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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Jun 6, 1924

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 The British  Columbia   Workmen's Compensation Act is  the most complete piece of legislation for the protection of workingmen in the world.    The
 ollver Government put it upon the statute books.    Workingmen should remember this when they cast their ballots on ihe 20th of June.
Victoria, June 5 —Witb thc rac
ing season just twn wirjl? away.ui ►
usual activity is b-itfg shown by
government officials to prt vent aoy
possible entry nf nice horses which
have been in contact witb foot and
mouth disease areas iu California.
Hon. E D. Barrow has received the
backing of the entire agricultural
industry in bis fi-jbt to keep the
plague out of British Columbia,
and nothing will be overlooked to
protect animals in this province.
Newspaper opinions here are
unanimous that nomination day
last week brought out a class of
candidates mnch above the average
in intelligence and business training, and it is cmceded thit the
electorate oi British Co u-nbiaubould
have little difficulty in sending men
to the legislature wbo will be in a
position to frame legislation tbat
will give an immediate impetus to
general development in the provinoe.
Practically every meeting, no
matter by wbom called, bas been
well attended—an evidence of tbe
interest displayed by the publie in
the approaching election. Enthusiasm is not lacking at Provincial and
Conservative gatherings, but tbe
outstanding feature of tbe sbort
campaign so far is the very apparn
ent endorsation given tbe Oliver administration.
The premier admits his faults.
"If you have a better man for tbe job
send him along," is his admonition. "Our government is far from
perfect, but I unhesitatingly con.
tend that it is the beat tbe province
has ever had, and after the govern
ment again receives tbe endorsation
of the electors it will be io a far
better position than ever to proceed
with the policy of administration
that can only result in one thing—
the rapid growtb of population and
industry."
t_And KETTLE VALLEy ORCHARDIST
TWENTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 32
"Tell me what you Kdow is trus*
,1 can.fjuess as well as yon."*?
FRIDAY, JUNE 6,   1924
THREE CANDIDATES
n
IJ
George H. Gray, returning officer,
on Friday afternoon declared the
nomination for the Grand Forks-
Greenwood riding of three candidates for the legislature ae   follows:
Conservative—John McKie, founs<
dryman, of Grand Forks; moved by
J. R. Jackson, seconded by C. M.
Kingston,
Liberal—Ezra C. Henniger, merchant, of Grand Forks; moved by
T. M. Gulley, seconded by Mrs.
Jessie Truax.
Provincial—C. A. S. Atwood,
rancher, of Grand Forks; moved by
Rupert Gray, seconded by J. T.
Lawrence*
Hqn. T. li. Pattullo, minister of
lands, has succeeded in having Newfoundland remove the embargo
against British Columbia fir, which
wood now enters the sister dominion in the same category as tbe eastern species.
An important step in the preven»
tion of accidents in coal mines has
been taken by Hon. William Sloan,
minister of mines. Tbe department
has secured a big supply of tbe most
up to dute "gaB masks" for use by
ceal miners, and officials claim that
in tbe event of disasetous explosions
in coal mines there should be little
lf any loss of life.
Without doubt the outstanding
issue of the present election cam«
paig is freight rates. Opposition
•nd Provincial candidates are taking
keen delight in robbing Premier
Oliver of tbe credit for tbe reductions already gained, but a sure indication of bis success is tbe voluntary service given him by prominent
men from tbe prairie provinces,
Many of tbese have come to British
Columbia to boost for John Oliver,
the man credited with having started and been successful in a movement wbich will mean more to
western Cauadi tban any otber
issue.
THE WEATHER
The following is the minimum
and maximum temperature for eacb
day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on E. F, Law's ranch:
Max.    Min.
May  30—Friday   77 40
31—Saturday  86 49
Juno   1-Sunday  90 46
2—Monday  88 51
3—Tuesday....... 88 46
4—Wednesday... 78 56
5    Thursday  67 44
Inches
BainfaU 10
Fjank Fritz was in town on Saturday from Mayers Creek.
THE CANDIDATES
Alberni—Maj. J, C Johnston
con ,C. A. MacNaugbton prov , Maj.
R. J. Burdeind
Atlin—H F Kergin lib , E J Conway con , B Armour prov.
Burnaby—H M Fraser lib,, T A
Sanderson con , A L McLean prov ,
F Browne lab.
Chilliwack—Hon E D Barrow lib,
J J McPhee con.,John McLeod prov
Columbia—J A Buck ham 'ib., A
M Chisholm con., James 8 Johuston
prov.
Comox--Wm Duncan con., G.
Every Clayton prov , T A Barnard
lab., Paul Harrison ind lib.
Cowicban Newcastle—W W Walk*
em lib., C F Davie con.K F Duncan
prov., Sam Guthrie, lab.
Cranbrook—J Taylor lib, N A
Waflinger con.
Cariboo—J M Yorston lib,, J A
Fraser con., D A Stoddart prov.
Creston—John Norcrosslib., Fred
Lister con., Mrs Annie Foster prov.
Delta—A D Paterson lib., A W
McLelan con., E L Berry prov.,
William Hugb ind,
Dewdney—Maxwell Smith lib., J
A Catberwood con.,H R Smith prov
Esquimalt—Frank Carlow lib., R
H Pooley con., R P Matheson prov.,
Alex Lockley ind con.
Fernie—James McLean lib., Dr
Saul Bonnell con , T Uphill lab.
Fort George—H G Perry lib., F
PBurden con., J A Shearer prov.
Grand Forks Greenwood—E C
Henniger lib., Jobn McKie con,,
CAS Atwood prov.
Islands—M B Jackson lib., C
Peck con , Dr J W Mcintosh prov.
Kamloops—J R Colley lib., A E
Meighen con., W F Palmer prov.
Knslo Slocan—C S Leary lib , W
F Marshall con., J J Threlkeld
prov., G FStirling lab.
Lillooet—A E Munn lib., K J
Robinson con.. Dr N J Paul prov.
Mackenzie—D G McKay lib., M
Manson con., C H Leicester prov.
Manaimo—Hon. William Sloan
lib., F Busby con., A M Whiteside
prov.   W A Pritchnrd lab.
Nelson—K Campbell lib, C F
McHardy con., Geo, Turner lab.
