BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Sep 22, 1922

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xgrandforks-1.0341102.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xgrandforks-1.0341102.json
JSON-LD: xgrandforks-1.0341102-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xgrandforks-1.0341102-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xgrandforks-1.0341102-rdf.json
Turtle: xgrandforks-1.0341102-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xgrandforks-1.0341102-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xgrandforks-1.0341102-source.json
Full Text
xgrandforks-1.0341102-fulltext.txt
Citation
xgrandforks-1.0341102.ris

Full Text

 Legislative Library
GRAND FORKS WfZ
the ceiilor of Grand Pinks valley the
premier fruit glowing district of
Southurn British Columbia. Mining
and lumbering are also important
industries in districts contiguous to
the city.
THE SUN II
Kettle Valley Orchardist
the favorite newspaper of the citizens
of the district. It is read by more
people in the city and valley than any
other paper because it is fearless, reliable, clean, bright and entertaining.
It is always independent but never
neutral.
TWENTY-FIRST YEAR—No  46
GRAND FORKS,  B. C, FRIDAY,   SEPTEMBER 23, 1922
"Tell me what yoo Know is true:
I can guess as welt as you.
$1.00 PER YEAR
THE PRAIRIE
" FRUIT MARKET
Onions, per Ib -    .03
Lettuce, onions and radish, per
doz 15
Potatoes, per Ib 02
Corn, green, per  doz 15
F.O.B. SHIPPING
POINT PRICES
Demand for All Fruits
for Country Points Has
Strengthened During
the Week
' Calgary, September' 20 —Wet
weatht*/ most of the week with
clouds and more moisture in the air.
The produce market has strengthened perceptibly and the movement
to country points i." better than it
has been for a long time.
The Washington competition is
getting past, and prices over the line
are rising. The movement from
British Columbia this week has put
tbem in the shade, and it looks as if
their competition wae over for the
season.
Tomatoes are still in a low rut,
struggling to come back without
much success. Tbey are selling
wholesale at 50c to 60c and may
reach 75c.
Pears are higher iu price witb
good demand. Apples are ,moving
freely at popular prices. Early ibis
week a half car of DuchesB apples uf
good quality, strapped and packed,
were slaughtered here; tbey retailed
in the grocerteria stores at HI per
box. They came.from Vernon. Giving away apples at below cost uf
transportation and handing always
upsets tbe market. We can not call
this a sile.
Elberta peaches are in heavy demand. We need more Elberta
peaches from British Columbia aud
they should be planted in tbe dis
tricts where early ripening will take
place. We call attention to tbe
heavy importation of peacoos from
over the liue to show that Elberta
peaches are in demand far beyond
the British Columbia supply.
British Columbia plums - have
been iu week demand and have b..en
sold at slaughtered prices in many
cases. Demaud for couutry points
for all fruits has strengthened, Tbe
country movement is exceptionally
encouraging.
Calgary wholesale prices:
Apples, BeJ J une, Duchess, Bed
per box, 81.75 to $2.00
Apples, Mcintosh Bed, No. 1 .. 2.50
Apples, Wealthies, No. 1  2.15
Apples, Wealthies, No. 3, $1.75 ■
to  2.00
Pears,   B. C. Burtlett,   No. 1,
per box  2.25
Pears, B.C. Bartlett,unwrapped,
"per box, $2 50  3.00
Pears,   B.C.   Flemish  Beauty,
No. 1  3.00
Pears.    B.C.   Flemish   Beauty,
No. 2  2!25
Pearf, B.C. Bossock, No. 1  2.50
Pouches, Wash.,Elberta,per box 1.50
Peaches,  Wash., Crawford, per
box   150
Peaches, B. C. Yellow St. John. 1.25
Crabapples, B. C. Transparent,
per box..  1.25
Plums, B. C,  Ysilow Egg, No.
1   1.50
Plums   B. C, Imperial Gage .. 1 50
Plums, B.C. Burbank ami Bradshaw, 50c to 75
Peaches, B. C. Carmen   1 25
Peaches, B. C, Hales Early .... 1 25
Prunes, Italian, per  suit   case,
•1.00 to   1.10
Blackberries, B.C.'  per  crate,
$1 50 to  1.75
Cantaloupes, Standards, up to... 3 50
Tomatoes, green, per pear box.. .65
Tomatoes, ripe per 4   bskt., 50c
to 75
Grapes, Takay, per case  4.75
Sweet potatoes, per barrel  8 50
Peppers, per apple box, 90c to... 1.00
Celery, B. C, pel Ib     .06
Cucumbers, B C.,per peach box,
50cto  75
Onions, pickling, per peach box,
$1.25 to  „  1.50
Local cauliflower, cabbage,  car
Pears, Wash.,
storage	
Pears, Wash .
Bartletts,   cold
 .'...» 1.65
Spokane      1,75
.05
.60
1.00
1.60
1.50
1 50
1.60
1.50
1.75
"SCAT"|
Peaolies, Wiisli , El ber I a	
Prunes, Wash , 85o no	
Plums, Wash,,Pond's Seedling,
per crate	
Apples, IJC, Delicious.No. 1,
par box 	
Apple-, BC , Molntosh   Hed,
per box	
Apples,   B.C,  Jonathan,   per
box	
Apples, B.C., Wagner, per box
Apples, B C, Snow, per box...
Apples. B.C.,Spios, Spitz, Winter Bauana.Wewtown, Winesap, No, 1, per box     1.75
Apples, B C.,8pies,Spit/., Win
ter Banana.Newtown, Wine
sap. No 2, per box 	
Pears, B.C, Flemish    Beauty,
No. 1 	
Pears, B.C.,   Flemish   Beauty,
No 2     1 50
Pears, B.C., Anjou, No   1     3.00
Pears, BC, Anjou, No. 2      2.50
Peaches, B.C., No. 1      1.00
Peaches, BC. No. 2 85
Plums. BC, 4 bskt     1.00
Plums, 4 bskt, No.2 85
Hyslop crabs, per box     1.50
Prunes, BC , box, 65c to 75
Grape, Ont., Concord,Niagara,
fiqt ■ 32
Washington reports rhow a big slump
in prices in apples compared with
1921,and very few sales are reported,
Last year at this time most of the
crop was sold. Extra Fancy Winter
Bananas from Olds, Wash., shipped
to Chicago on September 1 sold for
$1.25 as against $2.75 for the same
class last year.
