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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Oct 22, 1926

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Array Stir, up a man's sentiment if you wish to convince him, not his sense of logic
Port Coqultlam, October 18.—The
lure ot the wild and Its ever present
promise that Just round the corner
may be found tho lode of gold fur
which all prospectors strive, nearly
proved fatal once agaltn to an aged
pioneer who has fa th that Bomeday
he Will find an 101 iDorado.
..Thlg time It wtg Robert A. .(Ooe.)
Brown,, of.. Qrand Forka, 70, known
throughout., the. Friser valley, who
almost paid tha supeme price. More
youthful men, tcuatomed to the perils
tnd privations of the wilds, are .now
earrylng him out on t stretcher. One
of. h s. feet Is frozen and he Is In t>
badly emaciated condition.
The aged prospector had boen In
the Wild country north of 1'ltt lake
alone since August and should have
been out before the middle of September,
Provincial    Constable    Oeorge Elliott and A. MoMartin,   trapper   of
Hammond.weiit    in    search    of him
two   weeks   ago, carry ng food and
comforts ln case he was in need.
FOUND  IN  CABIN
Over windfalls and crags, searching every part of the country as
they penetrated into the roughest
parts, they took longer than had
they been going on ordinary mis-
Bdons.
Brown wus found lying in an old
Jog cabin near Seven-Mile creek, 26
miles from P tt lake; alive, but In
very low condition. He had no
mutches to light a fire, one foot was
severely frosted and his food was
almost gone.
-Quickly lighting a fire they prepared warm food, attended to his
foot and, itmlmedilately he was comfortable, one man proceeded back
for more food, medic ne and a
stretcher. The other remained to
doctor the patient.
They will carry Brown out
-through dense forest and under -
brush to the head of Pitt lake.
Brown was one of those who accompanied Qeorge Platzer, his son
George, <&-. A. Brawn, Qrand Porks,
-Mid Alfred Perrp, Vancouver, on an
expedition when they discovered an
immense glacier, 20 miles in w dth
at 7000 feet altitude, four days' pack
troiri the confluence of the Pitt
river and Pitt lake.
The party penetrated to tSeven-
Mile creek, so named because ot Its
distance from Pitt river, Above the
Ice, rent asunder ln places by vast
crevices and chasm e surpassing
those ot the Alps or Urau moun
tains.
WERE WELL REPAID
It took 14 hours to cross this
Btretch ot level Ice, but on the other
'Bide 'the party considered themselves
well awarded, as they found deposlts
of rich mineral-bear ng ore. Showing content high in copper and gold,
this ore encouraged therm to search
tor pockiets of thie precious metal
and when the party decided to return, "Doc" Brown eleoted to re-
maaln.
Other members of the original
party returned to Vancouver Au
gust 12.
)
<_Ana KETTLE VALLEy ORCHARDIST
TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR-No  51
"Tell me what too Know Is tni»
I canKiKss as well as you."*-*
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1926;
Grower Gets Only 7 Per
Ger tof Sale Priceof Apples
(Laurence
Donovan
Sun.)
ln
OROP  ESTIMATE   HAS
NOT BEEN REDUCED
The official estlmlaite ot Uanada's
current wheat crop was revised upward on September 10 to 399,008,000
(bushels. This figure has not been
reduced 'by subsequent bad harvesting weather, though there has been
a lowering of grades.
The October 13 estimate by the
Northwest Grain Growers' tssocia-
tion.based on threshing returns,
gives a grand total of 409,201,000
bushels. Of this 353,301,000 bushels
has been Inspected; 900,000 ls still
ln the farmers' hands'5,000,000 Is
reserved for seed; and 10,000,000 is
allowed for wastage.
AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON
Mnre than usual Canadian-interest
attaches to the preliminary hearing
Of the charges against thiu noted
•vangellst at Los Angeles, from the
fact that she ia a Canadian *ay
birth, having been born aud grown
up near Ingersoll, Ontario. She '.3
remembered aa a remarkably list-d-
some girl with wonderful red hair
Mid a peach-bloom complexion.
Ninety-three  per cent of the retail
prloe of a pound of British Columbia
apples on the London market goes to
those who buy and sell and transport!
cent of the London retail price   goeB |
into   the  pocket of the fruit grower'
in    British   Columbia, who produced
tlie apple. ;
Take these almost Incredible figures as a basis of tact, this may be
added, that ot every 100 apples consumed in the United Kingdom, 19 apples are grown t n Canada and 38
am grown ln the United States. And
figuring ithe apple as t basis, it is
shown that the greater percentage
ot all fruits consumed ln the United
Kingdom are imported there by
countries foreign to tbe empire tnd
its dominions.
Only a days ago an eminent agri-
culaural authority declared tbe outstanding need of British Columbia
to be marketing organization. ..
WHAT OF THE GROWER
Faced by the urgent necessity of
encouraging and fostering the development of its millions of acres of
agricultural and fruit lands, as a
fundamental means of originating
landed wealth, and as a further
means for providing an Increasing
domestic market for home manufactured lndustral produts, at the
outset it is discovered that Canada
is faced with the tremendously urgent necessity of developing a super-
organization for packing, marketing,
preserving and transporting fruits.
Otherwise, all ot the settlement possibilities that may be poured into
the laie end of the horn are going to
con»)e out the small end squeezed almost dry of prospects, investment
and ambition.
.First, taking the home market
beginning right in Vancouver, the
impost of buying and selling, trans
puliation and handling, leaves such
Bmall diaritln for the growter that lt
is wholly accountable for the thousands of tons of fruit annually left to
decay on the trees.
FACING THE  FACT8
{Settlement  is the first element of
prosperity.   It   is    settlemlent,    and
prosperous    settlement   that   establishes a wide domestic market.
In turn, the broad domestic mar-
ket make possible the development
of the greater foreign market. In
other words, because the United
States .has 110,000,000 people that
annually eat mlore apples per capita
than the people of the United Kingdom, that country can . afford to
shade ithe prices of its surplus fruits
for the BriitiBh market. Moreover,
It can afford growers' marketing
organizations, storage warehouses,
motor transportation, even control
of ships, in order that some portion
ot that 93 per cent of spreadbetween
the grower and the consumer may
be returned, to the grower.
IMPERIAL REPORT TELL8
The figure s and facts quoted are
nat fanciful approximations, but the
result of minute and detailed research by the imperial economic
committee, jupointed by the varvarl-
ous •'governments of the British empire. Before quoting more in detail
from that report, some au» leuuu-Ks:
::Well, It's the Bystem. iSamethlng
the grower doesn't understand. It
is ..customary, tradialonaland eco-
nomically necessary that dlstrlbu
tion be thus provided,"
So? A man named Paulhamus in
the Puyallup valley in Washington
proved otherwise.
Simplest solutions are the most
often evaded for the greatest length
ot -Mme. The fruit grower, to be
specific, the apple grower of British
Columbia, lives ln ignoble isolation
from his market. Vou think his
Ufo'B wtork Is selling apples, lt
Isn't. He only grows them. Once
grown, the business of selling the
apple becomes* a mysterious process,
confused by technical terms off
brokerage, transporation and what
not.
THE SIMPLE SHORT CUT
Qreat movemients are arrived at
by short cuts, lopping off of mossy
took a short cut He sold, why
should not the -grower, collectively,
own Mb own warehouses, canneries,
motor transportation, selling agen
cles, ete? 'Remember, fruit growers
ln the United States went through
the Bame mill as British Columbia
growers. And, guided by one mran,
they began to acquire them.
"When Paulhamus died a little
more than a year ago, he had made
scores of growers wealthy, created
the immensely profitable. Western
Washington fair, and had caused a
few farmer fruit growlers to climb
over the barnyard gate and find out
why all the profits were on the outside.
WHY IS THE NEED?
But   is the   need of all thia apparent? *
. Referring to the imperial economic
report, we tind these excerpts:
"ill, as the committee believes, the
bulk of the fruit requirements of the
United Kingdom from abroad   oould
i ba obtained from the empire, the re-
: suit   would clearly be an Increase in
! this country.
I    "It   appears   that on   an average
, each    of   va   eats   100   apples,
Vanoouver Of   the apples 38 come from the Uni-
i tedStates,   25 from the United King
dom, 19 arelmported from Canada
and 8 from' Australia and New Zealand."
THE  FOREIGN   SUPPLY
Canada being unaffected by similar showing on oranges and bananas,
that reference is omitted.
..The report continues: These
figures go to the root of the matter,
for they ahow that In each case the
commanding position. In the trade
held by foreigners is not due solely
to lack, of .enterprise, but to econo-
mls   causes that are far less simple.
"In., fact, the American apple industry affords another example of
the disturbing effect on international
trade created by an exportable surplus that can be sold at any price,
because the home market for the
main output. Is proteced In the
United States there are 115,000,000
persons who consume, more fruit
than the population here
"The home market is, therefore,
enormous and fairly constant, and
it I* evident that a relatively small
increase in the crop means an Immensely relative increase In the exportable surplus. Indeed, In a recent year an Increase of 8 per cent
in the total American crop resulted
In an increase of 100 per cent In the
guantity exported, and .In this way
the prospects of British tnd Canadi
an growers are always liable to be
destroyed by American competition,
which, with th adoption of cold storage, promises to be even more se
vere.
SETTLERS   DESERTING
"Already new settlers in Canada,
Australia and New Zealand have in
some cases become disheartened
that ithy deserted new orchards.
"No advantage appearsto be derived hy the consumer in the United
Kingdom' from the occasional getting of the market by large supplies
of apples from the United States.
"The consumer is apparently the
laet person to benefit from the fluctuation ot prices. The committee
declares that both the home con-
Bumter and the producer at home and
in the emjpire are at a disadvantage,
but a remedy is not immediately ap
parent."
APPLES BOLL
10
ti
Heavy shipments of British Columbia apples are be ng received on
Uie -prairie market, according to b.
A. Grant, markets commissioner for
British Columbia, stationed at Calgary.   iMV. Grant's  bulletin reads:
"Weather during the past week has
generally ibeen favorable for threshing operations, with the except on
of a heavy thunder storm on Thursday, followed by rain and ball.
"Heavy shipments of British Col-
ubmia apples, onions and potatoes
are now being received. A car of
Grimes Golden apples have just arrived from Armstrong and are reported   as being of super or quality.
"The apple market Is not very
brisk, but favorable weather should
see   a   fair demand for crated stock.
"The potato market ls easier, due
to stocks on hand and the possibility
of now digging Alberta potatoes.
Two cars of British Columhia potatoes arrived dur ng the week showing some damage from field frost."
FEDERAL ELECTION
FIGURE8 COMPLETE
Complete figures available show a
total of 3,170,000 ballots eaat in the
recent election. Conservative candidates received approximately ly
476,747 votes, Liberals 1,361,876, Progressives 110s630v L berai-Progres-
slveB 93,057, United Farmers of Alberta 60,457, Labor 50,153, Independents 17,790.
In British Columlbia the vote stood:
Conservative 100,119, Liberal 68,264,
Labor 11,792. Independent 4323.
In the twelve months ending with
the sixth month in this year, according to the Dominion Dairy News
Letter, Canada's e**rpont of butter decreased close oipon two and a half
million pounds compared with ehe
previous year's returns, 'but a cent
and a half per pound increase in
price to some extent counterbalanced the deficit. On the other hand
the total export of cheese Increased
by over twelve million pounds and
by almos t three oents a pound in
price.
"Pa," said young Billy, "What's a
golf hazard?"
