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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Nov 13, 1925

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Array 1/
You may consider it a fact which admits of few exceptions, that those who ask your opinion really want your praise
F
Toronto, November 12.—
It is Jeported in fftcal Llber.il
circles that several surprises
are nil ready to be sprung by
Prime Minister King in the
formation of the new government.
The first surprise, it is said,
will be the entry of Robert
Forke, leader of the Progressives, iuto the cabinet as minister of immigration.
Hon. Charles Dunning,
premier of Saskatchewan, is
coming to the capital also to
take a seat, according to the
report, aud it is said the
prime minister himself is going to run in Russell, Ont.,
when the time conies. Hon.
George P. Graham will not
be in the new cabinet after the
first session.
Winnipeg.Noveuibar 12.—
Robert Forke, Prugressive
leader, in an interview with
the Canadian Press over the
long-distance telephone to his
home at Pipestone last night,
denied emphatically that he
had protested against the
calling of a session of the
federal house in December.
The local Sontham paper yesterday qnoted him as having
protested.
-'Premier King," he said
last night, "probably has a
good reason for catling a session in Decemher and 1 can't
see anything wrong with the
date.''
"Do you think that an
election in the spring would
work a hardship on the farmers of western Canada?" Mr.
Forke was asked.
"I think it would," he replied, adding that that was
one of the busy seasons for
the farmer.
"Would you like to make
a statement as to your attitude toward the government
when the house assembles?"
was another question asked.
"I have nothing to say
about that at the present
time," Mr Forke replied. •
will say, though, that I have
no intention of saying or doing anything at the present
time that might embarrass
the government."
Pressed as to whether that
would be his attitude when
the house sat, Mr. Forke re
peated his former statement
that he had nothing to say
regarding the altitude he
would take in the house.
The    Progressive    leader
stated   that   he   would be in
Winnipeg Thursday and  in
timated that he might issue a
statement at that time.
THE WEATHER
The following is the minimum
and maximum temperature for each
day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on B. F. Law's ranch:
Max.    Min.
Nov.  6—Frid«r 42        21
7—Saturtliy  39        18
8—Sunday  38        28
9—Monday  44 32
10—Tnesday   46 37
11—Wednesday  49
12—Thursday.".  63 32
Inches
Hain and melted snow    .30
\
£
I******
d_And KETTLE VALLEY ORCHARDISTJ
TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR—No  2
"Tell me what you Know Is Iras-
I can'stnese as well as you."C
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1925
STANDING  OF PUPILS
The followiug is the standing- of the
pupils of the Urand Forks Central
School, in order ot merit, as determined by cjaas.-work done aud tests
he d duriug the months of September
and Octoher;
puincipal'b class.
Ruth Savage, Fred Smith, James
Miller, Lilly McDonald, Agues Mc
Kenzie, Jean Love, Gladys Pearson,
Raymond Dinsmoje, Francis O'Keefo,
Harry Thomas, Colin Graham, Freda
Lyden, Donald McKinnon, Allan
•Stewart.Carl Hansen,Clarence Hardy,
Hetty McCallum, Dorothy Jones,Erio
Clark, Louise McPherson,Ellen Hansen, Lillian Pell, Myrtle Fisher and
Harold Helmer equal, Ralph Smyth,
Marvin Bailey, Charlotte Acres,
Elizabeth Mooybaer, Eugene Mc
Dougall, Patricia Cook, Mary King
ston, Catherine Gowans, Gordon Mas.
sie, Vilmer Holm, Josephine Davison.
DIVISION II.
Grade Eight—fithel Longtuff,Olive
Huggins, Marie Kidd. Lillian Drum,
Jean Gray, Welhe!mina DeWilde,
Walter Manson, Roy VValker, Winni
[red Smith, Rupert Foote, Louis Santano, Arta Montgomery, Charles
Robertson, Walter Ronald, Everts
Biddiecome,
Grade Seven—Grace Crisp, Elsie
Egg, Fred Mason, John Acres, Gladys
Smith, Frank Thompson,8ei eta Hut-
tuti. Mai ji;iie lunin, Mildred I'attiM'-
son, Marjorie Taylor, Katherine
Henniger. Helen Beran, Ernest Hut
ton, Beverley Benson, Norman Cooke,
Irene Bailey, Violet Crisp,„ Elvera
Colarch, Delbert Kirkpatrick John
Chahley, Esther Newman, Earle
Bickerton, Margaret Longstaff, Leo
Gowans, Albert Dodd, Annie Van
Marsbergen.
DIVISION III..
Grade Seven—Lora Frechette, Ber.
uice Donaldson, Bruce McDonald,
Vivian Plant, Wilhelmiua Weber,
Edna Wenzel, Elsie Scott, Melvin
Glaspel,, Chester Bouthrou, Winnifred Truax, Peggy McCallum, Margaret Kingston, Peter Jmayoff,Ernest
Crosby, Mike Maurelii,Petar Vatkin,
Agnes Winter, Donald Ross.Marjorie
Otterbine, Betty Massie, Effie Don
aldson, Madeline McDougail, Roy
Cooper, Elsie Ogiloff, Evelyn Collins
Edith Patterson, Euphy McCallum,
Bill Tutt, lan Clark, Ernest Daniel
son, Lee Maurelli, Harry Anderson,
Charlie Harkness, Nathan Clark.
DIVISION  IV.
Grade Six—Winnifred Lightfoot,
Valentine Griswold, Dorothy LidJi-
ooat, Mildred Smith, Maissie Henderson, Audrey Roynolds.Jessie Sweezey,
Florence McDougail, George Thump
son, Elise Prudhotnme.RichardMich.
ener, Joe Lyden, Evelyn Cooper,
Cbarlie McLeod, Harry Murray,
Clarence Henderson, George Savage,
Fred Wenzel, Daisy Malm, Harold
Bailey, Charlio Dodd,Alma Frechette,
John MoD nald, Mildred Anderson,
Miunie McNevin, Charlie Egg, Laura
Maurelli, Hazel Mason. Ernest Fit/,
patrick, Ronald McKinnon, Vera
Newman, Qeorge Bird, Thomas
Mudie.
DIVISION v,
Qrade Five, Seuior—Katie Dorner,
Mary Jones, Alex Skuratoff, Edward
Thomas, Laura Sweezey, Tuny Sans-
tauo, Caytou Patterton, Harold
Montgomery, Irene Bickerton, Bobbie Carlson, Atigelo Colarch, Helen
Pell,James Allan, Genevieve Mitchell
(absent).