FOSTER'S FORECAST
LIBERALS ELECT  THERE IS LACK
DELEGATES TO
Washington, Sept. 18.—October
will be one of the most rainy, disx
agreeable months of the thirteen, of
wbich its sixteenth day will be tbeir
center. Temperatures will go to such
extremes that the three great.cold
waves of the lest tbree waeks of that
month will demand heat in rest
dences aud offices three weeks earlier
than usual.
That means that heat will be in
demand along and north of latitude
40 near and after October 6, and that
frosts will be two weeks earlier than
usual.
The principal reason ia tbat three
severe storm periods, centering on
October 3, 12 and 27, will constantly
keep the atmoBphere stirred and
prevent warm air from accumulating, tbe resultB being the reverse of
the early September warm wave.
But the humidity—moisture in
tbe atmosphere—will continue great
of the Rockies; better weather will
prevail west of the Bockies.
Beekeepers' Calendar
/    for British Columbia
Issued by the Department of  Agriculture, Victoria, B. C
SEPTEMBER- All colonies requir
ing it should be fed up for winter
with thick syrup, so that the bees are
able to store it in the combs and seal
it over before the nights get too cold -
Combs containing fruit juice or honey
dew, whicb are fatal to bees in winter, should be removed and may be
kept for spring feeding.
Syrup for Winter Food—Two parts
of white granulated sugar to one
part of water, by volume, and boiled
for about 15 minutes. Add 1 oz. of
cream of tartar for each 40 pounds of
sugar before boiling point is reached.
The latter helpR to invert the sugar
and retard granulation Keep well
stirred until sugar is dissolved. Burnt
sugar is injurious t*> bees Give syrup
warm, and in the evening cover feeder well to retain the heat. A level-lid
can with about twenty holes pierced
in the lid, large enough for a pin to
pass through, and inverted over feed-
hole in quilt, makes an excellent
feeder. Six deep Langstroth frames,
filled with sealed stores are required
rots, beets and turnips.per lb.    .02' to last the bees through the winter.
A well attended meeting of
the Grand Forks Liberal association was held in the G.
W.V.A. rooms on Wednesday evening for the purpose of electing delegates to
the Liberal convention which
is to be held in, Nelson next
week.
E. C. Henniger, local member, made a thirty-minutes'
speech to the meeting, confining his remarks principally
to the P.G.E. question, with
which he was thoroughly familiar. Other members of the
association spoke on topics
concerning the welfare of the
district.
The delegates elected wore: John
Donaldson' A, F. Michener, D McPherson, T. A. Wright, C. M. Meggitt, R. L Hodgson, of Grand Forks;
R. G. Bitchieand W. S. Phillips, of
Cascade; A. P. Holm and <). Tain-
bollini. of Fife.
The alternates choson were: W. J.
Gallipeau, H. W. Gregory and F. J.
Miller.
OF COOPERATION
Consumer, Distributor
and Producer Have
Nothing But Common
Interests
books of this province until
organization of effort throughout the entire cycle of trade
takes place.—Vanconver Sun.
Thanksgiving
Day Nov. 6
Thanksgiving day this year will tie
November (i. Th" dale was fixed by
pnliament hi the 1931" session, be-
i in des'gnated  to fall ■ n the Mon«
y of the week containing Armis-
tice duy, which jb November 11.
IS
Bank of Montreal Experts
Report on the Outlook
in   the   Various   Prov
inces
FOR FALL FI
Entries Will Be Numerous iind 11 Good Sports
Program Has Bcen Prepared
A Family Necessity
No other journal caters so intimately aad minutely to the needs
of the agriculturist as does tbe
Family Herald and Weekly Star of
Montreal. From hi« medical to his
religious nteds, from the health of
slock to lhe capabilities of bis machinery, from hiB ladies' embroidery
to tbeir pickles, from the minerals
on the land to tbe"fish in bis brooks,
from the books of his leisure hours
to the amusement of his children,
from bis individual cares to hiB
public duties, be finds companion
ship, help and guidance in the same
old journal, which delighted his
father and is thc joy of his children
today. He could not afford to be
without the Family Herald and
Wetkley Star of Montreal. JPhe subscription price ie 12.90 per year.
A farm buroau report says
lambs are short. But there
are plenty in town.
Harvesting has been delayed by
rain in Manitoba and Saskatchewan,
but conditions generally are satisfactory and grain continues coming
forward in good volume and grae'ea.
Threshing is nearing completion in
Ontario, where th? yield is prov»
ing about the average. Cutting of
tbe heavy orop of corn has begun.
Cereals are practically all harvesied
in Quebec. Weather conditions have
improved the outfook in the Maritime provinces. General conditions
are now favorable in British Columbia, though crops are below the
average.
Throughout British Columbin*
with tbe exception of the Cariboo
and tbe Kootenay, warm, dry
weather has been experienced, local
rains improving conditions in the
Cariboo and Kootenay. Harvesting
is prctically completed. Witbexcnpx
lion of Okanagan valley, potato crop
well up to previous estimates. Apples are moving in large quantities
in Okanagan. Late varieties are
shaping and coloring well. Peaches
and stone fruits are moving rapidly;
quality good. Tomatoes are being
canned in large quantities—excel
lent crop both in Okanagan and
Kamloops district*. Pasturage generally improving.
Cascade-Kosslund
Road to Be Finished
by November 15
The Rossland Cascade gap on the
transprovincial highway is to .be
closed by the middle of November,
says the Penticton Herald. This
section of the highway will-give connection between the Boundnry and
Rossland ahd also between tbis cily
and tbe Kootenay. The entire gap
between Bossland Cascade was 42
miles in length. A section seven
miles in length was completed out
of Rossland in 1920, and another
stretch of lli miles was finished east
from Cascade in 1921. Thusu space
oi 19 miles in the middle remained
for this season's work. It w uld
have been finished up the middle
of October, it is said, but for the
fact many of the meu were called
away on fire fighting. During the
height of the season 350 men were
working. The gauge at present total
250.
Next spring it will be possible for
motorists to travel from the Okana-
gan to Nelson on a  British  Colum |orobardfl ,„ ,,ref(.ram.,. t0 buvin(?  it
bia road via Grand Forks,  Cascade,!
Bossland and   Trail,  crossing the
Vigorous charges against
the apathy which is threatening the fruit industry in British Columbia have been made
by W. H. Lyne, provincial
inspector of fruit pests.
