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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Aug 6, 1926

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 Most people would rather be rich and miserable than poor and happy
COSSITT LIBERAL
Well Known Vernon Fruit
(irower Choice of Well
Attended Convention in
Penticton Last Thursday
F. B. Coaaitt, ol Vert-on, well-
known fruit grower, was tbe unmi-
moug choice of Yale Liberals to contest tbe c lining election, at a well
attended convention in Feotictioo
list Thursday eveniog. Mr. Cossitt
waa nominated by May r Sutherland
of Kelowna, and received a rousing
reception from the convention when
be declared tbat, witb tbe backing
of every Liberal in tbe riding, he bc«
lieved tbe riding could be redeemed.
Others nominated were Dr. K. C
McDonald, of Vernon; G. A. B.
Macdonald, reeve of Penticton, and
Col. C. E. Edgett, of Vernon, Lib
eral candidate in tbe last campaign.
All withdrew from the contest.
"if*
t*_Ana KETTLE VALLEy ORCHARDIST
TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR
,—No.
40
"Tall me what you Know Is tni.'
I oasafcuesa aa well aa you."C
FRIDAY, AUGUST 6, 1926
Col. C. E. Edgett to
Run as Independent
Vernon, August 2.—Col. C E.
Edgett, Liberal candidate at last
year's federal election for Tale, bas
announced tbat he will run as an Independent candidate in tbe coming
contest. His poaitioo, be asserts, as
be explained it to the Liberal con
vention at Penticton last week, is
tbat be desires to see embodied in
legislation many principles wbicb
are the basis ot the platforms of both
parties but bave been neglected in
praotice.
He feels that in tbe past tbe needs
of Yale constituency have been
stultified for tbe sake of party ad»
vantage and, altbogb not prepared at
the moment to indicate tbe precise
source and form of tbe Buppdrt tbat
is being prepared for bim, le is
confident be will receive a great deal
ot sucb support, especially in tbe
mining sections of the division,
He has benn pressed for some
time to come out os an independent
candidate aud is confident of receiving many Conservative vote* as well
a large number of others tbat
been previously withhold.
Why the Greedy Bass
Got Into the Frying Pan
" Tbis is not a fish story, because
it's true.
Last Sunday while three or four
of tbe week-enders from tbis city
were strolling on the beach at Christina lake they met little Betty McCallum trying to carry a four pound
bass without showing signs of being
overweighted,
"Where did you get tbe big fish?"
asked tbe week-enders.
"I caught it in tbe lake," replied
the little
"But how did vou catch itl"
"With my hands."
Tbe last answer s emed so ridiculous tbat tbe men tried to laugh it
off as a very clever joke.
Bettv wouldn't have it that way,
however, and sbe took tbe men down
to tbe sbore and demonstrated bow
tbe fish had been caught witb ber
bare bands.
The bass, wben quite close to
shore, had caught a large eunfish for
its luncheon. Tbe auofisb was too
large for the bass' tbroat and it
stuck tbere. This evidently choked
the bass, and it quickly reappear
on tbe surface for fresh air. As it
did so Betty grabbed it.
The moral of this piscatorial
episode is self-evident: If tbe bas*
had not misjudged the size of tbe
suofisb it would still be a happy inhabitant of Christina lake.
London Mail. That may be true.
But are tbey delic cy enough to
justify the extermination of one of
the most beatiful and valuable of
British birds? Valuable, because
tbe favorite food of the plover is tbe
water enail, and tbe water snail i~
the host of the liver fluke, tbe para-'
sitic worm which is the cause of
liver rot in sbeep.
Liver rot is a horrible disease. Tbe
poor animal suffers bonibly before it
dies, and tbe deatb roll ot sheep
from liver rot is estimated at a mils,
lion a year io Great Britain alone.
It makes aoy animal lover hot to
think that just for tbe sake of tickling the palates of greedy folks this
suffering and loss sbould be in.
creased.
HT
have
British Writer Calls
Halt on Gourmands
A dozen plovers' egga weigh just
about eleven-ounces and cost on an
average of 18 shillings (about $3,50)
so from the point of view of value as
food their purchase is simply absurd
But tbose who can afford to eat
them argue that tbey are a great
deilcacy, says T. C. Bridges io  tbe
Tory Chief's Trick
Resented, Says Rumor
i
Ottawa, Augt 3.—That Oovernor
General Byng has been considerably
disturbed by the criticism levelled
against his action in refusing disson
lution to Mackenzie King and gtant-
ing it to Mr. Meighen, is tie rumor
in tbe capital.
Not only bas a section of tbe press
of Canada condemned his action,but
sucb influenti 1 Btitisb newspapers
as tbe Manchester Guardian, the
London Times and a number of
other responsible journals have
called his refusal to take the advice
of tbe Canadian premier a blow at j
self government in Canada.
Tbe gossip is that tbe governor
general feels that he was tricked by
Meighen into an action that not
ooly has offended public opinion all
over the Britieh empire, but tbrough
the recent statement in the British
bouse by Hoo. L S. Amery has
been officially repudiated by tbe
colonial office.
Words are but holy as abe deads
they cover.—Shelley.
Appeal for Western Canadian Unity
Special OontA*spondence of The Sun.
Vancouver, August 3.
Perhaps the outstanding speech upon the
vital question of western Canadian unity was
that delivered to a crowd which overflowed
the huge ballroom of the Vancouver hotel last
week by Hon. Charles A. Dunning, minister
of railways in the late Liberal government of
Canada. If there were any doubters in the
attentive audience as to the great need for the
western provinces tn stand firmly behind the
progressive, low tariff policy of Hon. Mackenzie King, they were converted, and throughout the week the chief topic of discussio has
been Hon. Mr. Dunning's speech.
The former Saskatchewan premier roused
his audience to cheers when be proved that
the lowering of the duty on automobiles had
not only saved the people of Canada millions
of dollars, but had resulted in the largest
manufactnrers of automobiles in Canada pr •
ducing more motor cars in the first alf *-f
1926 than during all of 1925. The same
applied to farm machinery, he, declared. He
contended that reasonably lowered tariff alone
spelled prosperity for the entire Dominion.
Hon. Mr. Dunning deeply regretted the fact
that the "autocratic" attitude of Hon. Mr.
Meighen had caused the death of v ry impor
tant legislation, statutes that only required
the approval of the governor general to make
them law. Sevejal which he enumerated had
passed both houses, but remained inoperative.