Grade Five.Junior—Maty Dorner,
John Baker, Brnce Qrey, Bessie
Heodeison, Isabel Huffman and AI
bert Euerby equal, Brt ce Harkness,
Edith Gray, Chester Hutton, James
Robertson, Harry Hansen, Mary Mo
Kinnon, Mae Waterman, John Mc
Laod, Peter DeWilde, Roy Clark,
Joe Nucich (absent for 3 exams.).
DIVISION* VI. !
• Grade Five, Judior—Alex Woods,
Dorothy Innes, Florence MacDonald,
Folly Vatkins, Teresa Frankovich,
Alberta Biddiecome, Josephine Ru.
zicka, Mory Reibin, Catherine Davis,
Eyrtle Kidd, Edna Scott, Peter
Reibin, Stewart Ramsay (absent).
Grade Four.Senior—Delwin Water
man, Dolores Kirkpatrick, Barbara
Love, Charlotte Longstaff, Gordon
Wilkins, Dorothy Donaldson Victor
Rella, Grace McLeod and Phyllis
Simmons equal 'Lola Ogloff, Mowat
Gowans, Albert Deporter, George
O'Keefe, Jack Love, Gordon Mudie,
Prackup Kabatoff, Winnifred O'Keefe
Swanbllda Helmer, (absent).
Tide of Christmas Traffic Flows East
1.—Typical Chrlstnuui scene In Montreal.    2.—Finish of Eaatern Dot Darby 111 Quebec.    J.—Riding and Skl-lna In Winter.
Ever since that time, some years ago now, when the
West was discovered by the East as the most likely
place to amass a fortune ln the briefest possible time,
and the simple words, "Oo West, young man!" '.-ere
the best advice a parent could give a son; well, ever
since that time, the young man who heeded the advice
has bcen coming back East at least ouce a year, and
that once Is generally Christmas.
Perhnps tiie young mun has amassed no great fortune; perhaps he lina; and perhaps again ho has fared
rather 111; but In any event he usually finds that as
Christmas draws near, recollections of his childhood,
bis Christmas stocking, the tree at home, the plum-
pudding or the turkey and cranberries, constitute too
powerful a memory to negate. And because these
recollections are so potent, transportation companies
operate special serv'.c/s to handle what they call the
Cbrlstmas traffic.
This year the crop lias been extremely good; money
wW be more free in 'lie West than for some time past.
Tbe season's work Is done and the Westerner will have
lots Jf time on his hands. If he hag few financial worries he may spend quite some time In the East; there
Is much to attract lilm. There In the social life In the
big hotels, where a.11 ts luxurious comfort; wlntor sports
such as hockey, skiing, skating, slelph riding and tobogganing to Indulge in, ov to watch, if he so prefers, tbe
round of the theatres lo make, whovo ho will hear the
tune* that will be popular for the year, or bob the plays
that will ba discussed nt most civilized/ dinner tables;
and if be has brought friend wife, there are the shops
to visit, though many a man has found this a costly
pastime, more eo perhaps, than poker or the races.
However, from every angle, the season ln the East
ls rich and pleasant. That side ot the continent is a
magnet for holiday seekers and lt ls at that particular
time tbat tbe ancient provinces reclaim their sons, lf
only for the briefest of visits. This year it will have
visitors galore.
Thc Canadian Pacitlc Railway announce iliat many
Inquiries and requests for reservations have already
been made at their agencies throughout western Canada. This would indicate the likelihood of a huso
volume of traffic moving In an easterly direction this
December. A portion of lt will no doubt move straight
through to the British Isles and the Continent, as many
settlers are originally from those places. The Canadian Pacific will run special traln-i from all western
centres, connecting directly with their A'.Uint!** llnors,
sailing from the win.er port of Saint John, N.H., to all
the larger ports in northern Europe.
But the great portion of the traffic will bo pointed
for Eaatern Canada and the company will f-<cilita'.6 Its
movement by offering special train servic.!': and spnclal
tourist cars that will obviate the necessity or change tut
any point along tbe route, and further thnn this, special excursion rates will be given. The:-o conditions
will prevail from December 5th to stannary lithj nnd will
be effective from all stations In Manitoba, &:•■ katc'.-.ewan
and Alberta.
DIVISION VII,
Grade Four,Junior—Jean McDonald, Junie Danielson, Grace McDonald,Lola Hutton and Myrtle Mitchell
equal, Alice Bird, Janet Mason, Allan
Huggins, Nels Anders.in, Jack*Long-
staff, Willie Gowans (absent).
Grade Three, Senior—Geraldine
Gowans, Helen Harkoff, Norman
Ross, Margaret Baker, Steve Boyko,
Wilma Davis, Mary Colarch, Nellie
Skhuratoff, Jack McDonald, Mike
Boyko, Bennie Rella Lloyd Bailey,
Angus McKenzie, Ernest Heaven,
Eunice Patterson, Willie Linsley,
John Crisp, Roger Thomas, Jimmy
Graham, Elsie Kuftinoff, Christine
Reynolds (absent), Jim Maloff,
DIVISION  VIII.
Grade Three, Junior—GeorgeKas.
trukoft, Williamina Grey, George
Robertson and Carl Wolfram equal,
Robert Kidd, John Hlady, Nick
Chahley, Fern Henniger, Lillian Biddiecome, Hazel Huggins Peter Pop-
off, Edith Newman, Mabel Miller,
Aulay Miller, Veronica Kuva, George
Ruzicka, Morris Bailey, John Dan-
chin.
Grade Two,8enior—Georgo Howey
Ir-no Hutton, Lois Dinsmore, Kath-
erine Chahley, Winnifred Cooper,
Nora Halisheff, Francis McDougail,
Doris Egg, Lindsay Clark, Irene
Lighttoct, Jenny Maloff and Bernice
Huggins equal.
DIVISION IX.
Grade Two, Junior--Mary Kuva
and Catherine McDonald and Wil-
liam Ogiloff equal, Bertha Wolfram,
Annie Ogiloff, Ralph Meakes, John
Marsbergen, Jobn Gowans, Allister
McKenzie, Gladys Ctark, Beruice
Postnikoff.
Unranked — Shirley Docksteader
Irene Frechette, Konald Griswold,
Bernice Hull, Norman Hull, Opal
Lusk, Crystal Mason, Alexander
Ramsay, Muriel Smith, Eva Woods,
Sam Zebroff.
Grade One, Senior—May Thomp
son, Annie Hlady and Tania Kastrukoff equal, Leonard Montgomery,
Annie Ronald, Walter Carpenter, Joe
Pohoda, Sadie McDonald, Wilma
Miller, Barney Hlady, Roger Don
dale.