Mr. Lyne declares that because there is little cooperation between producer and
distributor a great quan|ity
ofthe fruit crop will return a
very small profit to the province.
The evil is by no means
confined to the fruit iudustry.
Lack of cooperation in the
cycle of trade is the one factor that can threaten commercial prosperity in British Columbia. ,
All the lip patriotism in the
world is insignificant in effect
beside a little earnest commercial patriotism.
It is all very well to pass
resolutions favoring the exclusive consumption and use
of British Columbia products.
The sentiment of commercial patriotism must go further than that and produce an
organization of effort that
will allow the good-will to
bring practical results.
Consumer, distributor and
producer have nothing but
common interests.
■The distributor usually has
a knowledge of the markets
that would be invaluable to
the producer. There should
be constant intercourse between producer and distributor on the questions of marketing, packing and shipping. |o0"luibU on the Tagum bridge.and j    The most popular summer
The reso'urces of this prov- ,hen into Nelsnn.   Nelson is about, resort  is   "It's   too   hot    to
All arrangements for the
fall fair to be held in this city
next Thursday and Friday,
September 28 and 29, have
now been completed, and the
event will rival if not surpass
pre-war efforts in this direction. With the completion
of the sports program, which
was accomplished this week,
the preliminary work of the
fair was finished.
As in former years, the
agricultural, horticultural, industrial and other displays will
be made at the skating rink,
while the races and ajhletic
sports will be held at the
baseball gronnds in Columbia.
The fruit in the valley is of
a very good quality this year,
and some exceptionally fine
exhibits may be looked for.
A new feature not seen at
previous fairs here will prob-
a bly be an elaborate exhibit
by the beekeepers of the valley. As this is an "infant"
industry in the district, it
should prove instructive as
well attractive and interesting.
The fair will officially opened at
7:30 o'clook on Wednesday evening
by Superintendent Helmer, of I lie
•Summerland evening station, in the
fair building, ln the aftirnoon of
tha't day there will be a parade, and
in tbe evening it is proposed to hold
a community singing enrertainment,
to bo followed by a luncheon.
On Friday afternoon a program of
sports, consisting of races, baseball
games, athletic sports, etc., will be
carried out at the baseball grounds
in Columbia. An auiomobile drive
through the valley of the officials of
the fair and the irrigation district
and invited guest* will also form
part of the second day's program.
The fair will be closed with a dance
in the evening.
THE WEATHER
-•	
The following is the minimum
arid maximum temperature for each
day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on E. V. Law's ranch:
Max.
15 —Friday    83
16 -.Saturday   92
17- Sunday   91
18 —Monday  90
19—Tuesday  sg
20—Wednesday.. 88
21    Thursday  76
Sept.
Min
41
47
41
38
36
41
31
Inches
Rainfall  0.00
Even at the present 1 )w price of
fruit, some disruptable people who
have been raised in the slums rob
inee will never fill the pocket   50 miles from Rossland.
work!" THE   SUN,   QRAND   FORKS,   B. C.
3te (graufc Jfarka £>un
AN INDEPENDENT  NEWSPAPER
G. A. EVANS. EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) $1.00
One Year (in the United States)      1.50
Addles:" -" '--'cations to
Thk Grand Forks Sun,
Phone 101R Grand Fohks, B. CJ
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
of its members. Labor has a large field of service in the further elimination of jurisdictional
disputes, the removal of all restriction upon
effort, and the elimination of restriction upon
the use of materials. This requirement for
full effort applies to those who work in
hard collars as well as to those who who work
in soft collars.—Herbert Hoover, United
States Secretary of Commerce.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1022
The minister of finance is offering, on attractive terms, to exchange Victory bonds
maturing December 1, 1922, for new bonds
bearing the same rate of interest and running
for a further period of <Mthar five or ten years.
As an extra inducement a bonus of a month's
interest is given those accepting the offer,
which is open until September 30. The minis-
■ ter's proposals carry us back to the grim war
days li) 17 when these bonds were first put
out. Under the impetus of the patriotic appeal and the intensive campaign of the first
Victory loan organization the ssue was successful to a degree that the most optimistic
had not dared to anticipate. Literally, hundreds of thousands of Canadians became, for
the first time, investors in bonds—a result of
tremendous importance to the country as well
as to the investors themselves. Aocumulated
savings wero invested and surplus earniegs for
many months ahead were pledged, calling for
a very practical response to the "save and"
serve" of the then minister of finance. The
1922 maturity was particularly favored by
small investors and, even as it was important
to Canada that they should have subscribed
in the first instance, so it is desirable now
from a national as well as a personal standpoint that their investment should coutinue.
It would indeed be regrettable if any considerable number of the holders of bonds subscribed to under these circumstances should
pass over the minister's offer withjjthe idea of
using the money at maturity for less sound
investments or unnecessary expenditure. Invested in Dominion secivities the money is
safe, and the interest return sure and profitable. The minister makes a generous concession to home investors, as a large issue of
Dominion bonds were floated in New York
last April at 5 per cent. It is hoped, and anticipated, that there will be a large percentage
of re-inve.sto.is from the ranks of the small
investors who purchased bonds for the first
uime in 1917.
We get from thc Paris correspondent ofthe
Ma Chester Guardian this interesting glimpse
of a well-known American consulting public
opinion on a question of international consequence: "The crowd in the Tuileries garden
in Tuesday evening was surprised by two
well-dressed men who accosted peaceable
citizens enjoying the cool evening on the
iciiclie.s. One of them, a Frenchman, approached many in turn, raising his hat. T am
| lie interpreter for this gentleman you see be-
ide me,' lie said. 'He is Governor Cox, a
candidate at the last election for the presidency ofthe United States. He wants to know
what you think about the League of Nations.'
Surprised and Mattered, the men addressed
always stood up and answered to the best of
iheir ability, This strange resurrection of the
methods of Sacrates much impressed Parisians,
who are divided whether it is a practicable
scheme of getting the views of the man in the
street." A traveler who recently returned from
England reports that in London ex-Covernor
Cox pursued the same direct method of trying
to learn the opinion of the everyday Briton
concerning the League of Nations.