This applied chiefly, he explained, to old age
pensions. Due to the action of the Conservatives, the bill was killed in the senate, and
meanwhile needy old people of Canada were
denied the blessing which were their due
Penticton, B.C., August 4—No
clues have so far been'found to tbe
murderer of William Hunt, 60
years of age, who was found dead
near tbe roundhouse of tbe Kettle
Valley railway at South PeDtioton
on Saturday.
He had be6n shot tbrough tbe
head, robbery being the motive.
Hunt had been employed for the
last few days at tbe fires in the Penticton district aod wbb known to
bave been in possession of some
forestry meney. The murder was
particularly brutal, in tbat the man
had been shot while lying asleep in
a small depression running down to
tbe river
Cheok on Oratory
At a recent conference a novel plan
was adopted for restricting the
length of speeches according to their
interest. Rach of the delegates was
armed with a large card, red on one
side, white oo the otber. After eacb
speech had beeo going for some
minntes delegates would begin to
bolJ up their cards, red side toward
the chairman. This was a sign that
tbey were bored with the speech.
Others wbo wished to bear more
would turn tbe white side toward
tbe chairman, who was thus able to
see at a glance whether the audience wanted tbe speech to continue
or not.
Wben the number of red cards
exceeded the number of white cards
he would tactfully intimate o tbe
speaker tbat time was up.
FROM EVERYWHERE
"There is no chance of another
general strike in Great Britain for
a generation and perhaps longer,"
is the view of Victor Suhr, news
editor of thc Evening News, London, who spent a short vacation ia
Canada recently. He thought the
miners' strike in Great Britain
would not be settled before the fall
and perhaps not until the winter.
eral party would never cease its efforts until
old age pensions were in operation.
A system of rural credits was worked ont,
continued Hon. Mr. Dunning, a method of
financing which would have spelled relief and
great benefit to the farmers. Tnis, too, had
been killed by the Tory opposition.
The speaker urged, begged, British Columbia to stand shoulder to shoulder with the
prairie provinces, claiming that every dollar
earned by the formers meant profit to tha producers of lumber, minerals, fruit nnd fish in
tbis province.
Hon. Mr. Dunning declared that the Liberals of Canada were loyal to the British
crown in a most marked manner, and the aim
ofthe party was to build Canada to the point
where she was the most important dominion
in the empire. Canadians were loyal, he declared, because they loved to be loyal and not
because some one compelled them to be. He
maintained that tbe high-handed, autocratic
attitude of Premier Meighen was utterly distasteful to the people of Ua; ada—a free1
people within the empire, who did not want
and would not have a Mussolini, a dictator,
ruling them.
Upon the conclusion of his eloquent speech
the Budience cheered the speaker for several
minutes.
Hon. J. H. King, former minister of public
works for Canada and member for East Ko t-
enay, was given an ovation when he rose to
speak The ex minister w.is given striking
evidence of the thanks felt by the people of
British Columbia for the splendid work he
CHEAP FARES
TO HARVESTERS
Arrangements for transporting
British Columbia harvesters to tbe
prairies were announced at the
labor department in Victoria
this morning. As a result of arrangements made at a conference of
western labor officials io Winnipeg,
cheap railway fares for harvesters
will go into effect on August 8 and
remain until tbe end of the month.
Tbe rate will be til from Victoria
to Edmonton and Calgary and bait a
cent per mile from those places to
poiots of destination. British Columbia will send 6000 men to the
harvest as compared witb 10,000
last year. Employment conditions
here are better than last year and
fenet men are available for harvest
work.
Ii   it's a woman
pinches she buys it.
and the  shoe
has done during the past years   in  furthering
'c'j lthe interests o' the Pacific province  He drew ^M™"«*-*-™ H? Jjhar!'c-er- Jnbe.
nnd     .. s .      .       *****., , Archbishop of Mexico ha* notified
*-"u attention to the attitude of Mr. Meighen, who, --- —*-•-   *	
S OFF C.N.R.
The fishing season opens agate
August 15 on Lesser Slave Lake and
Lake La Biche in Alberta. There
are approximately 100,000 pounds
of white fish to be shipped during
the season from Lake La Biche and
over half a million pounds from
Lesser Slave Lake as well as a
considerable quantity of jackfish
and pickerel from both.
Canada ■ estimated wheat yield ai
indicated by crop conditions on June
SO is 348,026,000 bushels. The
yield estimated for the Prairie Provinces according to the Bureau of
Statistics report is 327,226,000
bushels and for the rest of the Dominion 21,400,000 bushels. Total estimated yield for oats is 468,840,000
bushels and for barley, 100,624,000
bushels. For rye the total estimated
yield is 11,762,000 bushels and fer
flaxseed 8,419,000 bushels.
The Manitoba Government haa
commenced an agricultural survey
of unoccupied lands in the province
which when completed will provide
the incoming settler with all available information on such lands. A
total of 2,474 homesteads have been
taken up in Western Canada this
year. All post-war immigration
records were broken recently when
1,681 immigrants passed through
Winnipeg recently in 48 hours.
Winnipeg, Augnst 4.—"I want to
tell Mr. Meighen that the people of
Canada want bim and everyone
about him to keep hands off tbe
National railway," declared Rt.Hon.
W. L. Macke zie King, leader ot
the Lideral party in Canada, in an
address here last nigbt, openiog hia
tour oi the western provinces.
Thousands attended tbe meeting,
while thousands of others were
given tbe opportuoity of listeniug
to tbe Liberal chieftain's address by
radio.
Mr. King made bis reference to
tbe Canadian National railways
fo lowing a declaration in which be
declared:
'-Mr. Meighen had hardly been in
office an bour before he was telling
the people of the Maritimes how tbe
National railways should be adjusted."
Tbe Liberal leader  declared   big
administration bad aided the  west'
"whan we saw tbat the Crow's Nest
Pass rates lates were restored."
The Earl of Clarendon, British
Under-Secretary for Dominion affairs, and T. Macnaughton, chairman of the overseas committee, are
making a tour of Canada to investigate conditions under which the.
8,000-f amily scheme is being handled
in this country. They, are issuing
glowing reports of what they have
seen. The full three thousand families will have been brought over
here by the end of next year.
A civic vacation party arranged
by the Kiwanis Club of Shenandoah,
Iowa, recently passed through Toronto and Montreal en route to London, England. There were 600 who
availed themselves of the trip and
most of these had never travelled
outside the United.States before in
their lives. They will pass through
Stratford-on-Avon and Oxford on
.their way to London and will make
a side-trip to Paris and the French
battlefields during their stay.
