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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Feb 23, 1923

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 GRAND FORKS iJt
the center of Grand Forks valley, tbe
premier fruit growing district of
Southern British Columbia. Mining
and lumbering are also important
industries in districts contiguous to
the city.
1 /6%3
Kettle Valley Orchardist
THF K\IN is t'le ^ivoi'i° uows-
IUU IJUL1 paper of the citizens
of the district. It is read by more
people in the city aDd valley than any
other paper because it is fearless, reliable, clean, bright and entertaining.
It is always independent but never
neutral.
TWENTY-SECOND YEAR—No   17
GRAND FORKS, B. C., FRIDAY,   FEBRUARY, 23, 1923
"Tell me what you Know ll true:
I can guess as well aa yoo.
$1.00 PER YEAR
OLIVER'S OTTAWA
LOWER RATES
Minister of Labor Makes
an Appeal to Employers
on Behalf of Disabled
Returned Soldiers
Sttecial ContstpontUiice of The Sun.
Victoria, Feb 21.—Tbe elimina
tion of Orieotals in British Column
bit is a matter which has occupied
do little amountof attention tbrough
out tba province for several years
aod tt the last session of the legisla
ture Hon. William Sloan, minister
of mines, introduced a resolution
asking Ottawa to coopering in keeping more Chinese and Japanese out
of the province. Following tbe recent disastrous explosion at Cum
berland, the miners petitioned the
Canadian Collieries to cease employing Orientals in tbe coal mines. Tbe
assistance of tbe government was
aaked and tbe miners bave returned
to work witb the understanding tbat
tbe company will replace tbe Orientals with white workers as soon as
possible.
Speaking at a meeting in Van
oouver recently Hon. J. D. Mac
Lean, minister of education and act-
ing premier, denied that the credit
ofthe province was impaired. In
support of his contention he showed
that wbile Ontario and other prov*
inces were obliged to pay 6 per cent
interest when borrowing on treasury
bills, British Columbia could float
the same loans lot 5 per cent. Tbe
minister claimed tbat lbe political
enemies of the government were responsible for tbe reports of ruined
oredit, wbile tbe truth was tbat tbe
province was never in better condition.
Premier Oliver's visit to Ottawa
and otber eastern cities in connection with tbe freight rates case-has
taken on something of the nature of
a triumphal march. He bas ad«
dressed Canadian clubs throughout
tne eastern provinces and is credited
with having done more to win
recognition for British Columbia
tban any other representative. At
tbe personal request of Premier
Hackeniie King, Premier Oliver has
agreed to leave tbe settlement of tbe
frieght rates matter until tbe close
of tbe federal session, so tbat the
full time of the Ottawa government
may be given to it. Last year the
provincial fight over freight rates
resulted in tbe removal of balf tbe
discrimination against tbis prov
ince, and prospects are bright for
the establishment of equal freight
rates. The direct result of this will
be a rush of wheat westward and an
unprecedented stimulation of iodusn
trial development throughoet BriU
ish Columbia.
A special appeal to tbe employers
.on behalf of disabled reiurned sold
urs is being made by Attorneys
Qsneaal A. M. Manson, minister of
labor. A letter has been despatched
to practically every employer ot
labor in British Columbia, asking
for cooperation in providing work
for returned men, and especially
those incapacitated throuSh their
war experiences. Toe minister
points out tbat there are between
600 and 1000 disabled veterans in
the province.
"They remind ue," be writes, "of
a  duty   wbich we can not ignore
assured of safe positions io tbe professions, in commerce or io indue-
.ry, and of every comtort for the
rest of their days Tbey put tbese
thingi- behind ibem Tbey made
tbe sacrifice—a saciifice known to
all. They have come back maimed
in body and broken io health, desiring nothing so mucb as to be able
to make a new start in life. Many of
these men find it impossible 'o look
for a return of the same measure of
prosperity wbich tbey formerly enjoyed. But they do ask to be Billowed to serve tbe community in
some nsefnl capacity, in such a way
as tbeir strength add opportunity
will permit."
Hon. Mr. Manson appeals to the
employers to arrange their organizations so that at least a few veterans
may be given employment and to
give tbe preference to returned men
when engaging more assistance. In
cidentally, he points out tbat more
tban 80 per cent of the men who have
been added to the oivil service during tbe past four years, by appointment and reinstatement, bave been
returned soldiers.
NEEDS A SNOW-PLOW
■ mT******W*l tiSS9kW^*9t**. ■***,-*'*•**' '4 **-A**m****mmm******>a    .   '_****-**, ******* m^*********** *****.
t-v•**"<**■**t*'"-?• -•"• "t***-*.*'■"■ "*»■ -'~''y •**— -
The Artless Art
Repartee, the "artless art," seems
really to be a gift, and he whe has it
is fortunate indeed. In the Nineteenth
Century Sir Edward Sullivun relates
this bit of sparkling conversation that
once passed between Cardinal Vaughan and Dr. Adler, the chief Jewish
rabbi.
The two  men were seated next to
eaoh other at luncheon   "Now, Dr.
[Adler,"   said   the  cardinal,   "when
msy I have the pleasure of helping
you to some ham?"
Tbe rabbi replied without a pause,
At your eminence's wedding!"
It was not a rabbi but a bishop—
Dr. Potter of New York—that once
■eplied neatly and  unhesitatingly to
i   question   that must have been almost as startling as   the oardinal's.
A lady had asked him wny in pictures
and statues angels are   always represented as   women or as young men
without beards or moustaches.
"Oh," replied the bishop, "every
one knows that women naturally in
herif   the  kingdom  of  heaven, but
men get in* by a very close shave."
T
Jiany of them before tbe war wer* Snowfall    0.J
Boy Scout News
First Grand Forks Troop
Boy Scouts
Duties—February 24 to Maroh 2,
Bull Dog Patrol; next for duty,
Wolf Patrol.
Parade—Marcb 2 as usual at tha
Quild ball at 7:30 p.m.
Awards—P. Ls., Harry Aores snd
William Foote have passed tbe
necessary tests and are awarded tbe
Ambulance Man's Badge.
Notioe—Until further notice tbe
patrol on duty is responsible for the
supply of enough firewood to heat
headquarters during all parades of
their week of office.
Warning—Gymnastic apparatus
is not to be used unless a patrol
leader ie actually present and in
charge of it. Tbe gymnastic instructor will shortly appoint au
tboriced leaders for tbis purpose.
THE WEATHER
The following is the minimum
and maximum temperature for eacb
day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on E F. Law's ranch:
MmmmmmmmmmrJt*t.    Min.
Feb. 15—Fridav    28        lo
10
17
23
23
19
H
Inches,
15—Friday  28
16—Saturday  38
17-Sunday  36
18—Monday  44
19—Tuesday  43
20—Wednesday.. 40
21- Thursday  37
Vernon, Feb. 22.—"The
support accorded to the organ
ization by the way in which
the growers are signing the
contracts is most gratifying
to the committee," said J.J.