And his wise parent replied:
"Some of the stuff that's handed
around in the locker-rooms, son."
'Man (in barber chair)—"Be careful not to cut my hair too short—
people-will take mo tor my wlte."
Arctic
Adventures
MY FIR8T WINTER  POLAR  BEAR
(Written for The Grand   Porks   Sun
by 'Henry Ette, the Navigator.)
The midnight sun at 80 deg. N.L.
had tor four long' Bum-mer months
been incessantly shining on Ice, sea,
icebergs, vraen fields, eternally
snowclad iron mountains and stream
ing blue salmon rivers with a flue
rosy tint. At the end of August he
begins to grow tired tnd approaches
the horizon; then it is time for the
polar bear—the largest beast of prey
and 'absolute monarch of the Arctic
regions—to cast oc his yellow summer coat, soiled by seal-blood, and
put on bis dazzling white winter coat
and go southwards. The higher the
midnight sun, the more to the north
goes the bear; the lower the sun, the
more to the south goes he. It iB
difficult to find food in the pinch-
dark polar night, where the great
stillness is only brokenby the howling of the storm, mingled with the
high, shrill, ghostly cryof the white
Wolves, while stones will crack like
glass in the paralyzing cold of -40
deg. Reamur.
The seals have gone to the coasts;
they prefer to be in the neighborhood of water; therefore the bear
n*|ust choose the same way.
One day in late autumn a yellowish-white mass is seen moving slowly across the endless Arctic wastes,
spatted with pointed screwings and
here and there small icebergs. Now
and then he stops at the top of a
screwing, turning his broad, triangular head with the black pointed nozzle towards the highest top of the
nearest mountain, and when, like the
seaman , he has taken his bearings,
he stalks on again with his long
straddling forelegs.
Only the teemling she-bears make
themselves a lair nnder a thick field
of snow sheltered bv the mountains,
and will not appear until next sping
with their newly snow-white young
ones. The she lis not to be trifled
with. The he-bears, on tho contrary,
continue their wanderings through
the long polar night in an incessant
struggle for food. Their inch-thick
blubber covering will last till Christmastime, but when it is consumed
tnd they walk about with only a little wator in their shrunken bellies,
death by hunger is at ,the door,
Hooray! A depot! Away with the
stones! They are flung aside by the
heavy rigbt paw, strong enough with
one single blow to make a big walrus drop, fainting. A barrel! The
bottom is broken by a heavy blow.
Alas! dry biscuits only. What Is that
to a hungry old bear! It is blubber,
liver, blood, and lastly, flesh he
v/lants. But what lis this! On the
breeze comes an almost imperceptible, peculiar smell, and quick as
lightning the bear turns his nozzle
(with the absolutely phenomenal
sense of smell) in that directiou.
What is it? Burnt blubber and
feathers! And on he trots mile after
mlile, led by the peculiar smell, till
at last he stops in front of a little
hut. Am!ong tons of seal walrus
meat the bear ls able In a trice to
find a bit of blubber not bigger than
a match-box. If not able to find any
thing eatable, he is instantly Inslined
to turn everythng upside down and
break all he can get at with his heavy
paws.
On. the east coast of Greenland,
along lthe 1600 miles of mainpac, in
and out of the fjords, there is a trek
of at least 500 animals every spring
and autumh. Once three bears forced
an entrance into the house of the
settlement manager, where they
were shot ln the kitchen, and last
year a Danish hunter was killed in
the Immense silence by a furious
he-bear. Even the most skilful
sharpshooter Is helpless In the titer
nal polar larkness where he ls barely able to see the groove tnd block-
sight of his own rifle, and the bear-
hunter who wants to get the animals
from windward had better trail a
seal-skin with the blubber on a few
miles out along the coast. Should
the night wanderer meet a trail, he
wil lnstantdw give up his formJer
course. After him follows a pack of
howling white wolves and at their
heels some white and blue foxes, All
the larger and smaller beasts of prey
in the Arctic solitude know vesy
well that when the rich are feasting
there will be some crumbs left for
Northeastland, 80 deg. N.L., 1902-03,
I had brought some wolf traps, and
now I wanted to try them on the
pooner and I myself set the trap,
kekeeping our fingers at a safe distance; then w pltoea a piece of
blubber on the plate anl put it down
tbout 50 yards from the hut, fastened to a long iron chain with an
anchor. Th first to go into the
trati was a great sea-gull, the biggest
bird of the Arctic. Gracefully he
alighted on the blubber on his aut-
spread greyish brown w ngs and
pecked at lt The trapclapped and
the sea-gull wias clipped ln two.
Then I decided not to use the trap
till the sun had disappeared over the
hoolzon and the gulls had gone
southwards. Clad in Eskimo costume, n*|y Larsen seal-rifle between
my knees, 1 kept watch at a loophole
in  the   wall during the night.
sun was a few hours in the day
above the hor zon.
The first winter bear escaped from
me, unfortunately. One calm nver-
cast pitch-dark night at 1 o'clock I
heard an angry hissing and growling, and, rifle in hand, I sprang out,
but the bear had already aisappear-
ed, leaving four claws tnd some white
hairs in the trap. I swore a heavy
oath that next time he should be
m no, even if it should be my turn
then to lose some hairs and claws.
Four long tedious nights I kept my
watch at the loophole, facing the sea
where the Ice waB now lying thick
tnd light on to the shore, but however much walrus blubber, seal flesh
and sea-gull feathers I burned in oe
the oven, dishes that would be sure
to tickle the nose of a hungry polar
bear, no bear appeared. The wind
did not blow the right way. The
Just thrown a new portion ot blubber into the oven tnd stood again
on the lookout in skin coat and hoots
mlade of bladernose skin, when I noticed something big, heavy and
clumsy steering right towards the
hut. 'Pitch-dark it was. I could
barely see his orck ng trot towtrds
blubber In the trap. My heart was
throbbing so that I thought it would
burst. I almost fancied that my four
men in the berths inside could hear
its throbbings. Cautiously I closed
the flap ot the loophole bo that only
half of my right eye was on the bear,
while the other half and the rest of
stopped, put his forelegs wide apart
eagerly.   Blubber and  human  flesh!
1 saw him lift his paw and heard
the clicking of the trap, tnd firmly
grasp ng my rifle, I reached the hear
in a few jumps. He stood on his
hind legsand, hissing with fury, be
swung the trap, with Iron chain and
anchor, with his right paw. I placed
my rifle right aga nst him and pulled
the trigger. A flash! A report! A
roar! And in a jiffy I was back in
the house, banging the door behind
me and laaking eagerly through tbe
loophole. The bear was lying quite
still—Dead. The pointed steel bullet had gone right through the
breast and out through the back and
k lied him on the spot. I got the
fleece without losing either hairs or
nails. i
HiB body measured almost four
meters.
E
conomize on
Your Gasoline
BY   ERWIN   GREER
WEATHER AFFECTS
APPLE SALES
Calgary, October 18.—Trade Is
dull, due chiefly to the unsettled state
of the weather. It ls still threatening and cloudy with occasional snow
falls.
Theshlng ls being spasmodically
done and harvesters are suffering
through loss of t me. No improve-..
ment will take place ln the apple
movement until settled weather arrives.
INDEPENDENTS   OFF8ET
The Associated Growers and the
Sales Service are cooperating ln
grand fashion ln an effort to regulate and feed tho market and are
holding off winter and bulk stuff.
This influence is greatly null tied by
several independents, outside of
these organizations, who are shipping everything they have ready in
bulk and in crates. Today they are
taking for bids on crated Macs. The
bulk stuff is be ng crated here by
the purchasers and sold at a price
below the laid down cost of Bitish
Columbia crated tpples..
Very little damage to onions haa
been done by the frost. All Sample
Grade stuff examined has shown up
wtell and the trade is pleased with
them.
APPLES   DUMPED?
Friday morning a report came ln
that two cars of American crated
apples are being sold tn Lethbridge
and Cadston to the retail trade at
$1.40 per crate. This price is below
the dump price set and the matter
is being investigated.
Building Activity
and Politics
Should two cars of the same year
and model 'be driven over a hundred mile oourse each would show
t totally different gasoline consumption at 'the end ot ihe trip.
Why? Because no two drivers
operate a car alike. Jones, for instance, nurses his boat along at a
certain steady speed, while Brown
likes to cover ground in spurts. Naturally then, Jones gets more mile
tge than Brown.
But driving a car economically is
just one halt the dollar battle. The
good driver also sees that all gas
joints are tight, that his engine ls
sweet running and free from carbon
and Chat the carburetor is economically adjusted. And you would be
surprised to learn how mnny dollars
a car owner saves a year by paying
attention to these little details.
Great progress has been made tbe
last few years in carburetlon and intake manifold construction. It Is
an actual fact that some cars today
get a better gasoline mileage on low
grade gasoline than cars tchieved on
high-test gasoline ten years ago.
The carburetlon system is not the
only location to look for fuel leaks.
If the ignition system Is not up to
snuff fuel yill be wasted. This also
lnsludes the battery. There is little
use ln getting a correct .fuel mixture
unless there is a good hot spark to
fire it
Carbon in the engine's cylinders
will waste more fuel than will be
thought possible. By cutting down
the proper output ot the engine carbon compels the use of au excessive
amount of fuel.
The clutch, if slipping, may become a terrific waster ot fuel. Misaligned wheels are another source
of power losses. When the wheels
are out of correct alignment, a dragging motion ls set up and some of
the engine's power goes to produce
this drag which, by the way, is one I
of ihe most potent causes of tire
wear.
Dragging brakes waste power, yet
brake adjustment ls so simple that
there is little excuse for this condition.
Finally, the car owner may conserve his fuel by the way in which
he drives his car. Long fueling
periods eat up a lot of zasoline, that
has performed no unusual function.
The driver should learn to set his
throttle and spark on long runs and
plug along at a steady gait. i
Motor sense is gasoline dollars
poured into.the tank.
Figures just issued show that British Columbia stands third in the list
of provinces in respect of building
activity   for the present year so far.
Economic experts point to any increase In the building of homes and
Industrial establishments as the sire
sign of commercial progress. They
point out that the average taxpayer
does not build a home until he is con
vlnoed that local conditions promise
him Bteody employment and the
wherewithal to pay the contractor.
The same argument applies to the
merchant and the manufacturer.
The enormous Increase In the
tmfount of building in Vancouver and
Victoria this year over the corresponding period of 1925 Is symtom-
atlc ot what has heen taking place
attll over British Columbia. 'From
practicallyevery settled area reports of proportionate advances of
last year"s activity hare been received.
The reason for this satisfactory
condition haa been traced to two
causes. One ls the efficient manner
in which the business of the province has been conducted by the provincial govrnment, which has
strengthened British Columbia credit
to a point at which its bonds sell better than most of the provinces of the
Dominion, and the other is the beneficial effect which the policies of tho
King government have had throughout Canada, particularly ln the west,
during the last few years.
Those in close touch with political
affairs, moreover, declare that when
the provincial government goes to
the people it will be returned with a
larger majority, their investigations
throughout the province convincing
them that the m|iBtake made In the
recent federal election will not be
repeated.
A negro cook came into a. northern Missouri .bank -with a check
from the lady for whom she worked.
As Mandy, the cook, could notwirte,
she .always endorsed her checks
with a big X But on this- occasion
she made a circle on the baek ofthe
check.