Unronked—Mike Danchin, Doris
Mattocks, Rnby Wilkinson, Mary
Zebroff.
L
The regular meeting of tbe city
council was held in the council
chamber on Monday evening, tho
mayor and all the aldermen being
pieeent.
Ad offer of 110 trom C V. Meg.
gitt for the wooden pipe at the
Bonndary Iron Works wah .not ac
cepted.
The bouse on lot 17, block I,
plan SS, was sold to C. C. Heaven
for •26.50, the bouse to be torn
down and removed and tbe lot Ieit
in a clemi condition.
Tbe bouse ou block 11, plan [839,
was sold t > H. Hlady for tlOO on
terms of 120 per month witb interest
at 10 per cent, tbe bouse to be repaired and used as a residence
Tbe finance committee submitted
a statement of receipts and dim.
bureements up to October 31.
Tbe water aod ligbt committee
reported tbat 276 feet of 4 inch
water mains bad been laid on Water
street at a cost of 46 cents per foot,
and also that a slight damage bad
been done to the Mill creek flume
by some evilaminded person.
The board of works reported tbat
tbe usual repairs to sidewalks were
being done, and tbat at present
James Walker was in charge of tbe
police department during the ab
eeoce of Chief Docksteader.
Tbe proposal of the fire department regarding attendance of members at all large gatherings, will be
submiited to Fire Marshal Thomas
for information.
Aid.   Liddicoat and Miller, with
the mayor, were appointed members
of Ibe oourt of  revision for tbe re- j
vision of tbe municipal voters' list, I
tbe   first   sitting  to be beld on the
10th oi December.
Vancouver, November 12—The
fruit combine cases against forty
two firms and eleven individuals
were last nigbt stood over until
January 18, on application of counsel for the defense. The application
came beiore Mr Justice D. A Mc
Donald at Ihe assizes and on Mc
Leod Sinclair, KC, giving an undertaking that tbe ststus of the
firms would not be bbanged mpsn*
wbile, tbe chsrges were stood over.
Bob Shawkey, New York Yankes
veteran pitcher, who organized tha
party of major league baseball play.
crs now hunting big game in New
Brunswick, shot a moose with antlers
ipraadlng GO inches and having 28
points, according to word received
it Fredericton, N.B. Shawkey shot
bis moose tho first day the party
■•ei-nl in the woods, This information is conveyed by another party of
hunters who passed tiie camp of the
ball players at Nepisiqui Lakes. In
the group are some of the best
known players in the American
League, Eddie Collins,- Babe Ruth
and Muddy Ruel being among them.
The romance of a world cniiss
culminated in New York City recently when Dorothy Holmes
O'Ryan, daughter of Major-General
and Mrs. John F. O'Ryan, of Naw
York, married Darwin Curtis, of
Chicago. The couple met for ths
first time a year ago on board the
Canadian Pacific liner Empress of
France which was then making a
tour of the world. It is feared they
had no eyes for the world marvels
which were unrolled before them on
the tour, since it is slated they fell
in love at first sirjht and could only
see each other. The marriage was
performed by the Rev. Father Franks P. Duffy, chaplain of the "Fighting Sixty-ninth," a regiment commanded by the bride's father during
ths war.
NEW ELECTRICAL
MQTQRTROUBLES
Moscow, November 7.—An
accumulator . whicb can be
carried in a vest pocket and
contains sufficient electrical
energy to drive an automobile
for ten days without recharging has een invented by
Prof. Joffe of Leningrad.
^"Experts declare that Prof.
Joffe's experiments havHtaade
possible the concentration of
a-greater quantity of electrical
energy than has ever.been attained by modern technique.
Scientists believe that his discovery will have a revolutionizing effect on every branch of
industry.
So far Prof. Joffe's discovery
is in the experimental stage,
but he declares that soou it
will be made possible to apply
it to general industrial pur-
poses
Good reading for Canadian Pacific shareholders is fus.iished in tha
September statement of gross earnings, working "xpenses and net
profits. It has been the most favorable month for the company In
a long time. The gross earnings
were $18,009,071, the greatest shown
in any month since Octobsr, 1924. *
Operating- expenses were $12,641,-
152 and the difference between ths
two, the net profits $6,267,619, an
increase of $1,719,978 over the corresponding month of last year. Nat
earnings for the first thret quarters of thia year, ending September 80th, is $1,190,089 greater than
the 1924 figures, despite a decrtaM
in gross earnings of over four and
a half million dollars. This wat
made possible by tha company's
policy of rigid economy.
To bring tht Arctic within tht
scope of tourist traffic ls the object
of the Marquis M. N. dtgli Abizzi,
winter sports director at Lake Placid, who is organizing pack horst
trips of thirty days' duration nazt
year from the Canadian Pacifit
Rockies aa far north as the Columbia Ice Fields within the Arctic
Circle. "We are going to swim our
horses and outfit across tht Saskatchewan River and camp' near
the sources of the Athabasca which
emptits into Great Slave Lake and
thence Into the Arctic," the Marquis asserts. The first of these trips
is scheduled between Junt 28 and
July 27 ntxt year.
Santa Approves a
Christmas Gift
Santa Claus hss been down a
great many chimneys since be start,
ed business, and he is lntinwtely
acquainted with a Urge number of
people. He knows that the best
kinds of gifts are those wbicb please
the whole family, and wbioh bring
tbe excitement and enjoyment of
Christmas every week. Thst is wby
he looks so jolly when be receives
hunu eds of stibi-criptions to Tbe
Youth's Comdanion witb wbich to
fill bis pack. And, being wise from
long experience, he knows lhat
people are likely to overdo things
around Christmas, so be chuckles
when be sticks a Compamo into
tbe top of a stocking. "Be as greedy
aa you like," be thinks, "the more,
tbe better for you."
The 52 issues of The Youth's
Companion for 1926 will be crowded
witb serial stories, ebort -stories,
editorials, poetry, facte, and fun.
Jus; send your order to tbe address
below aod Santa Claus will take care
of delivering the paper to ymir
home or to tbe bome of a fi-fi-nrl.
Subscribers will receive:
1. The    Youth's    Companion—52
issues in 1926, and
2. The remaining ispnes of 192.-J.
All for only 12.
3. Or, include   McCall's   Magazine,
the monthly authority on funhiona
Hoth publication-!, nni*.* $2.50
THE YOUTH S COMPANION,
S N Dept, Boston, Mar*s>.