Campbell.chairman,last night
when the day's returns had
been received.
'•The growers have shown
that they want a big cooperative organization, and the
large numbers who previously shipped through indeden-
dents who have signed shows
that all are agreed that the
individual must forget himself for the good of the indes-
try. And by so doing he will
be benefiting himself,"'added
Mr. Campbell. .
CityParagraphs
A fire broke out io the Presby *
teriau church snortly after tbe funeral service on Sunday afternoon,
and although tbe brigade made a
prompt response to tbe alarm, tbe
roof of the building was destroyed
before tbe flames could be extinguished. The plastering on tbe
walls was also badly damaged.
Nothing will be done in the way of
repairing the building until after
tbe insurance adjuster has appraised the damage. Tbe fire is
supposed to have started from an
overheated stove.
in a Spokane hespital, underwent
an operatiou last Monday morning
for appendicitis.
Mrs. Jepson, of tbe North Fork
district, is reported to be seriously
ill.
It's   only   a few  days to spring
time aud flowers no*.
Card of Thanks
We tbe undersigned take tbis
opportunity to thank our many
friends for flowers sent and for the
their many messages of sympathy
and kindness shown during our
irreparable loss of wife, mother,
daughter and sister.
E. C. Hknnkxr and Family,
The Miller Family.
Death of Edith Pierce
The death of Miss Edith Pierce,
aged 70 years, occurred at her bome
in this city on Friday afternoon,
February 16, after a brief illness of
influenza. Deceased, who followed
tbe occupation of a professional
nurse, was an old-time of Qrand
Forks, and she leaves many warm
personal friends here n mourn her
passing. At tbe time of ber death
none of ber relatives resided here,
but a number of years ago one of
her brothers was engaged in ranching in the valley. He is now living
in California.
The funeral was held from Miller
k Gardner's undertaking parlors
on Wednesday afternoon at 2
o'clock, interment being made in
Evergreen cemetery.
The blank contracts for tbe big
cooperative marketing project have
arrived in tbe valley, and are now
ready for tbe ranchers' signatures.
In the distribution of tbe contracts
a large number of tbe growers seem
to have been missed. According to
reports received at tbis office, not
many of the agreements have yet
been signed; but tbe campafgn is
yet in its infancy.
Miss Rena Boss, school teacher at
North Vancouver, and Miss Silvia
Ross, who is attending school at
Bellingbam, returned bome last Friday evening to attend tbe funeral of
their  father,   the late William T.
What Are Parties For?
"Well, Frank, so you went to your
first   party  today," said the   boy's
father, drawing his young son to him.
"Where was it; at Billy Mason's!  I
suppose you had a great time, didn't
youl"
Frank nodded vigorously.
"What games did you play?"
Frank gave a detailed account.
"What did you have to eatt"
Frank looked   at   bis   father   in
amazement.   "Wbat did I bave to
eetr" he replied. "Why, dad, I didn't
.***« toaat anything. I Waotad tol"
The First street bridge will be
closed to traffic next Monday morning, and will remain closed during
the construction of a new pier in
center to strengthen,' it. While
this work is going on the tanchers
across the river will have .to use
the Cooper bridge—or ford the
river.
Tbe fouoeral of the Mrs. Agues
Mary Henniger on Sunday afternoon wae iargely attended and many
beautiful floral offerings were in
evidence, showing the high esteem
in wbioh deceased wai held by tbe
people of the community.
Cecil Armson and The Suu m an
paid Mr. Forepaugb a pleasant so*
eial visit in Phoenix on Tuesday
and Wednesday.
His Degree
Eli Brown, a dark impressive figure
in his long, black clerical coat, a gift
of the rector of St. James', had come,
says a writer in Harper's, in answer
to a post card of mine, asking htm to
whitewash my back fence.
"Ise done moved, Miss Ma'y," he
said, wheu he had explained to mo
that he could not do the work that
day, since noon service at St. James'
necessitated his presence at the organ
bellows, "an'I reckon I'll jest leave
my card so you kin know whar to
sen' for me when you wants me
ag'in."
With an expression of dignified
gratification he unfolded a scrap of a
church announcement leaflet that he
had pulled out of the pocket of his
waistcoat ond handed me a card with
the words, "Eli Brown, E.O.B., 50
Fenchurch street."
"What do these letters stand fori"
I asked.
"Why, Miss Ma'y, all de quality in
our congregation has letters after
their names. Dr. Pjice, he has I). I).,
Dr. Simmon has M.D., an' there is
LL.D. for some of'em and U.S.N.
for dat Yankee off'cer, an' coasa I
naterally has 'em, too "
"But what do they meant" 1 insisted.
"Now, Miss Ma'y, dou't you
know? E O. B.— Episcopal organ
blower.    Dat's what I is."
STRANGE CASE
OF
Gilpin Man hinds Life Under Impression Thu t
Hia Assessment Is the
Amount of Taxes Due
Just Right
Last winter a Northern tourist,
while spending a few days in Atlanta,
decided to try a little of tho local
moonshine about which ho had heard
so much. He secured a pint of the
"white lightning" and retired to his
room to sample it. Une taste was
enough, He did not care to throw it
away, so he presented it to an old
darkey who had been driving liim
about the city in his taxi,
The next day ho asked the old
negro how he liked the liquor. "Boss,
it was zackly right. Yas, suh, it was
jus' zackly right."
"What do you mean by ju.it exactly right, undo?'' he asked.
"Well, suh," said the darkey,1' it
was jus' zackly right, 'cause if it had
er been any better you wouldn't er
give it to me; an' if it had been any
worse I couldn't er drunk it."
A tragic case of suicide occurred on Tuesday, when
Joseph Carboni, an aged and
highly suspected Italian resident of Gilpin, blew the top
of his head off with a shotgun.
The cijcumstance that is
said to have been the cause of
}he tragedy is an unusual oue.
A short time ago Carboni received a notice of the amount
at which his property hid been as-
sessed, something like* $1900. Itis
said that he thought this mum rt presented the amount of taxes he was
liable for. Brooding over his ill-
ability to pay thin large sum undoubtedly unbalanced bin mind to
a degree tbat he could see no way
of escape except in death.
The body was brought to this city
on Tuesday evening, and on Wed
nesday Coroner Kingston beld au
inquest in the court house. Tbe
jury returned a  vetdict of suicide.
The remains were interred in
Evergreen cemetery yesterday afternoon.
Carboni is survived by   his   wife.
Mrs. Francis Miller haB been seriously ill during the past week,
and shortly before going to press
The Sun learned tbat ber condition
was critical.
Mrs. W. E. Carpenter, wbo bas
been seriously ill for over a werk,
ie reported to be improqing.
B. M. Baker, of Edmonton, is a
visitor in the city tbis week. He is
a brother-in-law of Mre. F. W. Russell.
Mia* Jnnie Downey, of this city,
wbo bu been working as a nana'
A Matter of Diet
A negro employed at one of the
movio studios in Los Angeles was
drafted by a director ta do a novel
comedy scene with a lion.