■e-!e**i:.v* ■
dod bless the inconspicuous citizen—the man who quietly fulfills all
obligations to his family and to his
sommunlty as a matter of course,
andd who does not consider himself
entitled to preferment; political pull
The or tree puffs In the newspapers. -   <
This crayon sketch of Viscount
Willingdon, the pew Governor-General, was mado by Kathleen
Shackleton, well-known Canadian
artist, on board tlie S.!5. Empress nf
Scotland, upon which tht) Vice-regal
party came to Canada. THE SUN: GRAND FORKS, BBITISH COLUMBIA
Kettle Kiver Assessment District
Nam* of Person Assessed
8hort iDeteriptlbn of Property
Arrears -Interest Cost*
of all       and        and
Taxes. Penalty. Expenses. Total
I  HEREBY GIVE NOTICE  that on WEDNESDAY, the 10th   day of NOVEMBER, at the hour ot 11 a.m.
at the Provincial Police Court, Penticton, B, C, 1 will sell at Public Auction tbe lands in the list hereinafter
set out, of the persons in said list hereinafter set out, for delinquent taxes unpaid   by said persons, on the' £.' nA *p"™'
30th day of June, 1926, and for interest,  costs and expenses, including the cost of advertising said  sale,  if urown,
the total amount due for the period ending Deceiriber 31st„ 1924, is not sooner paid.
Dier ft David-son, ..** Lots 30, 33, 34, Block 13,
Dler ft  Davidson,    Lots 36, 36, Block 14 _..
FAIRVIEW  TOWNSITE,  iMAP   27
Mrs. R.  H.  Parkinson „ Lot 19, Block 2. ... _,
Ian  R.  Brown,   _ Lot -Is Block 3, 	
Mrs. R. H. Parkinson Lot  4, Block 3,  	
Mrs.  M.  Dalrymple Lots 14 to 16, Block_4, ...
i R. H. Parkinson,  ,. Lot 19, Block 4,
$ -S-82   $ 1.07
3.41 .64
$12.76   $   20.64
12.76        16.70
LI8T OF PROPERTIES.
Name  of  Person,  Assessed
Short Description of Property
Arrears Interest Costs
of all and and
Taxes. Penalty. Expenses. Total
CROWN  GRANTED  LAND8 8. D. Y D.
Keremeos Land Co.,   _ Lot 114, 1 acre,  	
S.  Itt Johnson,   _ . Lot 166s, 312 acres except K. V. R.
right  of  way,  .... 	
Robert Dibble     Lot   382,   1  acre,    _ _.
William Brown _ _ Lot 436s, 272.67 aores,   	
William   Brown,    _ _ _ Lot 437s, 303.46 acres,  	
V. E.  B.  Robinson,    _ Lot  580s  	
S. M. Johnson & Tuzo Estate, Lot 622s, 117.54 acres, except   Plan
A  106,	
S.   M.  Johnson,   _ Lot 624s, except Plan A-166, 	
Greenwood City Water Works,  Lot 821, except 10.01 acres D.D.
116776, A and Plan B 1412 	
Rock Creek Trading Co.,   Lot 862, Lot 8, Block 3, Hap 2033, ..
Weat Kootenay Water Power &
Light Co. Ltd   Lot 971s, 4.36 acres, C. ot T. 13062 A
West Kootenay Water Power &
Light Co., Ltd.,  _- Lots 972s, C of T 13062n  	
Ashbury F. .Johnson,   _ Dot 1136s, Lot 2, Map 1832 	
S. M. Johnson ft Tuzo Estate,  Lot   1274b, _	
S. M. Johnson ft TUzo Estate, .  Lot  1276s,   _	
S. M. Johnson ft R. McLeod,  Lot   1418s,   „ _ 	
Joseph  A.  Brown,     Lot  1471s,     	
South Kootenay Water Power &
Light Oo - - Lot 1623, 9.76 acres _.	
James L. Jaroell,   _ _.Lot 8005, except Plan 79, 	
Mrs. E. G. Warren,  — .._...*Lot  2365,    	
J. A. Tuzo Estate _ Lot 2578, except K. V. R. right-of-way
Howard D.  Camjoron,    Lot 2698, Sub Lot 4,   	
West Kootenay Powier ft Light Co.,..Lot 2701, 65.7 acres, C of T 23362 H
Hugh  Leir _   Lot 2709, Sub Lot 3 	
William Thomas,   Lot 2710, Sub Lot 21, 	
Hugh Leir, - Lot 2710, Sub Lot 57 	
Johnson & Tuzo Estate,  _ Lot 3638, Sub Lot 4, 78.87 acres	
Johnson & Tuzo Estate,  - Lot 3638, Sub Lot 5,	
Johnson & Tuzo Estate, .    Lot 3638, Sub Lot 6 	
W.  H.  Pefley,   _ Lot 3639, Sub Lot 10, 	
Arthur M, Shaw, N%, NE%, Sec. 22, TP. 63, 	
Arthur Ml Shaw,    N&, NWH.Sec. 23, Tp. 53,  	
Arthur M.  Shaw SWA, NW>4, Sec. 28, Tp. 63, 	
Arthur M.  Shaw,   Sec. 29, Tp. 53, Part Lot 1007, 	
Arthur M.  Shaw,   NWU, Sec. 33, Tp. 63, Lot 1009,	
Arthur M.  Shaw,   E%, SW*A, Sec 33, Tp. 63,	
SUB-DIVISION  OF LOTS /-*» ft 174,   MAP 300, 8. D. Y. D.
___________^^_J.    Lot 1, 2, 11, BIock 6	
JR. -H.  Parkinson,   Lata l» to 21, Blook 7.
! White  ft  Parkinson,   Lot 22, Block 7	
; Mrs. R. H. Parkinson, ....'_ Lot 1, Block 8 „..
Steve Mangott,  Lot 6, Block 13, 	
Ian  R.  Brown   Lot 14, Block 18, 	
' Mrs. R. H. Parkinson,  Lot 14, Block 14	
|  GLOSTER  TOWN8ITE,   MAP  323 ij  Mfi, I
! Wm.  Towes     Lot 2, Block 7 —.
47.76
3.20
47.75
15.49
34.80
6.71
114.97
10.32
9.60
3.41
3.41
10.63
3.00
19.28
-50
19.28
1.88
14.19
.89
47.28
4.06
3.69
.64
.64
4.21
.48
Keremeos  Land Co., ..
..Block 59, Part,
Keremeos Land Co   Block 68,  Part,   _ .-.._ 	
Keremeos Land Co _ 'Lots 4 to 13, 15, 17 to 21, 24 to
Block 70, ......
Keremeos Land Co.,   _ Lot 1 to 14, and 27, Block 71,
Thomas Daly Estate,    Lot 21, Block 71,
Keremeos Land Co.;' Lots 4 to 12, 15 to 30, Block 73,
Keremeos Land Co Block 74, Part,
Keremeos  Land Co Block 75, Part,  	
Keremeos Land Co .Lots 1, 2, 4 to 26, 27 to 30, Block 76,..
Chong  Kee, Lot 26, Block 77 	
Keremeos  Land  Co _ Lots 2, 4, 6, 6, 9, 10, 20 to 30, Block
79    ____ _ _
J.  D. ifrass _ _ lLot 8, Block 79,  _  .....
Keremeos  Land Oo _ Lots 16, 17, 19 to 25, Block 80	
Keremeos  Land  Oo _ _ Lots 1 to 13, 18 to 30, Block 81	
Keremeos Land Oo _ _ Block 90   _    .._ ...
Keremeos  Land Oo.,  ..._ _ Block  92,    _	
ANACONDA   TOWNSITE,    MAP  24, ».   D.   Y. D.
S.  M. Johnson,   _ _ __ Lots 9 and 12, Block 2	
* H.   O.   Medlll Lots 1 to 6, Block 7	
H.  C.   Medlll,  : _ -Lot 11, S%, and Lot 12, Part Block 9
George  S.   Walters,   Lots 13 and 14, Block 10 _	
S.   M.   Johnson,    Lots 11 and 12, Black 14, _
S.   M.   Johnson Lots 8, 9, 10, Block 16,  „	
ANACONDA   TOWNSITE,   MAP  115,8. D. Y. D.
S. M. Johnson & F. Keffer, Lots 1 to.6, Block 1 	
S. M. Johnson & F. Keffer,  Lots 1 to 7, Block 2 _	
S. M. Johnson & F. Keffer,  Lots 1 to 6, Block 3,     ..    	
S. M. Johnson & F. Keffer,  Lots 1 to 4, 6 to 8, 21 ano 22. Block 4
Kef Her, Weir & Johnson,  Lots 9 to 18, Block 4 '. _.
BOUNDARY   FALLS TOWNSITE,  MAP 19, ,S. D. Y. D.
Mrs.   Jennie   Wake    Lots 17 to 25, 29 to 30, Block 4, 	
David  G.   Smpth,     Lot 6, Block 6,  _	
BOUNDARY  FALLS TOWNSITE,  MAP 136, S. D. Y. D.
S.  M.  Johnson .Lot 12,  Block "B" 	
BEAVERDELL TOWNSITE,  MAP 94, 8. D. Y. D.
J. A. Tuzo Estate   Lots 79 and 80, Block 4 	
CARMI TOWN8ITE, MAP 109, 8. D.Y.  D.
E.  Etchepare   -   Lot 9, Block 1,
.Lot  6,  Block  1,
Mrs. R. H. Parkinson _.
E. Etchepare, Lots 8, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20,
Block  2   *	
E. Etchepare ^.ots 1 and 3, Block 5,	
Charles  Gilmore,   Lots 1 and 2, Block 6	
B, Etchepare Lots 3 to 31, Block 6 „	
E. Etchepare Lots 1 to 24, Block 8	
E   Etchepare 'Lots 1 to 24, Block 9	
E. Etchepare Lots 1 to 24, Block 10, 	
E. Etchepare Lots 3 to 22, 26 ito 39, 41 to 44,
Block 16	
E. Etchepare Lots 1 to 18, Block 16, 	
E.   Etchepare Lots 1 to 6, 10 to 24, Block 17	
E.   Etchepare,    Lots a to 4, 6 to 24, Block 19, 	
E.   Etchepare Lots 1 to 24, Block 20,	
E.  Etchepare Lots 4, 9, to 22, Block 25	
E   Etchepare Lots 1 to 24, Block 27	
E. Etchepare , Lots 1 to 24, Block 28	
E.  Etchepare Lots 1 to 24, Block 31	
E. Etchepare Lots 1 and 2, Block 35	
E.  Etchepare Lots 1 to 6, Block 36 	
E.   Etchepare,    Lots 1 to 12, Block 37 .	
E.   Etchepare,    Lots 1 to 12, Block 38	
E.   Etchepare Lots 1 to 21, Block 39	
E. Etchepare Lot 4, 14 to 17, Block 46	
Rev.  Jean  Ferroux, ' Lots 6 to 8, Block 45 ;	
CASCADE   TOWNSITE,  MAP 8, 8. D. Y. D.
Katherine   Munro Lot  4,  Block  10	
Dominion  Supply  Co.,   Lots 5 and 6 (Part) Block 10	
Hilda  L.  Bertois   Lot 2 E%, Block 11 _	
Hilda L.  Bertois Lots 7 and 8, Block 12  	
J.  A.   Bertois Lot 2, W%, Block 19,   	
CHRISTINA   TOWNSITE,    MAP  60,8.   D.   Y.   D.
J.  R.  Poole Lots 1, Block 8, „	
W. M. McKay Estate Lots 2 and 4, Block 11	
EHOLT TOWNSITE, ,MAP 71, 8. D.Y.   D.