PRESIDENT CALLES OF MEXICO
In a lengthy statement President
Calles makes the claim that the
crisis ln Mexico ls political rather
"Association football ln the Dominion of Canada bids fair within
the next few years to become a rival
to the brand of soccer played by
the major leagues in Great Britain,"
was the comment of Joe Smith, captain of the All-England Association
Football team which has just completed its seven-week tour of Canada. The team travelled close on
ten thousand miles on its tour and
played twenty games against all
kinds of teams. They did not lose
a single game and scored 105 goals
In all with only 18 registered
against them.
University men, municipal and
government representatives, doctors, priests, notaries, lawyers and
newspapermen made up the majority of the party of 100 people who
took part in the across-Canada tour
of the Universite de Montreal recently completed. They were feted
and welcomed by civic, university
and government heads throughout
their tour and return from it with
a far clearer notion of the problems of the West than when they
started. The tour was run on C.P.R.
lines under tha auspices of the University of Montreal, and was the
second annual trip that 'as been
-made.
which the. house of commons had granted. Hejhe said, had a separate policy for each prov
evoked cheers wheu he declared that the Lib-1 ince of Canada.
the public that all religious services requiring the offices of priesta
will ha auspoBded attar July 31.
Women  in . England,   esp-cUlly
tbose witb large families, ate  leun
ing   to   repair hoots  and  shoes, as
ibey know it will   save money  tor
them.
Unfailing Method of
Judging Age of Eggs
By holding ao egg between the
eye and a 50-candlepower metal
filament lamp, or a similar light, it
is possible to tell its age to within
twelve hours.
A newly laid egg, less thao an
bour old, appears uniformly trans-,
parent, except for a few dark spots
here and there due to inequalities in
the shell. Twelve hours afterwards,
however, lighter patches appearand
tbe egg looks more or less blotchy
near the ''ends" (tbe "top" aid
"bottom"). These patches ate
more or less blurred in outline-
As time goes on tbey increase io
definition and numbers and are
more easily seen from 24 hours of
age onward. Recent research shows
tbese patches to be due to hydro-
scopicity, or affinity for water, of
certain parts of the shell. Water is
absorbed and transparent patchs
are formed. Otber parts of theshel1,
on the otber hand, lose wafer by
evaporation, and so become more
opaque. Tbe forma ion of tbe
blotches is prevented by keeping tbe
eggs in an atmosphere saturated
with moisture.
Telegram Got Results
Her mother's death was announced io a telegram received by
a Parisian womao from- her native
village. Overcome witb grief sbe
notified otber relatives, and tbey
hurried home, wearing mourning
and carrying wreaths and otber
lioral tributes. As tbey came within
sight of the old bome tears streamed
down their (aces, but a moment
later they saw their mother in the
garden, "I was loogiog to see you,
my children, aod I knew tbat telegram would be sure to bring you,"
was ber explanation.
R. D. COLQUETTE
The market for Canadian grown tobacco ls expanding rapidly and
Britain is becoming a bigger customer every year, according to a
report issued by Prof. It. D. Col-
quette, who recently left the staff
of the Ontario Agricultural College
to resume his journalistic work
with the Grain Growers Guide,
Winnipeg. Ontario produced more
than 20 million pounds of tobacco
last year, mostly in the countte* ot
Kent and Elgin. THE SUN: GBAND FOBKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Wm* (Srattii Sfarka Bun
AN INDEPENDENT   *HK3*APE"
Q. A. EVANS. EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) $1.00
One Year (in the United States)    1.50
Addresr -" —-->—-cations to
sJThk Grand Fork* Sun
Phonb 101 Grand Forks. iS'C'm
OFFICE:    COT.UM11IA AVBNIJE AND LAKE STREET.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 6, 1926
Notes • Notions • Notables
English and the other in   Swedish, to which
doubtless many citizens in Grand Forks  besides The Sun fan listened.    Both speeches
arrived here without static The prince shares
the honor with the Prince of Wales of being
the most advanced Joyal democrat in Europe.
His 'Frisco speech was democratic to suit our
liberal views.  He crossed the Atlantic to un
veil a monument in Washington to tee memory
of -he   late   John   Eriekson,   the  Swedish
American inventor of the Monitor, the craft
which played such a conspicuous part in   the
Ameaican ci\il war nnd which was  the  forerunner of the modern armored battleship.
One part of the speech which Hon. Charles
Dunning delivered in Vanconver on Monday
has caused quite a stir among old country
people in various parts of the province. The
former minister of railways in the government
of Hon. Mackenz e King, who is a native of
Leicester, England, startled his audience by
reminding them that nader a clause whieh the
gov rnment of Mr. Arthur Meighen wrote
into the criminal code in 1919, any old countryman could be deported to his native land
without a trial. It simply meant, Mr. Dunning explained, that old couutry people were
discriminated against, since the native born
could not be treated in a similar manner because there was nowhere to deport them to.
In other words, an immigration agent aud tbe
minister of immigration could constitute
themselves a judge and jury under the law
and deliver their verdict without interfejence.
This condition prompted Mr. Dunning to
point out that Canada should be for all Cana
dians and not for some. Incidentally and in
spite of Conservative opposition, on no less
tban four occasions the government of Mr.
Mackenzie King succeeded in getting tbe
house of commons to sanction the removal of
this provision. But on four occasions the Con
servative majority in the senate threw out the
measure and the code still discriminates to
this extent, Itis understood ihat Canadian s
in Bruish Columbia from the old country who,
while law-abiding and first class citizens, object to tbeun-British nature of this clause and
are planning some sort of action to prsjss fof
its removal as soon as tbe next parliament
meets.
Two Arabians were visiting oa a farm and
hey sat under a high apple tree. One of them
w«s complimenting the Creator on His wisdom and the other was criticizing the Almighty because he thought that God did not
create things in a balanced manner. And so
he said to his friend to convince him of his
side of the argument; "Look up here at this
large and higb apple tree and it only produces
a smnll fruit and over there is a tiny water
melon seed wbich produces a large fruit that
weighs ten or twenty pounds. Now I should
think if things are created in a just, equal and
harmonious manner then the big tret.-, will
produce a large fruit and a small seed or plant
will produce a small fruit, but instead it is the
reverse and things are unbalanced in the hu
man family, in tbe animal family and the
vegetable family as well." While he was talking thus an apple fell ftom the high tree and
hit him on his nose. He realiz d his mistake
immediately and with eyes raised upward he
said: "I thank God that i was an apple and
not a watermelon, which might have smashed
my nose."