''You get into bed," ordered the
director, "and we'll bring the lion in
and Jput him to bed with you." It
will be a scream."
"Put a iion in bed with me!" yelled
the negro. "No, sah! Not a-tal I! I
quits right here and now."
"But," protested the director, "this
lion won't hurt you. This lion was
brought up on milk."
"So was I brung up on milk,"
wailed the negro, "but I eats meat
now."
In Spite of Newton's Law
This story ia told of an Irish lawyer
uanioil Keller who was famous for Ins
native wit but who, partly from indolence and partly from a frivolous
disposition, did uot succeed particularly well iu his profession
Another lawyer named Mayno, as
Sober aud ponderous as Keller was
light-minded and clever, was made a
judge, much to Keller's vexation. Ou
one occasion tlio impecunious lawyer
was sitting in the court room whore.
Judgo Mayno was solemnly presiding.
Suddenly ho plucked a brother attorney by the sleovo. "Look at that,"
he whispered. "There's Mayno risou
by his gravity, and bore am 1 fallen
by my levity. What would Sir Isaac
Newton make of that, I wonder!"
A Pardonable Mistake
After Mi. Smith had raked hi
yard, says the Argonaut, lie look tlio
accumulated rubbish into tbe road to
burn. Anion1' the neighbors' children wlioeuniu Hocking round the bonfire was a little girl whom Mr, Smith
did not remember having seen before,
Wishing with his usual kiudliness to
make her fool at ease, hu beamed
upon hear, and said heartily, "Hello 1
Isn't thiB a now face!"
A deep rod aiowly submerged the
little girl's frecklos. "No," sho st ami
mered, "itisn't new. It's just boon
washed.    That's all."
Behaving Mannerly at
Table
j{j"My dear," said a thoughful lady
of whom Punch knows, addressing a
small boy who with his parents was
a guest at her table, "wouldn't you
like to have your meat cut up for
you?"
"Oh, no, thank you," replied the
boy with great politoness, thouSih he
did uot look up or desist from his determined struggle with his helpiug of
beef. "We often have meat quite as
tough as this at home." THE   SUN,   GRAND   FORKS.   S. C.
tyxt (Sranft Jfeka §mt
AN INDEPENDENT  NEWSPAPER
G. A.
EVANS, EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) $1.00
One Year (in the United States)    1.50
Addre'sr *•'* ■*•*■—'cations to
Thk Grand Forks Sun
Phonb 101R Grand Forks, B. C;
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
not likely to submit without protest to that
sort of thing, and therefore there is likely
to be more civil war in North China.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1923
Notes, Notions and Notables
How the mighty have fallen!- Not long ago
a woman who was playing a bugle in the
Boulevard Montmartre in Paris and collect -
ing money was recognized, just as the police
were taking her to the station, as the Princess
Poltcouchhof, a former lady in waiting to the
czarina. She was destitute and had been reduced to that means of getting food. A compatriot who knew her succeeded in obtaining
her release.
The male African elephant iu the New
York Zoological Park has given convincing
evidence of his strength that is most surprising. gOne day, says the Zoological Bulletin,
he attacked a partition fence made of iron
and actually broke the top rail in two aud
tore one of the pieces from the post to which
i*. was attached. The broken iron, which
formed the top of the fence, was a railway rail
four inches by four and a quarter.
CONSERVE YOUR SIGHT
The Cooperator's Creed
THE STRAIN of modern civilized lite falls heaviest upon
the eye, the hardest worked and
most neglected of all the human
organs. The constant need of
close-range vision; tbe continual
exposure to the glare reflected
from pavement and buildings or
from high-powered eleectric
lights, all expose the eye to terrific strain. Many suffer from
eyestrain without being conscious of it. Have your eyes ex •
amined and know. We are admirably equipped for this work.
An astonish ng tale that the newspapers
have spread is the story that the Russian
crown jewels were hidden in the coffin of an
American bluejacket who died in Gibraltar
and who lies buried in Cypress Hill cemetery
in Brooklyn. The story came anonymously to
the United States customs serviee, and the
public has heard none of the details. Who
had the four million dollars' worth of jewels,
and how he or they managed to hide them
with the body of the seaman Jones, has mt
beeu disclosed. Probably the whole story is a
hoax, but the government takes it seriously
enough to keep a guard over the grave.
The brother of Premier Mussolini, who may
be supposed to have unusual opportunities
of learning what the policy of the new government is to be, says that one of the first ro-
forms will be to abolish all tariffs on imports
ind to establish a fiscal system based on almost absolute free trade. The state railways
ire now raanagod with rigid economy. The
railway staff has been reduced by about fourteen thousaud men, the hours hf work have
ia some cases been increased, aud a system of
rewards for conspicuous faithful service has
iieen introduced. Mussolini hopes in this way
o save five hundred million lire a year.
A Russian steamer, the Polotofski, which
was caught in the ice at Saint Michael in December, 1915,and disappeared the uext spritig
in the great storm off Cape Nome, is the latest
addition to the Arctic phantom fleet. According to Populor Mechanics the abandoned
steamship was seen by Eskimo hunters, who
planned to board the vessel, but changing
winds swept the ship away into unexplored
seas. Every winter deserted and unkown
ships are seen in the mists of the polar seas,
but the Polotofski's name plate could be
made out.
A recent attetn.pt to imitate daylight by
means of incandescent electric lamps has sue
ceeded in correcting the light from the lamp
filament hy coloring the bulb. The bulbs are
made of a special blue glass that absorbs the
excess of red and yellow light rays. They
have an Osram filament and are filled with
gas. The new lamp is especially adapted to
lighting studios and picture gallaries.
The following is taken from the creed drawn
up by'Paul V. Maris, director extension service, Oregon Agricultural college:
1. I believe firmly that modern conditions
demand a better system of marketing farm
products and that this can be brought about
only by intelligent cooperation among producers.
2. I understand that marketing embraces
part or all of the following functions, depending somewhat upon the nature of the commodity:
1. Assembling. 5. Transporting.
2. Grading and standard- 6. Storing.
izing. 7. Financing.
3. Packing. 8. Distributing.
4. Processing.
And I believe in cooperation for the purpose
of performing these functions efficiently.
Economical and orderly marketing is the object sought rather than speculation and price
control.
3. I know that fundamental chauges must
come slowly and that they will be fraught
with great difficulty.
4. I expect cooperative enterprises to be
■opposed by agencies with which they come in
competition. I know that this opposition will
assume the form of bait prices that will be
held up to tempt me and cause me to become
dissatisfied; but understanding the motives
back of these, I will remain constantly stead
fast and loyal.
5. I know that it will require time to get a
cooperative business properly organized and
running smoothly and that if I am unwilling to
overlook some mistakes and bear with my
organization unavoidable adversity, I had
better conserve my time and means by refusing to be a part of a cooperative enterprise.
6. I know that trust and confidence are
the keystones of cooperation. Hence I will
participate in the selection of men to direct
the affairs of my association in whom I have
confidence, and I will at least grant tbem a
fair and considerate hearing before condemning their actions.
