tor,8B ■>***•••&<>•***> <™ strong boxes,
the    Shogun's pleasure    park.   This' and thlB Patrt can * flooded a8 Pr°-
ward also Is famous for a willow-tree
thoroughfare, its second-hand clothes
stores, and a Shinto shrine which
dates to the elgth century.
While each ward retains distinctive
characteristics of the time when it
was a separate town, and each has
its own (business section. Tokyo
a whole has a distinctive individuality. It is an "official" city, and
frankly so.
Official hours, official   guides, offic-
tectlon against fire. In this same
section of modern banks and office
buildings ls a Shinto shrine where
charms are dispensed which are supposed . to be efficacious in such diverse emergencies as shipwreck,
child delivery and being the victim
of a Har.
I "Newspaper Row" Is in Kyobashi-
Ku. Here are practically all the
principal journals. Sfaiba-Ku contains the mortuary   temples   of   the
sible wrecker. He ls a psychological case and belongs to the same aggregation as the common criminal.
Is it because of human nature?
Partly so! The man that buys his
flrst car wants to be looked upon as
an equal in rights ot any other man
who owns a car even though the
latter may have been an owner for
years. The new owner gets out on
the street, wholly Inexperienced and
not educated to the rules of the road.
Immediately confusion results find,
with confusion, antagonism,. Then,
everyone for himself—ln the resulting crash.
There are as many different types
of motor car drivers as there are
human beings—there must be since
the mind operating the car ls a hu
man. To point out each individual
kind of driver is certainly to point
directly at you in one or more cases.
However, if lt tends to make the
reader see himself as a fool and to
correct that fault ibefore six foot of
of earth ls piled on top of him why—
the mission of this article is accomplished.
One type approaches, gliding al
high speed, In the grooves of the
trolley rails. Because of his smooth
{approach he hates to slow down and
whiz—over the crossing he swishes,
grazing a street car, a truck, several
automobiles and half a dozen pedes-]
trians. Then he sticks his head out
of the side and grins at the conster-j
nation he has caused. This very
same grin is on his face when, later,
he is hurried to the morgue.
And then comes tbe fellow who
tried to beat the train over the crossing. He is too well known to describe, but take any type of reckless
driver, add two or three drinks of
bad liquor (or plain jackass ignorance) and an automobile. Soak the
fool well ln the liquor (or ln his own
ego), place him in the oar and let go
After due time remove from debris,
place in satin-lined receptacle and
garnlsbt with flowers.
Nothing—no psychological test of
character analysis—reveals one's
true Inwarness more quickly and
with greater certainty than the motor
car.
THE PRAIRIE
FRUIT
Tokugawa    Shoguns.   A    concession
ial guide books and official seasons' to foreign visitors is indicated by the
for various sights and sceneB are of-J announcement, "Boots need not be
flclally prooclaimed. You come ( taken off, as covers are provided to
sense of ha-ylng been
slip over them."
awpy with a
officially conducted through
land  of  cherry  blossoms,  of  noisy j memento' ot the years before Shinto-1 roads wain mentioned:
a fairy-1    in Azafiu-Ku is a Buddhist temple,
COMMITTEE    ORDERS
ONION PiRICES UP
Kelowna, Oetober 4.—The following
prices have been set by the committee of direction, usual order, effective
October 1: Apples, King Dsvids,
bulk, .coontalners .extra, .940, 946.
Onions, 910 per ton higher. No samples to be shipped.
THE IRONIC WHI8PER
George Washington's attitude, to
ward those who underestimated the
need of adequate means of national
defense was much like that of military men todaty toward the same
class of persons. This little anecdote of him was related ln 1817 by a
member of the Virginia house; of
delegates in thecourst ot a debate
during which the matter of military
lotus flowers that bloom with a de-;
tonation, of doll's festivals, ot Geisha girl dances.
ism took firm hold. Shinto-Ism has
been kept alive in Japan from the
dawn of   the empire.   Tokyo, as .Ta-
Tho oldBurvives alongside the new! pan's capital, became a stronghold of
The Geisha girl continues to perform Shlntois'ui .v. -mse officialdom ot
though the cafeteria ha|B made its ad- .Iup-i.ii support It . -rdently.
vent In Tokyo.   The Geisha girl Is an
institution hard for the western mind'
to comprehend.  Her   most compare^
ble   functionary ln the western world
was   the   court   jester—long   since1
passed away.   She is a modern prototype of the private entertainers of
wealthy medieval nobles.  She    is of
cl class different from the women ot
Japan who cling to their semi-seclusion amid  the Inroads of modernism;
hut   she   is   not   of the type which
westerners class as the demimonde.
Restaurants and tea houses in
Tokyo still have their Geisha girls.
The Japanese business man.student,
official, or visiting farmer are tho
patrons. More often lt ls a party of
men friends whom the Geisha girl
entertains with song, dance and monologue, a-nd for whom she acts as a
sort of hostess.
Custom does not fill these restaurants with husbands and wives, men
ITS FOR MOTOR
The/ question before the new con
gress wsb how large a standing army
the country should have. One of the
members made a motloon that the
standing army should not exceed live
thousand men. Genera^ Washington
whispered to a member from Mary
land to amend the motion by providing that no foreign enemy should in
vade the United States at any one
time with more than three thousand
i men.
BY   ERWIN   GRBER
THE REASON  FOR IT ALL
IN 970 caseB ln which motor cara
, were wrecked by trains, 136 persons were killed and 405 were
injuered. In 490 cases automobiles
stalled on grade crossings were demolished. Forty-three cars actually
collided with the danger signals.
Why do they do lt?
Is It because of false egotism? Tt
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Isn't necessary to go into detail as
and their fiancees, or friends of op-' to the tagging of the false egotism
posite sexes, as in Canada. But the driver, ttae one who is under the lm-
wish to have members of the other | presslon that everyone ia racing with
sex present Is just as strong in J a- him, the one who persists in making
pan as elsewhere. Hence the Gel- his own usurpations a self-favoring
sha girl. [ law of the road, or the one who falls
WHO'S RANDOM?
'Twas a hard and bloody battle al
tho pistol range.   At last the Instate
! tor called; "Fire a(t Random!"
I    After the carnago] had ceased one
freshman still stood with his pistol at
| "ready," a full clip In it
I    'IHey,  you," yelled  the  instructor.
"Why didn't you .shoot?"
"I'm waUiug for Random to stick
his head around the pap-apet."
Outside the pervading senseof offl-' Into a genera|l class ot tha irrespon- thing else.'1
USING  THE  IM/aiNATION
A small boy, says the Tatler, solemnly Bat by the side of a pool, flsh-
lng(
"What <a"8 you fl**hlng for, little
man," askwd a man who was passing.
"Sharks," replied the boy.
"Hut there are no sharks in that
pool, my little man," satd the man.
"Tliere ain't any flsh In the pool,"
afnswered the child stolidly, "bo I
might as well flsh for sharks as any-
CALOARY, October 6.—Weather
this week has been of an off
and on variety. Considerable
frost has been reported, with little
damage. Alberta Is assured of a
fine crop. Biuusiness has Improved
and ttae volume sold last week exceeds the -business done a year ago
of even   date.
Mcintosh apples are being offered
everywhere. Heavy bookings of the
Macks are repported from all points.
Wealthies are preferred at present,
being a little more advanced ln ripeness.
British Columbia tomatoes shipped
as semi's are arriving very green,
some entirely without color. Ontario
tomatoes ln 11-qt. baskets sire offered here, containing about 19 tbs. of
tomatoes. These toms are firm and
ripe, but not uniform in size. Oliver
cantaloupes are coming in mixed
cars. Some of them are slightly
over-ripe, but otherwise they are satisfactory.
Several cars of British Columbia!
potatoes arrived this week. Potato
advices from the eastern states and
Canada claim that potatoes may be
scajree, chiefly caused through disease. The same news comes from
Europe. This will have a tendency
to stiffen western prices later ln the
season. ,
Apples All The
Year Under
New Plan
LOUISVILLE, KY—How the
consumer Ib enabled to have
a fresh apple on his table or in
his pocket the year around was revealed at the thirty-second annual
convention ot the international Apple Shippers' association.
"Today American fruits have no
season," said Samuel Fraser ot Gen-
esco, N. Y., a fruit grower. 'The
supply is constant. While our population has Increased 40 per cent in
the last 25 years, the rail movement
of fruits and vegetables has Increased more than 300 per cent, and
that by truck enormously. The rapid
increase in city population and In
the standard of living has created a
market for American fruits, tspecial-
ly the apple, which was not dreamed
of a quarter of century ago."