While the discovery of Nova Scotia is
credited to Cabot, on whose reports in 1497
were based tbe English claim of right of pos
session of the continent, occoiding to well
founded data tho credit for its discove y
should properly be to that hardy band of
Norse mariners who, under the leadership of
Eric the Red, visited Cape Sable islaud in
994, fully 500 years before Cabot's visit, says
the Halifax Manning Chronicle. It is not
thought, however, that the Norsiuen explored the mainland to any extent, if at all.
Another bit of "South sea romance" has
succumbed to the onward warch of modernity.
A few days ago the grass house on the famous beach of Waikiki, where Robert Louis
Stevenson loafed and dreamed, and wove
some of his best k own stories, was torn
down. It would have been utterly lost had
not a Salvation Army officer heard of the
occurjence. He collected such of as is usable
and is having the house rebuilt on Salvation
Army property in Manoa valley, an upland
residence section of Honolulu. It will be
restored as nearly as possible on the lines
of the house where the immortal Scot lived
6ECRETAIRY MELLON OF TJ.S.A.
Chief of tbe treasury department
who precipitated the international
dispute over war debts by declaring that Britain took advantage of
war borrowings to bolster np trade
and commerce.
How lightly young people quarrel with
one another. Older ones know better than
to hurt and be hurt.
Every man's skeleton ln the closet is his
temptations; and It makes a clamorous rattling sometimes
If you can't hide it, laugh it off.
Poems From Eastern Lands
Arabia
Must Pay for Paper
In giving jutgrof-nt against a dt>-
linqueot subscriber recently, Judge
O'Reilly, of Cornwall, Ont, made
the statement that newspaper publishers bad a hard enough time in
financing the business without he
ing done out of their subscription*.
If a person desires to stop a new**
paper the proper way ie for him to
pay all arrears and get a% receipt, or
if he has paid, refuge to take the
paper at tbe post office and have a
record hade of hie refusal. A man
who owed for a newspaper coi*ld not
stop tailing it and expect the pub
li*her to go without his  pay.
It may be added that no publisher
wishes to force his newspaper on
any one, and aoy subscriber desiring to discontinue bis paper will not
have tbe slightest trouble if be does
so io ao honest and businesslike
way.
Hundreds of dollars are lost every
year to publishers bv those,who after
a subscription has expired for three
or six months, discontinue tbe
paper and send it back as "refused '
The amouot is too small forthe
publisher to make a fuss over, but
all tbe same it amounts to a neat
litll sum in a year.
The proprietor if a second-hand store at
Ottawa, Kansas, bought an old sofa from a
home where seven daughters had been courted
in thi parlor. Tuning it apart for repairing,
he found forty-sven hairpins, three mustache
combs, forty six buttons, thirteen needles,
eight cigarettes, five photographs, 217 pins,
some grains of coifee.six pocket knives, fifteen
poker chips, a vial of headache tablets, thirty
four lumps of chewing gum, nine toothpicks
and four buttonhooks.
Why not save a hyphen and considerable
space by calliug this the Grandwood electoral
district.
His royal highness Gustavus Adolphus,
crown prince of Sweden, got on the air from
station KGO at San Francisco last Sunday
night and  delivered  two  addresses,   one  in
The Adieu
The boatmen shout, " 'Tis time to part.
No longer we can stay"—
'Twas then Maimuua taught my heart
How much a glance oould mean.
With trembling steps to me she came;
"Farewell," she would have cried,
But ere her lips the word could frame
Io half foriu'd sounds it died.
Then bending down with looks of love,
Her arms she round me flung,
And, as the gale hangs on the grove,
Upon my breast she hung,
My willing arms embrae'd the maid,
My heort with raptures beat;
While she but wept the more and said,
"Would_we had never metl"
—Abou Mohammed,
FanltH are easier seen   tban  virtues.
Fot alfalfa a leet a field that it-
well drained, both as to surface aod
subsoil drainage. Alfalfa will not
atsnd "wet feet."
o4ncient History*
[TakenFrom Twenty-Year Old Sun Files.]
Fred B. McKeehan has imported a fine
race horse from the Palouse country. It is a
fine animal. The white and red polkadots
ou its back, are soj arranged as to repre
sent the Stars and Stripes. Mr. McKeehan
feels somewhat disappointed that the man
who guessed the animal's weight at 150 lbs.
should have won first prize. However, as we
said a minute ago, it's a fine horse, and the
owner will enter it in the next race,meet pro
vided he can find a jockey tbat won't break its
back It is understood that the animal can go
around the race track in a day and a half.
Three new business firms have been added
to the city within a week—Lawson, Baker &
George, grocers; J. A. Hartley & Co., jewel
ers; D. D. Mu ro & Co., clothiers.
The e-irly morning milkman who brings our
daily supply informs us that he is more com
petent than anyone else to give expert   testimony on the genuineness of women's com
plexion.
John Simpson,   principal     f   the  Moyie
school, is visiting relatives in the city.
A. E. Smith & Co. have purchased the old
Norden hotel for office purposes.
Blessed are the innocent, for they
have a lot to learn.
Tbe Sun Presses' have twice tbe
speed of any otber presses in the
Boundary. We oan save you money
on both long and short runs of com
mercial printing and give you a su»
perior class of work.
YOUNG AT 50
Dr. Le-Jard's New Life Tableta
Imparts to the Old and Middle-aged
Youthf ulness, Energy and Fitness, retards mental and physical
decay, thus promoting longevity,
Preserves the arteries and tissues,
Sufferers irom Deafness with its many
distressing accompanying ailments,
as Head noises, deriveal most immediate beneflt. Calm refreshing sleep
assured. Gloom, Depression ~nd Nervousness is banished under the influence of these | Life-giving Tablets
Wrinkles, hard lines and blemishes
disappear. The skin becomes clear,
light and elastic and the complexion
bright and smooth. Think of the
blessings of perfect health, the pos
sesion of few; the joyof a clear Youth'
ful appearance and tingling blood, of
lustrous hair, bright eyes and health-
tinted cheeks; the beauty of radiant
life and the realisation that Tims has
been put back Ten years to the envy
and admiration of your friends, and
theunbouoded satisfaction of your,
self. Can you allow a golden opportunity like this to pass! Remember
there are no arduous rules to follow,
no restriction on diet, not are there
any ill effects after. On the oontrary
it gives the entire system a feeling of
exhaltation with increased mental
and bodily vigour. Why not look
and feel 30 at 50? Do not delay,
commence the treatment at once.