7. I realize that many of the benefits of co *
operation are intangible and immeasurable,
and that they wil! accrue alike to members
and non-members. Non members will fre
quently receive better prices than members,
but these facts will not shake my confidrnce,
nor cause me to withdraw my support of cooperation.
8. I will read all official communications
sent to members and attend meetings for th e
consideration of the business of my organiza
t'on. I will vote on all measures snbmitted
to members by ballot. I will ofler constructive
criticism and demand the highest possible degree of efficiency and service.
9. I realize that destructive criticism is of
no value and that it imposes unnecessory ex •
pense upon the organization. I will refrain
therefore from using it.
J. C. TAYLOR
Jeweller and Optician
Bridge Street Orand Forka
E.G. Henniger Go.
City   Real Estate
Sale
For
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the City, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Prices i~From $25.00 per lot upwards.
Terms»—Cash and approved payments.
List of Lots and prices may be seen at the
City Office.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
City Clerk.
Grain, Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and^SaJt
Cement and Plaster
Poultry Supplies
STOVE
Cooking Heating
Wood Coal
Electric Gasoline
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
MILLER & GARDNER
Complete Home Furnishers
Grand Forks, B. C.
3. T. HULL
Established 1910
RealEstate and Insurance |
Resident Aj-ent (irniid Fork, Townilte
....     ,Couip»u«*, Limited
Farms    .'Oreharda     City Property
Agent* at Nelioii,  Calgary, Winnipeg and
other Pralrlo polnti. Vanoouver Agenta:       |
PENDERINVESTMENTS
HATTBNBUBV LANDS LTD.
ttatabllahed in 1910, wo are in a po.illosi   lol
iurnlih reliable Information oonoeriiiug thli
district.
Write lor (ra, lituratitra
GRAND FORKS
Transfer Company |
DAVIS S HANSEN, Prop.
City Baggage and General |
Transfer
THE NEXT ISSUE
OF THE
Kootenay Telephone Directory
CLOSES MARCH 1st, 1923
If you are contemplating taking new service, or making any changes in or additions to your present service, you should
send notificatidn, in writing, not later
thai, the above date, in order that you
may take advantage of the uew directory
listings.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
Coal,
Wood and
for Sale
Office at
R. f. Petrie'i
Phone 64
Ice
Store
C.V. Meggitt
Beal Batata and Insurance
Tell The People
What   You   Have
to Sell
A. E. MCDOUGALL
CONTRACTOR ANO BUILDER
Agent
Dominion Monumental Worka
Asbestos Products Co. Roofinft
There has been another turn of the wheel
in China. Gen. Chang Shao-Tseng is appointed
premier. His accession to power indicates
the increasing influence of the old military
party at Peking and the diminishing prestige
of Gen. Wu, who only a few months ago was
hailed as the savior of China. The new pre
mier is said to have a secret understanding
with Gen. Chang Tso-lin, the dictator of Manchuria, whom Gen. Wu drove out of Peking
last summer, aud the return ofthe "old gang"
to complete control is predicted by the newspapers that come out of China.   Gen. Wu ia
cAncient History
Items Taken From The Orand Porks Sun ior the Corrcspondtng '
"Weak Twenty Yeart Ago
Preparations bave been started by the Granby matin
ageuient to enlarge the big reduction works here to a 2200
daily capacity.
It is reported that Paul Johnson, general manager of
the Mother Lode smelter at Greenwood ever since the
plant started operations, will retire from that position al
the end of the present month.
W. B. Megaw, of Vernou, is at the Yale. His visit to
the city is for the purpose of inspecting bis store here.
Among thc numerous visitors to the Rossland  carnival
this week from Grand Forks were the following:   Mrs. J
F. Royer, Miss Mader, H. C. Smith, George Massie and
I. H. Ingram.
OBCHABD8, FABM   LANDS   AND CITY
PBOPBHTY
SueUenl feollltte, for wlllnc your farina
hsve agent* at all Ooaat and Prairie
DS*
WI CABBY AUTOMOBILE INSURANCB.
DBALBB IN POLES, POSTS AND TIBS,
AND FABM PBODUCB
Sellable Information roj-ardlnK thli distrct
ESTIMATES FURNISNED
BOX 332     6RAHD FORKS, B. C,
cheerfully furnished
qulrleB.
aollolt your in-
K. SCHEER
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONIST
Dealer in
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Folk*, B. O.
PICTURES
AND PICTURE FRAHIR8
Furniture Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds,
Upholstering Neatly   Don
R. G. MoCCTCHBON
wuoum iwn
Counter
Check Books
We have secured the
agency for Grand
Forks of a large
Western Publishing
House which manufactures .a superior
grade of Counter
Check Books—carbon back and carbon
leaf styles.
Prices Are Right
Encourage Western
enterprises and keep
Western money in
the West.
Any Quantity
from 100 up to 2500
books.
The Sun
Joh Department THE   SUN,   GBAND   FORKS,   B. C.
B.C. VETERANS WEEKLY LTD.
Oompettttou No. 21 Closes Friday
Midnight, Hatch 2nd
at the Olliee of tha
B.  0. VETERANS  WEEKLY Limited
P. 0. Drawer 838
Oor.  Hastings  and  Oamhie   Streets
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
I enter The B. C. Veterans Weekly Football Competition and agree to aljido hy the rules published in The B. 0. Veterans Weekly. 25c enclosed for fire --reeks' subscription entitles competitor to one estimate; 60c for ten weeks and two estimates; 76c for fifteen weeks and five estimates; tl for twenty-five weeks aad ten estimates. IN
STBDCTIONS FOB FILLING IK COUPONS:   Tou simply Indicate whether the HOME TEAM will score MOBE, LESS or the SAME NUMBER of goals than they scored ln
the corresponding game last year, by placing an "X" in the column provided in the Coupon.
FOOTBALL COMPETITION
GAMES TO BE PLAYED SATURDAY, MARCH 3
TEN ESTIMATES WITH $1.00 SUBSCRIPTION
$5000 - First Prize
$3000 Second Prize
$2000 - Third Prize
Coupons may also he deposited at aay of
the "DON'T ABOUE" STOBES by
courtesy of Mr. Con Jones.
NAME -. ...-	
Figures after each team denote last season's score.
ADDRESS..
M la MOBE
L is LESS
S if SAME
21
CHELSEA
NEWCASTLE
2      BLACKBUHN  li.
PRESTON N. E.
WEST HAM
2       WEDNESDAY
BURY
WOLVERHAMPTON   1    Leicester c
BRIGHTON & HOVE   1    Plymouth a.
NORWICH CITY
QUEENS PARK R.     1
HALIFAX TOWN
FALKIRK
GREENOCK M.
ST. MIRREN
THIRD LANARK
Away
Last
Years
Score
CARDIFF   CITY
BIRMINGHAM
DERBY  C.
NEWPORT   C.