Twelve hundred firms in Canada,
the United States, Great Britain, the
Scandinavian countries, Germany,
Spain, Finland, Italy, Tasmania and
Australia, have headquarters tn the
association, whose headquarters are
in Rochester, N. Y. There also is a
representative In London. Producers,
storage men and buyers are represented in the association, which thus
has, bo ot speak, a -personal interest
ln the nipple from the orchard to the
wholesale distributor. A number of
British delegates registered at the
convention and several German firms
were represetned.
The I.A.6.A. is a clearing house
for anytsing affecting the apple. It
was explained by R. G. Phillips, secretary. In June, when the fruit ls
ln blossom, the members are furn-
ilshed with crop estimates for United
States, Canada, England and the continent. Tho Antipodean crop does
not come into competition with that
In the northern hemisphere. At the
annual convention ln August a statistical report by states and coun-
trtiiDB ls furniBhed together with the
relationship of the year's crop to
those for Ave or ten years previous.
From these reports members make
their deductions as to how the crop
should be moved. This ls followed
up September and Octoher reports,
showing  possible   flustua|tion8.
On December 1 association members get figures on storage holdings
In the United States and Canada. A
similar report on January 1 records
the movement of the month previous,
which enables shippers to judge
whether it has been of right proportion. Monthly surveys are continued
until June, each time with a resume
of storage holdings for the It-fit five
years.
The stafbillzing effect on the detra
of these reports Ib obvious. The
shippers are able to move up or hold
back the crop, so that every corner
grocery and fruitstand can have regular Btipplles of fresh fruit every day
of the year, Secretary Phillips explained.
Every evil ronus to us on wings
and goes away limping. THB SUN: GRAND FOBKS, BEITISH COLUMBIA
®h? (gratti 3n$lw §un
G. A. EVANS, EDITOR ANO PUBLISHER
S jeSORIPTION RATEB—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) SI.OO
One Yem- (in tlie TJnitol Stntes)      1.50
•gjAddresr -" ——•-—-'cations to
sTbk Grand Porks Sun
Phone 101 ■ Grand Forks. 1.1  C
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKH STREET.
FKIIJAY. OCTOBER
1927
woman was asked by    an official wha|t her instructor
would say if he knew she    was in police headquarters
paying a fine  for violating an ordinance, the coed re- j
plied:   "I guess    he wouldn't say a thing.   He's stand-
ing in liue right back of mo with a tag himself." .
<T* HE United States department of agriculture   bas an-
Kettle River Assessment District
nounced the development of a new process for making newsprint paper from hardwoods. It is believed
the system will assist materially in continuing the news- j
print supply from aspen and birch and possibly maple; ^^ _____ NOTICE that  on Wednesday, the 12th day of October, 1927, at the horn* of
in   the     northeastern   region and in development of a the p.ovtn..al Police Court, Penticton, B. C, I Will soil at publi-* auction tr.c ! -C-,  in tl . Us   :
new-sprint industry in southern   states from gumwood.    !outf 0_ the persons In said list hereinafter ^set out, for delinquent taxes ijnfaltJ bj sa'id -. . ■    i   or! .
                                       .   i of June, 1827, lor lands other than farm lunds, find for lands classified as l-.n i i :;c*; on Use   '.'..
p.m..
(Notes* Motions • Notables
BniTlfii COLUMBIA'S ci i:;' und ;• tha pnancial poli-
cisc of Hit; MacLean government reached a new
peak last Wednesday when provincial bonds to th--
amount of $6.01)0,000 were soul fit t::i .sverago yield of
4.6216 per cent. This is the lowest Interest' rate that
the province 1ms paiil on a loan since lfcS.1, and indicates that financial men all over the continent, who bid
on the new bonds, are more impressed than ever witb
the soundness of provincial finances, Tenders on the
uen- $0,000,000 loan were received from thirty powerful
financial organizations In Canada and the United States,
the government's first entry into the financial markets
this year having attracted continent-wide a/ttention. A
spndloate composed of A. E. Ames & Company; Wood,
Gundvy.«S: Company, and the Royal Bank were the successful tenderers. The proceeds of the bonds sold to
this syndicate v.-ill be divided equally between refunding
and the financing of provincial buildings and roads.
T\H. TOLMIE litis publicly declared that he does not
•■■-'.propose to tell the people of this province what the
polcy of his party is because he is afraid the government
will steal his thunder and do him out of the credit. All
he will sp.y just now is that he is in favor of an industrial survey in order that the present policy of what
he calls "muddling through" may be brought to an end.
In other words, the citizens of British Columbia| have
ibeen told that they can whistle for the Conservative
party's policy until Dr. Tolmie has had time to discover
a piec0 of progressive legislation that the Liberals may
have failed to got on tli3 statute books—a job that obviously is baffling him t,nd his lietcnants. This is the
way tho Victoria Times deals with the recent announcement which Dr. Tolmie made at Cloverdale, and then
goes on to compare actual facts relating to the expansion
which has taken place in British Columbia during the
last ten years with the complaints and generalities in
which the Conservative leader has been indulging of
late as a result of utter failure to present anything constructive for the public to consider. The Times points
out that since 1916 agriculturi:(l production has increased
121 per cent, lumbering 138.7 per cent; water-borne export of lumber In the five-year period of 1922-1926 as
against 1912-1916, 984 per cent; log scale in the same
comparative period, 111 per cent;_ value of forest production, 159 per cent; value of pulp production, 368 per
cent; mining production in the ten-year period increased
58.9 per cent; fishing, 88.95 per cent; and the total production of tho btislc industries of the province in 1926
reveals an increase over that of 1916 of no less thin
$126,180,211.'!, or 101.3 per cent. It also should be noted
that in 1919 the number of industrial firms in British
Columbia was 5301. In 1923 this had grown to 6524, and
of by June of this year to 8058, E|n increase over the
1919 total of 52 per cent. Another reflection of progress
is seen in the    number of companies incorporated.   In
1916 the total was 438; in 1926 it grew to 700, an increase of 60 per cent. Capitalization increased by 184.2
per cent. The Vlvtorla newspaperh then reminds its
readers (hat Dr. Tolmie repeatedly haB said that capi-
L.il steers clear of British Columbia because it is afraid
of the Liberal government's policies. The Times argues, however, that there 01,11 be veny little wrog with
plans evolved for the promotion of industrial development which 'have been responsible for the Increase of
a purely industrial    payroll amounting to $87,900,000 In
1917 to one totaling $175,000,000 at tlio end of 1920. "If
Dr Tolmie really wants to know what is being dons t<
promote Industrial development, and wnuld like to get
11 n'. 1 of detailed and reliable information in thia re
r,.. I tlio Time;; coi ri ides, "he could satisfy himsell
• *.*■ «   ing at the ii . ar 111 ijil of Industries."
A'
T Atlanta, Ga„ C. Dukehart, of Decatur, Ga., stooped
to recover ,', small screwdriver that had slipped
through a hole in his pocket. By its side he found a
chamois skin lag that that contained jewelry worth $13,-
000, Tho Las and its contents wore returned to Ita
owner. . j
ber, 1926, and for penalty, cos's and expenses, including the cosi, of advertising said sale, ii
for the period ended December 31st, 1J25, ls not sooner paid.
LIST OF PROPERTIES (ILL IN SIMILKAMEEN DIVISION OF YALE   DISTRICT)
Name of Person Assessed
Short Description of Property
Arrears of Costs and
all Taxes   Penalty Expenses Total
AT a dinner party a ihishop was seated next a lady who ! ~~~~^~~~~~~~—————————-— ■
mnde a somewhat lavish display of    her charms.; fiitcher, Wm. Estate  Lot 30, except Part 6 acres covered by
,.,.       , .    , ..    ., .      „i„ „., „„ „„.,,„ „„ fc„. I       (Reg. owner, Prank Ritchcr) Lot 2150 (S)  	
When dessert arrived tho bishop placed an apple on her  McKavr.lchel.t Mrs. j. p Lot 316  	
whereupon    ho    said; j puliy. Hili et al  Loi 860, Block
plate.   She   expressed   surprise,    whereupon    no    saiu; j peUyj inil et al
"Vou must <"*nt It.   When Eve ate  the apple  she knew | Nord, Anton   Lo'; 970, Parcel 1
what sho looked like, and was   ashamed!"   The woman I£-1e*9B' J,0l*n, "," •• •■■••■;;:;",'v;';jLoi 15il   	
,        „,        . .,       .   . .fc   fc, .      I Dividend Lakevlew Consolidated Gold
was epual to the occasion.   She quietly asked the bishop, |       Mininp- Oo !