Sam  McOrmond,  .Lots 9, 10, Block 23, 	
FAIRVIEW  TOWN8ITE,   MAP 26
Isabella  G.   Russell I/Ot 1, Block 2, 	
Mrs.   Ellen  Dier Lots 20, 27, 28, 31, 33, Block 2, 	
Dier  &  Davidson,  _ Lot 30, Block 2	
Dier  &  Davidson .- Lots 11, 26, Block 3	
Isabella G.   Russell,   ._ -Lot 20, Block 3 	
W.  A.  Dier,   Lot 24, Block 3,  	
Dier & Davidson ...Lots 14, I'i, 27, Block 4	
Isabella   G.   Russell Lots 31, 33, 34, 36, Block 4	
Dier   &   Davidson Lots 10, 16 to 18, 24, Block 6,
Dler   &  Davidson,
Isabella G.  Russell,
Annie Davidson	
Isabella G. Russell,
Isabella C. Elliott,
Dler & Davidson, ..
Isabella G. Russell,
Isabella G. Russell,
 Lots 7, 8, Block 7,
 Lots 1, 3, 5, Block 9 	
 LotB   2,   4,   Block   9,:	
 Lot 4, Block 10	
 Lot  6,  Block  10,  	
 Lot  3,   Block   11	
 Lots 4, 7, Block 11	
- Lots 8, 33, Block 12	
.....    OA GRAND IFORK8 TOWNSITE,  MAP 38
I 6.66   $   .89       |13.76   f   20.20 !,„„,. .
* l J. H. Slater _. Lot 1 and 2, Block 9,
190.20
12.91
311.00
106.50
300.00
336.00
674.41
704.00
74.30
3.00
36.00
6.00
46.00
60.00
200.00
80.00
80.00
20.00
180.00
240.00
22.60
19.60
308.00
53.60
226.05
85.00
170.00
169.00
192.00
12.00
12.00
6.00
90.00
24.00
12.00
80.10
2.38
48.96
16.86
48.00
144.20
238.69
110.48
12.87
.48
6.76
•1.10
16.00
15.60
75-20
29.60
4.80
2.72
28.80
62.80
3.60
3.13
130.16
8.66
102.63
30.82
61.64
61.12
30.72
1.92
1.92
.96
14.40
3.84
1.92
16.68
11.12
68.41
66.72
38.92
24.76
13.91
5.56
23.35
66.72
201.56
11.1(2
25.03
72.30
6,56
5.66
29,17
22.26
7.34
63.25
16.83
27.94
25.38
31.86
30.88
90.26
7.02
24.64
8.81
2.67
■1.77
9.33
10,66
6.21
3.92
2.22
.89
3.74
10.66
32.17
1.77
3.99
11.66
'  -89
.89
13.36
13.40
1.12
8106
6.64
1L81
10.92
13199
13-J7
38.77
2.00
3.86
L37
13.76
18.76
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.76
13.76
W.Vt>
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.78
13.76
• 13.76
13.76
13.76
13.76
113.75
13.76
li.lb
13.76
13.75
113.76
13.75
13.76
13.76
12.76
12.75
02.75
12.76
12.76
14.75
12.76
12.75
12.76
121.75
12.75
la.-io
12.75
12.76
12.76
1&75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.76
12.76
12.75
1*2.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.76
284.05'GRAND 1 FORKS TOWNSITE,  MAP
29.04'
373.71
86
136.11
361.76
492.95
826.85
828.23
100.92
17.23
56.61
19.86
73.75
79.35
288.95
123.35
48.55
36.47
222.55
306.55
39.85
36.37
461.91
75.91
341.43
129.57
245.39
243.87
236.47
27.67
27.67
20.71
118.16
41,59
27.67
Mrs.  J. Stevens,   .Lot 4, BM, Block 80	
GRAND  FORK8  TOWNSITE,   MAP 166
G. C.  Brown,   _ Lots 1 to 4, Block 8	
G. C. Brown,  a. Lots 1 to 9, Block 9 „...
G. C. Brown Lots 8 end 9, Block 10 ,
GRAND   FORKS  TOWNSITE,   MAP 1254
Win. Aitkin, —  Lot 3, Block 7  „ .
R.  E. SurteeB.  _ Lots 9, 10, 11, Block 13 —
Annie Boorman,   Lot 1, Block 16, 	
GRAND   FORKS   TOWNSITE,   MAP  1467.
Alex.   Campbell   —  Lots 9, 10, .19, Block 4,
37.21     16.26
19.61      6.69
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.76
12.76
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.76
79.78
16.45
79.78
30.12
61.74
19.35
174.96
27.12
26.04
16.70
16.70
27.59
16.23
66.21
38.95
George H. Brown, a Lot 3, Block 6	
GRAND  FORKS TOWNSITE  MAP 1466.
W. C. Monro,   Lota 7, 8, Block 6,
KALEDEN TOWNSITE, MAP 763.
Mrs. O. E. Tomlln,  	
19.93
138.30
13.20,
6.93
65.04
4.67
12.75
12.75
12.76
39.61
206.09
30.62
3.80
35.69
4.96
.61
15.42
.93
12.76
12.75
12.76
17.16
63.86
18.63
35.63
14.49
13.99
6.63
12.76
12.75
62.37
32.87
.Lot 10, Block 14, ...
24.08    10.12
6.97      2.16
12.75
12.76
46.96
21.87
KEREMEOS  UPPER  TOWNSITE,    MAP 66.
Mrs. W. B. Palmer     Lota 11, 11A, 14. ISA, Blook 1«„
John M. lYoung,
■ Lots 11, 11A, Block 22,
...Lota 9, 9A, 10, 10A, Block j
..Lota 9,9A, 10,10A, 11,11A Block 27,
..Lota 1, IA, 2, 2A, Blook 37,	
Arthur   Smltheram,   .
Thomas Sm-Mheram,     	
M.  Baroelo Estate _ Lota 1, IA, 2, 2A, Block 29,	
L.  Bullock-Webster         " *"   " - -   ****-*- •»
MIDWAY  TOWN8ITE,  MAP 3.
Win   Haegerman ,
J. A. Tuzo Estate,,
-Lot 15, Block 9	
...Lota 19, 20, 21, Block 16,
32.10
25.64
80.49
90.13
67.88
41.43
28.88
19.20
39.84
90.13
246.48
25.64
41.77
96.60
19.20
19.20
56.27
38.40
21.21
75.06
•35.12
62.50
49.05
68.60
67.00
141.77
81.77
41.26
22.93
Canadian Bank of Commerce Lot 16, Block 33,
Mrs. E. W. Foulds, _. Lot 16, Block 33,	
Steve Mangott    v—Lota 15, 16, Block 36,
May P. White   Lot 16, Block 46, 	
Mrs. Jennie W. Wake  Lot 16, Blook 58, 	
MIDWAY TOWNSITE,  MAP 42.
Steve Mangott,  Lot 4, Block 21,
Mrs, J. B. Wake  ........   „
NIAGARA TOWNSITE, MAP 53
R. B. Jones 	
OLALLA TOWN8ITE,  MAP 86
..Lot 1,' Block 22,
7.66
1.53
12.75
21.84
6.00
.96
12.75
19.71
4.10
.66
12.75
17.60
6.16
.98
12.75
19.89
4.10
.66
12.75
17.60
61.18
24.43
12.75
98.36
6.00
.96
12.76
19.71
7.97
1.34
12.76
22.06
27.66
4.29
12.75
44.70
5.53
.98
12.76
19.26
9.22
1.43
12.75
23.40
6.00
.96
12.75
19.71
6.00
.96
12.75
19,71
4.61
.73
13.76
18.09
4.61
.73
12.75
18.09
.....Lot 6, Block 5,
3.00
.48
12.75
16.23
-..Lots 12 to 16, Block 6,
—.Lota 6, 7, Block 8,	
Lillian M, Chase,
Frank Wedner.  —
OKANAGAN FALL8 TOWNSITE, MAP 628    ■-:■,'. »-*j
 -. Lota 1 to 12, 16 to 19, Block 6,
 Lota IS to 16, Block 5. ™.	
MrB Edith V. Elsey.
A. A. Hamilton	
60.39    27.09
12.00      6.04
12.76      100.23
12.76
29.79
OKANAGAN FALL8 TOWNSITE, MAP 4 i; " ■.*••,*«;
■"-  S. Rior-dan,  . . Lota 1 to 12, Block 2, _
Lots 23, 24, Block 16, ..
Lota 3 to 24, Block 17,
C. A. C. Steward,
Reginald Hody,
.-Lot 7, Block 50
...Lot 7, Block 51,
Mrs. E. A. Ashcrort,
Mrs. E. A. Ashcroft,
OKANAGAN  FALLS TOWNSITE, MAP   1280     H
Lot 1, Block 3,
H. L. Jackson,
W. B. Hine, ...
Reginald Hody,
Reginald Hody,
J. P. McOuddy,
Reginald Hody,
Reginald Hody,
...Lots 1, 2, (Pant of 3. *4, 5 8, 9,) 10 to
14. Block 6 	
...Lot 9, Block 7,  -  	
....Block 11,  .....	
....Lota 11, 12, Block 13,  ..	
..Block 18 . ... .	
...-Block 19,
OLIVER  TOWN8ITE,    SUB-DIVISIO N OF LOT 77, D.L. 2460S-S. D. Y. Bg^fffl i]
J. G- Curry, 	
Bablneau ft Deacon,
Leslie Keith, —	
V. R. Crag-g, .......—
W. Byers,
Wm. Dolyrmlple, 	
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, MAP 68
T. M. Ivens,       	
—Lot 28, Block 4,    ..........
—lot 20, Block 7, 	
—Lot 20, Block 15, 	
—Lot 1, Block 17, „*	
—Lot 10, Block 17,	
—Lot 13, Block 17,	
13-36
8.20
2.27
1.61
12.75
12.75
28.38
22.46
76.00
40.60
12.05
7.26
12.76
12.76
100.80
60.51
119.60
21.47
52-86
4.76
4.76
19.63
7.37
6.28
.74
.74
12.76
12.76
12.76
12.75
12.76
161.88
41.69
78.28
-18.24
18.24
17.90
6.91
12.75
87.56
16.77
4.76
28.50
9.60
7.10
7.16
'• 1 ;1
2.60
.74
4.62
11.51
1.12
1.13
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.76
12.75
32.12
18.24
46.77
83.76
20.97
21.03
H i ■
12.98
13.48
23.36
38.93
11.88
18.16 '
2.67
2.12
3.67
6.74
8.12
2.86
12.76
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.76
12.75
28.40
28.36
39.77
68.42
27.76
33.76
ii-u.il
..Lot 1, Block 8,
.45
.07
12.75
13.27
10.00
4.06
12.75
26.81
3.60
.'68
12.75
16.93
.90
.14
12.75
13.79
18.00
2.88
12.75
33.63
8.65
1.88
12/.75
22.68
10.80
1.73
12.75
126,28
10.80
1.73   -
13.75
25.28
10.J80
1.73
12.76
25.28
17.10
2.74
ia75
' 32.69
8.10
1.30
12.75
22.15
9.00
1.44
12.75
23.19
10.36
1.66
12176
24.76
10.80
11.73
12.75
25.28
7.20
1.16
12.76
21.10
10.80
1.73
12.75
25.28
10.80
1.73
•  12.75
25.28
10.80
1.73
12.75
25.28
.90
.14
12.75
13.79
2.70
.43
ia.75
16.88
5.40
.86
12.75
19.01
6.40
.86
12.75
19.01
9.45
1.61
12.76
23.71
2*25
.36
12.76
15.36
4.60
.72
12.76
17.97
6.21
.93
12.75
18.88
6.00
.96
12.75
19.71
3.70
.63
la.76
17.08
7.91
1.39
12.76
22.05
4.22
.78
1&76
17.76
3.69
.63
12.75
17.07
8.70
.63
12.76
17.08
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, MAP 60
Martha Zucco,  „_.....