READING
ROCHDALE
HAMILTON  A
PARTICK THISTLE   2
RAITH ROVERS
Coupon No. 1
M       L       8
CHELSEA
1
CARDIFF   CITY
0
1    !
NEWCASTLE
2
BLACKBURN  R.
0
1
PRESTON N. E.
2
BIRMINGHAM
2
1    1  '
WEST HAM
2
WEDNESDAY
0
1    1
BURY
2
DERBY C.
0
1    1
WOLVERHAMPTON
1
LEICESTER C.
1
1    1
BRIGHTON & HOVE
1
PLYMOUTH A.
1
1    1
NORWICH CITY
2
i
NEWPORT  C.
2
.1    1
QUEENS PARK R.
READING
1
1    1
HALIFAX TOWN
1
ROCHDALE
.1
1    1
FALKIRK
1
HEARTS
0
1    1
GREENOCK M.
1
HAMILTON A
0
1    1
ST. MIRREN
1
PARTICK THISTLB
2
1    1
I THIRD LANARK
1 | BAITH ROVERS
°
1
Coupon No. 2    1
ML       S    |
1          1          1
I
1
|
1
^^M
■1   1
I   i   1
i
.    1    1    !
1
I    1
1
1    1
1    I
1
1
Coupon No. 3
MLS
Coupon No. 4
MLS
Oonpoc No. S
MLB
I   1   1
1   1
1   1
1
1   1
1   1
1
1   1
1   1
1
1
1
1
1
1   1
1   I
1   1
1
1   1
1   1
1   1
1   1
1   1
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1
1     1
1   1   1
1
,
O.F.
ii.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
Banff.—J. B. Harkin, Commis-
aioner of National Parks, bas announced that tbe formal opening of
the Banff-Windermere Road, work
on which was concluded last year,
will take place on June 30. The
ceremony is to be held nt Vermillion
Crossing, half way between Banff
•nd Windermere, motors leaving
both ends of the road early in tha
morning to meet at that place. Th*
suggestion has been made by R. R.
Bruce, of Invermere, that the National Park be named "Columbia
National Park," and the road leading up the Columbia Valley from
the boundary to Golden be named
the "Canadian Columbia Highway."
Victoria,—Motorists will have a
new circuit trip available with the
completion in May of the hifh-
powered motor ferry now building
at Yarrows. Not only will Island
and Mainland be linked by the operation of this craft, but the Canadian Pacific will nave the steamer
"Charmer" engaged ln the purpose
farther north. The "Charmer" will
operate between Vancouver and Nanaimo, furnishing accommodation
for all types of can. With the new
ferry in service, a new circuit will
be made available—from Seattle via
Bellingham to Sidney, thence to Victoria over paved road, to Nanaimo
over the Malahat, thence by the
"Charmer" to Vancouver and down"
the Pacific Highway to the border
Uae aad Seattle again.
The motor ferry will have ample
height between deck to allow for
ill classes of cars. During the busy
■eason it will make two round trips
•very day. The vessel will be fitted
with observation rooms and open
deck spaces to give tourists every
opportunity to enjoy at their ease
tne fine scenery through the channels between San Juan, Lopez and
other islands of the Ban Juan archipelago.
St. John. N.B.—The Canadian Pa-
tific .freighter, "Bolingbroke" recently brought from London the
largest import cargo to reach St.
John since the war. She was crammed to the hatches with more than
4,700 tons of general merchandise.
Capt. E. Landy, who is in command,
•aid that he had never carried •
more valuable cargo and expressed
great satisfaction that not a single
{lackage had been lost. Included in
he cargo were silks and other valuable dress goods, dry goods of various descriptions, perfumes and many
other expensive commodities. A
cargo of this kind makes lots of
work for the longshoremen.
MAJOR ROGERS AND HIS TIME
Vaacoavar.—Carrying a record
shipment of'Canadian apples to the
Orient the Canadian Pacific 16.850-
ton liner, "Empress of Asia recently sailed. ..
' On opening the crates in the
Oriental ports the consignees of
past shipments have found that the
apples are as fresh as lf taken from
the tree. This is partly due to the
fact that at this time of the year
the perishable cargo oaly sets one
day of tropical heat during the whole
voyage across. The "Asia" took approximately 860 ton* of this com*
medity in her holds, the largest consignment of apples to go through
the Narrows this season for the
Orient.
The enterprising Oregon plumber
who has put a complete plumbing
shop on wheels should not have to
traveUar for jobs—and he will al-
ways have hi* toola.-with him.
(1) Mater Roger* lived in thia house
ln Waterville, Minnesota. He
else died here.
ONE of the most difficult tasks in
the conitrucdon of the Canadian
Pacific Railway was to discover a way
through the Rocky Mountains. A
aumber of explorers Hard made attempts to find a way, but it remained
for Major A. B. Rogers to discover
the most feasible route, the route that
waa chosen, and is now known as
Rogers Pass.
Major Rogers was a true type of
railway pathfinder. The reputation he
had made in the United States at a locating lagkiiii r ud his advanced ideas
on: raUw»y mnttraction attracted th-*
attention of tht wmadlan Pacific Railway officials, who et*, *tjt*d him to take
charge oi the mountain section from
Savona's Ferry in B.C., to Moose Jaw.
He saw at ones the problem that confronted him in finding a straiirhU'r
•road through the SelkTrks, tliaii (as
was suggested) to follow tbe great
bend northward of the Columbia River,
a distance of over two hundred miles.
He found the near way by following
the South fork of ths Mecillewaet
River to tbe present site of the Glacier
House, where he climbed a mountain
and gazed upon the summit of the pass
that now bears Ms name. Major
Rogers seems to have been a man of
few words. His reports contain little
beyond me technicalities of his undertakings, otherwise a description of the
magnificent spectacle displayed by the
Rogers Pass snd its surroundings, when
•tea far tha first time hy a whtle man.
(2) Watch preeented io Major
Rogers, of Rogers Pass fame,
about 1885.
would be well worth the reading.
This was in 1881. The following
year the exploration was completed by
ascending the Beaver River Valley to
Bear Creek, a tributary stream, then
up that stream through thc rugged defile between Mts..- MacDonald and
Tupper to the summit of the pass, and
over the same to the IMecillewaet Val-
ly. The surveys of the main line between Calgary, at the Eastern base of
the foothills of tlie Rockies, to which
point they had been carried from the
East, and the summit of the main
nanpre were completed in 1883. Three
years later daily trains were passing to
and fro between Montreal and Port
Moody, at tliat time the Pacific terminus of the railway; and so they
pasjed for thirty-one years over this
section, until with the opening of Uk
Connaught Tunnel under Mount MacDonald, it was no longer needed.