'"Who gave Evo the apple
Map 65
"Lakeview"
R
EPORTS from New England's four colleges for girls
show the bob on the wane, it is said. "We are sick
of heeing ears and bristly necks," say the girls, who
complain of too many trips to the barber shop. Being
a man, even, has its drawbacks. Perhaps the day of
mannish fashions   for women is passing.
TWELVE yearn after receiving shrapnel injuries in
the bombardment of Hartlepool, England, by the
Germans during the war, MrB. Sai-ah Stringer died there
recently. Mrs. Stringer had wounds all over her body.
The coroner's jury returned verdict of "death following
wounds received in the bombardment."
Mining Co Lot 1899, Surface Rights
Mineral Claim  	
Etchepare, E. (Reg. owner, Jean Fer-
oux)    Lot 2358 except Plan A-440 	
Brown, W. H Lot 2704, S. L. 1, Map 1186	
Templeton, John P Lot 2710, Block 2 of S. L. 34, Map 890.
Riley, R. T Lot 2720 except Plan A-105 	
McKay, Alex (reg owner Alex McRaelLot 3590  	
$ 10.50
liis.ie
3.00
34.02
130.00
9.00
9.00
256.00
4.0,3
105.00
60.70
2.12
24.14
.28
4.33
22.65
1.17
1.17
108.00
.ea
13,67
7.77
TOWNSHIP 53
12.00
12.00
180.00
36.00
1.55
1.55
23.25
4.05
A DIGNIFIED young (business womain, carrying an
umbrella, was standing in the corridor of one of
Philadelphia's office buildings waiting for the elevator.
Glancing out a ne-arby window, she found it Btill was
raining. Absent-mindedly she raised her umbrella over
her head and returned to her former position ln front of
the elevator cage.
Poems FromEasternLands
PERSIA
Southern Okanagan Collieries Ltd. .. .!*.¥. ot NWY, Sec. 26  .'
Southern Okanagan Collieries Ltd. .. .NM, of NEH Sec. 27 	
Southern Okanagan Collieries Ltd. ...SiE.li and SM of N.E.V1 Sec. 34	
Southern Okanagan Collieries Ltd. ...S.W.tf and S.^ of N.W.'i Sec. 35 ...
TOWNSITE OF KEREMEOS, SUBDIV, OF LOTS 749 and 174, MAP S00.
Innis, David J. (Reg. owner Keremeos
Land Co. Ltd.)  Block 59, Lots 16 and 17, Map 785 ...
Innis,' David J Block 71, Lots 16 to 18 	
Bligh, S. J. O. (Reg.owner Robertson &
Hackett Sawmills Ltd.)  Block 71, Lots 25 and 26 	
Innis, David J. (Reg. owner Keremeos
Land Co. Ltd.)    Block 72, Lots 27 and 28   	
Hong, On Block 77, Lot 24 	
Innis, David J. (reg. owner Keremeos
Land C o. Ltd.)  Block 79, Lots 11 and 12 	
$ 13.75
11.75
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
lc-.',")
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
32'
23.92
2:: 32
377.75
13.35
li ■...
82.28
27.30
27.30
217.00
54.40
43.44
114.03
5.59
14.61
12.75
12.75
01.78
141.45
157.47
20.23
12.75
190.45
21.72
24.38
2.80
2.52
12.75
12.75
3727
3l'.65
38.01
4.80
12.75
55.03
SUBDIVISION OF LOT 697  (S) and PART OF SUBLOT 14 OF LOT 2710, MAP 1431.
Loewen, Chas. J Block 7 .
Loewen, Chas. J Block 8 .
Loewen, Chas. J Block 9 .
Loewen, Chas. J > Block 12
TUB history of  the  motor  car  began  over  230  years
ago, when street, an   English inventor, firaa utilized
oil  as  tt   motive  power.   It was  not  until  1870  that  0
really  practical   pel ml     engine     appeared,   It  was  the
work of Julius    Hock,  of Vleniv'..   Tho  next namo con
necied with the progress or the   motor car ls the most
Important    of   r,,11- that   of Gottlieb Daimler.   In  188"
Dalmjer made the flrsOsmnll, high-speed   petrol engine;
all previous engines "Sad been huge, clumsy and slow
' g.   Two years later he Installed his engine in 1
Icycle,  und  nt the t>'inl°     time,  filled  boats  Willi
.     and   run   tliem   i|t     Paris.   Tho  boats  attracted
nl Ion of l.tivttssor, another famous pioneer, who
saw  the  Immense  possibilities  In  Daimler's  In-
ven Ion.    '.    boughl     ths  French    p-tlenls from the In-
ventor,   Lsvassor  Invented   a     : ystem   of  transmission
- a method of taking the power from the engine to the
wheels—and with << tew small Improvements this system is in use today.
C ELECTION of Dr. Bphroim McDowell a s one of Ken-
•^ tucy'n two representatives in the hall of fame—the
other ls Henry Clay- is it reminder of the great service
thi3 surgeon rendered to humanity. He blazed tho way
in his profession in i| .dominnl numgery when, ln 1809,
ho performed a difficult opcratlon<that never had been
tried before, saved the patient's life and enabled his
profession to suvo countless other lives afterward. Dr.
McDowell was literally a "doctor of Hie old school,"
the t.vpo thut thought nothing of the monetary return
from his practice. He wifi an adviser of the people,
often in financial matters as well as being the custodian
of their health and that of tlieir children. He was born
in Rockbridge county, Virgiha, and had simple opportunity to study tho science in which he early decided
to spend his life. After obtaining whajt medical education was available In America, he attended the University of Edinburgh and on his return fmom Europe
located in Danville, Ky., 1795 to practice. It was there
that he performed tho operation that made him ftmous.
O breeze of morn! where is the place which guards my
friend from strife?
Where is the abode of that sly Moon who lovers robs of
life?
The night is dark,   the Happy Vti^e in   front   of   me I
trace."
Wbere is the fire   of Sinai, where is the meeting place?
Herejointly are the wine-filled cup, the rose, the minstrel ;    yet
While we lack love, no bliss ls here; -where can my loved
be met? ■
Of the Shaikh's cey my heart has tired, and ot the convent bare:
Where is my friend, the Christian's child, the vintner's
mansion, where?
Ha|flz, if o'er the glade of earth
The autumn-blast Is borne,
Grieve not, but musing ask thyself:
"Where has the rose no thorn?"   ,
—From The Divan of Haflz
•Aiman (Happiness) is the valley in    which Ood appeared to Moses—metaphorically, the abode of the Beloved.
ANACONDA TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SB
Jackson, John R, Estate  , Block 1, East Vi Lots 5 to 7 	
Garland, Mrs. Mary, Estate  Block 1, Lot "A" 	
Jackson, John R., Estate  .Block 3, Lot 14 	
Garland, Mrs. Mary, Estate  Block 25, Lots C to li, and "B" 	
Garland, Mrs. Mary, Estate  .Block 23, Lot 6 	
CASCADE TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF LOTS 268, 263 and 313, MAP 3.
Ritchie, R. O. (reg. owner Catherine
M. Cameron Block 8, West V. Lot 2 	
Ritchie, Robt. Geo Block 20, Lot 12 	
Ritchie, Robt. Geo.   ...u Block,28, South V. Lots 1 and 2	
Sitchle, Robt. Geo Block 24, North tt cf Lot 7 	
Weill, Mrs. Annie  Block 33, Lot 11 	
CARMI TOWNSITE,  SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 2369, MAP 10!.'.
Morton, W. D. (reg. owners Jas. Kerr,
J. C. Dale and Robt. D. Kerr) ...Block 3, Lots 13 and 11   3.75
CHRISTINA  TOWNSITE,   SUBDIVISION OF LOT 317, MAP 50.
Ritchie, Robt. Geo. (reg. owner Wm. M.
Wolverton)    Block 5, Lot 10 ;	
Chisholm, Alex. Estate   Block 7, Lots 4 to 6 	
Ritchie, Robt. Geo. (reg. owner Harry
L. Moody)   •**". Block 8, Lots 9 and 13 	
Ritchie, Robt. Geo. (reg. owner Harry
L. Moody.) Block 13, Lots 8 aud 9	
FAIRVIEW   TOWNSITE,  SUBDIVISION PART S.W. *A SEC. 7, TP. 50, AND S.E,
Heath, William H. Block 3, Lot 9 	
Rytner, Harry M Block 3, Lot 10 	
42.41
5.46
13.75
Oi.65
16.08
2.17
13.75
32.90
16.98
2.17
13.75
32.90
16.98
2.17
13.75
32.90
TP. 70, MAP 24.
4.99
.61
12.75
18.35
3.87
.48
12.75
17.10
3.87
.48
12.75
17.10
14.40
4.85
12.75
32.00
3.17
.41
12.75
10.33
d 313, MAP 3.