New Westminster—J E Rothwell
lib., Dr A M Sanford con,, G Cas-
i-ady prov., li C Higgins lab.
North OkutiBgan—Dr K C MacDonald lib , AT Howe con., R J
Coltart prov., Price Ellison ind-ccn.
North Vancouver—J M Bryan
lib., W S Deacon con., R F Cruise
prov., G E Hanes and J Orchard
ind.
Omineca—Hon A M Manson lib,
Samnel Crocker con , A Sbelford
prov.
Prince Rupert—Hon TD Pattullo
lib., S M Newton con.,T B MacKay
prov.
ITts HKHTY QKRI- -v
scWi.Cnjrrtfl' /
THE DOLLAR SIGN
Revelstoke—Hon Dr Sutherland
lib., Adam Bell con., J M Humphrey prov.
Richmond Point Grey—H P Mc-
Craney lib.. W W Foster con., G A
Walkem prov.
Saanich—Hon F A Pauline lib.,
T G Coventry con., Munro Miller
prov.
Salmo Arm—FE Wilcox lib, R
Bruhn con , W A Warren prov.
Similkameen—Mrs H McGregor
lib., W A McKenzie con., P W
Gregory prov.
South Okanagan—OB Latta lib.,
J W.Tones con.,H 13 D Lysons prov
J Logie lab.
South Vancouver—W J Buckingham lib., J Cornett con , J Nixon
prov., R H Neelands lab.
Skeena—H C Wrincb lib., RS
Sargent con.
Trail-Rossland—J McDonald lib.,
G H Schofield con., G Dingwall
prov.
Yale—Hou J D MacLean lib.,
John McRae con , J S Fagan  prov.
Victoria—Hon John Oliver, J B
Clearihue.Dr M Rayner.Sam Drake,
liberals; R Hayward, J Hiochliffe,
H D Twigg, G Lyons, conservatives;
C E Todd, E S Woodward, A G
Smith, A Wright, provincials; J H
Hawthornthwait?,Mrs H W Graves,
W E Pierce, labor.
Vancouver—Mrs M ESmith.J W
DeB Farris, Ian Mackenzie,C Woodward, Victor W Odium, Chris McRae, liberals; W J Bowser, Mrs S D
Scott, P D Roe, R L Maitland, S L
Howe, T H Kirk, conservatives; A
D McRae, Mrs J Z Hall, A .McO
Creery, B Showier, F W Rouosefell,
D E McTaggart, provincials; Miss
Priscilla Smith, Angues Mclnnes,
H W Cottrell, E H Morrison, Wm
Dunn, J D Harrington, labor; C C
Peiton, H McEvoy, R Cassidy, in
dependents.
PERFECT ATTENDANCE
The following pupils of the Grand
Forks public school were neither late
nor Absent during the month May:
principal's class.
George Biddiecome, Aubrey Dins
more, Jessie Downey, Edith Euerby,
Edgar Galipeau, Fred Galipeau Alice
George, Grace Glaspell,Rosa Hansen,
Genevieve Harkness, Walter Haw,
Marion Kerby, Francis Larama,
Margaret  Luscombe, Joseph Lyden,
Landlord John Bu 1 to Tenant RamBay—"You say you'll keep the
house in repair if I give you a long lease. You'd better see to tbe roof
at once, or the house won't list you three months I "
J
AT
Blanche Mason, Francis Otterbine,
Frank Price, Henry Reid, AliceScott
Jjseph Simmons, Phyllis Smythe,
Orville Winter.
DIVISION II.
Mary Acres, Linden Benson, Bruce
Brown, Parma Cooper, Edmund
Crosby, Edmund Euerby, George Hadden, William Henniger, Dorothy
Kidd, Glen Murray, Alex McDougail,
Daniel McDougail, Herbert Ominaii-
ney, Martha Otterbine, Ruth Pyrah,
Jessie Ross. John Santano, Ruby
Savage, Ruth Savage, Walton Vant,
James Shannon.
DIVISION III.
Alice Dcport.T, Lillian Dunn,
Georgina Grey, Mabel Hobbins, Dorothy Jones,, John Kingston, Freda
Lyden, Walter Manson, Gordon
Massie, Jigi Maurelli, Eugene McDougail, Fred McKie, Helen McKin
non, Donald McKinnon, Peggy Mudie,
Francis O'Keefe, Walter Ronald,
Elmer Scott, Edna Wiseman.
DIVISION IV.
Charlotte Acres, Marvin Bailey,
Jean Clark, El > era Colarch, Norman
Cook, Raymond Dinsmore, Colin
Graham, Katherine Henniger, Marie
Kidd' Mary King-ston, Betty Mc.
Galium, Lily McDonald, Fred Mason,
Elizabeth Mooyboer, Harry Nucich,
Gladys Pearson, Louis Santano, Fred
Smith, Roy Walker
DIVISION V.
Jack Acres, Harry Anderson, Bev
erly Benson, Rosamond Buchan, Ian
Clark, Robert Foote, Jean Gray,
Ellen Hansen, Clarence Hardy,
VilmerHolm, Sereta Hutton, Ernest
Hutton, Harold Jackson, Zelma Larama, Lee Maurelli, Edith Patterson,
Mildred  Patterson, Vyvyan Plant.
DIVISION VI.
Ruth Boyce,Evelyn Collins, Ernest
Crosby, Ernest Danielson, Bernice
Donaldson, ISlrie Donaldson, Aleck
Hobbins, Margaret Kingston, Betty
Massie, Violet McDougail, Peggy McCallum, Bruce McDonald, Madeline
MDougall, Marjorie Otterbine, Elsie
Soott, Billy Tntt, Agnes Winter,
Jack Sales.
DIVISION VII.
Mildred Anderson, Angelo Colarch,
Evelyn Cooper, Charlie Egg, Clarence Henderson, Winnifred Lightfoot, Joe Lyden, Daisy Malm, Hazel
Mason,Laura Maurelli, Harry Murray
John McDonald Marguerite McDonald, Florence McDougail, Ron»ald
McKinnon, Minnie McNiven, Helen
Pell, Elsie Prudhomme, George Savage, Dorothy Liddicoat.
DIVISION   VIII.