It was on November 7th, 1885, that
the last spike in the construction of the
Canadian Pacific Railway across Can
ada was driven at Craigillachie, Brit
ish Columbia.    This opened up a new
era   for   Canada.     In   recognition   of
the   valuable    work    done   by   Major
Rogers the directors of the Canadian
Pacific  presented   him   with a cheque
for $5,000 and a wartch^thus inscribed:
!'P",seated to Maj' A. B. Rogers
by   the  Directors  of  the  Canadian
Pacific Railway Company as a token
of their indebtedness to him for the
discovery of a pass tor the railway
(3) Major A. B. Rogers, who discovered the Rogers Pass, the
first feasible route through the
Rockies to the Pacific Coast.
through the  Selkirk Mountains, and
of their appreciation of his services
as  Engineer in Chief of the location
of the Mountain section of the rail-
Evidently  Major Rogers was of s
more  poetical  than  financial  temperament, tor he carried the cheque in his
pocket for several years, and he only
cashed it when his friends of the Canadian Pacific insisted that he should
do so.
At thc time of hit death In 1889,
Major Rogers left his watch to his
brother, L. Z. Rogers, of WotervWe,
Minnesota, who in turn left it to hit
ot>ly grandson, George Rogers Glotfel-
ter. Young Glotfeher was killed in
France on October 3rd, 1918. The
watch is now in a safety deposit box
of a Watervllle bank. There are, at
present, two nephews of Major Rogers
living, both of whom accompanied him
on ail! of his explorations in the mountains, and were with him when he discovered Rogers Pass. They are Mr.
Albert L. Rogers and Mr. John G.
Rogers, HOC 5th Avenue, Seattle,
Wash.
The nieces of Major Rogers, and
particularly Mrs. C. A. Gray, have
taken a great deal of interest bi the
activities of their uncle, and are m possession of a great many of his original letters, newspaper clippings, Including letters to him from bath Sir
William Van Home and Lord Shaughnessy.        '
HORSESHOES
OR
HAIRSPRINGS ?
Five dollars worth of iron made into
horseshoes ,hnd a market .value of ten
dollars. Converted into needles that
five dollars worth of iron becomes
worth six thousand eight hundred dollars, but when made into hairsprings
for watches it i* worth two million
dollars.
•|We may all be compared with that
ori«iuaI' five dollars worth of iron—
what we make of ourselves--how
valuable   we    become—depends    upon
ourselves.
Most of us are content to be in thc
horseshoe class. A few reach the rank
of needles, but how rare is thc man
who can be classed as a hairspring—
the man who makes the most of every
talent he was born with—who not
merely takes advantage of every opportunity but, Napoleon like, creates
opportunities.
J
One step won't take very far,
•Ton ve gat to keeo on walking;
One word won't tel! folk-* who you are,
You've got to keep on talking;
One inch won't make you very tall,
You've got to keep on growing;
One little ad. won't do it all,
You've got to keep them going.
r
Brown startel r»at without a cent;
He's rich now i id still rising;
Some  say  'twas  luck;  .some say 'twas
pluck;
UE says 'twas advertising.
flealth-Peace-PIenty
A New One   on An
Subjeot
Old
It waa the judgment day, aDd
throngs of people were crowding
around the pearly gates trying to
convince St. Peter thai they had a
right to onler heaven.
To the first applicant St. Peter
eaid, ' What kind of a car do  you
own?"
"A Packard," was the reply.
"All right." said St. Peter, "you
go over there with the Presbyterians."
Tbe next in line satisfied that he
owned a Buick, and was told to
stand over with the Congregation ■
alists.
I   Behind him wai tba owner of
Dodge, who was   ordered to   stand
with the Baptists.
Finally a meek little individual
came along.
"What kind of a car do you
own?" was the question.
"A Ford." was the answer.
"You jnst think you own a car,
You go over there with the Chris-
ian Ssieatiats."
Recovery of Ancient Eastern charm presents an inestimable boon
to mankind in bestowing Power and Success upon all wearers
Bvil Inftueuoegare romuved, acci'tentn warded off, planetary mallg-uanoy overcome. It* touch h,.ii,ii,.ii, iu. .I i.vu >>i i, new existence. Itn wear Immedlaiel** re-
leases all tlio powers for stood uuil brlngi thut Joy mul bllii, peaoe and plenty,
whioh you have hoped fur and Btrngglo 1 to "t,tain.
"TRILOKBEJOYVTHE MYSTIC CHARM
(CONOIWIIOH OF THK UNIVERSE)
A Divine Olf 11 Bought nfter for centuries I Recovered by mere accident from
the disciple of a Hindu Sage, dweller <>f thu sanctified, mysterious, oiuwv height*
of the Himalayas. Confirmed sceptics testify to it* miraculous powers. Men and
women everywhere acclaim lu potentiality In realising mat-rial expectations,
bringing in prosperity and securing n lover ■affection, To be worn as a pendant or
on tne arm. Write Name and Address legibly stating SRX of thelntendiiig wearer
wben ordering.
HEALTH AND GOOD FORTUNE GO HAND IN HAND
PBlCBt—Kneaefld In ooppor.Inolmlvo poitfttfo, paoking nud registration costs
Ac. 11.80, Dos. *lo.  Sliver, $3, Doe,$16.  Oold($t80, Dos.$4ff. cash wi th OKDBK
Complete instructions on how to iret host rewults With each Charm.
The Mystic Charm Co.
At thc Hindu T'llismim Cottuge,
123, LOWER CIKCULAK ROAD, CALCUTTA, INDIA THE   SUN.   URAND   FORES,   1.0,
8
1/
DON'T HESITATE!
PHONE 101R
FOR FINE PRINTING
News of the City
E. F. Laws wi'l build a bungalow
on bis rancb tbis spring.
Bob Simpson bas nearly finished
bauling tbe Pboenix school house
to his North Fork rancb.
Tbe work of dismantling the
Phoenix brewery has been completed and the equipment is now
on its way to Mexico
H
ere an
dTh
ere
tsl.iM.uii, SeulJUUll. — Tlie Glas-
*ow Herald says: An agreement has
been made between tbe Government
of tbe Province of Ontario and tbe
Overseas Settlement Committee for
tbe acceptance by Ontario of A
certain number of British settlers.
The majority will consist of unmarried men. but tbere will also be
a limited number of married men
and of youths and girls over 16 years
of age. Of the married men, about
KOC have already been accepted by
(he Ontario authorities ln London
from applicants now dwelling ln the
Hebrides, wbere agents on behalf of
the Province bave been carrying on
a special eanvass for some time
past. The agents are also endeavouring to select from the same
islands a number of female farm
workers, and there ls a proposal
that a special ship shall be chartered
to sail from the North of Scotland to
convey these settlers in a body.
MEDICINE HAT, Alta. — The
Moose Hall was recently the scene
of what is probably the most Important ra.lway funct;o*i In the historj
of Medicine Hat. Tbe occasion was
a banquet and presentation in honor
of Henry Hardy, J. P. Plaber a*tW
Thos. Penhale, all engineers In the
Canadian Pacific Railway service
who have recently retired. There
were more than 200 guests. A considerable number of tbe guests wen
from other railway centres throughout Canada.