You will never regret the slight cost
Incurred for such incalculable benefits. Tbe price of these Marvellous
Tablets including Mail Charges is
3 Dollars per bottle, dispatched in
plain wrapper on receipt of amount.
Obtainable from
Dr. Le&ard's Laboratories,
106, Liverpool Road,|B-mubu-*r,
London, Knfll-ind.
Proved safe by millions and prescribed by physicians for
Colds     Headache      Neuritis        Lumbago
Pain       Neuralgia      Toothache     Rheumatism
| DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEART
S*fi
Accept only "Bayer" package
which contains proven directions.
Handy "Bayer" boxes of 12 tableta
Abo bottles of 24 and 100—Druggist*.
A-nlrln 1st Uw trado nurk (redtttrad In Canada) of Bayer Mamifiietor* of Moisotcs-Ue-
at-ldester of Salicyllcacld (Acetyl Salicylic Add, "A. 8. A."). While It la well known
tint Aapirln mcana Barer manafacture, to aaalat tha public aaalnat Imltatlona, tba Tablata
at Barer Company will ba atamped wltb tbalr f-neral trade nurk, tba "Barar Oroaa."
Cit'zens of Grand Forks are asked to note the following extracts from the 1925 Amendments to the
Hospital Act:
(4) Wbere tbere is, eitber within or without tbe limits of any
municipality, a hospital which is maintained by tbe municipality,
or to tbe support of wbich ths municipality ie chief contributor
with the exception of tbe Crown, tbe municipality shall not be
liable in respect of any patient treated in any otber hospital, except
in cases of emergency, or wbere ih9 hospital so maintained or supported is not in a position to furnish the special treatment necessary for any certain patient, nnd authority for tbat patient to apply for admission to the other hospital hag been given by the
Mivor or Reeve or some duly authorized officer ot (he municipality, in whicb cases the munioipaliry sball be liable to te extent
set out in subsections (1) and (2).
JOHN A. HUTTON.
City Olerk
Massey-Harris
IMPLEMENTS
We are agents for the well known -Massey-
Harris line of farm equipment. Let us
figure on your needs.
A Complete Line oi Garden Toola
MILLER & GARDNER
Furniture and Hardware
What A Speedway!
Slender copper wires are strung across
the count yside. They are highways
ready to carry your words at a speed of
thousands of miles per specond. For
business or social calls—th: long-distance telephone.
British  Columbia Telephone
Company
THE SUN prints all the loeal news
and carries a number of interesting
features found in no other Boundary
paper   $1.00 per year M-
THE SUN:  GBAND FORKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
*X**s> -^•i...'_a'
■HIS SEASON'S TRANS-CANADA
EQUALLED THREE TRIPS TO THE MOON
The Trans-Canada Limited, the crack transcontinental express
of the Canadian Pacitlc Railway, operated from May to September, completed Its 1924 schedule on September 13th, when its
last trains started and on September 17th these trains steamed
Into the termini at Montreal and Vancouver, bringing to a close
bne of tho service's most successful seasons. The train covers
the 2.83G miles of Its run between the two cities in 90 hours and
ita Toronto-Vancouver run of 2,7/97 miles In 86 hours.
Mr. C. B. Foster, Passenger Traffic Manager, summing up
the season's performance, gave out some remarkably interesting
figures which afford a partial Insight into the magnitude ot the
task of maintaining such a service. The Trans-Canada Limited
began its runs this year on May 18th, and before being discontinued made 119 trips in each direction, or 238 ln all. The
equipment, of the train ls limited to one baggage, one dining rar,
four standard sleepers, one lO-conipartment car Vancouver to
Montreal, and one 10-compartment car Toronto to Winnipeg,
with a drawing room-3-compartment observation sleeper Montreal to Vancouver, plus a local sleeper on the west-bound
movoment only from Fort William to Winnipeg. Thus tie maximum accommodation available ln each direction between the
East and Winnipeg is forty-eight i-.ectlons, twenty-three compartments and five drawing rooms, while between Winnipeg and
tho Coast there Are forty-eight sections, thirteen compartments
and five drawing rooms. The average number of passengers
on tho train at night varies from seventy-five to 110 on different
sections of the line, but for the 119 days tbe train was In service
last season there was a one-night use of approximately 100,000 berths. The
east-bound und west-bound trains together covered 6,292 miles every day,
which Includes the distance between Montreal and Vancouver, 2,886 miles,
and between Toronto and Sudbury, 2C0 miles, covered by each train and its
Toronto-Sudbury connection. Thus the season's mileage was 758,748 for
the 238 trips, or three times the distance from the earth to the moon.
Bach day four Trans-Canada trains were in motion over the Company's
lines in each direction. At 8 A.M. each day, one was west-bound between
Cartler and Chaplcau, ono between Kenora and Winnipeg, one between Medicine Hat and Calgary, and one between North Bend and Vancouver, while at
that hour one east-bound was approaching Glacier, one approaching
Regina, one east of Fort William and one between Chalk River and Ottawa.
Ten complete sets of equipment, of which four were in motion each woy
every day and one was being cleaned, refitted and turned round at each end
of the run, were required to maintain the service.
DO YOU WANT
THE PEOPLE
TO READ YOUR
ADVERTISEMENT
Powerful lecomotlvea
changed forty-
eJBht rJnatM dally la tbe
movement of the Tranav-
Cnnssda tralna and tea
seta of equipment are ia
constant operas-Jon.
The year's schedule called for 22 changes of engine on every Trans-
Canada run from Montreal to Vancouver and two engines for the
Toronto-Sudbury connection made by each train. There were 48 engine
inns daily for the service. Including these engine-stops, the trains made
only 26 stops on their whole run. It is on thiB steady movement at a
uniform speed over long distances and not on high speed that the trains
maintained their fast schedules over the transcontinental journey and the
elimination of all but essential stops resulted in the smooth running for
which It is noted. Owing to the necessity of changing trains crews on
such a long run, about 14 crews, or about 84 men, were required for one
trip on each train, while 48 sleeping and dining-car employees were
required for each trip on one train or nearly 400 men for this branch of the
Trans-Canada service. None of the hundreds of employees whose duties
also associate them with the Trans-Canada Limited, but who do not travel
with it, i3 included in these figures.