John Baker, Albert Deporter,
Peter DeWilde, Albert Euerby, Bruce
Grey, Bessie Hendersonc May Joues,
EyrtleKidd, Windsor Miller.Clarence
McDougail, Mary McKinnon, Joe
Nucich, Josephine Ruzicka, Aleck
Shkuratoff, Tony Santano.
DIVISION IX.
Ernest Angliss, Shepherd Boyce,
Alberta lddlecome, Alice Bird, Katherine Davis, Dorothy Donaldson,
TereBa Frankovich, Harry Hanson,
Bruce Harkness, Chester Hutton,
Dorothy Innes, Dolores Kirkpatrick,
Norman McDonald, Florence McDonald, Gordon Mudie, Winnifred
O'Keefe, Phyllis Simmons, Edith
Gray, Clarence Wren, Lawrence
Wren.
DIVISION X.
Mary Colarch, Juney Danielson,
Wilnia Davis, Ernest Heaven, Helen
Harkoff, Helmer Jackson Fern Hen
niger, Lola Hutton Verouicii Kuva,
Janet Mason, Arthur Massie. Jean
McDonald, Grace McDonald, Jack
McDonald, Ben Rolia. George Robertson, Mona Rylett, Nollio Skuratoff
Mike Boyko, 8tevo Boyko, William
ina Gray, Norman Ross.
DIVISION XI.
Lillian Riddleooine, Ethnl Boyce,
Gladys Clark. Doris Egg, Irene Hutton, Mary Kuva, Kathleen MacDougall, Au'.y Miller, Mabel Miller,
Lewis Wren.
John ArmstrongMacKelvie.mem-
ber of parliament for Yale, died of
heart disease at bis apartments in
the Alexander hotel, Ottawa, at 1
o'clock Wednesday morning. He
was in his fifty-ninth year.
Mr. MacKelvie, after attending
the night session of the house, retired s 10:30, complaining of pains
over his heart. About 1 o'clock Mrs.
MacKelvie was awakened by her
husband, who was io great distress.
She roused Senator Scbaffner, who
lived in adjoining apartment?, but
although he rushed to the bedside
of the stricken man it was too  late.
John Armstrong MacKelvie was
formerly editor of the Vernon News.
He was first elected to the house of
commons as u Conservative in tbe
hy-election of 1920. He was re.
turned to tbe bouse again in the
general electioas of 1921 He wss
born on September 14, 1865, at St.
John, N B , and was the son of
Thomas M. MacKelvie and Sarah
Janet Armstrong. His father was
Scotch and bis mother a Canadian.
He was educated in u grammar
school at St. John,
February 15, 1892, he was married
to Jessie Stuart Mclntyre, daughter
of Donald Mclntyre if Inverness-
shire, Scot and. He perved during
tbe Riel rebellion in 1885 in the
Albertr Mounted R-ifl-s, nuovii.-g
west to Vancouver in 1888, and lo
Vernon in 1889.
He became interested in tbe Vernon News, wbich paper he edited
from 1893 till his election lo Otta
wa. He was a Mason aDd an Odd
Fellow.
Edward Akin Brau, son of J. and
Mrs. Brau, 1759 Eighth Avenue
West, was found dead yesterday
lying on a bed b,*:-ide his Bleeping
father, according lo the police. Ac
cording to the p 'lice report, the
fatbertook the chihl and lay down
on the bed with it ind fell asleep,
MrB Brau, who was absent,returned
bome ami found tbe baby dead. —
Vanoouver Sun.
ABSENTEES MAY
CASTTHEIRVOTES
persons who find themselves
away from home on election day
may yet vote if they arc on the list
io iheir own riding by reason of tbe
absentee clause in the elections act.
They vote as do others here, but in
a separate booth and the ballotB are
placed in a special ballot box. All
absentee votes are then segregated
and sent to tbe returning officer in
their respective idings, who keep
them sealed for twenty-one days.
On the twenty-first day after elec
tion the envelopes containing the
absentee votes are opened by tbe
returning ofiicers and counted in
the presence of representativ s of
the political parties. The result of
this balloting is then communicated
to the government at Victoria.
LIBERAL MEETING
A big Liberal meeting
will be held in the Empress Theatre on Thursday evening, June 12th,
when the following speakers will address the electors:
MISS SUTHERLAND
G. G. McGEER
S. G. TOBIN
of Leduc, Alberta
E. G. HENNIGER
Liberal Candidate
Everybody is invited to
attend. THI BUN: GRAND IWJBKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
®te (Srattli larks 8>ittt
AN INDEPENDENT   NEWSPAPER
G. A. EVANS. EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
St'SUBfSORIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) $1.00
One Year (in the United States)    1.50
Henniger is now entitled to the support of
the ranchers who benefited by his work, because a member shonld receive the support of
his constituents as long as he is loyal to the
constituency. We refrain from commenting
further on this subject at present, because the
report quoted above may, after all, be only
street talk,
f-Addresr -" **—
t
Pho-jk 101R
OFFICE.*    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
cations to
|sTni* Grand Pork.5 Sun
Grand Forks, B. C^
FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1924
r
Having acquired by inheritance tho Pacific
Great  Eastern  railway,   what other   course
could the Oliver government have taken to
safeguard the huge initial expenditure  of the
people's  money than that which it  has  pursued?   If it had   scrapped  the system  for
old iron this money would have bee . irretrievably lost; if the  road had been handed over
to a competing oompany there would have been
a loud howl from the electorate   And in view
of these facts, fair-minded men  are forced  to
admit that a difficult problem Iris  been handled with consummate skill.    The  report  of
the royal commission shows that the road has
been efficiently managed and operated; that in
many instancies the cost  of construction has
been below that paid by private corporations.
This is a remarkable record for a government
undertaking.    After all, the money  that has
gone into enterprise has not been entriely lost.