CALGARY. Alls. Beiseker, a town
on the C. P. R. and G. T. P., about 35
miles northeast of Calgary as the
crow flies, Is in the grip of an Incipient silver boom. On Saturday
and Sunday men from the local district and from points afield, where
the news spread with the usual rapidity of such tidings, staked out
claims covering several sections
about four miles east of the town.
These were registered at the federal
land office ln Calgary.
No assay has yet lieen made of ths
ore, but tbose Interested ln tbe property are sending n sample to Edmonton. It may be necessary to
bore another test hole, ths finders
say, before sufficient ore can be obtained to get a reliable assay. The
original find was made by crews
drilling for water and much of the
flrst ore taken out bas been given
away ae samples. The first find
was made about tbre;- months ago.
CALGARY, Alta. "We eannot expect to recover ln a year or so from
the effectR of abnormal circumstances tlie whole country has beea
suffering from," remarked W. B.
Lankan, of Montreal, frelahl traffic
nanager of the Canadian Pacific, In
the course of an interview with The
Herald, in Calgary, "hut I am safe in
making this prophesy thnt this year
will witness throughout Canada a
revival of industry and agriculture,
uid that by 1924, thc city of Calgary
:ind the country tributary to It, as
well as the rest of Canada are going
io enjoy a return of their former
prosperity." ,
It was ln these words that the
freight traffic manager of the great
transportation company replied to
tbe question as to how he viewed
present conditions. "No matter wbat
pessimists may say," he continued,
"the resources of this country in
minerals and In the fertility of Its
soli has not. been appreciably touched
and It has been Inadequately advertised. The Province of Alberta, with
its agricultural possibilities. Its
wealth of coal, and in my opinion,
the waterpower of Its streams and
hills need only population to bring
tbese possibilities Into wealth. How
any person can survey all these natural conditions and still remain a
pessimist. Is something I cannot understand ."
BROCK VII I.i:, On Iii rie. — Several
retirements on pension are announoed
on tbe Canadian Pacific Railway ln
this vicinity.
James Jelly, n>ad master for tke
railway at Carleton Place for nany
years and a native of Leeds county,
Is retired on pension upon reaching
tbe age limit He entered the railway service a-s a youth and has seen
the railway grow trom small beginnings Into the present great system.
James Mil! ikon, section foreman
for the C.P.R. at Carleton Place, ls
also suncraunuated. For some yean
he was on duty on the ivltmtreal-To-
ronto mainline aud a Dumber of
years ago was transferred to Carleton Place.
After 28 years as station agent at
Merrlckvlllc, and neurly 4'l v ars in
the company's service, .Tamos A.
Angus bas also retired on pension.
He Is being succeeded by H. S. Cor-
bett, Terrebonne, Que.
E. M. Jelly, who has bean ase'etant
iilvlrlon engineer of the C. P. R. at
Smith's Falls, has been appointed division engineer, samo road, at Sclwel-
ber.
Tbe steel structure for the new
C.P.R. overhead bridge over the O.
T. R. tracks at Kingston Junction
has arrive-! and tbe Dominion Bridge
Company, Montreal, the contractors,
has started to erect the bridge which.
when completed, will open the new
line Into Iba city for the C.P.R, aad
.CJJI.K. tiains.
GEORGE E. BUCHANAN, a
Chatham, Ont., boy who is
now a proaperoos cowl dealer n Detroit, aMributes bis
success largely to an offer
made him when he was a boy that he
would have a trip to Europe If he
saved up a tWrd of the cost. The
offer was made by a friend who
promised to lend a third provided
George's father lent the other third,
the loans to be repaid when George
could afford to do so. Here was a
real incentive tor saving, and when
the trip was made it proved of aa
educational value that has stood Ma
ia good stead all his Hfe. Laat year
Mr. Buchanan made a trip to Alaska,
and tht idea occurred to him of making the same kind oi offer to other
boys that he had himself enjoyed In
his own youth. But the trip should
be to Alaska aad not to Europe. As
soon as he made the announcement,
he was inundated with applications,
and a large party oi Detroit boys has
already been booked to sail from
Vancouver on the Canadian Pacific
steamer "Princess Louise" on July
14th. I Mr. Buchanan will personally
conduct the tour which he is thus
helping to financt;. He says that
such a trip would have been worth
ttO.OOO to him If lit had taken it him
self a hit own boyhood because of
Its educational aad broadening Iftflu-
encea.
The Rev. Lynn Harold Hough,
pastor of the Central Methodist
Church, William Livingstone, president of the'Dime Savings Bank, and
Circuit Judge Joseph A. Moynihan
have indorsed Buchanan's scheme as
an unusual opportunity for boys to
learn the value of thrift and industry.
But the trip will have still other
benefits, as Mr. Buchanan has said.
These lads cannot cross thc continent and take that wonderful trip up
the island-sheltered waters of the Pa
cific Coast without Ha having a tt**
mendously stimulating effect upon
their imagination, and upon their
future modes of thought and lift.
From Vancouver up to Skagway and
back is a nine-dav trio that can never
be forgotten. The yacht-like "Princess Louise" glides over a still sea
among countless islands that rise forest-clad or mountainous on either
side against a snow line of mow-
capped mountain peaks. The Indian
villages of Alaska with their totea
poles arc unique, and they too wid
have a special charm for these fifty
fortunate boys.
bide ram °" CLEVELAND
IT brings the whole country for miles around within easy reach.
Have you seen the new models! They're as graceful as swallows! As
bright as new coin! As weatherproof as a duck? Automobile Sbael
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Real Quality. Real
Value. Easy Terms. We are tbe people'to mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER M^i^rS
Open Saturday Ere-ninOa* Till 10 o'Clock-
News of the Gity
George E. Mimie returned laat
niilbt from a visit to Edgewood.
General MoRae, leader oi the new
Provincial Party of British Columbia, Mr. Stewart of Nicola, and
Commander Lewis ot Ruck Creek,
members of tbe executive, will
apeak in tbe Davis Hall on {Friday
evening, Marcb 2nd, at 8 o'clock.
Everyone is vitally interested in the
government of tbe country, and all
are cordially invited to attend and
bear tbese three leaders explain tbe
manifesto and platform of tbe new
party.—Advt.
KETTLE BIVER ASSESSMENT
DISTRICT
MOTICK 19 HEREBY OIVIK, Id accordance
•" with the Statut-t. that aU assessed taxes.
iucomaland school taxes, attested aad levied
nnder the "Taxation Aot" and "Public Jehool
Aet" are now due and payable for the year
int.
All taxes oolleotable (or the Kettle River
Anmmont DUtrlot sre due and payable at
B» offloe,iltuete In the Governments Agent'«
offloe. Pentioton, B. C.
Thli notioe, in lerrot of law, it equivalent
to a personal demaad by me upon all pertons
liable for taxes.
Dated at Penticton, B.C.. this sixteenth dty
of February, A.D. IMS.
8. T. COFI.
Colleotor for the
Kettle Biver Assessment Dlltrlot.
THE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ARMSON
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Heming a Specialty'
$4.95
WEN'S WORK SHOES
$4.95
Call at Donaldson's and
see the be.-t buy in men's
work shoes on the market today.