5.51
.09
12.75
18.05
7.30
.91
12.75
21.02
4.60
.57
12.75
17.92
23.02
3.00
12.76
39.67
6.00
.77
12.75
19.62
■■8
12.76
c/4ncient History"
Ellis, Thos. Estate  Block 1, Lot 4 	
Ellis, Thos. Estate  Block 2, Lot 13 	
Hawtrey, Ralph O Block ., Lot 12 *.	
'. Ellis, Thos. Estate  Block 0, Lot 14 	
'McGuffie, H. C.   (reg.  owner  Shat-
!       ford's Ltd.) Block 14, Lot 1  	
Ellis, Thos. Estate  Block 15, Lots 12 and 13, Map 41
3.17
4.14
.40
.00
12.75
12.75
: .,
17i58
3.21
.42
12.75
16,33
3.27
.43
12.75
16.45
i SEC.
3.53
3.5J
13, IP.
A0
.45
51
MAP 25.
12.75
12.75
16.00
la.ao
Vi SEC
1, TF.
54,
MAP -i7.
3.63
3.50
3.03
3.58
.45
.46
.47
.47
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
' 16.00
10.80
10.80
10.80
16.70
4.10
2.03
.50
12.75
12.75
31.48
17.43
GBAND FORKS TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 352, MAP 128.
Anderson, Jens'     Block 3, Lots 14 to 16  11.03 1.37
(COMPILED FROM TwInT^YEAR OLD SUN  FILES.) | GBAND FOBKS ™>WN8ITE. SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 53!.
Thoriias rowers, ono of the successful and enterprising - MAP 36
ranchers of lh0 valley, assisted by Fred Cooper, fitted [McLaren, Mrs. E Block 31, Lots 9 and 10 ,
p a miniature fair on the corner of Bridie and First j » MAP 1264
stre'ts iast Monday.   An if tractive display of fruits and* Eoatma, Ida  Block 17, Lots 14 and 15
vegetables grown in the valley was made.
24.11
5.45
2.01
.47
C.P.R.  emi'loyeos at Eholt aro    looking
forks property near the station.     _.
for    Grand
Monday was a big day for tho Conservatives (■ of tho
I'nuutliiry country, the occasion being the visit of Mr.
t. h. Borden, loader of tho opposition in tho federal
iititiso, v, ho Is making a campaigning tour over the entire
Dominion, nllhough lhe generr'l elections may not be
brought en for a year yet. Mr. Borden was accompanied by J. O. H, Borgeron, member for Beauharnois
since 1S78. Mr. Bergeron prefacod his speech by telling a falsehood, and he spoke In tlmjt strain during the
entire evening. He said that The Sun, by saying that
iho Conservative party was lacking in leaders of sufficient ability to conduct the affairs of the country, had
furnished bim with s| subject for a two hours' speech;
as   he   merely   repeated the charges he has made
MAP 1457
Reynolds, Ezekiel Block 1, Lot 8 	
Reynolds, Sarah J Block 1, Lot 13  	
MAP 1455
Jones, J.--E. Estate (reg. owner Edith
Bennett.)    Block 10, Lots 1 and 2 ..
6.45
.30
.30
.47
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
but
against the Liberal administration over since he started
on his present tour, no further proof as to the correctness of The Sun's statement is required. His other
charges were evidently of a like nature. Mr. Bergeron
felt terribly grieved al The Sun for making such a statement. His anger, however, furnished capital evidence
that it contained more truth than Action. Mr. Bergeron
is the comedian of the Borden combination. Whether
he is a low or a refined comedian we leave to our readers to decde. At any rate, his charming habitant patois
and unique stage mannerisms captivated the audience,
antl they were in excellent humor while he was before
the footlights. If he can toa trained to abstain from Insulting the intelligence of bis audiences with out-of-dajte
almanac jokes, tbere ls no reason why he should not
achieve a complete success In modern comedy parts. Almanac literature may be all right where Mr. Bergeron
resides, but in Grand Forks The; Sun furnishes the people
with a higher standard of bun ior. Bergeron's antics on
the platform were eccentric and ludicrous. First he reviled The Sun for a few minutes, then he would slander
A COED motorist headed a line of twenty University the Liberal administration until he ran out of breath,
of Minnesota students that filed into trallic court after which he wound up with an old almanac joke. In
to pay flnues for parking vlojatioas.   Whon the young  this order he continued until, tho meeting closed.
12.75
GREENWOOD TOWNSITE, ELKHOR.N ADDITION, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 818.
MAP 62
McGillis, D. H Block 1, Part 100x170 feet   3.00 .40       12.75
McGillis, D. H Block.5     3.00 .40 12.75
KEREMEOS UPPER TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF N. *A LOT 107, MAP 66.
Innis,   David   J.   (reg.   owner,   John
Gibson)   Block 21, Lot 13, and Lot 13A, Map
B-1819     3.58 .47 12.75
Williams, Charles (reg. owner Geo. R.
Naden;    Block 21, Lot 14, and Lot 14A, Map  *
B-1819     3.58 .47 12.75
Williams, Charles (reg. owner Geo. R.
Naden)    Block 22, Lots 15, 16 and 17, and Lots
ISA, 16A and 17A, Map B-1819 ..
Innis, David J. and Gibson, John ....Block 28, Lots 11 and 12, and Lots 11A
and 12A, Map B-1819	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate  Block 29, Lots 1 and 2, and Lots IA
and 2A, Map B-1819 	
20.10
38.87
18.67
17.00
17.00
18.0/
10.15
16.15
10.80
10.80
6.22
.80
12.75
19.77
4.14
.53
12.75
17.42
4.14
.53
12.75
17.42
MIDWAY  TOWNSITE,   SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 501.
MAP 3.
Mesker, Asa Carl  Block 35, Lot 6 	
Sater, Andrew (reg. owner Olaf Johnson)    Block 36, Lot 4 and East *A Lot 21.
Mesker, Asa Carl  Block 36, Lots 9 and 10 	
Jackson, John R. Estate  .Block 44, Lots 23 and 24   	
Kerby, Forbes M Block 48, Lots 23 and 24 	
4.97
.60
12.75
18.32
16.89
1.71
12.75
31.35
4.97
.60
12.75
18.32
5.97
.73
12.75
19.45
29.85
3.65
12.75
46.25
,,   .       MAP 88
Kerby, Forbes M. (reg. owner Midway
Co.  Ltd.)    Block 71, Lots 5 and 6         $   7.46     $     .91    $12.75    $21.12
Mair, Hugh (reg. owner Can. Pacific
Bly. Co.) Block "r,' Plan A-333, formerly Lots
7 tt        -Mock 76, Map 88  11.95 3.65        12.75
MAP 42
Bryant, Wilberforce Est Block 23, Lots 2 and 3   27.35 3.33
OLALLA    TOWNSITE,    SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 170, MAP 85.
Williams, Charles  Block 5, Lots 1 to 3, and 7     14.50 1.85
OKANAGAN FALLS TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF TART OF LOTS 337, 374 and 10, MAP 1230.
Okanagan Falls Land Co Block 2, Lot 2   2.49 31       12.75
12.75
12.75
28.35
43.43
29.10
15.55 TBE SUN: GBAND FOBKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Name of Person Assessed
Short Description of Proper* *™£ peMltjr ££»£ TotaI
Name of Person Assessed
Short Description of Property *£*%£ ^ %££* ToM
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 980 MAP i
Rumberger, Geo. W. Estate  Block 1, Lots 7 to 10 	
Rumberger, Geo. W. Estate  Block 2, Lots 1 to 5, 7, 8, 11 and 12
Bamberger, Geo. W. Estate  Block 4, Lots 9 and 10 	
Davis, Peter J Block 5, Lots 1, 2 and 7 	
C.isholm, Roderick O Block 5, Lot 11 	
Rumberger, Geo. W. Estate Block 6, Lots 13, 21 and 22	
Rumberger, Geo. W. Estate  Block 6, Lots 11 to 14	
Pringle, Geo. R Block 6, Lot 17 	
Oxley, David  Block 6, Lot 18 	
McKay, John G Block 8, Lot 19 	
::,:;, Geo. Whitfield  Block 7, Lot 3  	
berger, Geo. W. Estate  Block 8, Lots 3, 5 and 19 	
.::. ... and Lynch, A Block 8, Lot 6 ,	
McCarthy; J. C. and Munter, William. .Block 8, Lot 12 	
baiwerman* o. May  Block 9, Lot 11 ...	