People take The* Sun
because they believe
it is worth the price we
charge for it. It is
therefore reasonable to
suppose that they read
its contents, including
advertisments. This
is not -always the case
wifh newspapers that
are offered as premiums with chromos or
lottery tickets
PREVENT
FOREST
FIRES
YOU CAN
HELP
B.C. FOREST SERVICE.
of the Brewing Industry
in British Columbia
■~pHE Brewing Industry of British Co-
■*■ lumbia employs hundreds of men
with an annuaj payroll of about three-
quarters of a million dollars, using per
annum nearly ten million pounds of malt,
made from barley grown in Canada, and
over one hundred and fifty thousand
pounds of hops produced in British
Columbia.
IT requires over one hundred thousand dollara fop
fuel, mined In British Columbia, to produce the
Beer consumed In Ihis province. Many hundreds
of thousands ot dollars are paid by the Brewers
annually for materials such as bottles, cooperage,
orownstoppera, labels and bottle wrappers—all of
which are manufactured In Canada.
TIIE taxes paid hy the Breweries to the Government amount to over eight hundred and
seventy thousand dollars per annum, exclusive of
Income taxes,
THE citizens of this province must -recognize Ihe
Importance of such an. induslry and help lo
build lt up; payrolls and Industries are building
oities and are the foundation of prosperity.
TIIE Amalgamated Breweries of B. C. are manufacturing good Beers, fully matured and aged,
a product recommended by. physicians on account
of Its nourishing and health-giving qualities; these
beers contain only a very low pereentuge of alcohol
and therefore are the proper stimulant needed
when exhausted or overworked, as recognized by
medical authorities.
THE Vancouver Brewery Limited, Rainier Brewing Co. of Canada Limited, Westnilnslcr Brewery Limited, Sliver Spring Brewery Limited nnd tlte
Victoria Phoenix Brewing Co. Limited, members of
the Amalgamated Breweries of B. !"., are under
supervision of Ihe Liquor Control Board, and their
Beers are analyzed from time to time by expert
firms of the continent upon Instigation of the
Liquor Control Bonrd, which olves ample assurance to Ihe public thot Ihey receive onlv pure ami
wholesome Beers when Itoiinht either in the Government Vendor Store or in licensed beer parlors.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by
the Government of British Columbia.
^*l**\W-i\^*-^^3^-M\
*PU-tE BEE
itnWi
-gff,:.
WE DO NOT
WANT CHARITY
ADVERTISING-
Advertising "to help
the editor." But we do
want businessadvertis-
ing by progressive business men who; know
that sensible advertising brings results and
pay. If you have something to offer the public that will |benefit
them and you as well,
the newspaper reaches
more people than a bill
board
SUN READERS
KNOW WHAT
THEY WANT
and if you have the
goods you can do business with them THE SUN: GBAND FOBKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
You Cannot Buy
XiEa
in bulk. Sold only in sealed packages.
NEWS OFTHE CITY
A pretty weddiag vi- •■tletjjoized
at the bome jf the bride's parent*
oo VVeduesdiy, wben Miss Winnifred Ritchie, daughter of Mr. aad
Mrs. B. 0. Ritchie, of Cascade, aud
Fred Barlee, of tbia city, were united
ia the bonds of mitrimnny, Rev. P.
C. Hayman of tbis city performing
tbe ceremony. Both the bride and
tbe groom were raised io tbia valley,
aod tbey buve many friends wbo
will wiab tbeM a happy married
life. After a short wedding tour
tbe youog couple will make their
boas, in Trail, wbere Mr. Barlee is
employed in tbe smelter.
Aid. Wm. Liddicoat and family
and City Clerk John A. Mutton re
turned on Wednesday from a
month's automobile vacation tour
to California. Mr. Liddicoat aod
family attended a family reunion at
tbe home of Mr. Liddicoai's brothej
in Palo Alto, and Mr. Hutton visited relatives and friends in Los Ai>
geles. Tbey report having bad an
enjoyable trip and feel mucb bene
filed by tbe outing.
Ralph Budd, president of tbe
Qreat Northern Railway company;
L C. Oilman, vice president; F. M.
Elliott, general superintendent, and
J. M. Djyle,district superintendent,
passed through the oity oo tbe
south.bound Great Northern train
yesterday morning, having traveled
from tbe coast via the Wenatehee
branch.
Staff Captain Mayall of the C. P,
R. liner Empress of Canada and
Mrs. Mayall and iwo children were
visitors in Qrand Forks for a few
days thiB week. Mrs. Mayall is a
daughter of the late Dr. Westwood,
wbo was one of the pioneer pbysi-
oians of Qrand Forks.
Quetaf Bjorkluod, a Swede who
has beeu living alone up the North
Fork for over twenty years, was
found dead io bis orchard on Tuesday by a Doukhobor. Heartfailure
hid evidently been tbe cause of
deatb. He was over 70 years of
age. ll is not known whether or
not be left any relative. The remains were brought to tbis city and
tue funeral was beld from Cooper's
undertaking parlors on Wednesday.
Juiljre J. R Brown returned last
Monday from Sarnia, Ont, where
be was called three oi four week*
aj-o owing to tbe serious illness of
his brother. Wben Mr. Brown left
Saroia bis brother's conkition had
slightly improved.
Mrs. J. R. Mouyboer returned
yesterday from a few days' visit to
Keremeos,
All the robins in the valley seem
to be concentrating their efforts on
the wild cherry trees 'around The
Sun office tbis week.
Mr. and Mrs. W. E Carpenter
celebrated their silver wedding anniversary Thursday eveniog by entertaining a number of tbeir friends.
FROM EVERYWHERE
♦
The Cascade Rossland section of
tbe transprovinci*l highway was
temporarily ciosed yesterday on account of forestfnes.
Miss Mary Wiseman has taken
tbe place in Woodl aid's drugs ore of
Miss Violet Walker, who basmovtd
to t ancouver.
Contractor McDougail finished
tbe C.P.R. s'eel bridi-n over tbe
North Fork at tbe Humming Bird
mine the first of the week. The
structure ie now of a sufficiently permanent nature to withstand any
traffic that may pa<s over it during
tbe next century.
Wheat cutting in western Canada
-sommenced at a few scattered points
this week, but it will not become
general before August 13.
MORTGAGE SALE OF FARM PROPERTY.
E A, Hales received tbe news
tbis week tbat a brother of bis, bad
died at Havre, Mont. Mr. Hales
was uuable to leav ■ for Montana to
attend tbe funeral, but Mrs, Hales
decided to make tbe trip in bis
stead, and she left for tbe bome of.
her late brother-in-1 w yesterday
morning.