Subscriptions Received at tbis Office THE SUN: GBAND FORKS, BBITI8H COLUMBIA
®te OSrattJn Jfnrhfl Bun
»N INOEPEN3ENT NEtfSPAPER
Q. A. EVANS. EDITOR AHD PUBLIS IIR
^SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) $1.00
One Year (in the United States)   1.50
150,000 schools and 20,000,000 pupils. Europe has fewer than 70,000 schools aud about
8,000,000 pupils. Asia ranks next with 30,000
schools and 1,300,000 pupils.
FROM EVERYWHERE
Addresr -" —
Phonb 101
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
•cations to
JThk Guano Fork.*, Sun
. Grand Forks, B.
c:
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1925
Notes • Notions • Notables
H.R.H. the Prince of Wales spoke very
wisely when he condemned dancing on Armistice day as a desecration. If the present
generation of dance-crazed people can not get
enough dancing in 364 days, they should invent a 366 day year calendar.
A man charged in Christchurch, New Zealand, with burglary, attributed the crime to
his craza for wireless, and he was discharged
on pjob-ition on condition that he dismantle
his wireless set and use nobody else's. Tho
evidence showed that he had become mentally
deranged, owing to a close application to wireless apparatus. A similar fate has befallen
other New Zealand wir. less enthusiasts. The
judge said it was most extraordinary that re.
spectable citizens should become criminals
through wireless.
Motion picture films exported from the
United States made their highest record in
the year 1925, when the total length of "exposed" films exported was over 200,000,000
feet, or about 30,000 miles.
The Russian Academy of Science, which
explored and mapped all the Ru*sias, is celebrating its two hundredth anniversary this
year.
Archery is not a forgotten sport by any
means. This ancient art is indulged in at some
of tbe leading colleges for womeu in the United States and iu many colleges for men
abroad. The girls' schools which have archery
training are: Wellesley, Radcliffe, Smith,
Mount Holyoke and Bryn Mawr, and at the
following co-educational institutions, Cornell,
Deicago, Northwestern, Wisconsiu, Miunesota
and California, girls Uke part in the sports.
Besides Old Folks' home, there should be
an Old Fogies' home. Few the cities that
don't need one.
A widower who had a five-year-old son
married a second time and his choice was a
rather plain womau of about fifty. After the
wedding they came home and the father introduced her to the little fellow, saying: "Arthur, this is the new mamma I promised tc
bring you." After taking a good and steady
look at her, Arthur went over to his father and
exclaimed in a audible whisper: "Papa,you've
been cheated.   She isn't new at all."
Plans are already being laid to
make the 1925 Eastern International
Dogsled Derby an even greater success than in any previous year, and
it is reported that the prize money
will be considerably increased next
winter, with the object of attracting
more teams and mushers from the
West and the United States.
By incorporating rubber latex with the fulminating material and then vulcanizing by a
special process, matches and match-box
strikers are now made absolutely water and
damp proof. Tests have proved that matches
so treated can be actually immersed in water
without a single match being spoiled or its
ability to fire wben rubbed en the striker impaired.
Egyptian tilleis of the soil are beginning to
take an interest in modern agricultural
methods.
There are scores of starters to every finisher. Every person who gets ahead recognizes,
consciously or unconsciously, four rules for
success: First, be makes up his mind; second,
he's happy and keen at his work; third, he
studies and thinks; fourth, he fiuishes what
he starts.
The people who never make mistakes are
highly uninteresting.
There are few things more energetic than
life. Put a seed into the fissure of a rock, and
it will split it in twain from top to bt-ttom.
Though walls and rocks and rnins impede the
course Of the seedling, yet it will force its way
to the light and air and rain. And when the
Word of God enters the heart, it is not as a
piece of furniture or lumber. It asserts itself
and strives for mastery, and compels men to
1,'ive up sin; to make up long standing feuds;
to restores ill gotten gains; to strive into the
strait gate.—Rev, F. S. Meyer,
The earliest recorded eclipse of the sun occurred in 2137 B. C. it was visible in China,
and is reoorded in the Chinese classic, Chu
Ching. '
The man who bas a struggle for a living acquires a superior education.
Poems From Other Lands
China
At an international exposition in Bas tic,
Switzerland, this summer, new and old methods of producing hydro electric energy by
converting natural water courses into navigable waterways by construction of dams and
locks was demonstrated.
A kittiwake bird recently shot in Newfoundland had flown across the Atlantic
ocean, a numbered band on his' leg revealed.
The department of agriculture says that the
method of hanging geraniums up by the roots
in the cellar is a reasonably successful way of
carrying them through thn winter, but it is
not the best procedure. The best way is to
dig the plants up, put them into pots, cut off
most of the tops and keep in a light window
in a cool room. Another way is to put them
in earth, water once and leave them alone.
If some people practice humility it is because they are looking for the underhold.
There are more than a quarter of a million
Sunday schools  in   active .operation  in the
world, attractiug an attendance of more than
30,000,000 pupils.   North America is ahead of
other oontinents   in  this census, with some
aoillO aiilJ lu baviaosfl BnoUtjfeoadlifi ,
Hospitality
A few gourd leaves that waved about
Cut down and boiled;—the feast how spare!
But tbe good host his spirits takes,
Pours out a oup, and proves them rare.
A single rabbit on the mat,
Or baked, or roast;—how small the feast!
But the good host his spirits take,
And fills the oup of every guest. 	
A single rabbit on the mat,
Roasted or broiled;—how poor the meal I
But the truest* from the spirit vase
Fill their host's oup, and drink his weal.
A single rabbit on the mat,
Roasted or baked:*—no feast we think!
But from the spirit vase they take,
Both ho»t and guosts, and ]oyoU8 drink.
—Prom the Shi-King-
Fire Prevention Week, October
4-10, Was observed throughout the
Dominion, and to mark the sense of
the importance of the occasion Mr.
Grant Hall, vice-president of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, broadcast
an appeal by wire to. every officer
and employee of the system "to co-
operate as in the past and set a good
example by thoroughly cleaning up
all premises."
Canada's great outlook, says a recent issue of the London Outlook, is
that she wants more people, but of
the right type, namely, steady agricultural workers with enterprise,
initiative and endurance. Enthusiastic letters from emigrants under tha
joint scheme of settling 8,000 families in Canada are bound to have their
healthy effect on relatives and
friends dissatisfied with their lot in
England.
E. F. L. Sturdee, general Passenger Agent for the Orient of ths
C.P.R., with headquarters at Hong
Kong, has bcen appointed Assistant
General Passenger Agent of the system at Montreal. His dnties commenced here in. October. He was relieved of his other work owing to
ill-health, but the climate of Canada
soon restored him to physical well-
being. He has a long record of service with the C.P.R., dating back to
his first appointment at Saint John
in 1894.