Most people in discussing the subject talk  if
it   had been   burned up, or had magic like
vanished from the face of the earth.    This is
not the case.   All  of this  money is in existence.    Most of it, we   dare say, is still  in
Hritish Columbia.    In agreat number of cases
the taxpayer has taken the money  out of his
rigbt-aand trouser's pocket, and  when it returned in an increased amount as payment for
labor or supplies  put it back  into  the left-
hand pocket.    Looked at from this angle the
road is not as heavy a burde*. on the taxpayers as  is generally  imagined.   And it is not
reasonable to suppose that it will  always  be
operated at a loss.    The  Oandian National,
under wise management, is beginning  to  pay
its own way, and with the development of the
territory which   the  Paoifie Great  Eastern
serve! there is no reason why that line should
not do the same. Some optimists predict that
in the  near future it will be a reveuue producer and bring wealth into the public treasury.   We believe they are right.   But even  if
this rosy prophesy should fail,  the road  will
eventually justify its existence by develeping
a portion ofthe province and in assuring the
people competitive railway rates.   The  most
sensible objection to the Pacific Great Eastern
js that the euterprise was started a few years
before the road was needed.
John Gloves Symmes lived from 1778 to
1829, He claimed that the earth was open
at the north and south poles forthe admission
of light and air, and contained within it other
concentric globes all inhabited in a like manner. His belief in this theory was so strong,
notwithstanding the general ridicule heaped
upon "Symmes' Hole"—as it was popularly
called—that he both wrote and lectured on
the subject. A petition was finally presented
to the American congress in 1823 asking that
an expedition be fitted out to investigate, but
nothing was done about it.
1923
521,707.000
FT. BM. I
1916
43,676,000
FT. BM.
S. T. HULL
.Established 1910
Real Estate and Insurance
Resident Agent Grand Porks Tov.iisite
Company, Limited
LUMBER   EXPORT  TRADE
1923.. 521,707,000/t.ie:
UMBEK   EXTORT  TRADE
1916. . 43,676,000/t.i*
This series oj articles communicated by tlte
Timber Industries Council of British Colmnbia
Whether one takes his cue in dress from
Lord Renfrew, or from Rudolph Valentino, it
would seem that suspenders are the order of
the day. When told that Rudolph Valentino,
the popular movie actor, had adopted brightly-
hued suspenders, the prince replied that his
were only a modest white. Anticipating the
demand that will follow the prince's intimate
confession, the far-sighted manufaoturers are
said to be redoubling their efforts on the production of the white article.
Opposition and McRae candidatss have
suddenly fallen in love with freight rates
equalization and are making all kinds of
promises to continue the fight started by
Premier Oliver if the people will elect them to
olliee. The only safe way to get equalized
rares is to vote for the government that commenced the fight for them.
Jt will be unfortunate for the people of
British Columbia if the ni.imory of the elector.-; i.s so feeble that they hive forgotten the
reasons why they rejected the Bowser government eight years ago.
If tliere is any truth in street talk, some of
the ranchers who, a couple of years ago, cried
loudly for government assistance for an irrigation system, have not only declared their
intention of voting against the Liberal candi
date but are actively working against him. If
these reports are true, we confess we can not
fathom their line of reasoning nor name the
brand of gratitude with which they intend to
repay a public service faithfully performed
I The government being skeptieal of the ad visa
b;lityof the scheme,Mr.Henniger had to work
hard, very hard, for the grant that installed
the system.   An opposition member, or a less
Idefermined   government  member  than   Mr.
Henniger, could  not   have obtained the ap-
The most amazing race of human beings is
undoubtedly the El Moro, a tribe of "fish
men," who inhabit tne deseiv wastes bordering Lake Rudolf, in Kenya colony, Africa.
This tribe represents the only known specimens of semi amphibious people, and it is a
enrious fact that any tribesman dies if he is
kept without water for about three hours. As
a rule they drink every hour dur-'ng the day,
for even an hour and a half without wator
causes cracking and bleeding of the lips. Th e
El Moro tribesmen spend their days swim
ming in the waters of Lake Rudolf, and fishing
from frail rafts constructed palm branches.
Fish is almost their only diet, aud they have
no opportunity at varying their menu unless
they are fortunate enough to spear a hippopotamus. Tue water of Lake Rudolf is un-
drinkable to anyone but the El Moro, for it
contains a large quantity of soda and has an
objectionable taste. The properties of soda in
that lake increases yearly, and it is believed
to be this fact that has caused the "fish men"
to become a deformed race
cAncienMHistory*
Items Taken From The Orand Forks Sun for tbe Corresponding
Week Twenty Yean Ago
Pierre Dennis, a half-breed, wqila half
mak, picked up a rattlesnake by its tail last
week near Osoyoos. His snakeship turned and
bit the half breed between the fingers. He
was found lying unconscious, with the dead
snake coiled around his hand, by a man herding horses forR. G. Sidley, who at once went
to Oro for a doctor. The doctor tried to force
some whisky down the Indian's throat. Strange
to say, the patient resisted taking the medicine.
Pierre is expected to recover.
Tha next dividend of the Granby stock may
not be as large as the last one, owing to a disastrous rouaway of the smelter team Thursday
afternoon, which left the handsome top buggy
iu a mass of ruins as a result of bumping into
a Uhinaman's fence too suddenly.
P. T. McOalluin, of this city, recently sold
a portion of the McCallnm property below
Midway to two gentlemen from London, England, who intend to go in for fruit growing on
an extensive scale.
Thirteen carloads of machinery to be used
in railway construction arrived in the city
Wednesday evening.
R. H. Gilpin this week sold his ranch to L.
Hansen of northern Utah for $30,000.
J. H. Kennedy, who will be chief engineer
ofthe V. V. & E. in charge of construction
between here and Phoenix, arrived in the city
Sunday eAening in Supt. Morgan's private car.
J. H. Hodson, the West end merchant, will
open a branch store on Government avenue
adjoining ehe Queens hotel.
Already the city has taken on a livelier appearance as the result of the certainty of the
immediate resumption of railway construction
ipriafion. This being an admitted fact, Mr.]in the Boundary country
UPK-CONTitJL PLEBISCITES ACT
Pi.0Ci.AMA.'UN OF RETUANIN6
-.OFFICER
Province of British Columbia.