Tbe fourteeu-year-old soo of Mr,
aod Mrs A. P. Trudeau, of Ana-
c tud-i, Mont, who have been visiting relatives al Hilltop for a sbort
time, tiled iu tbe Orand Forks ho*-
pilal ou Wednesday after a sbort
illness. Tne remains were shipped
to Anaconda yesterday morning, tbe
pir*nts accompanying the body east.
Effective on after August 15, proprietor* of all places in Vancouver
licenced lo sell beer will bar women
from tlieir premies*. Tbis action
was decided upon al a meeting of
tu-   Biiii'h Columbia   Hotelmen's
I .--; tcliiiltit).
qiENDSHS still be received by the Uniter-
A signed unto and inclusive ot Saturday,
August 11,1026, for the pttrohual ofthe following described lands viz; Lots 18, * and 5,
Map llO.Huniikameen Division of Yale District, excepting partof said Lot 3 conveyed
to the Vanoouver, Victoria and Eastern Railway aud Nhvigatio*s-*oomisany.
This property, comprising 27.13 acres, la
very well located adjacent tt) the Gity of
Urand Forks. The Roil is a rich loam all under cultivation and well fenced.
A good two-story dwelling aud barn are
erected on the premises.
Terms 20 per cent cash, balance spread over
a term of years not exec ediug IU, in manner
to suit the purchaser with interest at V '
per cent per annum. Tlie highest or any
tendernot neoesarilyaccepted. * I v
Vsr t'lrcsir c* trtionlar' innl y to
PAUL C. BLACK,
District Horticulturist,
Grand Forks, B   G.
or to
LAND SETTLEMENT BOAltD,
Parliament Buildings,
Viotorla, B. C.
THK ttnvl'HN.MKN"* OF
TIIEPBOVINOBOF liltII'ISH t;nr,t'.MTIIA
LIQUOR-CONTROL PLEBISCITES
ACT
PROCLAMATION OF RETURNING
OFFICER
Mrs. Smith Walker and family
have moved to Vancouver to reside.
Tocy sre old timers of Grand
torn ' aod tliey will be missed by
tin it wide circle of friends bere.
Province of llritish Columbia
In the   Urand   Farks-Grncnwuod
Electoral District
IO WIT:
PUBLIC   NOTICB  Is hereby given tn the
•"loctorsof the Klec'nral District aforesaid that 1 have received  His .Majesty's Wr t
to me directed and beitripg dale of the Sin-
teenth dny of July, 19211, commanding me to
cause the following- question, namely:—
Do you approve of tho sale of beer
by the glass in licensed premises
without a bur under Government
control and regulation?
to be submitted aocttrding to tht- '.Liquor-
control Plebiscites Aft" to the Electors of the
Electoral District, aforesaid; and, further,
that iu obedience to the said writ a poll t-tiiill
be opened at cieht o'olock in he forenoon
tint] shall he closed at seven o'clock in the
afternoon nn the
21 t Dny of August, 1926,
lor taking aud receiving the votes of the said
Electors aforesaid at the respective places
following: -
Polling Divisions.
Bpttvertlell
Kite
Grand Forks
Bridesville
Greenwood
Brown Oreek
Midway
Oarinl
Paulson
Cascade
Klverside
Christian Valley
Bnck Creek
Westbridge
Eholt
Of which all perton.- are hereby required to
take notice aud lo govern themselves ae-ord.
liiuly.
Given under iny hand at Grcenweod this
20th day of July, 1026*.
GEORGE H. GBAY,
Returning OHJeer
A total of 800,000 trout fry from
Ihe Banff hatchery have been placed
i** Sylvan Lake and 900,000 in Buffalo Lake, during the past week. A
further consignment is to be placed
in the tributary waters of the Bed
Deer River.
Export of pilchard oil to Europe
will commence in bulk in September.
Producers have contracted to ship
000 tons on each ship of the Royal
Mail Steam Packet Co., for several
months. The market is in Rotterdam. Thc company will have about
two ships per month. Pilchard oil
is used in preparing foods and medicines.
Another step forward in the effort
to restore to Montreal its leading
position in the live stock industry
was taken recently when members
of the Eastern Cattle Market Exchange met to reorganize their
operations on the basis of new
changes made calculated to improve
Montreal's standing in the industry.
Duke Dmitri, of Leuclitenberg,
Count de Beauharnois, lineal descendant of Charles, Marquis de
Beauharnois, who governed Canada
in the name of the French King
Louis XV. between 1726 and 1747,
is visiting for the first time the
country in which his ancestor made
history. He is taking part in the
Grand Pow-Pow of the Canadian
Trail Riders which is being held in
Ptarmigan Valley, near Lake Louis,
In the Canadian Rockies.
The English football team have
finiahed their seven weeks' tour of
the Dominion and they were greatly
impressed with the generous hospitality tendered to them by the
people in the cities they visited.
Joe Smith, captain of the team, said:
"Canadian football will, in a few
years, in all probability be on a par
with the brand of soccer played by
the major leagues in Great Britain."
According to him the object of the
tour has been fully accomplished.
Ooming from all parts of Great
Britain and Ireland twenty-five
thoroughbreds were unloaded from
the Canadian Pacific liner Metagama when it arrived in Montreal
lately. They are for Mulan's breeding and braining ranch near Winnipeg, and comprise one stallion, 16
mares and eight geldings. Nellie's
Pet, 8-year-old, by Cygnus (Sire of
winner of Scottish Derby last year)
out of La Lie; and Den tan, two-
year-old, who comes of the same
breeding as Coronach, winner of
this year's English Derby, were
among the horses arriving.
Captain Kilroy Harris, lecturer
and radio talker in the United States
on Australia and New Zealand, recently passed through Montreal on
his way to the west where he will
take part in the Trail Rides in the
Canadian Rookies. He is already
possessor of a silver medal for having completed 100 miles of trail
rides and hopes this year to earn the
gold medal that testifies to the completion of 500 miles riding trails in
that district. Capt. Harris is gathering material from Canadian
sources for his lectures and radio
balks.
Reports from the Banff Springs
Hotel and from agents along the
line of bhe Canadian Pacific Railway from Banff to bhe Pacific Coast
'received at C.P.R. headquarters,
state that the forest fires in the
Kootenay Park region at their near-
est point are eighty miles distant
from the hotel, and that they are
noVhere near any of the tracks of
the railway. Guests at the hotel
and travellers on bhe railroad have
been in no way incommoded by the
fires and these are now stated to be
well wibMn sight of control. Banff
Springs Hotel is at the present time
enjoying tiie busiest season in its
history.