Commenting on the proposals of the minister of finance for the conversion of'1922 Victory bonds into new bonds carrying the same
rate of interest and maturing in five or ten
years, as desired, the Monetary Times says:
"One point which should be borne in nrnd by
investors in considering the new issue of Dominion government bonds is that the time is
rapidly approaching when good securities will
be scarce instead of plentiful. Up to the present year, since the war, the investment market has been a buyers' market, interest rates
being high and money scarce. Looking back
to a time several years before the war, however, investors will recall that it was then
quite a problem to find a reasonably good investment which, would yield 5£ per cent, or
even 5 per cent. The "opportunities to invest
in ten Aear bonds at 5^ per cent is therefore
a good one. The loan will unquestionably be
a success and security prices will, judging by
prospects, be carried to still higher levels."
E.G, Henniger Go.
Grain, Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cement and Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks, B. C.
S. T. HULL
Established 1910
Real Estate and Insurance
Resident Agent Grnnd Forks Townsite
Company, Limited
By royal proclamation, the governor-general
of Canada has designated Ootober 9 as fire
prevention day. During the week preceding,
lessons on fire prevention subjects will be
given in every public school, public meetings
will be held in many of the larger cities, towns
and the owners and occupants of property
everywhere throughout Canada will be counselled to give special attention to the removal
of fire hazards from their premises. Fire waste
is one of the most serious economic problems
confronting Canada at the present time. The
public in general is vitally affected by the tremendous losses annually incurred by fire and
the enormous expenditures rendered necessary
to adequately protect life and property from
its ravages. Seeing that at least 85 per cent of
all fires are caused by carelessness and can
therefore be prevented, it is the obvious duty
of municipal authorities, fire department
officials, boards of trade and other representa
tive citizen bodies to bring the matter to the
attention of the people.
Many a holder of the Canadian government
botids maturing Decnmber 1, 1922, has been
asking this question. The advertisement of
the minister of finance supplies an answer.
The investor, by giving notice to any one of
the branches of a charteaed bank, can arrange
to get new bonds bearing the same rate of in
terest, the highest possible security and a lib
eral rate of interest.
otneient History*
Items Taken Prom The Orand Porks Sun for tbe Corresponding
Week Twenty Years Ago _
Lequime & Co.'s sawmill, two miles nortli of Columbia, aud 150,000 feot of lumber were destroyed by fire
on Sunday.
The severe frost on Tuesday nigbt did considerable
damage to gardens m the valley. Half an inch of ide was
reported in some quartors.
The Hot Air basoball team defeated tho Granby smelter team on Saturday by a score 12 to 2. Tlio players
wore: Hot Air—Coryell, Davey, T. W. Holland, J. Hoi
land, McKay, Skerritt, Dr. Northrop, Bower, Morrow.
Smelter—J. Crosby, Gregory, Jackson, P. Crosby,Burns,
Denton, Petrie, Richards, Niles.   Umpire, Aid. Sheado.
Farms      Orchards     Gity Property
Agents at' Nelson, Calgary, Winnipeg and
other Pralrlo points. Vanoouver Agents:
PBNDBR INVESTMENTS
HA'CTENBUll Y LANDS LTD.
Bstabltshed ln 11110. wo are In a position to
furnish tollable information couoeruing this
district.
Writs (or traa I Itarntii re
GRAND FORKS
Transfer Company
DAVIS & HANSEN, Props
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Coal,  Wood and   Ice
for* Sale
Office  at  R.  E.  Petrie's Store
Phone 64
C.V. Meggitt
Beal Estate and Insurance
ORCHARDS, FABM  LANDS   AND CITY
PROPEBTY
Excellent facilities for selling your farms
We hare agents at   all   Coast and Prairie
Polnta
WE CABBY AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE.
DBALEB IN POLES, POSTS AND TIES,
AND FABM PRODUCE
Bailable Information roganling this distrct
cheerfully furnished. We solloit your inquiries.
K. SCHEER
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONIST
Dealer in
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Forka, B. C.
A. E. MCDOUGALL
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Wc need in our organized labor a removal
of every restraint upon effort. No thinking
man wants overbuy working hours. What is
what is wanted is the full, complete effort of
every man during his working day within thc
utmost of his ability, Wc need further vision
in the labor world,that the volume ef employment i.s not increased by restriction upon effort. The absolute contrary is the case. Any
justification of those employers opposed to organized labor would disappear at once if labor
used ils organization to promote the best effort
^^S^StV^ltwdhsrfiiettdef
"Stie wedding
ring is tlie |
circle Lrffove<^:&$ik
tnatsiiOtiW*
fW**
SS*%'Md
f\ J 11 assortment of woiidins; rings is a most complete
*-' oao. You can purchase one here of the degree of
fineness you have in mind and at the price you wish to
pay. Jeweled wedding rings are finding favor with recent
brides. You might call his attention to this last line,
Miss About-to«be-Mrs.
Your sight is the guardian angel of your other  senses.
Our expert will fit your eyes with the proper .glasses.
BBIDUB STBBBT    f      ft     Tl VI < 111    JBWBLBB
UBAND FOHKS     «•    *~"   MAM MjXMMA       OPTICIAN
Agent
Dominion Monumental Works
Asbestos Products Co. Hoofing
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
BOX 332 6RAND FORKS, B. C.
DON'T HESITATE!
PHONE 101R
FORFINE PRINTING
City   Real  Estate  For
Sale
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the City, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Prices:—From $35.00 per lot upwards.
Terms:--Cash and approved payments.
List of Lots and prices may be seen at the
City Office.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
City Clerk.
FORTHESPRING GARDEN
AND LAWN
Rakes, Hoes, Spades, Shovels, Grass
Shears and Pruning Shears, Garden
Trowels and Forks. Wheel Barrows,
Lawn Mowers, Window Screen and
Screens, Screen Doors, etc.
Highest Quality Paint and Varnish
MILLER & GARDNER
Complete Home Furnishers
To most people the connecting or disconnecting of a telephone seems a simple
operation of installing or removing the
instrument. As a matter of fact, in every
case it necessitates changes in the cables
and wires overhead or underground. It
also necessitates changes in central office
wires and switchboard connections; in
subscribers' accounts and directory iist-
ings; and frequently requires new "drop"
lines from open wires or cables. The
problems of station movement are among
the large problems of telephone service.
Because of the double operation of disconnecting and reconnecting, the work
iuvolved is often twice as great as in the
case of new subscribers.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
New Manager For C.P.R. Hotels
Mr. Frank L. Hutchinson, sitae
many years servics hai resigned hla
position aa manager In chief of Canadian Pacific hotels to engage in
other business, and Mr. Andrew Allerton is appointed general superintendent of Canadian Pacific hotels
with offices at Montreal.