.ity.
10 teet Lot 16, and E. 10 feet
17, exo. N. 30 feet of W. 10 feel
Matt Johnson,
'!! i'i'
(of Lot 16 and exe. N. 30 feet ofj&i
E. 10 teet ot Lot 17, Block 8, ....
,.N. 30 feet of W. 10 teet of Lot 16,
and N. 30 feet ot E. 10 feet ot
Lot 17, Block 8,  ,
24.00    10.08
6.98
13.75      6.96
12.76
12.76
12.75
46.83
32.63
32.45
SUB-DIVISION OF PART W/t OF DL. 107,  PLAN   B-1819
Pels. L and La,
L. Bullock-Webster,
L. Bullock-Webster,
L. Bullock-Webster,
L. Bullock-Webster,
L. Bullock-Webster,
L. Bullock-Webster,
L. Bullock-Webster,
L. Bullock-Webster,
Hlne & Kerby, .....
Hine ft Kerby	
Hlne ft Kerby, ......
 ...Pels. M and Ma,
........ Pels. N and Na, .
 Pols. O and Oa, .,
...  Pels. P and Pa, .,
 Pels. Q and Qa, .
 —Pels. R and Ra, .
 - Pels, a and 6a, ...
 .....Pels. T and Ta, .
 Pels. U and Ua, .
  Pels, v and Va, .
4.10
.66
12.75
17.51
2.50
.70
12.75
15.96
2.60
.70
12.75
16.95
2i60
.70
12.75
15.96
2.60
.70
12.75
16.95
2.60
.70
12.75
16.95
2.60
.70
12.76
16.96
2.60
.70
12.75
15.95
2.50
.70
12.76
16.95
auso
.70
12.75
16.95
2.60
.70
12.76
16.95
|Vj
Mrs. Lucy Barcelo,
t-'-
9.82      2.44
86.20     13.94
12.76
24.51
GRAND   FORKS  TOWNAITE,   MAP 1363 ^^^^H
Alfred  Hatton, ., .- -.Lota 31, 82, Block S,
Sub-Division of Parts of Sections 3,9, 16, 16, 17, Tp. 62 and Part Lota666, 666, 113, 2766-Map 1476, S.D.Y.O,
Lots 15 to 21 (Pt) and PL Lot 23,
Block 8 Lying within D.L. 113,
12.76      111.89
MrB. Lucy Barcelo,
..Lot 2, Part Lota 7 to 10, and Part
  Lot 11, Block 4 Lying w*thln D„
K   tf-'i    1      ■'      L. 113 —
Mrs. Lucy Barcelo,   Part Lota 14 to 22, Blocs 7, Lying
wthuin D.L. 113,
Mrs.  Lucy Barcelo,
17.82      6.15
Dier &
Davidson,' Lot 13,  Block 12,
3.41
7.64
3.41
6.82
3.41
3.41
6.82
4.55
4.92
3.41
5.72
3.81
3.41
3.41
3.41
3.81
3.82
3.41
.54
1.19
.64
1.08
.64
'   .54
1.08
.718
.88
.64
.89
.59
.54
.54
.54
.59
.60
.64
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
.12.76
12.76
12.76
12.76
12.71)
12.75
12.75
12.75
36,72
GRAND FORKS TOWNSITE
H. J. Trimble,  *..-	
Aaron V. Anderson,  _..:	
John B. Montgomery,  .....	
John B. Montgomery, ..............
..Lote"(l to 47'p-L)"Loti"5 to 7, Block
11, Lying -within D.L. 118,	
..Lota 1 to 4, Block 17, Map 88,	
..Lot 1, Blot* 16, Map 36, 	
-Lots 1 to 8, Blook 6, Map 128, 	
..(Lots 1 to 7, Block 7, Map 128,	
86.12     16.26        12.75      125.13
147.94    26.26   .   12.76      185.94
96.86     16.82        11.75      126.92
MIDWAY TOWN8ITE, MAP 88 -
Hugh  Maitr,  Lots 1 to 12, Block 76, ...
Hugh Mair,  ., ..-.Lota 1 to 6, Btock 76, _»
■■'%*'" pi*riWr ■'
-Lot 1 (Part) Block 10,
PHOENIX TOWNSITE, MAP 69
B.  Raymond,
16.70
21.58
16.70
20.66
16.70
16.70
20.65
18.08
18.55
16.70
19.36
17.15   _____
16.70 ] R. Smailes,
16.70, Wm. Rlchter Estate,
16.70; M. Barcelo Estate,  ...
17.15  M. Barcelo Estate, ...
17.17 j M.  Barcelo Estate,  ...
16.70 ' Frank Rowell, 	
-Lot 2 (Part) Block 10,
..Lot 6, Block 10 _.
Mrs. Rosa Lachard,   .
Strachan  &  Smith  .-
CROWN GRANTED LAND8, 8. D. Y. D. ^^^^^^^^^B
  Sub. Lot f\ Block 1, of DjL. 2710,
   Lot 601, 1 : ika C ft D, Plan 8, ....
Mrs. Mary Ann Lee Lot 641 Pt. 8.8 acres,	
Gerald T. Wilson,
iHugh  Mair,
....Lot 1466 Ft. 90.28 acres,
...'Lot 41, Except Map 1835,
 Lot 257,
 Lot 289,
 ...Lot 290,
  Lot 347,
14.21
2.16
12.78
29.12
3.96
.65
12.75
17.35
80.98
6.98
12.716
49.71
Waiter Rates and Interest ....
 30.15
20.80
3.86
12.75
87.01
Water Rates and Iutereat ....
 30.15
1-
15.45
3.42
12.75
81.62
8.14
2.31
12.76
23.20
81.30
16.08
12.75
69.13
17.00
7.64
28.93
12.76
12.76
37.39
56.60
97.58
72.50
23.22
13.76
109.47
148.99
51.66
13.75
214.40
10.00
2.80
13.76
26.56
13.50
2.16
13.76
29.41
32.00
7.04
13.75
62.79
22.20
4.89
13.75
40.84
22.20
4-89
13.75
40.84
16.66
3.67
13.75
34.07
24.84
6.06
13.75
44.65 THESUN: GBAND FORKS, BBITISH COLUMBIA
Name of Perton  Assessed
Short Description  of Property
Arrears Interest Costa
of all and and
Taxes. Penalty. Expenses. Total
,   R.  C.  Johnston * Lot 352,   (Part)  except Plan B  378,
;-■-.„,',        , and Map 1622, and B. 348  143.33   $9.14      *13.75   8   66.22
S. R. Almond „ Lot  363   362.86     78.80        13.75       455.41
Water Rates and Interest  5042.58
Name of Person Assessed
Short Description of Property
Arrears Interest Costs n .
of all       and        and
Taxes. Penalty. Expenses. Total
M.  Barcelo  Estate Lot 393, Part 289 acres,     .
Win. Thomias,  Lot 465, (Part) 300 acres	
Louisa   Shuttleworth Lot 466, 2-6  Interest	
Jean & Michale Ferroux _. Lot  473s,	
Mrs. Mary Ruckle, Lot 630 (Part) 20 acres, D.D. 7350 A,
Robert   Dibble Lot 636, Lot 1, Map 179	
Mrs.   Barbara   McCurdy Lot 502, (Part) Map B 1799, 100 acs.
Hugh  Mair,     Lot 660 Part lying, N. and E. of Blk.
"H" and Including Block "H"	
Thomas Daly  Estate Lot 669b i	
Thomas  Daly  Estate Lot 670s	
Thomas Daly Estate,  Lot 67.1e _  _
T. ft W. Clark - Lot 681 (Part) 4.72 acres, D. D. 6132
-Mrs. Elsie L. Clement Lot 700 Part, Map 213, 61.43 acres,..
S.  O.  Grey,   , Lot 746 (Part) 8.5 acres, except Map
B  1260 „
Chas. M. Randall Estate Lot 756	
: Beatrice V. Johnston,  Lot 877	
John   Rlchter i^ot 900, WV4  ...........
'    MrB. F. D. Willis Lot  940s,	
T.  Daly Estate Lot 980s _ -	
J. ft M. Ferroux,  Lot 1078s, (Part) 313.06 acres, except Plan A 166, 	
H.  S.  Pittendrigh —Lot  1146s	
J. H. Thompson —Lot 1181s, exeept Plan B 1829 and
Part 98.30 acres forfeited	
Chas. E. Gilmore Lot 1209b, except K. V. R. Rt. of way
F. Gachaln Lot 1269s, except Plan A 164	
M.  Barcelo Estate,   Lot 1474s	
MrB. E. G. Warren —Lot 1549, Sub-Lots C ft D	
Joseph  Caron —Lot  1660b :  	
John Knudson  Lot  1925s,  	
Cecil C. Allen,  Lot  1973s	
Joseph Downing Estate  Lot 1975b, -  	
T.  R.  Preston,  Lot 1996 N%	
H. A. Barcelo Estate, Lot  2035s, ——»	
Reginald Vlck Estate Lot 2868s, -... , -., :	
H. D. Jory — Lot  2881b, - -
J.  Marse!  Estate -Lot 2991 	
Jas. A. HarriB   Lot 2733  	
H. F. Lockhart,  Lot 2795s, ...;. -	
(W. J. McKolvitw XaH 3281  	
Thomas Daly Estate _ Lot  3290	
R. J. Dinsmore Estate,  .__ Lot 3673,  '•	
J. A. McDonald Lot 967b,  —	
285.81
155.92
38.83
32.00
128.13
23.63
67.59
34.97
8.27
13.28
34.78
6.16
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
357.15
204.64
60.85
59.03
176.66
42.54
Water Rates and Interest 116.23
30.00      6.60
186.28
11.10
22.20
22.20
9.80
58.34
66.66
2.44
4.90
4.90
2.14
12.56
66.32     14.47
236.16    113.44
64.00     19.84
TOWN8HIP 81, S. D. Y. D.
C.  deB. Green   Sec. 4, Fr. NWH4 10.338 acres, 	
C.   deB.  Green Sec. 6, Fr. NE»4, 29.28 acres, 	
C.  deB.  Green,    Sec. 8, Fr. SE»4, 33 aores	
C. deB. Green Sec. 8, Fr. S% of SW %, 5.64 acres,
TOWN8HIP 62, S. D. Y. D.