In tho Urau-i Forks-Grccnwood
Kluclt-ral District:
To Wits
PU1JL10 NOTICE ia hereby given
to the li lector.-, if the Electoral District aforesaid tint I have received His
Majesty's Writ to uie directed, and
bearing date the 10th day of May,
1924, commanding me to cause the
following question, namely:—
Do yoa approve of the sale
Liof .beer by the glass in
licensed premises without
a bar under Government
control and regulation?
to be submitted according to law to
the Electors qualified to vote for the
election of a member of the Lqgishi
tive Assembly for the Electoral Dis
trict aforesaid; aud, further, that in
obedience to the said Writ a poll
iJiall bo opened at eight o'clock in the
forenoon and shall be closed at seven
o'clock in the afternoon on the 20th
day of June, 1924, for taking and re
coiving the votes of thesaid Electors
in each polling division of the Elec
tural District aforesaid at the respective places following:—
POLLING DIVISIONS.
Beaverdell Fife
Boundary Falls Grand Forks
Bridesville Greenwood
Brown Creek     Midway
Carmi Paulson
Cascade Biverside
Christian Val ley Rock Creek
Eholt Westbridge
Of which all persons are hereby required to take notice aud to govern
themselves accordingly.
Given   uuder   my hand at Greenwood, this lCtb day of May, 1924.
GEORGE H. GKAY,
Returning Officer.
K. SCHEER
Wholesale ami Itctail
TOBACCONIST
Doaler in'
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery
Farms     Orchards    City Property
*A(tenW at Nelaon,  Calgary, Wthnlpi-sj aud
other Prairie points. Vancouver Agent-- :
PBNDBB INVESTMENTS
BATTKNBUBY LANDS I.T1..
Ralabllslicil in l'.'l", wenre lis a po.tllon to
fisrtilKh reliable information concerning thin
district.
Wi-lso fnr Tree, IttorAture
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Forks, !?. C.
E.C. Henniger Co,
Grain, Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cci tent and Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks, li. C.
O0RSPRINGAND
SUMMERGOODS
are now on our
shelves;
The stock is complete in very
line, and up to-date and of
superior quality.
GROCERIES —This de
partment is well stocked
with everything needed
by the housewife in the
kitchen. The goods are
fresh and of high grade.
CLOTHING—Our clothing and dry goods department is betterstocked
, with seasonable goods
than ever.
PRICES—It will pay you
to get our prices before
buying elsewhere.
DONALDSON
!P(ione 30
S
C.V. Meggitt
Ileal Estate and Insurance
ORCHARDS, FABM   LANDS   AND CM I
IPBOPBRTY
Excellent facilities for selling your fain-.s
We have agents at   all    Coast and Pra't e
Points
WK CABBY AUTOMOBILE INSURAVl.,*.
DKALBB IN POLKH, POSTS AND TIBS,
AND FABM PBODUCB
Itoli.i Isle Inform itiiin i CKisnlln; s.lili 'llitrc
liia-fiillr fni'illshod    Wo  sollolt   your  in'.
WARNINC
I
Dear Sir:
The hours set by the City Council from this date for
Lawn and Garden Sprinkling are: from 6 a.m. to 9 a.
in. and trom 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and such sprinkling
shall be done only through sprays and nozzles exceeding not three sixteenth inch in diameter. Consumers
are requested in case of fire alarm t<> turn off all taps.
I am instructed by the City Council to impress upon
you the necessity of strictly adbering to the above
regulations as any person guilty of infraction is liable
to prosecution.
Grand Forks, May 12th,  1924.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
City Clerk.
Massey-Harris
IMPLEMENTS
We are agents for the well known Massey-
Harris line of farm equipment. Let us
figure on your needs.
A Complete Line of Garden Tools
MILLER & GARDNER
Furniture and Hardware
r
The ordinary way to measure distance is
by miles. You think any place you have
in mind is so many milesaway. Measure
the distance by minutes. Say to yourself,
"Such or such a place is so many minutes away," meaning, of course, that if
the telephone is used distance does not
need to be considered.-
If you want to talk to a friend or discuss a business matter, no place is very
faraway. Not only that, but the means
of communicBtion is always right at hand.
Evdry telephone is a long distance telephone. Besides, if you talk in the evenings you can take advantage of the special rates
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY THE SUN: GRAND FORKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
le/J*
§j CLEAR THE TRACK
S     pEANUT POLITICS is trying to hold  up
-- the   Relief  Express.   By your vote re
move this obstruction to proserity on June
20th. A vote for the Liberal Candidate is a
vote for John Oliver, the engineer who will
bring this Relief Express, bearing prosperity for British Columbia, safely through.
It carries Equalized Freight Rates—the one
fundamental that is essential to the prosperity of every man, woman and child in
this Province.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
Shipments of grain from Vancou-
ter for the 1923-24 season have now
passed the 41,000,000 bushel mark.
Officials estimate that the 50,000,-
000 bushel mark set for the season
will be surpassed in the near futurs.
i
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
fl
n
n
Equalized Freight Rates will bring millions to our Province; will double our population in ten years; will develop our ports;
will bring to us basic manufacturing industries and their payrolls; will develop
the necessary market for our agricultural
products.
Equalized Freight Rates means more
money—more industries—more people-
lower taxes—lower cost of living.
Equalized Freight Kales is the hinge on which the
door of prosperity hangs. John Oliver and his Liberal
Government have thc key in the form of the sympathetic ear of a Like Liberal Government at Ottawa.
Your vote for the Liberal Candidate is a
message to the industrial, financial and political interests of the East that you are behind
John Oliver in his fight for prosperity. Remember this on JUNE TWENTIETH.
VOTE LIBERAL
**)
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Reports from England state that
it has been universally conceded that
Canada's pavilion wag in the best
condition when the Kine opened ths
British Empire Exhibition at Wembley on April 23rd. "It waa the
Canadian building," the repoTts saM,
"spick and span and complete to
the last nail that led all others la
the race to the finish in time for
to-day's official opening."
Over 3,000 settlers left Liverpool
for-Canada on April 24th. Thirteen
hundred of these sailed on the Canadian Pacific liner "Montcalm," including a party of 200 skilled workers from Manchester, 38 belonging
to engineering trades, 40 to building trades and 42 farm hands.
Eighty skilled workers from Leeds
and a party of engineers from Barrow-in-Furness were also on board.
A total of 49,000,000 salmon trout
cgg3 has been collected during the
last season by thp Department of
Marine antl Fisheries in Lake
Huron, Georgian Bay and Lake
Superior. The total number obtained compares favorably with the
average collections of recent years
and is sufficient to fill all' the
hatcheries on the Great Lakes en
gej-ed in the propagation of salmon
trout.