These announeemante  bave  bean
ANPBEW    ALLERTON
"l     New C.P.R. Chief *t
Hotel System.
Aiade in a circular issued by Mr. C.
E. E. Ussher, passenger traffic manager of the C. P. R.
Mr. Allerton, who is well known
to Montrealers through his success
•9 manager of the Algonquin Hotel,
St. Andrews by the Sea, and the
Place Viger, Montreal, entered the
service of the C. P. R. in 1890 in
the dining car department. In August, 1893, he was appointed manager
of Windsor Street Station Dining
Hall; in June, 1894, he became dining car conductor. In January, 1897,
he was attached! to the Chateau
Frontenac, Quebec, and In February,
190!), he became clerk in the Place
Viger Hotel, Montreal, of which he
ligcaue manager jn AjNril. Ur**.   to
June, 1906, he was appointed man.
ager of the Algonquin Hotel, New
Brunswick, and since November,
1919, has been managing both thn
Place Viger Hotel, Montreal, and thn
Algonquin.
Mr. Hutchinson, who is understood
to have purchased a large farm in
Vancouver Island, where be intends
to reside, was bom in London, Ontario, on August 10th, I860. He
entered the service of the Bank of
Montreal in 1886 and remained there
until 1901 when he became a member
of the Montreal Stock Exchange. In
Mareh, 1908, he joined the C. P. ft.
Bervice as assistant to the manager.
Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, becoming manager in March, 1909. In
June, 1911, he became assistant t»
the manager in chief of hotel*.
Montreal, and in April, 1913, man.
ager of the Hotel Vancouver. In
July, 1918, he resigned from the C
P. K. to manage tie Windsor Hotel
in Montreal but in April, 191B, he
rejoined the aervice to become
***m k.-m-*-**!*** THE   SUN,   GRAND   FORKS,   B. C.
THIRTV YEARS SUCCESSFUL FARMING
Railway  News
I Montreal. — On August 23rd,
.George H. Ham, "the Grand Old
Man of the Canadian Pacific,"
jcelebrated his seventy-fifth birthday
and received congratulation.) from
aU over Canada.
In . period when tlie proiussion ol
farming is more or less stagnant,
when the tendency in so many countries is from rural districts to the
cities and industrial centres, and the
oft-made complaint is that the ardors
of deprivations of an agricultural life
arc not commensurate with its compensations, it is consoling to read the
history of a satisfied farmer of thirty
years' standing, one of the continent's
premier agriculturists, celebrating his
seventieth birthday in the tranquil
satisfaction of the honors which have
come to him in his chosen profession.
Such a man is Samuel Larcombe,
of Birtle, Manitoba, who expresses
pride in the realization of the signal
part he has played in making thc
possibilities of Western Canada
known to the world.
The record of Mr. Larcombe's
thirty years of farming is almost
phenomenal. In that period, with the
products of his Manitoba farm, he
has carried off no less than three
thousand prizes, including the world's
championship for wheat at the
Peoria International Fair in 1917, and
lhe sweepsteak for the best individual
farmer's exhibit as well as the sweep-
steak for wheat in the dry-farming
section at the World's Soil Products
exhibition in Kansas in 1918. His
Canadian successes constitute an
aggregate which gives him an average over his farming years of one
hundred prizes per year.
Born in a little Devon village and
for ten years following the pursuit
of market gardner, Mr. Larcombe's
experience forms a further addition
to the examples of outstanding success achieved by immigrants from the
British Isles, unacquainted with
Western conditions. He came to
Winnipeg in 1889 and proceeded to
Birtle, where even then existed a
thriving colony of old country
farmers. After a year's experience
as hired man with a farmer in the
district, he rented a farm, which,
after five years he purchased and still
occupies.
At a time when everyone was engrossed in wheat he concentrated not
so much on grains as on vegetables.
His   first   local   exhibit   won   three
prizes, and in his first ten years ol
fanning he made forty entries and
secured 134 awards, h'roni 1905 to
1908 he grew roots, vegetables and
grain for .the Canadian Pacific Railway for exhibition purposes in other
countries, and produced citrbns,
cucumbers, pumpkins, squash and
marrows for thc Dominion Government for tlie same purpose.
Mr. Larcombe's career as an exhibitor has been one consistent succession of triumphs too lengthy to
mention in detail. His international
successes have brought considerable
renown to Western Canada and widely advertised thc wonderful possibilities of intelligent farming with
assiduous application Mr. Larcombe
recently celebrated his seventieth
birthday on thc farm which has been
the scene of every one of his achievements He can look back over his
thirty years of agricultural life in
Manitoba with supreme satisfaction
in the knowledge that in winning
renown and prosperity for himself he
has pointed thc way to thousands of
his fellow-countrymen.
Vancouver.—Railwrys in Canada
are in an -excellent position to handle
the bumper grain crop of the prairie
provinces. There are also 10,000
cars in the western division of the
C.P.R. ready to Handle grain moving westward from the prairie grain
fields, officials of the railway state.
C. A. Cotterell, assistant general
superintendent of the C.P.R. western  lines, stated  that  heavy  shipments  will  be made  to the Orient ,
through this port.
A Lazy Switchman's Invention
Few things aro wholly bad Laziness is not an admirable trait in any
man, but for all that it appears to
havo boon responsible for at least one
useful and important invention In
1846, says Herbert Horwill in Discovery, a railway switchman who had
to attend to two station signals .some
distance apart decided to save himself
the trouble of walking to and fro be«
tweeu them by fastening the two
levers togethor with   a   long piece for
wire. Ue used a broken chair as a
counterweight and ran the wire on
nto his hut. Each night after that)
lie sat by his fireside and worked the
two signals without setting foot out
side
1'resautly the railway authorities
found out what ho had dono. reprimanded him for his indolence, promoted and rewarded hiin for his ingenuity and then adopted his invention.
A Harsh Critic
The gentleman dining at tlio tattle
nearest to the orchestra got   up  from
his chair and approached the orchestra
leader.
"Do you over play by request?" he
asked.
"Certainly, sir." replied tho delighted musician.