Sixty bushels ef wheat at every
tick of the clock is the rate at which
the Canadian Pacific Railway hava
carried the grain Into the elevators
thiB seaaon. To keep up thia unprecedented rush, it has been necessary
to move one car-load of grain out
of Winnipeg at every ona minuta
and twenty-three seconds of tha
twenty-four hour day. Grain delivered at the head of the lakes br
the Canadian Pacific in September
alone would fill a fleet of 200 ships,
each with a cargo of 800,000 bushels.
Back from an extended tour of
inspection over tha company's western lines, E. W. Beatty, chairman
and president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, found a very marked
improvement in thc West as compared with that which had existed
when he last went acroas the country. He thought the spirit of tha
people was much more optimistic
and with very good reason since ha
considered it safe to say tbat 880,-
000,000 bushels was not too high an
estimate for the total Canadian
wheat yield this year. He noticed
throughout the country a sustained
interest in immigration and a more
irencrnl realization that therein lay
the soundest remedy for most of
Canada's difficulties'.
cAncient History"
[Taken From Twenty-Yeah Old Sun Files.]
Gen. Sherman once gave an apt definition
of war and derived considerable glory therefrom. But the the term does not adequately
cover the conditions at present existing in
Russia. There is still au opportunity for some
bright phrase smith to immortalize himself.
This is the season of the vear when country
editors take an inventory of their half-tone
cuts prior 'to announcing grand, illustrated
holiday editions.
Judge element's Initial sitting at the county
court in this city this week was the signal for
an interesting ceremony. The Bar association presented him with a congratulatory address.
Negotiations for an eight hour day at the
Granby smelter ere progressing satisfactorily.
Bev. and Mrs. J. R. Robertson left yester
day for their new home in Revelstoke.
John Mcintosh, owner of the Pacific hotel,
arrived in the city from Spokane last Friday
and viftijteiiwith friends|for a few day^ aj(jl
YOUNG AT 50
Dr. Letfard'i New Life Tablets
Imparts to the Old and Middle-aged
Youthfulneaa, Energy and Fit-
neaa, retards mental and physical
decay, thus promoting longevity,
Preserves the arteries and tissues,
Sufferers irom Deafness with its many
distressing accompanying ailments,
as Head noises, deriveal most immediate benefit. Calm refreshing sleep
assured. Gloom, Pppn'.sssionand Nervousness is banished under •'he influence of these Life-giving ."ablets
Wrinkles, hard lines aud blemishes
disappear. The skin becomes clear,
light and elastic and the complexion
bright and smooth. Think of the
blessings of perfect health, the possesion of few; the joy of a olear Youthful appearance and tingling blood, of
lustrous hair, bright eyes and health
tinted cheeks; the beauty of radiant
life and the realisation that Tima has
been put back Ten years to the envy
and admiration of your friends, and
theunbounded satisfaction of your'
self. Can you allow a golden oppor-
tunity like this to pass? Remembaf
there are no arduous rules to follow,
no restriction on diet, not are there
any ill effects after. On the contrary
it gives the entire system a feeling of
exhaltation with increased mental
and bodily vigour. Why not look
and feel 30 at 50? Do not delay,
commence the treatment at onoe,
You will never regret the slight cost
Incurred for such incalculable benefits. The price of these Marvellous
Tablets inoluding Mail Charges is
3 Dollars per bottle, dispatched in
plain wrapper on receipt of amount.
Obtainable from
Dr. Lefta-cd'a Laboratories,
106, Liverpool Road,|Barnabury,
, England,
Proved safe by millions and prescribed by physicians for
Colds     Headache      Neuralgia       Lumbago
Pain      Toothache     Neuritis Rheumatism
DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEART
Accept only "Bayer" package
which contains proven directions.
Handy "Bayer"  boxes  of  12  tableta
Also bottles of 24 and 100—Druggists.
Aspirin Is tne trade mirk (registered *1n Canada) of Barer Manifaetnn or MonoaMtla-
aeldeater of Ballcjlicacld (Acetyl Sallc/lIc Add, "A. 8. A."). Wblte It Is wall known
tbat Aapirln means Barar mannfactnre, to assist tbe pablle against Imitations, the Tablets
of Barer Oompanr wUl to stamped with their general trade mark, the "Barer Cross."
CITY REAL  ESTATE
FOR SALE
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the City, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Pricest«From $25.00 per lot upwards.
Terms:—-Cash and approved payments.
List of Lots and prices may be seen at the
City Office.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
Qity Clerk.
Massey-Harris
IMPLEMENTS
We are agents for the well known Massey-
Harris line of farm equipment. Let us
figure on your needs.
A Complete Line of Garden Tools
MILLER & GARDNER
Furniture and Hardware
Getting Facts Quickly
When information is required from a
distant point, the long distance telephone
proves its worth as a speedy, personal,
direct service.
British  Columbia Telephone
Company THE SUN: GRAND FORKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FROM EVERYWHERE
One of tho largest shipments of
live foxes for export ever to leave
Prince Edward Island, left recently
for New York for transshipment to
Norway. The shipment comprised
200 foxes In all, with a gross value
of 140,000. Several small shipments
of animals were consigned to Norway last year and this large order
haa followed the success which the
Norwegian breeders have had with
those animals previously aent from
this country.
Ai Illustrating the volume of grain
delivered by tha Port of Montreal
compared with, that of Vancouver,
figures given by the Pacific coast
port for the crop year ending July
SI last, show Montreal deliveries
were alx and three-quarters times
those from the British Columbia
port. Vancouver shipped 25,188,218
bushels of grain for the crop year
•ntung July 81, while Montreal, during this period, disposed of 169,929,-
018 bushels.
I. W. Beatt7, president and chairman ef the Canadian Pacific Railway, accompanied by aeveral of his
directors is at present engaged in
the annual tour of inspection of the
company's system. In an address to
the directors of the Canadian Na-.
tional Exhibition in Toronto Mr.
Beatty declared that the "only safe
and certain cure for the relief of
the Dominion's railway obligations
rested upon the country's industrial
and agricultural development."
Teeing off for a "Round-the-World" Trip
(1) Captain R. G. (Jock) Latta, commander of the Empress of Scotland just prior to teeing off from the deck of his ship as a member
of the "Round the World Golf Club." (21 Captain R.G. (Jock) Latta, commander of the Empress of Scotland, splitting the fairway
ln the flrst stroke of the "Round the World Golf Club" tournament. (J) S.S. Empress of Scotland, flagship of thc Canadian Pacific
fleet, which will sail on a tour of the world from New York December 3rd next.