     -
Graphic and interesting educational motion pictures will bring
Alberta's various resources to the
eyes of those who attend the British
Empire Exhibition this year. In
addition to pictures illustrating the
life of Alberta's citizens on the
farms, on the ranches and in the
mining districts, charts will be used
to bring out interesting comnilatione
of statistics illustrative of the province's agricultural and industrUl
output.
Carrying an invitation to the
President of the United States to
attend the celebrations of the 140th
anniversary of the settlement of
Upper Canada by the United Empire Loyalists, which will be held
In June, Miss G. Lazier, herself a
descendant of the Loyalists, left
Belleville recently on horseback to
ride to Washington alone, a distance of 600 miles. Elaborate arrangements for the celebrations ars
being made and it is expected that
thousands of visitors will attend.
An attractive booklet entitled,
"A Week in Quebec in the Spring,"
foy Betty Thornley, internationally
known writer associated with
"Vogue" and other magazines, has
just been added to the series of
artistic pamphlets published by the
Canadian Pacific Railway. It describes the Ancient Capital and its
environs, is illustrated by many
striking photographs and bound in
a cover which reproduces in natural
colors the pattern of cloth called
catalogue, woven by Quebec habitant
women.
That the Indian village of Hochc-
laga, whioh stood on the site of
the present city of Montreal, was
a place of about fifty wooden houses
having a population of some 4,000
souls when Jacques Carrier sailed
up the St. Lawrence, was thensasser-
tion made by Dr. W. D. Llghthall
before the Antiquarian and Numig-
N matic Society of Montreal recently.
Dr. Lighthall was able to give the
boundaries of the village and described it as resembling the home
of Cedric the Saxon, in "Ivanhoe."
Apropos of the recent "Save the
Forest Week," E. W. Beatty, President of the Canadian Pacific Railway, stated: "A week's concentration on saving the forests of Canada is well worth while—much better to make it a 'Forest Saving
Year' and, if the forest resource;
of this countrv nre to be conserverl
in adsquately avail the greater Can-
ada of a few years hence it must
be a 'Fores* Saving Generation.'
'■'• rest wastage is to-day tr igieally
' ■', great and wo Canadians must
%.*,- and are paying for the loss."
TIMBER
BritiSbh Columbia's Greatest
Industry has helped to build
and is now further developing
a huge trade with the world*
Raw material is essential to
keep, fosier and enlarge Ms
business.
Prevent Forest Fires
It Pays
The man who is wronged
can forget it; the man who
wronged him never can.
DEAFNESS CAN BE
CURED
lll'Al'NI.SN, NOISKS IN Till! IIUAI) AMI
NASAL CATAKItll
Tho UOW Ccjrsi issorstal rnmuily smilei-
"I.AKMALKNK" (Reftd.'
if* u simple nannies-, hoin<"-treutin"iit which
absolutely otirei deafues-*. runs-'-in thf head,
eto. NO BXpENSIVK APPLTANOB8 NliKDICI)
Fur this nev (>iiitment, niNtautly opo rules
upon the affected pints witli complete nud
permanent success. BdORttS OF VVONDBR**
WL CURBS HKPOItKI).
69 HI.UHLK TESTIMONY.
Mrs. K. WlUirisuu, of SM Road, -Stroud,
writes:—"Pirtiiuo coulil trouble yuu to send
me another bnjt of the ointment. It is not for
myst'.r, hut fi r a friend of mine who I-as bnd
as I wus,uud c "Uinotget nny rest fir tha noises
in the iii-ii'l. ! feel a new womau, and ean ito
to bed now and trot a good night's rest, ivnlob
I bad not beeu able to do for many months.
It is a wonderful remedy and I am moat delighted to recommend it."    ;    .    .
Mrs. K. Crowe, of WIMtehorse Road, Croy
dou, writes:--"I am pleased to tell yoo that
the small tin of  ointment you sent to me at
Tentnor.ha* proved a complete MiQceas. my
hearing is now quite normal, and thohorrl*
ble head noises have ceased. Tho art ton of
this new remedy must be very remarkable,
for I have been troubled with these com
plaints for nearly teu years, and have had
some of lhe very bust medical advice toKether
with other expensive instruments all to no
purpose. I need hardly say bow very grateful I um, fo my life has undergone uu entire
change."
Try one bc s to-day.which oan be forwarded
to any address on receipt of money order for
tt.00.   THBP.SISNOTHKiBBTTKR AT   ANY
PRICK.
Address orderj lo:—
THE "LARMALBNB" CO.,
lO.South View, Watlin- St., Dartford,
Rent, England.
FOREST BRANCH
VICTORIA, B.C-
The shortest
thing in the
world—
isn't a mosquito's eyelash or a gnat's
whisker, or any other part of any insect
whatsoever-IT IS THE MEMORY OF
THE PUBLIC.
If j you doubt this ask the first men
men you meet the following questions:
21 When did the 1131 cross the Atlantic?
Who was her pilot? On What date was
Lord Kitchener drowned? What was
the name of thc ship that blew up and
almost wiped out the city of Halifax?
What German submarine torpedoed
the Lusijania?
It is a safe bet that you would not
get one correct answer.
Now do you sec the necessity of persistent advertising? When the details
of events of world wide importance are
so soon forgotten how do you expect
the public to remember you unless
YOU TELL'EM--and keep telling them?
ADVERTISE!
1
One step won't take very far,
J You've got to keep on walking;
One word won't tell folks who you arc,
You've got to keep on talking;
One inch won't make you very tall,
You've got to keep on growing;
One little ad. won't do it all,
You've got to keep them going.
r
Brown started out without a cent;
He's rich now and still rising;
Some say 'twas luck; some say 'tw
pluck;
HE says 'twas advertising.
tt* THI SUN: GIAND FORKS. BRITISH COLUMBIA
Quality Above All
This has been our policy -with
•PH
H499
Millions will now use no other blend.
The quality never varies. — Trylt today.
News of the City
E. C. Henniger, Liberal candidate,
and I). McPherson have been upends*
ins the greater part of the present
week in Greenwood and in the
western end nf the riding. The
outlook in that portion of tbe diss,
trict for a big Liberal majority,
says Mr. HeQoiger, ii decidedly
rosy.