M.  Barcelo  Estate Sec. 14, W-A  NE>4 —
M.  Barcelo  Estate Sec. 14, l*TW*A,  —
M.  Barcelo  Estate Sec. 15,  NE%	
M.  Barcelo  Estate Sec. 22,   SW!>4 „	
M.  Barcelo  Estate Sec. 31,  S% NBU -	
M.  Barcelo  Estate _ Sec. 31, SBS*A,  —
M.  Barcelo  Estate Sec. 32,   SEW  	
M. Barcelo Estate  „ Sec. 32 S% NH% 	
M. Barcelo Estate  Sec. 32 S% NW/% 	
Thos. Daly Estate    Sec. 28, NWVi  ....:	
Thos. Daly Estate _ Sec. 88, B*$*A
Thos. Daly Estate    Sec. 28,  Vfr. NE% 	
Thos. Daly Estate   _ Sec.  29, N%   	
Thos. Daly Estate    - :..Sec. 30,   NH14  • 	
Thos. Daly Estate    Sec.   30, E% NW%  	
Thos. Daly Estate    Sec.  30, NEU.SWi-i   	
Thos. Daly Estate .....'. Sec. 30, NM, SE%  __....-
ThoB. Daly Estate    Sec. 30, 8-.*., SE14,   —*
Thos. Daly Estate   Sec.  32,SW%    	
.Frank Surprise   Estate,, Sec. 31, SW?4 (Pt), 164 acres	
TOWNSHIP 64, «. D. Y. D	
R. H. Parkinson 	
R. IH. Parkinson 	
R. H. Parkinson,	
TOWNSHIP 66, 8. D. Y. D.
Ida B. Parry „ Sec. 5, NWU  - '--. ,*■■
Ida B. Parry, Sec. 6, NE%  -~
H.  T. 'LeibtB,  Sec. 14, SH NWtt («.) 65:6 acres
H.  T. Letts, „ Sec. 16, NE-xi   ,1—...—	
.......Sec. 2, B% SE»4	
.......Sec. 2, NB% (Ht), 109 acres
 Sec. 11, Bs-*A 	
32.00
29.09
2.00
156.00
20.72
80.00
8.00
8.00
3.20
17,60
18,18
21.20
24.75
9.63
8.00
9.63
8.00
8.00
102.12
26.67
16.03
108.20
67.66
90.00
4-00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
8.88
17.76
17.76
6.40
6.63
11.26
11.26
5.63
6.63
6.40
6.40
3.20
22.13
11.26
6.63
3.22
5.63
3.22
11.26
110.11
19.84
9.92
19.84
7.04
6.43
■    .44
74.40
4.41
10.24
1.76
1.76
.71
3.91
4.36
4.74
10.23
2.10
1.76
2.10
1.76
1.76
20.90
5.84
3.01
39.96
12.84
42.60
.44
.44
.44
.44
1.97
3.92
3.92
1.41
1.23
2.46
2.46
1.23
1,23
1.41
1.41
.71
4.87
2.46
1.23
.70
1.23
.70
2.46
24.17
6.77
2.88
6.77
18,00
4.01
30.51
6.86
19.56
4.10
11.44
2.42
SUB-DIVISION OF PART LOT 600, MAP'77, 8. D. Y. D.
C. W.   Clark [ Block 2, (NH)   	
C. W.   Clark Block 3,   (SH)   	
8UB-DIVI8ION  OF  PART  LOT 535,  MAP 110, 8. D. Y. D.
B. W. Biddlecomlbe,   _ Block 2	
C. F. L. Morgan _ Block 3	
C. F. L. Morgan,  J Block 6 —,
B. W. Blddlecombe ...* Block 6. ,—,—
Mrs. Myra A. A. Almas,  „.. Block 10, :	
24.73
49.67
46.76
31.24
41.05
20.52
22.06
5.21
10.62
10.28
6.82
v8.97
4.48
4.82
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.76
13.76,
13.75
12.75
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.76
13.76
13.76
13.7b
60.35
266.67
27.29
40.85
40.85
26.69
SUBDIVISION    of    PART of  SECTIONS 3, 9, 10, 16, Tp. 62, Lota 666,«nd 258,    MAP  1673,  S.  D. Y. p.
Similkameen Fruit Company Lots 1 to 6, 8 to 13, Block 18,    	
Slmllltameen Fruit Company Lots 1 to 4, 6, 8, 15, 16, Block IS, ...
Similkameen Fruit Company,  Lots 1 to 7, Block 20
Similkameen Fruit Company Lots 1 to 3, Block 22! 	
Similkameen Fruit Company,   Lots 1 to 6, Block 23      ""
Similkameen Fruit Company Lots 4 to 11, 14, 15, Block'24,  r~
L   .;. Hunt*    ,Lota 12 an° 13. Block 24	
-Blmflkmeen Fruit Lands Company,   .Lots 1 to 4, Block 25,
Similkmeen Fruit Lands Company, ..Lots 1 to 11,'Block 26	
Similkmeen Fruit Lands Company,  .Block 27,  (Part)  10.02 acres',
Similkmeen Fruit Lands Company, ..Block 28,  	
Slmlllunleen iFrult Lands Company, ..Lot 3, Block 29,
Similkmeen (Fruit Lands Company, ..Lots  1  to 7,  Block 30	
D.  A. Rogers   Lot 11, Block 30,  ********-*.*
Similkmeen Fruit Lands Company, ..Lots 12 to 17, Block 30,
...... , Similkmeen Fruit Lands Company, ,.Lots 1, 4 to 15, Block 31,        	
84.65 I Similkmeen Fruit Lands Company, ..Lots 1 and 2, Block 32,
1 Similkmeen Fruit Lands Company, ..Lot 2, Block 33,  "  .., ...
94.54 j Similkmeen  Fruit Lands  Company,..Lots 1, 2, 6. 7 to 12, Block 84, 174*46
363.36 I Similkmeen  Fruit  Lands   Company,..Lots 3 to 6, Block 35,
97.59'    •-'"—-- *      *     "
62.79
49.27
16.19
244.15
38.88
63.99
23.61
23.61
17.60
36.16
36.28
39.69
48.73
25.48
23.51
26.48
23.51
23.51
136.77
46.16
31.79
161.91
84.14
146.35
18.63
16.19
16.19
16.19
16.19
24.60
35.43
35.43
21.56
20.61
27.47
27.47
20.61
20.61
21.56
21.66
17.66
40.75
27.47
20.61
17.67
20.61
17.67
27.47
148.03
39.36
26.55
39.36
35.76
61.12
87.41
27.61
43.69
73.94
70.74
61.81
63.77
38.75
40.63
Mrs. Myra. A. A. Almas u Block 11.  :——	
: ii              •
C. F. JU Morgan Blook 13	
SUB-DIVISION  OF  LOT8 749,  174, MAP 1628, 8. D. Y. D.
'
Keremeos lnnd  Co Block 1 ,_, ..— ~	
Keremeos  Land  Co.,    Block 2,  .'.	
KeremeoB Land  Oo Block 8, .—......„...	
Keremeos  Land  Co Block 4, ....._. —	
KeremeoB Land  Co Block 6 -	
Keremeos Land  Co.,   Block 6 --..'..............,	
Keremeos  Laijd  Oo Block 7, ,.,	
Keremeos  Land  Co., Block 8, ...:.......	
Keremeos Land   Co.,   Block 9, -	
Keremeos Land  Co.,   Block 12	
KeremeoB  Land  Co „ Block 19 j	
Keremeos  Land  Co Block 20 ., ,	
Keremeos Land  Co., Block 21,	
KeremeoB Land  Co.,    I Block 22	
Keremeos Land  Co.,   ....; Block 23	
Keremeos Land  Co Block 24	
Keremeos Land  Co Blook 26 .'.	
Keremeos Land   Oo [ Block 26 .	
Keremeos Land   Co i Block 27, : I	
Keremeos Land Company Block 28 _. -	
KeremeoB* Land Company, Block 29	
SUB-DIVISION OF LOT8 749 and 174, MAP 300, 8. D. Y. D.
Keremeos 'Land Company, ......J. Block 45 ,	
KeremeoB Land Company J Block 46,	
Kerempos Land Company, Block 47 ;	
Keremeos Land Oompany Block 56	
Keremeos Land Company Block 57, (Lots 1 to 13, Plan 1603).
Keremeos Land Company Block 60 (Part) 2 acres,	
Kertm-fsjos Land Company,  Block 61 v	
Keremeos Land  Company Block  82 ,	
Keremeos Land Company i Block 89 - -	
Water iRatefl and Interest  82.58
27.81      8.92        13.75 48.48
Water Rates and Interest  165.17
41.80      9.18
13.75
10.07
2.25
13.75
9.80
2.19
13.76
6.63
1.48
13.75
6.63
1.48
13.76
6.68
1.48
13.75
6.63
1.48
13.75
6.63
1.48
13.75
9.80-
2.19
13.75
9.80
2.19
13.76
14.8-1
6J83
81.31
13.75
1.30
13.76
9.01
2.01
13.76
9.28
12.07
13.75
8.28
2.07
13.75
6.63
1.48
13.75
6.63
1.48
13.75
13.26
2.96
13.75
13.26
2.96
13.76
7.42
1.64
13.75
6.89
1.63
13.75
3.66
.81
13.75
10.60
2.37
18.76
6.30
1.18
13.75
6.30
1.18
13.75
3.66
.81
13.75
8.18
1.82
13.75
10.60
2.37
13.76
6.30
1.118
13.76
7.96
1.77
• 13.75
6.30
1.18
13.75
64.68
26.07
25,74
21.86
21.86
21.86
21.86
21.86
25.74
25.74
31.90
20.8S
24.77
25.10
25.10
21.86
21.86
29.96
29.96
22.81
22.17
18.21
26.72
20.23
20.23
18.21
23.75
26.72
20.23
23.47
20.23
Similkmeen Fruit  Lands   Con-pany,..Lots 1 to 3, 7, Block' 36	
Similkmeen Fruit Lands  Corapany,..Lot 3, (W<%) and Lots 17, 18, Blk. 87
CARSON   TOWNSITE,    Sub-Dlvlslon *f Lot 617, iMAP 39, S. D. Y. D.
Mrs. L. Parkinson Lots 1 to 15, Block 11,
Mrs. L. Parkinson,  Lots 1 to 11, Block 20, ..." '"""'""'"-"
$219.10
$48.68
$13.75
$281.53
204.39
45.47
13.75
263.61
98.12
22.42
13.75
134.29
33.14
7.63
13.75
54.52
45.04
10.55
13.75
69.34
80.07
18.63
13.75
112.45
35.48
7.97
13.75
67.20
43.05
9.86
13.76
66.66
163.99
36.87
13.75
214.61
60.00
13.20
13.75
86.95
73.00
16.26
13.75
103.01
24.22
5.39
13.75
43.36
156.72
35.89
13.76
206.36
16.65
3.67
13.75
34.07
72.67
16.34
13.75
102.76
191.17
42.56
13.75
247.48
13.87
3.06
13.75
30.68
26.75
6.96
13.75
46.46
174.46
38.58
13.75
226.79
65.10
14.45
13.75
93.30
93.12
20.94
13.75
127.81
64.10
14.29
13.75
92.14
9.02
2.11
12.75
23.88
4.86
1.03
12.76
18.14
SUB-DIVI8ION   OF  PART  LOT 377,MAP 87, 8. D. Y. D.  (MIDWAY)
O. L. Gunderson,  Lot 6, Block 4, 	
CROWN   GRANTED   LANDS
M. Barcelo Estate,   Lot 2963  	
12.80      2.92
.71
12.76
13.76
28.47
17.66
SUBDIVISION   OF   LOTS   109,. 110, 222, 319, 323, MAP 301, 8. ,D. Y. D.
Mrs. O. Oallaghan Block  16 t,       100.85      23.22        13.75 137.82
SUB-DIVISION  OF LOTS 672s, 103s, 104s, 105s, 106s, 3757, Part B.B.%. of Seo.  24,  Tp. 88,   Map  719, S.D.Y.D.