Also don't forget to look
at the new line of
CHILDREN'S
ELK SHOES
These are real bargains.
Watch for Mr. Bailey, the
expert tailor, who will be
with us the first week in
March.
Donaldson's
Phone 30
Canadian   Blind   Babies'  Home
Nursery, Hospital and Kindergarten
Dominion Charter,   Without Stock  Subscription.
DIHECTORS—Hou. Martin Burrell, Hon. President; Hou. J. G. Turriff,
President; A. H. Fitziiininoan, Vice President; Ed war] Grand, Seoretary.
C. Blaokett Robinson, Oir. Seoretary; J. IT. McKinley, Treasurer; Lt.-Col
Whiton, M.D., R. H. Campbell, Thomas Mulvey, K.C, A. E. Provost, W.
Lyle Reid, A. J. Freiinaa, Charles H. Pinhey, C.E., W, J. Cairns, and Tom
Moore.
TRUSTEES—C. H. Piuhey, C.E., Thomas Mulvey, K.C, A. J. Preiman.
Legal Adviser Bunkers Auditor
John I. MacCracken, K.C.    Royal Bank of Canada.     A. A. Crawley, C. ti.
The Objects of this Institution, for which Incorporation was recently obtained, are: "To provide a Home and Refuge for Baby and Infant Blind; to
provide free Scientific Care, Training and Maintenance; to Save the Lives of
even a few of the many of such unfortunates, who, for the lack of such ser«
vice, perish every year; and to return these little ones to their parents, at
sohool age with normal, healthy bodies and sound minds."
This is a large and greatly needed Child Welfare Service. Careful enquiry
at the Government offices in the venous provinces reveals the fact that there
are at the presant time nearly 250 Infant Blind in the Dominion. Nothing
has yet been done for those helpless little ones. In the United States, 16
years ago, the flrst home was opened in New York City; they have now homes
in 13 States, all doing excellent work. In England, some time ago, Sir Arthur Pearson organized "Sunshine House," Chorley Wood, for Blind Babies,
and he claims that it is the only one io the British Empire. Let us have tbe
SECOND in Canada. To reach this worthy end money is urgently required,
Fifty Thousand Dollars is the present objective of the Boajd. While the
Home is to be located in Ottawa it will take in the Baby Blind from every
province, so that this APPEAL for funds will be Dominion wide, and an
early and generous response is confidently expected. Cheques should be made
payable to the Canadian Blind Babies Home Association. All remittances
will be promptly aoknowledged.
Our
Hobby
is
Good
Printing
npHE value of well-
printed-, neat appearing stationery as
a meansof getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Bail programs
Business cards
Visiting cards
Sh'-r-ing tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
THE SUN
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Yam Horn, Fibst Struct
Synopsis of
Land Aot Amendments
Minimum prloe of urtt-olsss land reduced
»o •» ao acre; MCond-cleM to UK an aore.:
Pre-emption now confined to surra-red
landa only.
Keoorde will bo graotod covering only land
•nlteblo for agricultural parpotM aud whioh
Is non-timber land.
Partnership pre-emptloae aboUehed, ba*
parties of not moro than tour may arrant**
for adjacent pre-emptions with joint reel-
Sonce.but oaeh making necessary Improve-
menu oa reepostivo elalms,
Pre-emptore must oeeupy claims for Ave
years and mak* improvemeute to value of 110
Pernor*, Including clearing and cultivation
of nt letet S aere«. before receiving Crown
itraat,
Wlier* pre-cmpior in occupation not Use
tban I sears, and hae msde proportionate
improvement*, be may, because of Ill-health,
or other eauee, bc granted intermediate e*r-
tMeata of improvement and transfer hb
cluim.
Bccorda without parmanaut reildenoe may
be leaned, provided applicant mukes im-
proveraenU to extent ol f DM per annum ana
roeorde stun* eacb year. Failure to make Im*
provementa or reoord aame will operate ae
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained ln less
then Syeare, aud improvement* of $10.00 per
•cro, Including s urea cleared eud cultivated,
and reeideno of nt Icaal two -rents ar* required.
ITe-omptor holding Crown grant may record another pre-emption, If he require* land
in conjunction with hie farm, without actual
occupation, provided atetutory improvement!
nud realdence maintained on Crown granted
land.
Unaurveyed areaa, not exceeding 20 acre*,
mar be leased as bomeaitet; title to be ob-
talued after fulfilling residential aud im •
provemeat coudltlona.
For graxfng sud industrial purpoeea area*
exceeding 640 acrea may b* leaned by on* person or eompany.
Mill, factory or Industrial cites on Umber
land exceeding M .ere. may be parchaeed i
oondltioaa Include payment of stnmag*.
Natural hay meadowsinaoeeeelbte by dieting roada may be purchased conditional upon
conajructlou of a road to them. Rebate of
one-half of coat ot road, not oxoeedlng halt
of purchase prlo*. is matte.
Th* scop* of this Act lt enlarged to inclug*
*U deraoua joining or serving- with Bi*
MaUaty'e form. Th* tlm* within which th*
h*lrt or devisees of a deceased pre-*mptor
may apply for litle under thit Vot it extended
from for on* year from th* death ot euoh
parsou, as formerly, until on* rear after th*
conclusion of th* present war. Tbie privilege
la also made ntroaetlv*. *™™
M«hff h'.'fcH*!* S Pte-Mtptlone ar* do* pr
Srtar J■?nV0i(,,!J.,.on•JPr•••,0'Pt'ou, ********
&»y*t«-s Taxes ar* remitted ter
Prov'-'-—-* . -  .
wh
count.. _,
pr**mptl-Ms.
.iJ;??^ *?! »g"*s>*uu to purchase
r*mlt  ,..,***.
•US.PUROHASI.-IS  Of"oROWN
LANDS.
Provision made for issuance of Crown
BfJ8..*0. |uH-purehaeere of Crown Lands,
who failed To complete purchase. Involving
forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of
purchase, Interest and taxes. When sub*
purchases do not alalia whole of orlgnal par.
eeL purchase price due and taxes auy be distributed proportionately over whoU ana.
Apportion! must be made by Hay l, WW.
ORAZINQ.
Grailnjr Aet, WW. for systematic develop.
tsent of Hveetoek industry provides for gracing districts and range administration under
■MnmlulmuB        A n.,,.1 **m*lmm,      n       , i IS
IS i .it*
Jim™*0'*'*** return af moneys accrued, du*
™ ■*■*!• Paid sine* August 4, fill, pi ae"
5?w.pMSfm"to' '*" " *"•««*
*-**tt&ag*a*^b&
towner
■or***,
*.-******,* vrtmmx*,   .... „..«.,—„, 22***
AeaocUtlona for rang* management. Fr**,
or partially frecpermlts for settlers, campers
or travellers, up to ten head.
NEW HARNESS SHOP
I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and do all kinds of repair
work. Shop equipped with
modern machinery. All work
guaranteed:
C. A* Crawford

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