What rain we did get this week
was welcome. It did a lot of good
and enooreged the orjps to cons,
tinue in their growing operations.
The weather man has pr .noised us
some more.
Thomas Dunlap, of Chesaw, was
in the city last week and made a
trip of inspection to the Maple Leaf
mine in Franklin cainp.
Gen. A. D. Mcltae will address
the McKae party adherents in the
Empress theatre on Mjiday evening.
Krank Cory el returned to the city
this week from New Denver for a
short visit. He jb eogged in tbe
pole business at the latter place.
The British Columbia Chamber
of Mines desires to have samples of
ore from a-i many mines as possible
for the Vancouver Exhibition, to be
heid August 9 to 16. These samples
must necessarily be representative
especially irom new properties or
nld mfnes that have  resumed ship-
Provincial Elections Act
Form 12 (Section 41)
PROCLAMATION OF RETURNING
OFFICER
Province of British Columbia.
In lhe Grand Fords-Oruciiwood
liU'i issr.il District.
To Wit.
PUBLIC NOlTOEis hereby given
to tho Voters of Grand Forks-Green-
wood Liectoral Distr.ct that in obedience to His Majesty's Writ to ine
directed, and bearing date the Tenth
day of May, in lhe yoar of our Lord
ono tbousaud nine hundred and
twonty-four, I require the presence of
the said Voters at iuy olliee at Greenwood on the 30tli day of May, at
twelve o'clock noon, for the purpose
oi no moating and electing a person
to represent them in the Legislature
of tins Province.
Lhe mode ot u raiuatioii of eandi-
il ii's shall be as follows: —
I'he can lidato shall lie nominated
in writing; the writing shall be sub.
seribad by two registered voters of
tlie district as proposer and seconder,
and by ten other voters of the said
district as assenting to the nomina
tion, and shall be delivered to the
Hei urning Ollicer at anytime between
the date of this Proehmialion and one
p.m. of the day of nomination. In the
event of a poll being necessary, such
poll will open the 20th day of June
at
Beaverdell Fife
Boundary Falls Grand B'orks
Bridesville Greenwood
Brown Creek       Midway
Carmi Paulson
Cascade Riverside
Christian Valley Rook* Creek
Eholt Westbridge
of which every person is hereby re«
quired to take notice aud govern "himself accordingly.
Gi«en under my hand at Green
wood, thie 1 (ith day of Msy, one
thousand nine hundred atid twenty-
four.
GEORGE II. GRAY,
Returning Ollicer.
ment. Owners ol proper ies can
send samples properly labeled wilh
name of mine, location, value, and
any other information to Philip B.
Freeland, resident eugine:r, Grand
Forks, jwho will see that tbey are
shipped to Vancouver.
While on his way from this city
to Greenwood last Tuesday, Axel
Gustafson's car went over tbe bank
on the Doukhobor bill. Mr. Gus-
talson sustainrd a broken collar
bone and soveral broken ribs. He
was taken to the Or md Forks hos.-
pital. Pneumonia bas set in, but
his condition i0 repotted to be improving.
Hev. and Mrs. F. E. Hunnalle
visited Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Walks,
inshaw in Greenwood last Sajurday,
Mr. and Mrs. A. Cavaye, of Edin-
burgb, Scotland, arrived in the city
last week on a v sit to their son, D.
Cavaye.
Preparations are being made to
open Liberal committee rooms in
tbe old post office building on First
street.
At tbe special meeting of tbe city
council last Thursday evening Miss
Mabel Foote was a* poinded to the
position of assistant in the city
offic;*-,
Sargent Reid, of theR.C.M.P.,was
i tbe city this week from Penticton.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
oii.pments of grain from the
Grande Prairie and Peace River
districts over the Edmonton, Dunvegan and British Columbia Railway during the past season have totalled 2,471,000 bushels of wheat
•nd 1,700,500 bushels oi otber
grains.
The longest solid train of red
cedar edge grain shingles ever
hauled across the continent left
Vancouver, B.C., recently for Chi-
cago and the Eastern States. Several other long trains of this product will be shipped ln the near future by the Hunting Merritt Lumber Company, by whom the consignment was forwarded
A despatch recently sent from
London states that Professor Carlyle, of the E. P. ranch, ii sailing
for Canada shortly, taking back
with him a number of brood maret
and other stock for the ranch. Th*
Prince of Wales continues to evinca
the deepest interest ln all the doings of the ranch and keep* ste
close touch with things there.
Approximately the same acreage
as produced uie West's bumper
crop last year will be under cultivation this season. The outlook
now is that over 14,000,000 acres of
land will be ready for seed under
generally favorable conditions. The
estimated acreage to be seeded this
year, by provinces, Is as follows!
Manitoba, 4,450,400; Saskatchewan,
8,364,190;  Alberta, 8,472,315.
The value of boots end shoes exported by Canada during the year
ended March, 1924, more than doubled the value of Canadian boots
and shoes bought by other countries
during the preceding year. Last
year the exporta tions were valued
at $304,913, and for the preceding
year at $130,034. The United
States was the chief buyer, taking
2,227 pairs, with Japan second, taking 1,628 pairs.
Concluding her rouni-the-world
eruise, the palatial Canadian Pacific steamship 'Empress of Canada," docks at Vancouver on May
24th. Reports indicate that this
four-months' pleasure voyage under
the genial care of Captain Robinson, hero of the Japanese disaster,
has   been   a   splendid   success,   the
Jiassengers being loud in their dec-
arations of satisfaction.
During the fiscal year ending
March 31st, 1924, Canada imported
goods to the value of $893,335,491,
an increase of $91,000,000 compared with the previous similar
twelve months, while she exported
$1,045,141,056, an increase of about
$110,000,000. The total trade increased in that twe've-month period by ahout $210,000,000, compared with the corresponding period a year "go.
^genuine
m
Say "Bayer Aspirin"
INSIST? Unless you sec file
"Bayer Cross" on tablets you
are not getting the genuine
Bayer Aspirin proved safe by-
millions and prescribed by physicians for 24 years.