Smith, Edgar J Block 9, Lot 13 	
Haney, Geo. M Block 12, Lota 13 and 14	
36.00
14.40
3.00
640
3.00
4.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
6.75
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
4.65
145
.40
.78
.40
.57
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.88
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF FART OF LOTS 981, 796 and 982, MAP 113.
Dominion Copper Oo. Ltd.  Block "A," Lot 19   1.50 .20 12.75
National Trust Co. Ltd Block "A," Lots 20 and 21   3.00 .40 12.75
National Trust Co. Ltd  Block "G," Lot 10   3.00 .40 12.76
Rumberger, Geo. W. Estate Fart of Lot 980, "Oimeron" M. C. Subdivision, Map 69-142   7.50 M 12.75
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 980, MAP 142.
Rumberger, Geo. W. Estate  Lots 1, 2 and 5   5.50
Roderick, J. D. et   al  Lot 6  3.00
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 921, MAP 184.
Williams, Wm. R. et al  Block 3   3.00 .40
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOTS 688 AND 981, Map 281.
New Dominion Copper Co. Ltd. ......Block "Y"  3.00
Nev/ Dominion Copper Co. Ltd. ......Block "Z"  ,  3.00
ROCK CBEEK TOWNSITE, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF N.W.W SEC 19, TP. 68.
MAP L
Carey, Joseph F ...Block 3, Lots 20 to 23  17.06 2.40
SUMMIT   TOWNSITE,   SUBDIVISION OF LOTS 1557 and 2006, MAP 79.
.65
.40
.40
.40
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
V. V. &c E. Rly. & N. Co Block 48, Lots 9 to 26
CROWN GRANTED FARM LANDS.
Ritclier, Wm. Estate (reg. owner Geo.
J. Fraser)  Lot 41, except Map 1835	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate  Lot 257	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate  Lot 289	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate  Lot 290	
Mclnnis, D. Estate (reg. owner, Westminster Trust Co. "In Trust") ...Lot 362, Pels. A, B, C. and D, Map
B-1682   	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate  Lot 393, Part 289 acres, L.R.O. Ref. 8-
225-11766A    ,	
Midway Ranch Ltd Lot 425, except Right-of-way Can. Pac.
Rly	
Donald, Frank Estate  Lot 461 (S)  	
Lawless, Wm. Sr., Estate Lot 492 (S) 	
International Securities Co Lot 492, Part 271 acres	
International Securities Co Lot 493,. Pels. "B" and "C"	
Pennoyer, A. H Lot 519, Part 6.7 acres as per D. D.
28397F   	
Powers, Thomas   Lot 519, Part 24 acres as per O ofT
20012F   	
Meggitt, Eva  Lot 519, Part 10 acres as per D. D.
7421D   .,,	
Powers, Thomas Lot 619, Part 39.86 acres as per Map
B-894 and C of T 20012F except
Rights of Way  *
Kerby, Forbes M. "In Trust"  Lot 534, Plan B-172 •
Newbauer, S. F Lot 535, Part 10 acres as per L.R.O.
Ref. 17-120-7820D  	
Cox, A. E. (reg. owner Robt. Dibble)..Lot 536, Lot 3, Map 179 	
Grand Forks Syndicate (reg. owner F.
C. McAdam)   Lot 536, Part 259.91 acres, LJR.O. Ref.
12-481-26207A   	
Ritcher, Wm. Estate  Lot 900, East */> 	
Willis, Florence D.  (reg. owner Jobn
Knowles) Lot 940 (S)  	
Hong, Dick (reg. owner W. E. Hodges) Lot 1012, Part 27.17 acres, L.R.O. Ref.
37-14309F    ,	
Lee, Robert (reg. owners R. Wood &
C. S. Galloway)   Lot 1012, Part 92.84 acres, LAO. Ref.
3-205-2141A   	
Lavia, Gulseppe Lot 1138 (S), Plan B-498  ,\\
La via, Gulseppe  Lot 1355 (S) 	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate Lot 1474 (S)  ■
Barcelo, Henry A. Estate   Lot 2036 (S) 	
Naish, Major T. E Lot 2710, Si. 4, Map 1189 	
Naish, Major T. E Lot 2710, SX. 6, Map 1189	
Naish, Major T. E Lot 2710, Si. 8, Map 1189 	
Naish, Major T. E Lot 2710, S.L. 17, Map 1189 	
Naish, Major T. E .*.. .Lot 2710, Si. 61, Map 1189	
Hamilton, A. A Lot 2710, Si. 56, Map 1189	
Wilson, Gerald T. and Parhan, G. E.Lot 2710, Si. 58, Block 1, Map 1331 '
Barcelo, Manuel Estate  Lot 2963  	
Lawless, Wm. Jr Lot 3343  '
3.00
32.00
23.00
23.00
17.25
261.10
374.29
642.51
43.26
16.50
119.00
97.00
12.85
324.11
43.98
414.69
223.47
44.60
23.20
957.61
16.00
28.21
26.70
.40
620
3.65
3.65
2.75
38.90
60.81
238.29
6.69
2.25
11.00
9.00
1.85
99.39
4.27
129.56
22.38
4.85
2.16
109.24
2.60
4.59
8.16
12.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
TOWNSHIP SS
Barcelo, Manuel Estate W. M, of NE. >A Sec 14	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate  N.W. % Sec. 14	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate N.E. *A Sec. 15  ,	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate S.W. hi Sec. 22	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate S. *A of NE. *& Sec. 31 	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate s.... .S.E. V* Sec. 31	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate SE. % Sec. 32 	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate S. *A ol N.E. !4 Seo. 32 	
Barcelo, Manuel Estate S. % of N.W. *A Sec. 32	
Surprise, Frank Estate (reg. owner W.
R. Dewdney "In Trust") Part 154 acres S.W.K See. 31 LJLO.
Ref. 161-46465F 	
111.18
SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 600, MAP 77.
Lawrence, J. T.  Block 5   59,02
Lawrence, J. T Block 12  [ 66^7
SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 635, MAP 110.
Biddlecombe, B. W. (reg, owner Chas.
Hesse) Block 2   50,40
Biddlecombe, B. W. (reg. owner Chas. ,
Hesse)    Block 6   2225
Carlson, Albert B Blook 12   44)43
SUBDIVISION OF LOTS 749 AND 174, MAP SOO.
Keremeos Land Oo. Ltd.  Block 57, Lots 1 to 13, Map 1603
Innis, David R. Estate  Block 119 	
8.36
20.70
SUBDIVISION OF LOTS SIS, SSS AND 2486, MAP 378.
Wajna, Charles  Block 63   5,19
18,07
6.13
5.98
2.40
7.12
1.29
3.35
.85
Heaven, O. C.
SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOTS 152, 153, IH 827 AND 328, MAP 567.
Block 1, Lot 1   86.45
SUBDIVISION OF LOT 1475, MAP 817.
Gaw, Robert  Block 17 	
Gaw, Robert  Block 18  t'
SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOTS S37 AND 374, MAP 1379.
        *
9.05
53.40
29.00
16.15
19.53
16.15
17.82
16.15
16.15
16.15
16.15
16.15
20.38
16.15
16.15
16.16
16.15
16.15
14.45
16.15
16.16
21.23
18.90
16.15
16.15
16.15
16.15
32.20
16.15
50.95
40.40
40.40
33.75
SUBDIVISION OF LOT 457, MAP 438.
Gibson, Prank (reg. owner J. J. Arm-
~,_stl0IfS}    • B1oc*= M 	
Gibson, Prank (reg. owner J. J Ann-
strong.)    Block 13 	
18.62
18.62
2.93
2.93
13.75        35.30
13.75        35.30
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 788
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 805
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 811
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 812
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 813
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 814
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 815
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 816
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 1191
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 1192 (S)
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd    Lot 1465 CS)
Rock Creek Land Co. Ltd Lot 1466 (S)
TIMBER LAND
(5)	
(6) 	
(S5 	
(S) 	
(S) 	
(S) 	
(ST 	
(87 	
(S)   	
DATED at Penticton, B. O, this 15th day of August, 1927.
552.96
78.36
13.75
645.07
117.00
23.45
13.75
154.20
475.20
69.70
13.75
558.65
155.52
25.68
13.75
194.95
86.40
12.75
13.75
112.90
48.60
7.50
13.75
69.85
235.44
38.76
13.75
287.95
399.60
57.10
13.75
470.45
184.68
26.87
13.76
225.30
307.80
44.75
13.75
366.30
153.90
2235
13.75
190.00
246.24
35.81
13.75
295 JO
W.
R. DEWDNEY,
Provincial Collector.