DONALDSON
GROCERY
Phone 10
'S
Try our Special Tea
at 65c per lb
Shoes, Shirts, Overalls
Good values for your
money;
Call and see us before
purchasing.
JOHN  DONALDSON
General Merchant
S. T. HULL
Established 191D
ileal Estate and Insurance
Kealdent Agent Grand Korks Townsite
A sre
Goi
in pany, Limited
Farms    ^Orchards    City Property
Agenta at Nelaon, Galgar.r, Vs'ihnliu» aud
other Prairie poiuts.  Vanoouver Atreiif :
PKNUKI1 IN.
HATTBNBl*
TMBNTS
LANUSLTI..
fctpbltshetl In 1*111. we are sn & position to
ittruisli reliable information eoiioerniur this
dHtrlct.
tVrire for fraa literature
A. E. MCDOUGALL
.CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
FOR A SPECIAL CUP OF TEA TKY OUR
CHALLENGE  BRAND
This Tea wc have   had especially blende*].
Call in and ask for a sample.
CITY GROCERY
Phone 25
"Service and Quality'
Agent
lioniinion Monumental Work*
Assise-Isist Products Co. ll-aofin ft'
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
BMS33? BRAND FORKS, B. C
K. SCHEER
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONIST
ruler .in
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Giaad Forks, B. C.
PICTURES
AND PICTURE FRAMIN6
Furniture  Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds,
Upholstering Neatly Done
R. G. McCOTCHBON
WINNING AFMOI
Spooks Drive Keepers
From Alaskan Island
Two caretakers of a blue fox farm
on Chirikoff island, 80 miles west of
Kodiak, Alasda, are ready to resign
because of spooks.
Tbe island was once a Russian
penal colony aud many graves ar
marked witb crosses. The caretakers
claim tbat during tbe past winter
tbe cross on an unknown grave
moved from oue end to tbe otber,
spo:ks whistled do n tbeir cabin
chimney and queer voices spoke on
occasions,
Three bunnred ead of wiid cattle,
with a curious kind of fur like hair,
share the island with the blue foxes.
They thrive on luxuriant grass. It
is necessary to carry a gun when
distant from the settlement as a
precaution against attack from the
longhorns.
DON'T HESITATE!
PHONE 101R
FORFINE PRINTING
A complete Hoe of colored bonds
io all shades for fancy letterheads
anjj other classes of commercial
printing.   Suu Job Department.
Did you ever notice tbat business
firms wbo think tbat they can reacb
Th° Sun's readers tbrough otber
publications bave a great deal of
leisure time that might be more
profitably employed) A nuAber of
such firms have involuntarily retired
from business.
Classic blank cards for -lassy in
vitations and announcements Sun
Job Department.
CHEVROLET
See the new Superior Chevrolet betore you buy a
car. There are more cents in theCHOVROLET
DOLLAR than iu any other automobile dollar.
CHEVROLET Touring ,  $885
" Roadster  ,     885
" Coach  1080
" Coupee   1080
" Sedan       1200
" Ltndeau Sedan   1250
" One-ion Truck    935
GRAND FORKS GARAGE
E.G. Henniger Go.
Grain, Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cement and Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks, B. C.
Our
Hobby
is
Good
Printing
THE value of well-
printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Bail programs
Business cards
"Vi ;Hng cards
SbV'iiig tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
Nev   Type
Latest Style
Faces
THE
SUN
C>'  mbia Avenue and
Uke Street
TELEPHONE
R101
GRAND F  RKS
Transfer Co.
DAVIS 8 HANSBN. Props-
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Coal,   Wood and   Ice
for Sale
Office at  R.  F.  Potrie'i Store
Phone 64
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty"
P. A. Z. PARE, Froprjelor
YALK HOTKL,    FlItST    IKKKT
SYNOPSIS OF
UND ACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTION8
**"*Vacant. unrssserved, surveyed; Grown landa
may be pra-empted by Hritl-h subjeots oyer
IS years of ago, and liy aliens ou declaring
intention to become Urlll.h subjeots, ootsdl-
tloual upon real leiini-. occupation and Improvement forugriouliara 1 purposes.
Full information concerning regulations
regarding pre emutloiis is given in Bulletin
No. 1, Lun i Series, "How to Pre-empt Laud,"
copies of wh loll can be obtained freo of clt urge
by addressing tbe Depurtiueui of Lauds,
Viotorla, B.C., or any Uovernmenl Agent.
•JRecorda will be made covering only land
suitable for agricultural purposes, and which
la not tiinberluud. i.e„ carrying over 5,000
ioard feet per aore west of tne Coatt Range
and 8 000 foot per aore cast of that range. sj_J
*£ Applications for ii'e-eiii|>tlons"u"re to be
addressed toTsTe"s.auJ Oum.uusloimr ol tbe"
Laud Recording Division, lu wbleh the land
applied for la situated, and are made oa
printed forma, ooplea ol can ;bo obtained
from the Land Commissioner.
^Pre-emptions must be ooouplcd for Ave
yearaaud improvements made to value of (10
por aora, Including olearlug and cultivating
at least live acres, beiore a Grown tiraut eau
be received.
For mora detailed information soa the Bui*
latin "How to Pre-empt Land."
tm  PUROHASE
Applications am received for purchaae of
vacant aud unreserved Crown Lauds, not being timberland, for agricultural purposes:
nilnimiim prloe of 11 r.t-olass (arable) land it
t't per aore. and seoond-claas (grailng) laud
**.«l per aore. Fnr'her Information regard-
in* purchase or lease of Growu lands ls given
lu llullo'ln No. 10, Luud Series "Purchase and
Lease of Crowu Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on timber
laud, not exoeediug 40 aores, may be pur.
chaaed or leaaed, on oondltions Inoluding
payirteiit of stumpage.
HOMESITE  LEASES:
Unsurreyed areas, not exceeding 20 acrea,
may be leased as homealtes, conditional upon
a dwelling being e acted In the first year,
title being obtainable after residenoe and
Improvement oondltions »re fulfilled aud land
haa been surveyed.;
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areai
not exceeding 640acres may be leasedbyona
person or aoompany.
QRAZING.
I'nder the Graaing Aot the Province la
divided Into grailng districts and the range
administered under a Oraxlng Com*
missioner. Annual graaing permits are
Iaaued bated on numbers ranged, priority being given to- established owners. Stock-
owners may form assooiationt for range
management. Free, or partially free, permit!
are avatlablee for' settler', tampers and
trav oilers up to ten head.
»

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