"Then," said the diner, "J wonder
if you aud your men would be so good
as to play a game of dominoes until
I've finished my luncM"
Jazz is popular because
tliey can play the same piece
over and you don't recognize it
B. C. Veterans' Weekly, Ltd., P. O. Drawer 938, Vancouver
Games to Be Played Sept. 30th, 1922
FOOTBALL COMPETITION - - $10,000 IN PRIZES
$5,000
First Prize
$3,000
Second Prize
$1,500
Third Prize
$500
Booby Prize
Mail Coupons to B. C. Veterans' Weekly, Ltd.
P. O. Drawer 938, Vancouver, li. C.
UOUl'ON MUST BB out along bobdbb
Football Competition
B. C. Veterans Weekly Limited
GAMES TO BE PLAYED SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
Competition Closes 12 o'clock Midnight Friday, September 29th
I enter the B. 0. Veterans Weekly Football Competition and agree to abldt by the rules as publlsMd la the B. 0.
/eteraus Weekly, and to accept the Auditor's decision ae nul ud legally binding tm all nutters concerning this oom-
uulition ir.1 onter on that understanding. Twenty-flve cents enclosed for Are weeks' subscription entitles oompetitoi
to one estimate; 60c. ten weeks and two estimates; 76c fifteen weeks ul three estimates; 11.00, twenty weeks ud fire
estimates,
   ADDBBB8   	
NAME..
Note.—Mark with cross in column provided.    H la Home;  A Is Away; D is Draw.
HOME TEAM
ABSBNAL
BIRMINGHAM
BVBBTON
OLDHAM A.
DEBBT COUNTY
NOTTS COUNTY
FOBT VALE
BOTHBBHAM 0.
ABEBDABE A.
AWAY TEAM
TOTTENHAM H.
BOLTON W.
OABDirr OITY
CHELSEA
BARN SLOT
THE WEDNESDAY
CLAPTON  ORIENT
SOUTH SHIELDS
MLLLWALL A.
OUABLTON A.
ALLOA
HAMILTON  A.
MEBTBYR  TOWN
HEARTS
FALKIRK
Coupon No. 1
HAS
Coupon Xo. 2
HAD
Coupon No. S
HAD
Coupon No. i
HAD
Coupon No. 6
HAD
Toronto.—American tourists last
year spent $75,000,000 in Canada,
according to an estimate made in an
official report of the Dominion Government's Parks Department.
Last year more than 100,000 tour-
tot motor cars entered Canada; that
would mean upward of half a million tourists. This year the number
will be much greater, for the tide
is growing rapidly. The railways
are having a very busy season.
Winnipeg.—After a careful survey of reports received from C.P.U.
agents throughout the West, it is
estimated that this year's crop will
approximate 317,000,000 bushels,
according to the weekly crop report
of the C.P.R. agricultural department issued here.
Reports indicate that the Western
crop generally is turning on* veil.
Even in areas where poor yields
were looked for, the conditions have
proved better than anticipated.
Vernon.—Present indications are
that the 1922 British Columbia apple crop will total about 2^1)0 or
iOOO cars.
Last season was the province's
big crop year, when approximately
3500 cars were packed out.
The C.P.R. has made many provisions to take care of the valley's
transportation demands. On nearly every side between here and Calgary refrigerator cars are waiting
to be shunted to the packing houses,
while houses are well stocked.
Calgary.—While Calvin Coolidge,
Vice-President of the United States,
was not inclined to talk about trade
relations, tariffs or anything of that
nature when he arrived here on the
Trans-Canada train of the Canadian Pacific Railway, he waxed
most eloquent ih his raises of
Banff and Lake Louise and of the
Canadian Rockies along the route
by which he had travelled.
"No wonder you Canadians are
proud of your mountains," he asserted'; "they are magnificent."
The Vice-President spent some
time in conversation with J. M.
Cameron, general superintendent of
the Alberta Division of the C.P.R.
Montreal.—According to a joint
circular issued by the Canadian
Pacific Railway and Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited, Mr. Allan
Cameron is appointed Oriental manager, with office at Hong Kong, effective October 1.
It is understood that Mr. Cameron will be in charge of both traffic and operating departments. The
extensive growth in recent years of
Canadian Pacific activities in the
Orient, with enlarged fleets and services which have added Manila to
the ports of call, hat involved also
the transfer of the administrative
headquarters from Yokohama to
Hong Kong. Mr. Cameron is familiar with Hong Kong, as from
January, 1901, to September, 1905,
he was located there as general
agent of the Asiatic business of the
Oregon Railway and Navigation
Company's line of steamers.
Mr. Cameron's first connection
with the Canadian Pacific Railway
was at Winnipeg as clerk of the
local freight office in 1887.
Moose Jaw.—D. C. Coleman, vice-
president of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company, was a visitor in
the city for a few hours, while en
route to Victoria.
Mr. Coleman made thc announcement that the Canadian Pacific Railway Company had leased the last
of its terminal elevators at the head
of thc Great Lakes, on a long term
lease, to the Consolidated Elevator
Co. interests. The capacity of the
elevator is eight million bushels.
The lessees will assume possession
on September 1
The leasing of thc elevator is in
conformity with the announced intention of the railway executives to
go out of the terminal elevator
business.
Asked as to the completion of the
Assiniboia-Lethbridge line gap, Mr.
Coleman stated that it was anticipated that the gap would be completed late this fall Much, however, would depend on whether the
contractor would be able to hold his
men during the narvest season.
Relative ti the grading on thc line
from Consul, ea^t, Mr. Coleman
stated that the i first thirty miles
had been completed and the contractor was now working on the
second  thirty miles.
"What's tho matter, Dilsiel" a lady
aske.il when her colored maid declared
that sho would ntuy no longer, "Don't
wo treat you riglit? Don't wo pay you
enough?"
"Yes.'sum, dat's so all right; but
dey is too much sliiftiu' dishes for dr
f'.wness of do victuals "
A new pipe organ has 640
stops. The man who invented
j it was probably an  auto  me I iii
1 chanic. I III
Battleships
Are Not the
Only Things
Being
Scrapped
These Days
41 Lots  of other things
i
were scrapped before
the Washington Conference became even
a possibility—old prejudices—old   grudges
—old methods of diplomacy   had   to   be
discarded     before   it
was   possible   to  ask
for bids from the junk
man for a few billion
dollars worth of "war
canoes."