13.75      313.75
13.75       448.85
894.5e
63.70
32,50
143.75
119.75
28.45
13.75      437.25
62.00
658.00
259.60
63.10
39.10
1080.eC
32.3E
46.55
48.6C
22.25
6.80
13.75
42.8C
1230
1.90
13.75
27.95
15.44
2.43
"13.75
31.62
3.20
.52
13.75
17.47
10.00
1.60
13.75
25.35
10.00
1.60
13.75
25.35
15.00
2.46
13.75
31.20
4.00
.65
13.75
18.40
48.00
7.80
13.75
69.5E
13.00
2.10
13.75
28.85
10.00
1.60
13.75
25.35
72.50
34.00
13.75
120.25
3.20
.52
13.75
17,47
15.98
2.82
13.75
32.55
9.20
1.45
13.75
24.40
18.40
2.92
13.75
35.07
18.40
2.92
13.76
35.07
6.40
1.03
13.75   .
21.18
5.66
.94
13.75
20.35
11.33
1.82
13.75
26.90
11.33
1.82
13.75
26.90
5.66
.94
13.75
20.35
6.66
.94
13.75
20.35
The Spice of Life
LUNATIC'S WORLD  MOST
8ADLY OUT OF JOINT
Senator Smoot said at a Washington reception:
"Even England Is a|bandoning free
trade. . (How can she help It, when
all the other nations have adopted
protection? The English free traders complain, of course, but their
eibsurd complaints remind me of the
lunatic who banged himself on the
heajd with a brick and howled:
'"What a world! Chickens will
only lay when eggs are cheap and
plentiful—when eggs are dear and
scarce the Masted birds He down on
the job."
"The lunatic banged himself with
his (brick agajin.
"'The   sun,'   he   went   on, only
shines in the daytime, when there's
plenty of light.   Why doesn't lt shine I
after   dark,   when light is wanted?
Oh, what a world!"
'"The only man who can never
'borrow money iat the bank ls the poor
man who really needs It'
"A keeper ran up, sna|tched the
brick away and led off the lunatic.
As the wretch disappeared in a padded cell his last words were:
"'And you can't get a. job unless
you've got a new suit, and you can't
get a new suit unless you've got a
job.   What a world!"*
REALLY MACE SHOULD
PRODUCE AN AFFIDAVIT
IMace Llverwurat was telling a
crowd ln front of the (blacksmith shop
about a cyclone he was in one time
at the close of the Cival war.He said
it was the worst wind afnd electrical
storm he ever saw and that a bolt of
lightning killed a big fat hog for him,
and the wind twisted It in such a.
manner that the fat was rendered
into lard; a' frying pan came (bouncing through the air and fell right side
up beside the hog so that the rendered lard ran into lt.
jMace said about that time the wind
blew the feathers off -a big spring
chicken and tore the chicken into
pieces, which fell Into the pan of
greajse; the lightning set the grass
afire and the grease got hot and the
pieces ot chicken ln the skillet fried
nice and brown. When Mace hesitated, to take a chew of tobacco, all
his listeners left in disgust, and as
we sauntered oy we hea|rd him say
he could prove It toy a dozen persons.
Mace can prove anything by his
cronies.
13.76      143.00
Proved safe by millions and prescribed by physicians for
Colds      Headache     Neuritis        Lumbago
Pain       Neuralgia     Toothache     Rheumatism
I DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEART |
,£*       A-s ^*\~- Accept only  "Bayer"  package
^■k JM-fH^       which contains proven directions.
•T      3^M Handy •'Bayer" boxes of 12 tablets
*<mm^ f Also bottles of 24 and 100—Druggists.
Aspirin Is the trade merit (registered In Cnnsrtsl of Bayer Manufacture of MoDoseetle-
scldester of Sallcj-uucM (Acetyl Ssllcjllc Add, "A. S. A."). While It is trail known
thst Aspirin means Beyer menofactare, to smlst the public agslnst Imitations, tbe Tnblets
Of Bsyer Company will be stamped with  their general trade mark, the "Bajer Cross."
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
78.90
78.30
38.40
33.40
37.80
19.78
13.75      109.35
Hody, Reginald Blook "A"	
Hody, Reginald Block "B" 	
SUBDIVISION OF LOT 464, MAP 1416.
Keefe, Mrs. Ellen  Block "B"  	
SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SECTIONS 3, 9, 10, 15 AND 16, TP. 52, AND PABT OF LOTS  558,
2758, HAP 1479.
Parsor"-. "Miss Ella (reg. owner Sim'J-
OA'.jeyo. Fruit Land Co. Ltd.)   .... Block 1, Lots 4 and 5	
Barcelo, Mrs. Lucy  Block 4, Lot 13	
Scott, Robert (reg. owner Similkameen
Fruit Land Co. Ltd.)  Block 10, Lot 0 	
4.80
4.50
.76
.76
13.76
13.75
19.00
19.00
1279.
3.80
4.10
$     .55
.65
$ 13.75
13.75
$ 18.10
18.50
73.08
"~   11.87
13.76
98.70
OF
LOTS  588, 856, 113 AND
43.74
11.62
7.26
1.98
13.75
13.75
64.75
27.35
26.75
4.30
13.75
44.80
SUBDIVISION OF PABT OF SECTIONS 3, 9, 10 AND 16, TOWNSHIP 52, AND LOTS 588 AND 258, MAP 1573.
Bing, John J. (reg. owner Richard B.
Sheridan)   Block 19, Lot 19 	
Powers, C. A Block 34, Lot 6 	
Roblin, R. 8. (reg. owner Similkameen
Fruit Land Co. Ltd.)  Block 36, Lot 4 	
Sylvester, H. W. (reg. owner Similkameen Fruit Land Co.   Ltd.)  Block 37, Lots 6 to 8	
8.6»
16.76
24.75
1.38
2.80
4.10
13.75
13.75
13.75
23.75
33.30
42.60
APPRECIATION
Mra. Damon Is a more than ordinarily painstaking housekeeper,
especially ln the matter of cleanli-
nessRooms must ibe swept and dusted just so often, window draperies
washed and the kltcben floor scrubbed, "whether they need it or not,"
as her husband says; and It ls one of
her little secret grievances that John
does not always notice the Improvements unless she mentions them1.
"1 suppose you'd never know I'd
done a thing to that kitchen poor lf
I didn't call your attention to It,"
she says now a|ad then.
"Why, yes, my dear, lt looks fine.
Shines like a new penny," says John
graciously, and Mrs. Damon sighs
and resigns herself to the Inscrutable
ways of men.
One day last summer, when his
wife was. to return from a\ little vacation, Mr. Damon' thought he would
prepare a surprise for her. So he
got out the mop, the scrubbing
'brush and the pail and after halt an
hour's hard felt that the kitchen floor
was immajculate.
When Mrs. Damon came ln she
looked around somewhat suspiciously, but made no comment. In a spirit
of fun Mr. Damon remarked, "I suppose you'd never know I'd done a
thing to that kitchen floor If I didn't
call your attention to it"
Mrs. Datmon looked at it more
closely. "Why, no, dear," she s-ild.
"Have you " ,
CITY REAL  ESTATE
FOR SALE
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the City, within the
Municipality^ are invited.
Prices »-■-From $25.00 per lot upwards.
Terms.—-Cash and approved payments.
List of Lots and prices may be seen at the
CityJOflice.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
Gity Clerk.
Sometimes the informality
of the spoken word
is more effective
than a letter.
"LONG DISTANCE, PLEASE"
SUBDIVISION OF LOTS
Martin, H. (reg. owner Gladys M. Fer-
nan et al)   Block 25 	
  61.85
109, 42 AND 43, MAP 1958.
2.00
10.20
.32
13.75
13.75
85.80
16.07
first
LEARY
"Do you believe in love at
sight?"
"Well,      these       strike-anywhere
matches are sonvetlmes dangerous."
British   Columbia Telephone
Con* pany 11 THE SUN: GBAND FORKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Unvarying Quality
WtiUIT illII!
iU!
!•! LifUj?-*?
J Hhii I Uill\0
PUBLIC SCHOOL
TBI
That is why people insist cm Salada.
THE CITY
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Habb and Mrs.
MeAuliffe motored from Siinkum-
last week on ;/ visit to their old pio-
neer friend, Mr.'!. B. B. Perkins, of
this city. The old times at Wallula
Junction, which Ilea on the Columbia
river in Washington, antl old-fashioned photographs, together with
the Bannock Indian uprising and the
flrst railroad built from the steamboat landing t|t Wallula to Walla
Walla, a distance of 31 miles, were
discussed with ipeals of laughter.