O fes"**Accept only -
a^Otf^^ Bayer package
which contains proven directions
Handy "Bayer' "boxes of 12 tablets
Also bottles of 1*4 and 100—Druggists
Aspirin Is the txade mark (registered In
Canada) of Bayi- Manufacture ot Mono-
BcetleacldeBter of .'allcyllcocld
FRUITGROWERS
We will handle your Fruit and
Vegetables for 10 per cent or
buy it outright. Write us for full
particulars.
LANGSTAFF LIMITED, MOOSE JAW, SASK.
SECTIONS 103 AND 163
PROVINCIAL   BLKCTIONS   ACT
UltAN'l) FOKKS-HRIiKNWOUU
ELKCTOliAL UISTIHCT
I'he following Candidates have appointed their Election Agents as follows:
Candidate, Oliuton A. S. Atwood;
At-ent, E. P. Kier, Rancher, Qreenwood, B.C.
Candidate, E. C. Henniger; Agent,
Frank B. Hetherington, Barrister,
Grand Forks, B. C.
Candidate, John McKie; Agent, A.
F. Crowe, Barrister, Qrand Forks,
B 0.
(liven nnder inv hand this 29th day
of May, 1924, at Greenwood, B. C.
QEORGE HERBERT GRAY,
Retnrning Officer
"Now You* re Fixed Up for the Summer'
The Battery Man is your best friend when you sre getting the car
Into condition for summer driving. He will advise you, whether it's a new
pov.'( ful, long-lived Prest-O-Lite or your old battery, overhauled, that you
need to make the engine run with perfect rythm, the starter turn the
engiiie over powerfully and feed lights and horn with abundant current.
More than one thousand battery dealers in Canada recommend and sell
Pret..-0-Lite Storage Batteries because they know that back of every Prest-
O-Lite is the largest battery plant in the British Empire, and a nation-wide
chain of service stations where owners of a Prest-O-Lite battery can get
prompt, courteous service and genuine Prest-O-Lite repair parts.
tomqe
„attery
. —tighttotevery'car
McPHSRSON'S GARAGE
Grand Forks. «. C.
JUST ARRIVED
A FRESH STOCK OF
Bristling Sardines Fat Herring
Soused Mackerel Fresh Mackerel
Baby Mackerel
Something New.   Drop in Saturday and Try a
Sample
CITY GROCERY
Phone 35        H. H. Henderson, Prop.
HIDE THEBB PIS CLEVELAND
IT brings the whole country for miles around within easy reach.
Have you seen the new models! They're as graceful as swallows! As
bright as new eoin! As weatherproof as aduek? Automobile Steel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamier .Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Real Quality. Real
Valuo.   Kasy Terms. We are tbe people to mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER &»SiK
Open Saturday Evenings Till 10 o'Cloek
Ship I our Cream to
The Kettle Valley
Creamery Go.
We pay the highest price and assnre
you the most accurate test. Give your
local creamery your trade.
KETTLE VALLEY IttEAMERY COMPANY
A. E.
CONTRACTOR ANO BUILDER
Agent
bo-minion Moauincntnl Worka
Asbestos Products Co. Roofing
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
BOX 332 BRAND FORKS, B. C
GRAND FORKS
Transfer Company
DAVIS 8 HANSBN. Props
City Baggage and General
'Transfer
Coal,  Wood and   Ice
for Sale
Office  at R.  F.  Petrie's Store
Phone 64
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty*
101
illTAMENDIHTS
PRE-EMPTION*
Vacant,       unreserved,       surveyed
rown landa may bs -pre-empted by
'rltish subjects over 11 years ot as*.
ind Sj aliens sn dselarlng Intention
to   beeotni   British   subjeota,   conditions!   upon   residenoe,    occupation,
and   improvement   tor    agricultural
mmm,
Fall Information oon<*emlng regulations regarding pre-emptions is
liven ta Bulletin No. 1, Lind Series,
''Bow to Pre-empt Laad," copies ef
whioh ean be obtained tree of oherge
by addressing the Depart .nt of
Lends, Viotorla, B.O, or to aay Oev-
■rnm-snt Agent
Keoards will be (ranted covering
onl-f land suitable lor agricultural
purpoeis, and whioh is not Umber-
land ta, carrying over 5400 board
fas) per aore west of the C si .Un,-
and MM feet per aore eata of that
Rtn-a-s.
aa-sllaaUoas far pre-emptions are
o M Bddriwil to the Land Com-
ulssnener of the Land Rsoordlng Division, In whioh ths land applied for
■j situate*, and are made on printed
srma copies of which oan be ob-
taiaed from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emrMons must be occupied for
t*S*S pears aad improvements made
to Value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating- at least five
aorea, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed lnforn >tlon see
the    Bulletin    "How    to    Fre-empt
Laad.'*
PUROHASE
Applications are received for piy
abase of vacant and unreserved
drown lands, not being tlmberland,
tor agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (amble) land Is $6
par acre, ami second-class (grazing)
land (2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands ls given ln Bulletin
Iva, 10, Land Series, "Purohase and
T^ease of Crown Lands."
still, factory, or Industrial sites on
Imber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
mar be purchased or leased, the conditions       Including      payment      of
ituajpagfl
HOMESITE LIASES
Unsurveycd areas, not exceeding 10
acres, may be leased as homealtes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the flrst year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
Per grazing and Industrial pur-
posss.i area; not exceeding 640 aores
may be len-ed by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided Into grazing districts
and tho range administered under a
Gtrailr.r Commissioner. Annual
."'.■•tsulr, ■: per nits are Issued baaed on
numt-'i'ii ra-iged, priority being given
) s-siul>H.-h d owners. Stock-owners
,isj- .-■-■■• ■i-is'-clatlons for range
.uu- ':..-.'. '.■-;■,.■-, or partially free,
lerr ''< .- 'i-MUnblTi for Ffttticr**,
■am; *.:• •>:,'•! '■•' iltra, up (n '.••n
:icnd '
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Yale HoruL,  FinsT.'-TRBBT
PICTURES
AND PICTURE FRAMING
Furniture Mmlo  to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds,
Upholstering Neatly Done
R. g. McCutcheon
WULVrlG AVBHOI
TIIE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ARMSON
NEW HARNESS SHOP
I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and do all kinds of repair
work. Shop equipped with
modern machinery. All work
guaranteed:
if *%
rf'
N:

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