Here you aee Commander R. G. (Jock) Latta, of the
S.S. Empress of Scotland, flag-ship of the Canadian
Pacific fleet, just before and in action bb a member of the
"Round-the-World Golf Club", teeing off from the deck
of his Bhip and splitting the fairway far into the ocean
with the firat ball of the tournament. The idea of the
club was first started by I. O. Upham, of the San Francisco Golf Club, who on a $50 bet went ahead with the
notion of teeing on foreign golf links across the world,
playing one hole on every course with the Bame ball. He
nad all kinds of sport from losing his ball on a Chinese
lin ks and hiring twelve men to search for it, to finding the
Copenhagen Golf Club, Denmark, occupied by the whole
Danish army. Before returning to San Francisco he had
played on 65 courses. Captain Latta is one of the latest
members of the Club and a number of fellow members
will sail on the Empress of Scotland on December 8rd
from New York on the fifth yearly cruise of the globe
undertaken by C.P.R. Vessels. The coming trip will
cover 27,320 miles, nineteen countries, every kind of
climate, race and tongue, and will return to Naw York
April 10,1926 from a trip occupying 139 days.
WESTERN CANADA'S RIVER OF WHEAT
A NEVER-BINDING stream of gold,
flowing from the farms of the
Prairie Provinces to the consumers
of bread stuffs in all parts of the civilized
world, is represented by the movement
of the farmers' grain to the world markets. Beginning in August each
year and in some years flowing
constantly forward until August
of the following year, this everlasting river or wheat is Western
Canada's contribution to the feeding of the civilized world. In the
movement of tbis crop from the
country elevators and loading
platforms of the Prairie Provinces, tho Canadian National
Railways year by year are playing a more important part.
Long before the western farmer
has finished hjp seeding in the
spring, preparations have been begun by the railways to move his
crop. Cars must be ordered, for
each yjsr more equipment is needed
for the ntovement of the grain; other
cars, which have been in service,
must bo brought into the repair
yards and overhauled or rebuilt according to their needs, for the movement of grain is a strenuous work
and grain cars show the effects of a
season's haulage. And, since cars
could not move forward without motive power, new locomotives of immense hauling power are necessary
and must be ordered, while those
which have already Been service in
this strenuous work must also be
b*ui*>sivw
>■■/.•»„
■»-....
So, as the
season approaches for
the hum of
the binders
to be heard
across the
prairies,
everything is
of the company through the western
region, compile a report on the
loadings and movements of grain
cars at the close of each day. These
reports are telegraphed to Winnipeg
where, with advices from the lake,
head and Vancouver, they are assimilated. Hence, with one single
report simply compiled, the entire
Canadian National links in the Western region almost continually, and
that every movement of these cars
must be checked in order that there
shall be no' confusion or delay in
their handling, the enormity of the
work of handling the grain movement may easily be realized. And
to handle over 175,000 cars of grain
Farmers' Grain at Line Elevatora   '
being prepared for the rush of the grain situation is shown for the
i——....  -,. C....1..1 ..;»;i»»™i preceding day throughout Western Canada. Figures for previous
years are also kept on record with
tbe reports as they come if. and
at any time comparisons mv be
nud* to show the progress over
harvest work,
in this, as in
Constant vigilance
...  , .__  ...   every   other great
movement, is the price of safety and
nothing is left undone to ensure that
the movement forward shall be
rapid, even, and unhampered. An
important department, whose .work
is little seen outside of railway
circles, is the Car Service Department, whose eye is watching night
and day to see that grain cars are
properly distributed and that once
loaded, they move forward rapidly
to the lake or ocean port from which
further shipment is to take place.
During the grain rush each fall
the Car Service officials meet a difficult situation, for instead of an
even balance of haul back and forth
through the west, there is an over-
v -r'-rt-r-,
f^f'*J:*-**M*km.
* W*Wm
iffla*"' - " •■-■—*'
Lake Carrier Loading at Terminal
brought in to the huge repair shops
and overhauled end made ready.
Nor is this all. In preparation for
lhe movement of heavy trains load-
•:1 with wheat and in order that
Inert; shall be no delay en route
I'roii) the farmer's hands to thc lake-
lii nd or to Vancouver, roadbed nnd
oil or facilities must be in tho best,
nociNtJ condition. Therefore during
I.c Bummer mouths every foot of
Ine track over whiih the grain must
move is subject to careful inspection
and improvement; ballasting is done
wherever it'may be required and nil
■■arts of the system are keyed up to
the highest pitch in order that no
hitch may occur in the movement of
the crop.
Weeks before tht crop itself begins to move, there is another movement under way which has an important bearing on the steady flow
-if grain lo tha markets of the world,
md this is the gradual concentration
■f locomotn'es and grain cars at
strategic points on the western lines,
so that they will be available for
rapid distribution wherever they are
needed.
whelmingly large exodus from the
grain fields with a proportionately
small freight movement back toward
the prairies. Here the Car Service
Department faces the task of moving these empties back from tho lake
or ocean ports, to line elevators at
the lowest possible cost and It Is
only by wise and careful scrutiny of
the situation that it is possible for
this work to be successfully curried
out.
An elaborate system of tabulating
thc grain'situation daily is operated
by official:) of this department. Each day through
the press there appear reports on the grain movement, both on lines
through the west and at
the head of the lakes
where ships are fast loading from terminal elevators as cars discharge
their cargoes.
To   make   this
possible     agents
Loading Wheat into Box Cars
the "same period
each HuccesBivo
season for Ave
years.
When it is realized that upwards
of 50,000 grain
cars  are  on thc
to the two outlets, tho Groat
Lakes and the Pacific ports,
means that train loads <>." grain
must be kept constantly on tbo
move, both eastbound and west-
bound. Tho growing Import
ance of the Pacific outlet I
shown by the fact that Connd
ian National car deliveries
Vancouver  during   tin
grain year just el      i
have been ulmost live
times as great as during the  saagpn
of 1922-23,  anl
as more facilities    are    provided   for   the
handling of th:
westbound shipments it is expected that tin
next few year:.
will   see   oik."
mous  gain:
still    hoi-ii'.
made   yen
by  year  ii.
this   move
ment.
mi**.?.'. ■   '
Canadian National Train of Wheat Bound for Terminal Elevators
DO YOU WANT
THE PEOPLE
TO READ YOUR
ADVERTISEMENT
People take The' Sun
because they believe
it is worth the price we
charge for it. It is
therefore reasonable to
suppose that they read
its contents, including
advertisments. This
is not -always the case
wifh newspapers^ that
are offered as premiums with chromos or
lottery tickets
WE DO NOT
WANT CHARITY
ADVERTISING-
Advertising "to help
the editor." But we do
want businessadvertis-
ing by progressive business men who know
that sensible advertising brings results and
pay. If you have something to offer the public that will benefit
them and you as well,
the newspaper reaches
more people than a bill
board
SUN READERS
KNOW WHAT
THEY WANT
and if you have the
goods you can do business with them THE SUN:  GRAND FOBKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
When Exposed to Air
tea lose* Its strength and flavor.