0. M. Watson,  ....--,.,„ [j. Block 3,   1 1 L-         10.72      2.35        13.75 26.82
SUB-DIVISION OF  LOT 1475,
H. F. Broad 'Estate, .......
MAP817, S. Di Y. D.
..Lot   8,; ...'	
tt. T. Luckw*ell,   Lot 10	
H. T. Luckwell, .   j.L\\ Lot 11,	
  ; ; ....        141.01     61.73        13.75       206.49
Water Rates and Interest  245.63
 .'.  37.05       7.73        13.75        68.63
Water Rates and Interest  203,79
 j      . 31.94      6.73        13.75 52.42
;*'.   .' Water Rates and Interest 101.89
SUB-DIVISION  OF PART OF SECT ION8 3, 9, 15, 16, 17, Tp. 62, Part of Lota 566, 686,  113, 2768,  MAP  1479,
8. D. Y. P,
A. E. Johnson,   i Lot 15, Block 2, .,..*,..„
Jean Cal7l|eron,  .-„..' Lot 1, Block 3 „....'
Edward H<*W>,  L,i.....Lsks 7 and 8, Block 3, .
R. L. Cawtston Estate,  , L,.....ILotli 3 and 4. Block 4, .
Mm. Agns-js Monro, ...:i....v....:......I.'..i...Lot 5, Block 4 .....;	
Wm.  Lewtas  Estate,  .:..'..,J...:.....L_....Lot 6, Block 4, 	
• Mre. Lucy Barcelo,  t *-■-- Lot 12, Block 4,	
J. H. Treleaven, .:..... ;...Lot 2, Block 7, ..**.	
Jas.  F.  Stuart ...:..:....:....; L.Lot 9, Block 8, 	
Andrew J. Swan '...; ...Lot 4, Block 12,, „	
J.  8.  Sharp : : :....:.._.....;. Lot 4, > Block  13,   ,
Ernest Gordon,    ;...i...;...Lot  7,  Block  13	
•Fred M. Wright, I Lot 1, Block 14	
Mm. M. Taylor, _: .*-*—*. Lots 2 and 8. Block 16,
33.44
25.97
28.25
66.86
33.44
33.44
13.37
37.86
24.47
33.94
13.87
21.70
i 60.19
70.65
7.45
5.67
6.36
14.90
7.45
7.45
2.98
8.41
6.43
7.53
3.06
4.83
13.32
16.67
13.75
13.76
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.765
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.75
13.75
13.76
64.64
45.39
48.35
95.51
64.64
64.64
30.10
60.01
43.65
55.22
30.68
40.28
87.26
100.07
Dated this 27th day of September, 1
—   3.20
VT. R. DEWDNEY,
Provincial Collector, Kettle River Assessment District
The sale of
Beer by the
glass Vindicated
£7^? HE Government Control of beer sales to the
\__) people   of   British   Columbia   in   licensed
premises has been vindicated by the orderly
manner in which these premises are conducted.
These quiet and comfortable establishments
prove that the open and above-board sale of
pure beer has in great measure ended the evils
attending the illicit sale of strong drink. They
have proved that the self respect and good
behavior of the people of British Columbia are
more to be depended on than the opinions of
those who wish to prevent the people from
having any beer at all.
You may find citizens enjoying a healthful and
invigorating glass of beer in the quiet and ease
that the well-to-do have in their clubs. Licensed
premises in the colder winter months are more
than ever the working man's club, where .he finds
the company and comfort that is his right.
The supervision and regulation of licensed premises
by the Government is a guarantee that the
excellent conditions under which beer is sold shall
continue. Efficient Government Inspectors see not
only that such licensed premises are operated in a
strictly sanitary manner. They look for a high
standard of conduct.
The purity and wholesomeness of all beers
served—supplied by the Amalgamated Breweries of British Columbia—is guaranteed by
the frequent and strict analyses to which they
are subjected by the Government. Iri the
present administration of Beer Parlors the
interests of the public are completely protected.
Amalgamated Breweries of Britlah Columhia, In Which are
associated Vancouver Breweries Ltd., Rainier Brewing Go. of
Canada Ltd., Westminster Brewery Ltd., Sliver Spring Brewery Ltd.,
Victoria Phoenli Brewing Co. Ltd.
y
Thin advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
Cit'zens of Grand Forks are asked to note the following extracts from the 1925 Amendments to the
Hospital Act:
(4) Wbere tbere is, either within or without the limits of any
mruoioipalit*-, a hospital which ia maintained by tbe municipality,
or to tbe support of which the municipality is chief contributor
with the exception of the Crown, tbe muoicipility sball not be
liable in respect of any patient treated in any other hospital, except
in cases of emergency, or where the hospital so maintained or supported is not iu a position lo furnish tbe sppcial treatment npce-3*-
sary for any certain patient, nnd authority fo' that patient to apply for admission to the other hospital hug bepn given by the
Miyor or Reeve or some duly authorized officer ot the municipality, in which cases the tnonicipaliry shall he liable to te extent
set out io subsections (1) and (2).
JOHN A,, HUTTON.
City Clerk
TIMBER SALE X819 5
SF.ALBD TBNOKBSwIlI be received br tha
Distrlot Forester. Nvlsoa, not later than
noon on the Itil, dajr of October, 1988, for
the purchase of Lleence X81H5, near Paulson,
to eut 4,015 lineal feet of Cedar Poles.
One year will lie allowed for removal of
timber.
Further particulars of the District Forester, Nelson.
•HiOVBBNMBNT LIQUOR ACT."
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOB
BEER LICENCE.
1SJOTICE IS HKREBY GIVEN that on th*
*~ . 10th day of November next tha undersigned Intends to apply to tbe Liqnor
Control Hoard for a licenoe In respect of
premises belnc part of the buiidinsr hisown
as the "B. 0." Hotol, situate at ''ssrade, il.C,
upon the lands desorlbed as Lot No. One, Block
20, Map No. 8. *'a*i-itde, B. **., Kismlntsps Land
Land Registry Division In the Province of
British Columbia, for thc sale of beer by tha
**l*s* or by the open bottle for oonaumptlon
on the premises.
Dated this lltn day ol October. 1926.
BAN j l-KTUR TllOMl'SON,
Applicant.
LAND BBGISTBY ACT
(Section IM.) **-
IN THB MATTER OF Lots 1, i, «, 7. 8, *. 10,
11. 12,18,1', 15. Block 1; Blook 2: Blook >;
exeept Lot 5; Blook 4; Block fi; except Lots
8 unit 12; Blook 6. except Lots 8 and 10; Lots
1. 2 and 8, Blook 7; I. 'is 2, 8,4, 5. 6, 7, 8,10,
U and 12 in Blook 8; Lots 1, 2,1,4, S. 8,» a nd
10, Block B; Lota 1, 8, 5,8, 7. 8, 9,10, Block 10;
Lsits 1,9 and 10; Block 11; Lots I, *, 7, 8 and
9 Block 12; Lota 1 to 1, 10, 11 and 12, Block
18; Block 14; Blook 16; Lose 1, 2,1, 4, 6,8,11
and 12 Block 16; Lota 1, 2, 8,9,10, Block 17;
Lots 2,8,4,5, 8.1, 8, 9 and 10 Block 18, Block
19; Block -0; Block 21: llloek IBS Blotk23;
Map Fifty (50) Town of Christina, British
Columbia. Lot (17 Uroup 1 exoept plan 60
Osoyoos Division of Tale Dlatriet, British
Columbia.
PROOF having bean filed In my Offloa ot the
loss ol Certificate of Title No. M684A to
the above-mentioned lands In the name of
William Marshall Wolverton and bearing
date the 22nd Oetober, 1908, I HERBBV OIVK
NOTICB of my Intention at the aspiration of
one calendar month from the first publication hereof to Issue to the said William
Marshall Wolverton a provisional certllleate
at title ln lieu of such lost certificate. Any
person having any information with reference to such lost certificate of title Is requested to communicate with the under-
sinned.
Dated at the Land Registry Offloe, Kamloops, B.C., this28th day af Sopten-rber, 1928.
E. S.STOKJC8,
Registrar.
Date of flrst publication October 8,1928.
YOUNG AT 50
Dr. Ltntard't New Life Tablets
Impart* to the Old and  Middle-aged
Youthfulneea, Energy and Fitness, retird*  mental  and physical
decay,    thus    promo-tin-*  longevity,
Preserves  the arteries   and  tissues,
Sufferers irotn Dsafneis with its many
di'trn-'ing acoompanying   ailment*,
aa II>vl ruiies, deriveal  most immediate benefit.    Calm refreshing sleep
assured. Gloom, Depression and Ner«
vousnnss is banished under the influence of  tli*-*, Lifu giving   Tablets
Wrinklos, hard  lines aud  blemishes
disappear.    The skin becomes clear,
light and elastic and the complexion
bright aod smooth.    Think    of   the
blessings of perfect   health, the possesion of few; the joyof a clear Youthful appearance and tingling blood, of
lustrous hair, bright eyes aod health-
tinted cheeks; the beauty of   radiant
life and the realisation that Tims haa
been put back Ten years to the envy
and admiration of your friends, and
theunbounded satisfaction of   your,
self,    Can you allow a golden opportunity like this to pass!   Remember
there are no arduous rules to follow,
no restriction on diet, not   are there
any ill effects after. On the contrary
it gives the entire system a feeling of
exhaltation   with   increased   mental
and   bodily  vigour.    Why not look
and feel 30 at 50?    Do not delay,
commence   the   treatment   at once,
You will never regret the slight cost
Incurred for such incalculable   benefits.   The price of   these  Marvellous
Tablets including   Mail   Charges is
3 Dollars per bottle, dispatched in
plain wrapper on receipt of  amount.
Obtainable from
Dr. Legard's Laboratories,
106, Liverpool Ko*d,|]UnMbu-ry,
London, Enftls-uid.
The actuality ot today seldom
looks as good as tho theory of yesterday, THE SUN: GBAND FOBKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
&
NEWS OFTHE CITY
P. 'M. Burns and J. A. Yardley, of
Vancouver, Inspector s of customs
and exe se, were ln the city for a
couple of days this week.
Apple picking came to an end this
week tnd tbe orchards are now bare
of fruit.
iMfrs. "W. J. Cook returned on Wednesday from, Portland, where she
had been visiting her son Tack for a
•few weeks.
Joe Schnaveleyand family, old-
timers of the city, expect to move
to Spokane next week.
T. T. Walker came over from Trail
this week and visited w th his (ami
ly for a few days.
The Norris box factory has practi-
ctlly finished making this season's
supply of fruit boxes.
the
H. E. Woodland returned from
caast the first of the wieek.
FROM EVERYWHERE
ine recently organized egg sti.
poultry pool in Saskatchewan has
17,000 members. Egg production in
that province is 33,072,263 dozen
yearly. Saskatchewan is now the
second largest poultry producing
province in Canada, Ontario being
first
St. Catharine*—The North American celery championship has been
awarded to James Little of this city
by the American Vegetable Growers' Association, convening in Cleveland. The high quality of Canadian
celery has long been recognized and
this new triumph is expected to further stimulate production.
The Australian Cricket Team,
heroes of five test matches against
England this summer, arrived in
Canada on the Canadian Pacific
liner Montrose, October 8th. After
visiting some of the principal cities
In Canada and the United States,
the team proceeded to Vancouver
where they sailed on M.S. Aorangi
for their homes in Australia, October 21st.