The road was flrst built of wooden
rails, and later these were covered
with scrap iron; and sometimes the
scrap iron would come looBe and
kick up under the boxot-frs. Aa a
rule they had a dog running ahead
of the engine to drive the cattle off
the track. Tlio dog's name was Snyder. Mr. Babb. did some prospecting
at Nelson (now Danville) in 1895.
While here, he motored from one end
of the v-alley to the olher, and he
said it looks good to him and thinks
that it will "come back" just ap good
if not better than ever. The visitors
returned tn Spokane last Saturday.
They made several new friends while
in the city.
There are six or eight inches of
snow on the summit between Cas-
Ctlde and Hossland. But cars are
still  coming through.
"Mickey" MacKay will lea|ve for
tho eust tomorrow to play professional hockey with one of the U. S.
eastern hockey teams.
Dr. and Mrs. C. M. Kingston will
leave this evening for Winnipeg to
attend  the   Conservative  convention.
Mrs. M. Mackenzie returned on
Saturday from a three months'
visit to England.
C. D. Pearson returned last Sunday from a two wseks'    vacation.
Soves   are   again beginning to go
up.
Bears are reported to be more
plentiful than usual this . year—or,
perhaps, it may that they i*re becoming more sociable and show themselves more than usual. A family
group of four have been repeatedly
seen a short distance north of Prince
ton, and recently while hinging his
train Into that to*,yn Engineer Tommy
McAstocker had to bump a a| big
(black fellow off the railway track r
few noliles west of the town. Bruin
who did not appear to be much hurt,
clambered slowly up tha bank, afford
ing an interesting sight for the passengers ou the train.
J. H. Otterbine, teller at the Royal
'Bank of Canada, will return from
his vacation the latter part of this
week. Keitih Neltletou, of Vancou-
er, ls relievting   him.
The flre department wr's called
out on Sunday night by a very bois-
erous chimney (Ire in Mr. Winters'
residence on Winnipeg avenue.
E. R. Winder, who relieved Wm.
Emsley, teller at the Canadian Bank
of Commerce, during his holidays,
has returned  to to Bictoria.
GENERAL NEWS
To serve the interests of hundreds
of farmers in Southern Saskatchewan two new brunch lines of the
Canadian Pacific Railway began to
operate on September 1st, according
to announcement by D. C. Coleman,
Vice-President, C.'.'.R. Tho lon-T
of the two lines runs from Assiniboine south to Coronach, a instance of 59 miles, and the second,
a 27-mile stretch, runs from Brom-
head to Lake Aim:-..'
A barred Plymouth Rock hen,
owned by' the University of Saskatchewan, has made a new record
for egg production. This new champion has a total of 339 eggs in 365
days, not only a new record for bar-
reel Plymouth Rocks but, as far as
is known, a new record for all heavy
breeds of poultry. The bird was
bred and raised by the poultry department of the University.
The oity works department is improving the road' from (he corner of
Columlbia avenue and Blew street to
the C.P.R.  bridge.
The Toronto Pr-c
Aid Team carried
nessy Grand Chall-
atic of the First j
of the Canadian )
competition with t
of Winnipeg, Wes
pions, at the Place
tcmber 21. The
cured a total of •
a possible 610, v
shops secured 403
The establishme;
German noblemen
is a possibility ju.
to St. Walburg of
Germans heatlcd I
Seeli.org, of Berlii
established on an <
Investment of a cc
portions upon Into be confcemplat,
which is to retui
make its report :
the spring with ;
tives. One memo*
chased oik: audio;
lands
ight Office First
off the Shaugh-
nge Cup, emblem-
ad Championship
aeific system, in
he Weston Shops
tern lines cham-
Viger Hotel, Sep-
i'pronto team se-
119 points out of
hile the Weston
points.    •
t of a colony of
in Saskatchewan
■Ting by the visit
a number of titled
Dr. Smidel von
who is already
tate in the area.
Ital of large pro-
.'  farms  is  said
i   by   the   party
to Germany  to
d come back  in
,rnili«s and rcla-
llfl.3 already pur-
liaif i-ciions of
PERFECT  ATTENDANCE
The following pupils of the Orand
Forks Central school were neither
absent nor late during the month of
September:
PRINCIPAL'S CLASS—DIVISION I
..Harold Bailey, Earle Bickerton,lan
Clark, Norman Cooke, Lucille Donovan, Evelyn Cooper, Charlie Dodd,
Kotle Dorner,, Alma Frechettes Margaret Kingston, Daisy Malm, Hazel
Mason, .Florence .McDougail,. Madeline McDougail, Minnie McNiven,
Enid Morris, Marjorie Otterbine.Lin-
coln Sandner, - Randolph Sandner,
George Savage, Elsie Scott, Jessie
Sweezey. '
DIVISION II
James Allan, John Baker, Irene
Bickerton, Alberta Biddiecome, Bob
Carlson, Dorothy Donaldson, Mary
Dorner, Charlie Egg, Teresa Frankovitch, Bessie Henderson, Chester
Button, Dorothy Innes, 'Mary Jones,
Crystle Kidd, Genevieve -Mitchell,
John McDonald, Mary Me Kinnon,
Clayton Patterson, Mary Relbin.Jose-
phine Ruzicka, Tony Santano, I*aura
Sweezey, Delwin Waterman.
DIVISION   III.
Nels Anderson, Lloyd Ba|Uey,Mar-
aret Baker, Firman Bousquet, Mike
Boyko, Junie Danielson, Louise Dacre, Catherine Davis, Wilma D-avis,
Albert Deporter.Mowat Gowans.Elsie
Kuftinoff, Marguerite Lee, John
Love, Janet (Mason, Windsor Miller,
Myrtle Mitchell, Jean McDonald,
Qrace McDonald, Jack McDonald,
Lolla Ogloff, George O'Keefe, Winnifred O'Keefe Eunice Patterson.
..DIVISION   IV.
Lillian Biddiecome, Winnie Cooper
Marie Donovan, Freda Dorner, Jimmy Walker, Williamina Gray, Fern
Henniger, George Howey, Irene Hutton, Nels Johnson, George Ke|ptru-
koff, Robert Kidd, Veronica Kuva,
Irene Lightfoot, Audrey Markell,
George Olson, George Ruzicka, Bertha Sutherland, C-arl Wolfram.
DIVISION V.
Walter carpenter, Shirley Docksteader, Doris Egg, John Gowans,
Annie   Hlady,   Barney  Hlady,   Ttoiia
Frache, Lilian Gowans, Alexander
Gray, Douglas Howey, Bruce Kidd,
Jacob Kuftinoff, Catherine Kuva,
Garth Logdson, Grant McDonald,
(Donald McNiven, Bernard McPherson, Stlla Palek, Alfred Peterson,
Maimie Peterson, Annie Ridpborozny
Henry Pohoda, Oroville Rice, Florrle
Rltco, Victoria Rltco, Peter Slakoff,
Burbank Taggart,    Cortnne Wright.
It nas been announced that the
■representatives of the Cuban potato
buyers have agreed to take nine
hundred thousand bushels of New
Brunswick potatoes this season.
Negotiations are at present under
way with the Cuban buyers for the
sale of the Nova Scotia potato crop.
Increasing interest has. been
shown in the organization of boys'
and girls' swine clubs throughout
the province of Alberta and new
clubs have been formed, among other
places, at Pincher Creek, Macleod
and Raymond. To the winning team
in Alberta the Canadian Pacific
Railway awards a trip to the Royal
Winter Fair at Toronto.
The 4,000 sportsmen who made
returns to the Saskatchewan provincial gamekeepers department last
year secured a total bag of 100,000
duck, 26,000 prairie chickens, 6,000
ruffed grouse, and 3,200 geese. In
order to obtain some idea of the approximate bag of all hunters it is to
be assumed that 12,000 who did not
make returns secured the same
average bags.
An unfailing indication of farm
prosperity is the increasing sale of
agricultural implements reported by
nearly all dealers in the west this
year. The demand for haying
machinery has been especially
heavy, while the sale of threshers,
binders, combines and tractors has
been exceptionally large, some firms
reporting from 100 to 200 per cent.
Increases in the sales of these, implements.
Get Your
Groceries
at the «
CITY GROCERY
Phone 25 "Service and Quality'
E,C. Henniger Go.
SYNOPSIS of
AMENDMENTS
When the Canadian Pacific Railway train bearing 125 delegates to
the Canadian Chamber of Commerce convention arrived at Craigel-
lachie, B.C., recently, President S.
B. Gundy requested that a brief
stop be made during which the
delegates paid tribute on the spot
where the last spike of the Canadian Pacific transcontinental line
was driven linking for the first time
the East to the West. Mr. Gundy
Spoke briefly of the courage and
vision ef the builders of the railroad.