"SALADA"
TEA k-«4
for that reason is never sold in
bulk. Your grocer sells this
delicious blend. Try SALADA.
NEWS OFTHE CITY
Capt. P. S. Thompson has been
very low io the Orand Forks hospital daring tbe past week, but is now
reported to be improving. Hie
father-in-law, Rev. Clark, arrived in
tbe oity from Victoria on  Tuesday
•ain, wbere he owned a number of
claims near the Sail v mine. He is
survived by his wife, wbo is now
visiting in tbe old country.
Dan Matheson, superintendent of
the Rock Cande mine, left on Monday foi a visit to Trail.
Mrs. A. E. Hales and son Murray
left on Tuesday for a trip to Spo
kane.
Armistice day was appropriately
observed on Monday by a parade of
tbe aeterans and the customary
ceremony at tbe cenotaph. At night
numerous beacon lights were seen
on tbe surrounding mountains.
Wilford Brown left yesterday morn
ing for Vancouver, wbere be will
enter a law office.
Qeo. E. Massie left this week  for
a business trip, west.
Interesting Announcement
Word comes from Montreal tba
tbat great family aod farm paper
-he Family Herald and Weekly Star
has been enabled to reduce its subscription price to One Dollara year,
Tbis certainly will be interesting
news in every Canadian home wbere
the Family Herald is known and to
many wbo will avail themselves of
tbe offer. At two Dollars a year
Tbe Family Herald and Weekly
Star waB generally admitted to be
good value, io fact big value, hut
w1 en reduced to Ooe Dollar a year
it will certainly be the marvel of
tbe newspaper world.
Canada ie proud of tbat great
Weekly, and has every reason to be
so, as it bas no superior and few
equals in tbe world today. The
publishers annouuce that notwitb
standing tbe change in price evary
feature will not, niy be maintained
but improvements will follow. The
publishers are fortunate in being in
an financial position to do tbis, and
Canadian homes will have the ad
vantage. When tbe new rate is
made known it certainly* will bring
a rush of subscribers to tb Family
Herald. One Dollar is a small
amount for such a great paper.
Harmony and peace prevail
among tbe Doukhobors, according
to a statement made in Nelson by
L„ W. Veregin, secretary of the
P.ter Lordly's Christian Commuity
of Universal Brotherhood. Mr.
Veregin, a nephew of the late Peter
Veregin, is a member ol the community headed by Anast"8ia. Revival prayer meetings were held by
the communit/ folk for the tbree
weeks from October 12 to November
2, after all fall work, including tbe
gathering of the crops, had been
completed.
Our usaal illustrated features ap
pear to have missed tbe train this
week.
Chief of Police Docksteader is ont
of town on lis holidays
Ed Depew, the North Fork  e gi
neer of the  Kettle Valley   line, is
spending a couple of-weiks in Penticton,
Dr. Truax was called to Rock
Creek on Tuesday on professional
businasB.
Joseph Cunningham, of Beaverdell, died very suddenly in Penticton last week bt an attack of pn u
monia. He was taken to tba Penticton hospital tbe day before be passed
away. Mr. Cunningham wae an
oldntimer of tbe Boundary, having
lived in tbe district for over twenty
years, and was well known in this
city, where he had many friends.
During reoent years be cen ered hie
mining activity to  Wallace  moun-
Major-General Sir Fabian Ware,
vice-chairman of the Imperial War
Graves Commission, who has been
visiting in Canada during October,
has boen recalled to England much
earlier than ho expected.' Prior to
sailing on thc Canadian Pacific
linn*, Mngtclure, from Montreal, hs
expressed tlie hope that he would
be able to come to Canada a-rain
mux: spring so lhat he could (iva
Canadians in the West some Idea
of what the Imperial Commission
is doing; in caring for the graves of
western youths who perished during the war.
Robert L. Rice, Jr., of Boston, and
J. Y. Cole, of Harvard, took big
chances when they attempted to
travel by canoe from Rouyn to An-
gliers at the end of October. Although thoy started in beautiful Indian summer weather they ran
within a few hours into a bad storm
which filled thslr canoe with half
melted snow and almost froze them
into unconsciousness. Fortunately
they arri'""l in the nick of time at
a fire-ranger's hut where thej
stayed a few days until the storm
abated. They were prospecting in
the neighborhood and were none ths
worse for their perilous trip when
they finally reach,"-! Montreal.
GET YOUR
CHRISTMAS GREETINGS CARDS
PRINTED AT HOME
We have received a complete
assortment of the Classic Series
of Blank Cards, suitable for Personal Christmas Cards, Invitations, Announcements, and general society printing. They also
make Attractive Business Cards.
THE SUN PRESSES
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
' The total handlings at the new
Internal government elevator in Edmonton, Alta., since its opening last
fall, amount to 2,350,000 bushels. Of
this quantity of grain handled, mora
than 8,000,000 bushels was wheat.
The Sun Presses have twice tbe
speed of any otber presses in the
Bouudary. We can eave you money
on both long and short mne of commercial priating and give you a superior class of a-jork.
It is as easv to suppress a first
desire as it is bard to satis'y tbe
desires tbat follow.
With the completion of the 1926
assessment for Toronto, the Chief
Assessor announced that the city's
population is now 549,429, or 7,012
greater than laat year. The total
assessment for 1926 ia 1891,678,797,
•which is 116,269,448 higher than for
19W.
A naw high-water mark for tha 1925
season of navigation in regard U
number of passeugen landed at Quebec over a week-end, waa established
during ths week-end of September
6th when six boats docked with nearly 6/100 paasengers. The three Canadian Pacific steamers, the Montroyal,
Marloch and Melita, brought 2£24 ot
the total paasengers landed.
four and five hundred
travelling passenger agenta, representing railway' throughout the
United States and Mexico, united
with representatives of the Canadian railways and steamship companies in Montreal during the week
ending September 19th, tm the fiftieth annual convention of the
American Association of Travelling
Passenger Agents.