0 If   you  are  to  make
the    most    of     your
opportunities selling
Merchandise,  it  will
pay you to take stock
of your   methods  of
doing   business    and
scrap  ruthlessly   the
old systems or prejudices that new conditions   have  rendered
obsolete.    And above
all  court   publicity-
secret diplomacy is as
bad for your business
as  it is  for the business of running a nation—
Advertise THE   SUN.   URAND   FORKS,   B. C.
News of the City
Judge J. R. Brown, sitting in the
couuty court at penticton on Wedn
neBday, reversed the decision of
Magistrate T. A- Pope in the case of
Jack Nicol, convicted on two counts
recently in the municipal police
court, during the drive against boot"*
legging in the Similkameen riding.
Nicol was convicted of selling liquor
and beer by Magistrate Pope and
sentenced to si* months' hard labor
on the li Ht count and fined $100
and costs on tbe second.
P. IJ. Freeland, government mining engineer of tbis district, in
apected some mineral properties
on Copper cr^ek near Christian
Valley last week.
The principal topic of discussion
among the ranchers nowadays is
the fruit inirket-thit is, what's
left of the marked
Douglas Carter aud bride returned home from the coast last  night."
Thomas Newby left last night for
Vancouver, where^he will undergo a
surgical operation.
B.  J. Averill  leave
next for Oregon.
on   Monday
Death of Mrs. Mary Jane
Donnan
Theeieatli of Mrs. Mary Jane Donnan, aged 69 years, 4 months and 15
days, occurred at her home in this
city on Friday last. She had been
poor health for some time, and spout
the greater part of the past year in
California in the hope of gaining a recovery, but without avail. The funeral took place from the Presbyterian
church, where tbe service was conducted by Rev. Hillis Wright, at 3
o'clock on Sunday afternoon, interment being made iu Evergreen cemetery.
The late Mrs, Donnan was a pioneer
of Grand Forks, having resided here
for over twenty years. She had a
wide circle of friends and acquainntx
ances by whom she was highly esteemed and who extend their sympa •
thies to the bereaved family. She is
survived by five daughters and two
sons—Mrs. Ernest Chipman of California, Mrs. Stanley Todhunter of
East ■ Kootenay; aud Mrs. Charles
Bickerton, and Wallace, Bert, Stella
and Artheiiit Donnan of this city.
Never count your chickens
before they return from a
friend's garden. ,
Wilford Brown left on Thursday
for Vancouver to attend the U ni»
versify of British Columbia.
It took six days   to
the   world   and    you
change it in one.
make
can't
DON'T FORGET TO ASK FOR YOUR COUPON
We give coupons on Silverware
with all cash sales or   thirty
day cash sales.   Don't forget to
ask for yours.   Call and see the
Silverware.
ivmwimmrn
THE CITY GROCERY
Phone 25
H. II. UBNDBRSON
PHOPRIKTOH
CORPORATION OF TBE CITY OF CIAND
FORKS, B. C.
NOTICE
The water in the Cemeteries will be
turned off on  October 1st,   Persons
intending having  work done should
do so before that date.
By order of City Council.
JOHN A.  HUTTON,
City Clerk.
Card of Thanks
Wo wish to thank all those friends
who iu many ways gave their assistance and sent flowers during the long
illness and loss of our dear  mother,
Mrs. Donnan, who passed away  September 15, 1922.
Wallace, Bert, Stella and  Ar-
thena Donnan, Mrs. Chas, Bickerton, Mrs. Stanley Todhunter.
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. King, of
Greenwood, were visitors in fbe city
on Wednesday.
MissLiliian Hull left for the coast
on Wednesday to attend the University of British Coliimbi i.
Ivor Gtiflith   left for   Vancouver
on Wednesday to   attend the Uni
, versity of British Columbia.
A large number of members of
the Greenwood K. of P. lodge paid
a fratuurual visit to the local lodge
on Tuesday evening. •
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Niles, who
have been spending the past six
weeks at Christina lake, left the
first of tbe week for tbeir Saskatcb
ewau home by motor car via Spoi
kane.
TNSTRUCTED by the
J* Inspector of Municipalities, in trust tor William Hedges, lunatic,! offer
for sale by public auction
at the City Hall, Grand
Forks, on Saturday, September 23rd, at three
o'clock P.M., the following live stock, the property"
of William Hedges aforesaid:
1 horse,    weight   about
800 lbs., black.
1 horse,   weight   about
800 lbs,, bay.
1 good cow.
1 calf.
Terms cash  at time of
*S*&I*& '
G. F. KILLAM,
Provincial Constable.
Grand Forks, Sept. 13,
1922.
The mines of the Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company of
Canada, Ltd., at Rossland, closed on
last meek end following a conference
of J. J. Warren, president, and S.
Q. Blaylock, with the employees.
The company' has for some-time
only been doing development work
on the properties and until the concentrator in course of erection at
Kimberley is completed, whtch may
not   be   until  tbe spring of  1923,
AUTO LIVERY IS
Modern Rigs and Good
Horses at All Hours a*
the
Model Livery Barn
,'M. H. Barns, Prop.       '
Phone 68
Second Street
wben tbe mill in use for Sullivan
ores will be available for the ores of
the Rossland mines, theie is little
likelihood of the mines resuming.
RIDE THERE ON CLEVELAND
IT brings the whole country for miles around within easy reach.
Have you seen the new models? They're as graceful as swallows! As
bright as now coin! As woatherproof as a duck? Automobile Steel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Ileal Quality. Real
Value. Easy Terms. We are tbe people,, to mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER 8B3Sr^MrK
Open Saturday Evenings Till 10 o'Cloek
John McNeely, an old-timer and
prospector of this district, who located tbe Molly Gibson Burnt Basin
mine at Paulson, died in the hospital at Rossland Tuesday last week.
He was a native of Minnesota,
and first came to Rossland in 1895.
The funeral was held from the
Catholic church) Rossland, Wednesday morning.
Nothing is as high as  the
high cost of loafing.
FALL RYE FOR SALE
At
Donaldson's Store
$2.00  Per Hundredweight
;;MlfiM
To Holders of Five Year
51 per cent Canada's
Victory Bonds
Issued in 1917 and Maturing 1st December. 1923.
CONVERSION   PROPOSALS
THE MINISTER OP FINANCE offers to holden
of these bonds who desire to continue their
investment in Dominion of Canada securities the
privilege of exchanging the maturing bonds for new
bonds bearing 5$ per cent interest, payable half yearly,
of either of the following classes:—
(fi.) Five year bonds, dated 1st November,
1922, to mature 1st November, 1927.
tb) Ten year bonds, datid  1st November,
1922, to mature 1st November, 1932.