Grain, lia y
Flour mid Feetil
Lime :uul Sail
Cei lent and Plaster
Poultry S-tinpli-fc*
Grand   Forks, 3J. C
Alberta's potential coal wealth is
greater than all the known coal deposits in the rest of the British
Empire put together, according to'
Sir Thomas Holland, chairman of
lhe Empire Mining and Metallurgical Council, recently at Calgary.
Kastrukoff,, Mary Kuva, Crystal Ma-    i:If the present endeavors to change
Even a weak wo.nan can put up a
strong  bluff.
son, Ralph Meakes, Catherine McDonald, Sadie McDonald, Joe Pohora
Annie Roniv'd, George Ronald, Charlie Rltco, Frances Sandner, May
Thompson, David Tonks, George
Tonks.
DIVISION VI.
Margaret Cookson, Marion cooper,
Milton Dacre, Jean Dinsmore, Audrey
Donaldson, Isabel Donovan, Helen
Dorner, Ruth Kidd, Alfred Knowles,
Eileen iMarkell, Walter Meakes.Peter
Palex, Velma Rexin, Valarian (Ruzicka, Mike Starchule, Amelia Trombley, Ruby Wilkinson, Glen Willis.
DIVISION VII.
Albert Jepson, Alice Knowles, Eunice Kuftinoff, Mable Maloff, Daniel
McDonald, Geraldine McKay, Wilfred McLauchlan, Jessie McNiven,
Catherine McPherson, Charles Mitchell, Dorothy Muir, Windsor Rooke,
George  Skuratoff,  Cedric  Stringer.
DIVISION   VIII.
Pete Boycott, Charles Cooke, Ronald   Cooper,   Alexander   Donaldson,
Roma Donaldson, Henry Dorner.Ruth
Hunting Army to Irvade North Woods
THE SMOOTINU STARS
The enormous increase in the sport
of deer hunting has resulted not in
the vanishing of the tleer but in the
increase of deer. This is not as
mysterious as it sounds. Tlie more
men penetrate the wilds the fewer
wolves remain. The driving out of
wolves 1ms been thc greatest factor
in the increase of deer. But there is
another factor almost aa important
as the wolves. The invasion of the
backwoods by an army of enlightened
sportsmen has demanded a much
stricter and more sporting regard for
game laws than was the custom some
years aj.o. Destroyers of deer whether
human or animal, have to deal with
a strong and more or less organized
public opinion.
Goud Hunting News
Jteasauring news has been coming
in ilaily to the ofiiiTs of the general
tourist department of the Canadian
Pacilic Railway Company from operators of camps, guides outfitters and
others who report that all signs point
to an unusually promising hunting
Season for the current year.
Mike Bate3 send
his camps at Mel
that if thehunterat
and moose this Be,
nothing to blame
shooting. He sa*,.'
very plentiful and
a great year in ever.
From Schreiber 0
Handel, outfitter bl
the reports are ji;
Handel reports tni
increased in the Sv
down word from
agama, Ontario,
on t get their deer
son they'll have
but their poor
. that moose are
expects it to be
• way.
itano where John
a been operating
■t as reassuring.
t the game has
perior Game Re-
CALLING THB MOOSE
serve, south of the C.P.R. line and the
surplus has crossed to the north of
the tracks offering i ood hunting. He
says that caribou are roaming the
woods in increased numbers, and as
the C.P.R. line is the north boundary
of the game preserve hunters don t
have to go very far for their quarry.
The news from Sheehan's camp at
Lake Penage south west of Sudbury
is also music to the hunters ears.
Deer here are reported to be very
plentiful and sport should be excellent.
Reports turned in by guides of the
Ogilvic Bros Camps on the Tobique
River, N.B. are to the effect that
deer, though very plentiful last
season, show signs of much greater
increase. The same word comes from
A. D. Thomas, at South Milford in
the Kedgemakooge district.
Lining Sights.
Should you follow the deer with
your sights or set your sights ahead
of the deer and let him come on them?
Well, the army training which men
got overseas taught them to consider
the second system the better. Lewis
gunners firing on moving targets **. ere
taught to throw a burst ahead of the
mark, to see where it struck, and
then let the target move onto the
line of fire. Trying to follow a jumping deer in all Its excited movement
is harder, probably, than trying to
guess a spot that the deer will pass—
say an opening in the brush on which
to have time to lay your sights sharp
and true. For casual shooters to get
a little practice with their rifles a
method of letting the deer run on
sights already set is regarded as the
most successful.
TO THE VICTOR THE SPOILS
:oal into a fluid fuel, capable of displacing petroleum and all its products, are successful, Canada will
take the place of the United States
*s the world's provider of liquid
!uel," he further stated.
TIMHKlt SALE Xt-260
iBAI.KD ThNDKHi* nil! be received by the
Minister ut Lni.ds, Victoriu. II, C , nnt Intir
'han noun nn Uie mill day of iiololictr, 19.7,
tut tl.e uuii'lnsse of Licence NU2KII to oln
1,751,00(1 P1I.M. Kir, Lareli. Spriire. VN ble Pine
Mill lien,look and '4,701 Lin. Ft. of Cellar
Piles anil nlllnir on nn area s tuat d mar
Farron, K< otenn** lllstrlet.
.„-,-■ ('-) years will Lie allowei] for removal
ut limber.
Fnritiei •lnrtli-iiliir.-i ol the Cliie    t*,<rester,
,'ict,.rl«, H.C.,ni lllstrlet.Punster, Ns- toil.
GROCERY
Phone 30
Try our Special Tea
at 65c per lb
Shoes, Shirts, Overalls
Good values for your
money.'
Call' and sec 'us before
purchasing.
.JOHN  DONALDSON
General Merchant
Our
//Hobby
is
Good
Printing!
r|Mll's value of n.-II-
■*• prLitcd, net.t appearing stationery us*
a iiiemiNoi yetting and
holdj-t£ desirable ttu>
inefls has been aii'ply
demonstrated. Consult i* before- going
e!si'ivli-*rc.
VVciltling invitations
Ual I'.'ogranis
Businsss cards
Vi  ' ng cards
Sh' " iug tags
Letterheads
Statements
NoteheatU
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
Nev   Type
Latent Style
Faces
THE SUN
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant uiiivsei'veU.sui'veyed tro..ii
lauds may ue pre-empted by i.i-iusii
subjects over lit years oi age, auu oy
aliens on declaring intention io u.*
come llritish subjects, conditional
upou residence, occupation and iiii-
uient tor agricultural purisosis.
Full information concerning regulations regarding lire-einptions is
given in Bulletin No. l Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which cau be obtained free of charge
by alddressing the Department of
Lands, Viivtorla, B. C, or any Government Agent.
Records will be made covering only
land suitable for agricultural "purposes, aud which is not timberland,
I.e., carrying over 6,000 board feet
per acre west of the Coast Range,
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
range.
Applications for pre-cmptionB are.
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording B.vi-
sion, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occujs-.ed for
five years and improvements made to
the value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant clIu be
received.
.For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase ot vacant and unreserved
Crown Lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land is
H per i)cre, and second-class (grazing) land |2.50 per acre. Further
information regarding purchase or
lease of Crown land is given in Bulletin No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase
and Lease of Crown Li,nds.''
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, on conditions including payment of stump-
«■*-»• A-t-i-
HOMESITE   LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may be leased as hoinesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln thei first year, title being
obtainable after residence and improvement conditions tire fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or -
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Prov-
dnce is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual grazing permits are issued based on numbers ranged, priority being slven to
iestaLi^sheil ownora. Stock owners
may form associations for, range management. Free, or partially free, permits are available for settlers, campers and travellers up to teu head.
GRAND F  RKS
Transfer Co.
DAyi.S8HANSBN.Prop.
Cxty llag&afte and General
Transfer
Coal,   Wood and   Ice
(or Sale   .
Office  at   R.   F.   Petrie's Store
Phone 64
PalaceBarber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
..PIR8T 8T., NEXT P. BURNS'
K. SCHKfiK
Wholesale and lie tail
TOBACCONIST
•ater in
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery
Imperial Billiard Parle t
Grand t'ttri'-n. It. C.
A. E. M&D0UGALL
CONTRACTOR ANO BUILDER
Agent
biMiiinkn Mu-.tiuiiciitiii Works
Aabeatoa Proline s Co. Hoofing
.-ESTIMATES FURNISHED
BOX 332
GRAND FORKS. B. C
PICTURES
AND PICTURE FRAMING
Furniture  Made to Order.
Aho Repairing of all Kinda.
Upholstering Neatly Dons
R. G. MoCDTGdEON
WuearMATUoi

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