For the third year in succession
the McAdam First Aid Team from
New Brunswick carried off the
"Grand Challenge Trophy," emblematic of the eastern lines first
aid championship of the Canadian
Pacific Railway. The competition
was held recently at the Place Viger
Hotel in Montreal, four other teams
from points east of Fort William
competing.
The oldest employee of the Canadian Pacific Railway in point of
service, Isaac Gouverneur Ogden,
vice-president in charge of finance,
celebrated his 82nd birthday October 10th. He has served the Company for 44 years and his business
experience goes back to the Civil
War days. Mr. Ogden was thc
recipient of felicitations from all
parts of the Dominion.
ELECTRIC LIGHT TAKES
PLACE   OF   MINE
LAMPS
From fourteen huts on the rim of a
deep craterlilce hole in South Africa,
shafts of light stream out every
night to illuminate the diggings below where natives are toiling in the
clay for diamonds. Thil lighting
system has been in-tailed at the
Premier mines, v»-here the famous
Cullina** diamond was discovered,
and consists ot batteries of 1,500and
2,000-watt lamps with filaments of
the so-called "monoplane" type. In
front of each lam,p is a B 1-4-inch
spherical mirror and each projector
has a si .iron-inch parabolic mlirror,
The liu-hls have a range of from 900
to 1,600 feet lor sa'.islactory Illumination, ami arc considered a great
advance over the old type of arc
searchlights, which were constantly
being damaged by the blasting operations. It is estimated that, at the
end oi 1 .-..:, the mines had produced
23,500,000 carats of diamonds. The
area is the "pipe" or vent of a form
er volcano, ooval in shape, about
2.00U feet long and 1,500 feet wide.
Somebody remarked: "If wives
only knew what stenographers really think of their husbands, they
wiould cease to worry."
"KEEP IT iOUT OF
PAPER,"
IS THE CRY
tbe
"Keep It out of the paper" ls
crp We hetr every week.
To oblige often costs considerable
trouble and humiliation, but the
arty making the request thinks the
granting scarcely worth a "thank
you."
A newspaper ls a peculiar thing
in the public's epe. The editor is
stormled at because he gets one item
and ls abused because he does not
get another.        ■
Young mien and poung women, as
well as older -persons, perform! acts
which become logitimatefor publica
tion and then 'beg the editor not to
notice their escapades.
The very next week they condemn
the same paper for not yrlting up
another partp doing the same thin*;.
Tbe discretion of an editor is trulp
a marvelous thing and manp are the
stories upon which he turns his back
because of a good wife or a mother
who would be grlevouslp hurt to see
the thing in print.
Don't blame the editor for keeping
some things out of the paper, but be
thankful that hie has a heart and is
not as indifferent to pour feelings as
the cold and calculating circulation
builder who alts at the desk in the
big cltp papers.
DONALDSON
GROCERY
Phone 30
S
Try our Special Tea
at 65c per
I
lb
Shoes, Shirts, Overalls
Good values for your
money.
Call and see
purchasing.
;
us before
JOHN  DONALDSON
General Merchant
FOR A SPECIAL CUP OF TKA TRY OUR
CHALLENGE   BRAND
Thi$ Tea we have had especially blended.
Call in and ask foi»a sample.
CITY GROCERY
Phone 25
"Service and Quality"
S. T. HULL
Established 1910
UealEstate and Insurance
Resident Agent Grnnd Fortes Townsite
,, Company, l.imite'l
CHEVROLET
St*e the new Superior Chevrolet betore you buy a
car. There are more cents in theCHOVROLKT
DOLLAR than iu any other nutomobile dcllnr.
CHEVROLET Tourini-  »SK5
" Roadster  '..     8S5
" Cosch    uwn
" Coupee    1080
" Sedan    1200
" Linde-u 8ed»n   1250
" One-ion Truck    935
GRAND FORKS GARAGE
Proved safe bv millions and prescribed by physicians for
Neuralgia      Colds      Neuritis        Lumbago
Headache      Pain       Toothache    Rheumatism
DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEART
Parma    JOrcharda     City Property
•.(rents at Nelson, Calgary, Wlhnipeg and
other Prairie points.  Vanoosiver Ags-ms :
PBNDEK IN
BATTKNBU
TMENT8
LANDS LTI>,
Rstrbllshol In 1910. we are in a position to
furnish reliable information couoer'-.lng this
district.
Write lor tree literature
A. E. MODOUGALL
CONTRACTOR ANO BUILDER
Agent
IfuminioD Monumental Worka
Aabsratoa Products Co. Koofiii-}'
*5W
Accept only "Bayer" package
which contains proven directions.
Handy "Bayer" boxen of 12 tableta
Also bottles of .24 and 100—Druggists.
Aspirin Is Use trmli- mark registered In Canada) of Barer Msrrafteture of Mcrooacetlc-
ad'eater of. Sallcyllc-icld (Acetyl Sslicyllc Acid, "A. 8. A."). While It Is well known
that Aspirin means liayer manufacture, to assist the public sislnst Imitations, the Tablets
of Bayer Company will be stamped with their general trade nark, the "Bauer Onus."
DUTCH  BULBS
Auction
Sale
Farm    stock and Implements
The undersigned has received    instructions from
JOE   SCHNAVELEY
To. tell. by.. Public. Auction at his
ranch, hauf mile south of cemetery,
starting at 1 o'clock sharp, on
WEDNESDAY,   OCTOBER   27
the.   following..   Farm.   Stock,lmple-.
ments and  Household  Effects:
Cows and Horses
2Helfers, rising 2 and 3 years
1 Cow, 6 years, milking
1 team Mules
1 Cider Pres
2 heavy Wagons
1 light Wagon
1 Buggy
1 Cutter
1 set light Bobsleighs
1 two-horse international    Engine,
almost new
2 Cultivators
1 Wagon Back
1 Potato Planter
1 set Steel Harrows
B Scrapera
1 Bone Grinder
1   Blacksmith  Forge.   1   Anvil.
1 Stump Puller
Quantity Pulley Blocks
1 Garden Seeder
7 tone Wheat Hay
2 Bicycles
1 Saddle
2 sets Heavy Double Harness
1 set Light Doublet Harness
2 rolls Barbed Wire
1 Sideboard
1  DIningroom  Extension Table
1 Organ
1 6-Hole Range with Reservoir
2 Wood Heaters
2 Rocking Chairs
6 Kitchen Chairs
2 Parlor Tables
2 Washing Machines
2 Dressers
1 Churn.   3 Gas  Lamps.
Quantity Sealers and Dishes
1   Kitchen  Cabinet
1 Drop-leaf Kitchen Table
2 Shotguns and 2 Rifles
1 Beehive
3 dozen Hens and Chickens
And    other    articles too numerous
to enumerate
Term* of Sale:—Cash.
8,  B.  LAWRENCE,  Auctioneer,
8. T. HULL, Clerk.
If you wish to have early flowers in bloom
in Spring
PLANT THIS FALL-Hyacinths, Tulips
and DaiTodils.
VVe have the best varieties for this climate
FRACHE
.   Florists
RROS., LTD.
—Grand Forks, B. C.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
BOX 33? BRAND FORKS, P. C
K. SCHEER
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONIST
onler ia
Havana Cigars* Pipe*
Confectionery
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Forks, B. C.
GRAND V  KJvS
Transfer Co.
DAVIS 8 HANsSEN, Props
<■'»<>- Bag&ifte'aiid (icncial
Transfer
|| Coal,   Wood  and
for Sale
I
PICTURES
Giving Wings
to Friendship
The long distance telephone gives wings
to friendship. It enables the human
voice to be carried along wires at a
speed of thousands of miles per second
without losing any of its cordiality. The
special night rates after 8:30 p m. are
advantageous for social chats.
British   Columbia  Telephone
Company
AND PICTURE FRAMING
Furniture  Made to Order,
Also Repairing of all Kinds,
Upholstering Nejtly Done
R. G. MoCUTCHBON
WIN-tlPBOAVRIOI
Hobby
is
DON'T HESITATE!
PHONE 101R
FORFINE PRINTING
A complete line of, colored bonds
I in   all shades for fancy letterheads
and   otber classes   of   commercial
printing.  San Job Department.
Did you ever notice that business
I firms who think tbat they can reaob
| The Sun's  readers tbrongh other
publications  have  a great deal of
leisure  time  tha*. might be more
profitably employed)   A number of
| sucb firms bave involuntarily retired
from business.
•Good
^Printing
THE value of wcll-
pi-Lited, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult us before going
else whore*
Wedding invitations
Ball programs
Business cards
Vi::ting cards
Sh"; ~ iug tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheadi
Pamphlols
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
Classic blank cards for -lassy invitations and announcements Stin
Job Department.
THE SUN
Curable Arenae and
Lake Street
iiLEPHONK
R101
Office   at
R.   t.   Petrie's
Phone 64
ce
Store
Yale liarber Shop
Razor Honing a Specially*
P. A. Z. PARE, Fioprietor
Yaw. Hotol,  Kirst ikkkt
SYNOPSIS OF
UNO ACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant unrtsserved, surveyed Orowa lauds
msy be preempted by Uriel b subjaota o'er
18 years of us-c, aud by aliens on declaring
munition to beoome Hritish subjeots, ooudi-
tional upon re«l tenne. occupation aisd lm*
provemeutforagrtouDaral purposes.
Full Information concerning re-illations
regarding pre dilutions Is irlven |n Bulletin
No.l, Lun I Series "How to Pie-esmst Laud,"
copleaof which cau be obtained freo of chrsrge
by addressing the Depurtineui of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., or assy (lovernnieul Agent.
Records will bc made covering only land
suitable for agrlcuitnral purposes, and which
Is not timberland. I e„ carrying over 5.00"
■soard feet per aora west of tue Coast Range
and 81X10 feel per acre cast of that range.
Applications foi- pre-emptions are to be
addressed to the Land Commissioner ot tha
Laud KeoordingDivision, In wbich the land
ipplte" for la situated.and are male on
printed forms, copies ol o sn be obtained
from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be oooiipled for Ave
yearsaud Improvements made to value of 110
por aore, including olearlng and cultivating
at least live stores, beiore a Crown (irant ean
be received.
For more detailed iniunnaiinu tee the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land,"
PUROHASE
Appllcatlonsaro received for purohase of
vaoant and unreserved Orown Lands, not be*
ing timberland, for agricultural purposes:
minimum prloe of llrst-olass (arable) land Is
|j per aore. and second-clan (graaing) land
**.60 per aoro. Fnr. her Information regarding purchaaeor leases,f Crown lands Is given
lu Bulletin No. 10, Land Series. "Purchase and
Lease ol Crown Lands."
Hill, factory, or industrial sites on timber
land, not exoeediug 40 aores, may be pur.
chased or leased, on oondltions luolnding
payment of stumpage.
HOMESITE LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20 aorea,
may be leased as homesitsss, conditional upon
a dwelling being e-eoted In the firat year.
title being obtainable after residenoe and
Improvement conditions sro fulfilled and land
haa been surveyed.;
LEASES
Por graaing and Industrial purposes area.,
not exoeedlng 640 aores may be leased by ona
person or aoompany.
GRAZING.
t'nder the Oraalng Aot the Province la
divided Into graaing dlstrlots and the range
administered under a Oraxlng Commissioner. Annual graaing permits are
Issued baiad ou numbers ranged, priority being given to established owners. Stook-
owners may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free, permits
are availablee for settler-, tampers nnd
travellers up to tea bead.

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