In succession to Captain James
Gillies, who waa recently appointed
general manager Canadian Pacific
steamships in London, Captain R.
G. Latta has been appointed to the
command of the Empress of Scotland, flagship of the Canadian Pacific fleet. Captain Latta was previously on the bridge of the "Montroyal" and other veeaelf of the aame
line.
Arrangements are being made fee
the holding of the western annual
meeting ln Winnipeg from November 3rd to Bth of the Canadian Institute ef Mining and Metallurgy.
The meetings wUl be held in the
Royal Alexander Hotel. Delegates
from all pointa in the Weat, as wall
a* from Eastern Canada, are expected to attend.
A memorial known as "The Altar
ef Peace" has recently been unveiled In Stanley Park, Vancouver,
to symbolise the spirit of International good-will existing between
the United States and Canada. The
memorial waa raised by joint subscription of United States nnd Canadian Kiwanis Clubs, and stands on
the spot where the late President
Harding delivered the laat speech of
his life while visiting Canada, ta
Jnly, 1928.
S. T. HULL
Batabliahed 1910
RealEstate and Insurance
Resident Agent Grisnil Forki Townsite
Company, Limited
Parma    JOrcharda     City Property
Agenti at Nelsou, Calgary, Wlhnlprg mul
other Prairie pointe.  Vanoouver Ageim :
PBNDBBIN
BATTBNBU
TMBNTO
LANDS LTI.
Bstpbllshed In 1910, we are iu s. position to
furnish reliable Information eonoer-.lug this
district.
Write for tree literature
A. E. MCOOUGALL
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
A-tent
bo-minion Monumental Worka
(LAabr»to« Product:a Co. RooEnft'
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
BOX 332    BRAND FORKS, B. C
BARGAINS
Get the habit of
trading at our
store
We have exceptionally good bargains in all our
departments
DONALDSON'
Pfcone 20
Guaranteed Laundry Powder
Neutral Soap Pulverized
Will not injure any fabric. For washing woolens,
wool socks, lace curtain *, dishes, and for all
household use. Washes clothes sweet and clean.
CITY GROCERY
Phone 25
'Service and Quality'
SliipYoui Cream to
The Kettle Valley
Creamery Go.
W>*pav the hijhiist price and asanre
you th? most accurate tjst. Give your
local creamery your trade.
KETTLE VALLEY CltEANEIY COMPANY
K. SCHEER
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONIST
oiler in
Havana Cigars* Pipes
Confectionery
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Forks. B. if.
Make yourself aa sat, and you'll
bave every man's sack od your
shoulders.
Nature never explains.
^■^•IeI?
THE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ARM. ON
PICTURES
MD PICTURE FRAMING
Furniture Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds.
Upholstering Neatly Done
R. G. McCOTCHBON
WIMMQAVItlOl
BIDE THBBE ON CLEVELAND
IT brings the whole country for miles around within easy reach.
Have you seen the new models! They're as graceful as swallows! As
bright as new coinl As weatherproof aa a duck? Automobile Steel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing, Hard Maple
Rims. Heroules Brake. Everything complete. Real Quality. Real
Value. Easy Terms. We are tbe people to mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER SH^i&fifttt
Open Saturday Evenings Till 10 o'Cloek;
E.G. Henniger Co.
Grain. Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cement and Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks. 11. C.
Our
Hobby
18
Good
Priii ting
-THHE value of well-
printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult ut before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Ball programs
Busi: i -Ha cards
VL" ;ng cards
Sh'; "iug tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads
Pamphlots
Prioe lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
Coal,   Wood and   Ice
Cor Sale
Office at f R.  t.  Petrie't Store
Phone 64
(il.ANi) FCRKS
Transfer Co,
DAVIS 8 HANSEN. Prop*
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty*
L'Sjsi. •***
P. A. Z. PARE, Froprielor
YALK HoTKL,    FlR8T   HtKKT
THE SUN
Coin-on':?*' Avenue and
l-tlio Stara-at
TELEPHONE
R101
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant uisinrvssy.il, mrveyedOrowa land,
msy be pre-empted by Brlti h lubjaot. o'er
18 year, of age, and by aliens on declaring
Intention to become Brititb subleoti, conditional upon resi lennc. occupation and Improvement for agrioultaral purpose..
Full Information concerning regulation,
regarding preemutlous ii given In Bulletin
No. 1, Lan I Series, "How to Pre-empt Lands"
copies of wbioh can be obtained freo of cbnrge
by addressing the Dop.rtin.nt of Land.,
Vietorla, B.C., or.ny Government Agent.
Reoords will be made covering only land
suitable for agrlaiiltnral purposes, and which
I. not timberland. I e„ carrying over 5,000
board feet per. aere wait of tn. Coatt Range
and 1,000 leet per ure eaat of that range.
Application, for pre-emptions are to be
addressed to she Laud Commissioner of the
Land lUeordlug Division, lu wbich the land
applied for 1. situated.and are made on
printed forms, copies ol can ;iie obtained
from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions muat bf oooupled for flvo
years and Improvement, made to value of 110
por aora, including clearing and cultivating
at leaat Ut. aor... beiore a Grown Urant oan
b. received.
For more detailed information seethe Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PUROHASE
Applications arc received for purchaae of
vacant and unreserved Crown Lauds, uot being timberland, for agricultural purpose.;
minimum price of ilrst-olass (arable) land I.
16 por aere. and seoond-olu. (grailng) land
t'l.M por aore. Further Information regarding purchaae or lsas. of Crown land. I. given
In Bulletin No. 10, Land Series "Puiohan and
Leaae of Orawn Land.."
111U, factory, or Industrial sites on Umber
land, not exoeedlng 40 acre., may be pur.
chased or leased, on eonditlon. lnelotling
payment of stumpage.
HOMESITE  LEASES
Dn.urr.yed ares*, not exceeding 20 acres),
may beleueduhomesites, conditional upon
a dwelling being erected in tha first year,
title being obtainable after residenoe and
improvement eonditlon. are fulfilled and land
bu beeu surveyed.
LEASES
Por graaing and Industrial purposes areas
not exoeedlng 640 acre, may be Issued by on.
person or acompany.
QRAZINQ.
Voder the Gracing Act the Province la
divided into graaing districts and the range
administered under a Graxlng Commissioner. Annual graaing permits are
issued bated on numbers ranged, priority being given to established owners. Stock-
owners may form associations (or range
management. Free, or partially free, permit,
aro avallablee (or settler", tamper, and
travellers up to ten head.

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