While the maturing bonds will carry interest to 1st
December, 1922, the new bonds will commence to earn
interest from 1st November, 1922, GIVING A BONUS
OF A FULL MONTH'S INTEREST TO THOSE
AVAILING THEMSELVES OF THE CONVERSION
PRIVILEGE.
Thit offer ia made to holders of the maturing bonds
and ie not open to other investors. The bonds to be
issued under this proposal will be substantially of the
Mme character as those which are maturing, except
mat the exemption from taxation docs not apply to the
new f
Holders of the maturing bonds who wish to avail
themselves of this conversion privilege should take
their bonds AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE, BUT NOT
LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 30th, to a Branch of f
any Chartered Bank in Canada and receive in exchange
an official receipt for the bonds surrendered, containing
an undertaking to deliver the corresponding bonds of
the new issue.
Holders of maturing fully registered bonds, interest
payable by cheque from Ottawa, will receive their
December 1 interest cheque ae usual. Holders of
coupon bonds will detach and retain the last unmatured
coupon before surrendering the bond itself for conversion
purposes. .
The surrendered bonds will be forwarded by banks
to the Minister of Finance at Ottawa, where they will
be exchanged for bonds of the new issue, in fully
registered, or coupon registered or coupon bearer form
carrying interest payable 1st May and 1st November
of each year of the duration of the loan, the first interest
payment accruing and payable 1st May, 1923. Bonds
of the new issue will be sent to the banks for
delivery immediately after the receipt ofthe surreadered
bonds.
Datotj at Ottawa, 8th August, 1922."
The bonds of the maturing issue which arc
converted under this proposal will be paid off ia omI
the 1st December, 1922.
W. S. FIELDING,
Minister of Fmaaa*.
not
Our
Hobby
is
Good
Printing
rpUE value of well-
printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Ball programs
Business cards
Vi i'ing cards
Sti'j   ing tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
THE HUR—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ARMSON
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty"
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
THE SUN
Columbia Avenue and
take Street
TELEPHONE
R101
K. F. LAWS
HEAL, ESTATE
&
INSURANCE
OFFICK WINNIPBU AVHNUK
OFKMUTB OBOWBaSEXCHANOB
PHONE 164
PACIFIC SIIBBT MBTAL WORKS. LTD.,
VANCOUVKB
MBTAL
IRRIGATION
PIPES and      FLUMES
K. F. LAWS
SOU DISTHICT AGENT
PICTURES
nlSngJMnaHriUB^^ aJli^MfrUarBJl
-    ANO PICTURE FRAMING
Furniture Msde to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds.
Upholstering Neatly   Dod
R. G. MoCUTCHEON
;WUMMQ AVM0I
*S
•J.
h
It ;•*'■     fch.frv.or1 . .v
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Yalk Hotel, First Strkkt
Synopsis of
Land Act Amendments
Minimum price of first-class land
reduced to |6 an acre; seoond-alass te
$1.&0 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lauds only.
Records will be granted covering only
. .nd suitable for agricultural purposes ,
.-Ml whicb ls non-tlmbor land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
I Jt parties of not more than four may
■"**:" f !or BdJa««nt pre-emptions
with Joint residence, but each making
necessary improvements on respective
claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims for
five years and make lmi>rovements to
value of $10 per acre, Including dear-
Ins and cultivation of at least I acne,
before receiving Crown Grant
Where pre-emptor In occupation not
lees than I years, and has made proportionate Improvements, he may. because td Ill-health, or other cause, bt
granted Intermediate certificate of Improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent of
****** per annum and records same each
year. Failure to make Improvementa
or record same will operate as forfeiture.    Title cannot be obtained ln
Uf iS*!? B •****"• ***** Improvements
etp»M per acre. Including 6 acres
eMared and cultivated, and residence
or at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding- Crown grant
may record another pre-emption, If he
requires land ln conjunction with his
farm, without actual occupation, pro-
121 -j££uto,)r approvements made
and residence maintained on Crown
granted land. 0 ™
Unsurreyed areas, not exceeding M
tuiTi "I***.}". >,ms**i •» homesTteo;
?HS.to, "• '"•J'"* after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
y*r graslng and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding «M acres mar be
***£*$ *¥ "**' S>et*-OB or company.
Mill, factory or Industriaisltes on
timber land not exceeding to acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
"y .JS*"™1 ******* *****r be purchased
f^UoneTuBon construction of aroad
to them. Rebate of one-half of coat af
road, not exceeding half of purchase
price, Is made. te**.**-**
pre-emptors'   nam   grant*
ACT.
  -JI paWSS 53n&"Sd*Si£
Ing with HtjUaJesWyorces The
time within whlcFthehsin ot devisee!
tVt^^ir^Ln^^u^id
from for one year from the death of
sucb person, as formerly, until one
year after tlio conclusion of the present
war. This privilege Is also made retroactive. ^^ ™
eruptions recorded after June ML
Taxes are remitted for five yesu
PT?T^0>> ***** ****** at moneys ac-
cmed. due aa? been paid sSceAoaiat
i. lilt, e* account of paymentsThei
**.*"**•*** "Oldlers' peremptions.
interest on agreements to purchaae
AuTld,5^L ****** ** maSaberTZl
Allied voiees, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, retiUtteTfrom ao?
Uslment to March mTuivT ^^
SUB-PURCHASERS Ot* CROWN
Provision made for karaanee ef
frown grants to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase. Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase. Interest and tuxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and taxes may
be distributed proportionately over
whole area. Applications must be
•made by May 1, iiSs. ""*   "
GRAZING.
Crazing Act. Ult, for systematic
development of livestock Industry provides for graaing districts and range
administration under Commissioner
Annual graslng permits Issued based
on numbers rangedMirlority for established owners. Steak-owners may
form Associations for range management. Free, or partially free, permits
for settlers, campers sr '—nHsst uo
to ten head. "    "
The scope ef this
Include afl j
, fiu!
NEW HARNESS SHOP
I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and do all kinds of repair
work. Shop equipped with
modern machinery. All work
guaranteed:
C. A. Crawford
Nev Telephone Olliee

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xgrandforks.1-0341102/manifest

Comment

Related Items