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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Jun 30, 1922

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 GRAND FORKS JLf t
the center of Grand Forks valley, the
premier (ruit growing district of.
Southern British Columbia. Mining
and lumbering are also important
industries in districts contiguous to
the eity.
9a
THE SUN
Kettle Valley Orchardist
is the favorite newspaper of the citizens
of the district. It is read by more
people in the city and valley than any
otber paper because it is fearless, reliable, clean, bright and entertaining.
It is always independent but never
neutral.
TWENTY-FIRST YEAR—No 34
GRAND FORKS, B. C., FRIDAY,   JUNE 30, 1922
"Tell me what you Know is true:
JI csn totmi si well sa rou.
$1.00 PER YEAR
ILLUSE
Directors Are Empowered
to Contract for Supplies—Method of Marketing Still Uncertain
A largely attended meeting of tbe
Qrand Forks Cooperative Growers
Exchange was held in tbe Empress
theater on Wednesday nigbt, with
President Woodland in tbe chair.
Tbe purpose of the meeting was to
arrive at Bome tangible conclusion
io reference to tbe packing and mar
keting of the current year's fruit
orop, and to devise means of raising
fundi? for the purchase of the neoesx
sary supplies.
Tbe subjects,were thoroughly discussed, and the growers finally
decided to sign an agreement to
have their fruit packed tbrough tbe
packing house, and also to sign a
financial undertaking authorizing
the directors to contract for boxes
and other needed supplies.
No agreement was arrived at as to
tbe marketing of tbe crop, and is
matters now stand tbe ranchers can
either market tbeir fruit individually
jt as many of tbem as may be of
the same frame of mind can corns
bine. >
No local manager of the packing
house has yet been appointed
Northwest Apple
Crop to Be Lighter
The total apple crop oi the Pacific
Northwest is estimated at 31,802,000
boxes, or 8,327,000 boxes lees than
lust year and 2,722,000 boxes more
than tbe crop two years ago.
"The commercial apple crop esti«
mate, soon to be announced by tbe
government, will no deubt show tbe
aame ratio.. The decrease in the west
IB more tban offset by the heavy
increase in production in the eastern barreled apple sections. These
conditions were to be expected, bb
last year tbe boxed apple districts
of the northwest had a heavy crop,
while the eastern yield was light.
Fruit crop conditions throughout
the weat are unto the standard of
the season and approximately 158,
000 cars of fruit from fruit belts of
five western states will be shipped
east.
that Mr. Uownes deals witb, the
etrawherry root weevil is tbe mrst
persistent and most aggressive. The
weevils emerge as adults in the sum*
mer and deposit their eggs usually
near the crowns of the plants or
drop theih indiscriminately on loose
soil any time from the middle of
July to tbe first week in September.
On hatching, the larvae work tbeir
way down to the roots, lie dormant
during the winter months, and start
tbeir depredations with tbe spring.
During May the adults commence
to appear. They do not confine tbeir
attention to the strawberries, but
tbe grub wiil attack tbe roots of
raspberries, blackberries, timothy,
white clover, red clover, and other
growths.
Two main lines of control have
been revealed. These are cultural
methods (which include the plough.,
ing of infested fields at the proper
time of year and'the rotation of
crops) and the use of weevil-proof
barriers. Both methods are fully described in tbe pamphlet. The rotation suggested for new land is: First
year, strawberries; second year, first
crop berries; third year, second crop
berries, plough and plant fall wheat;
fourth year, fall wheat with clover;
fifth year, clover sod, manure if possible, aod sixth year, potatoes, after
wbich prepare (and for strawberries
the following spring. In tbe case of
old land it is suggested that potatoes
should precede the planting of
strawberries. Barrier prevention is
also fuggested and described.
Other insects dealt with in tbe
pamphlet, which can be had free on
application to the application to tbe
publications branch, department of
efffeuWBft, *C^S7areilhe'* 'blaok
vine weevil, tbe strawberry crown
miner, tbe western 10-line June
beetie aod tbe strawberry crown
moth, for each of which control
methods are suggested, mostly of ro«
tation, or pulling up and burning
the plants.
harvest lime near latitude 40. Not
much rain during July wesl of tbe
Rockies' crests. Bain shortage ex*
pected in all the West India islands
and northern South America.
Northwest Division—High temperatures near 1 and 9; cool near 6;
severe storms and most rain near 3,
but most of this rain will fall on
long soutbero slopes; mucb loss on
northern slopes; crop weather will
average fair. This paragraph is for
north of latitude 36 between Rockies
crest aod meridian 90.
Pacific Slope—Not mucb rain;
low temperatures near 5; warmer
than usual near 1 and 7; most severe storms near 1; coolest weather
near; crop weather about normal.
zens, a number of NelHon people being also interested in llm  property.
Registrar of Lands Sued
Victoria, June 26.—An action
without precedent iu the provincial
courts, aod said to be the first one
ever brought to obtain recompense
from the assurance fund of lbe land
registry oflice, although that fund
has been established for nearly
twenty years, came up. for trial io
tbe supreme court when Mr. Justice
D. A. McDonald reserved judgment
in jthe suit of D. Chetham against
tbe registrar general of titles.
The plaintiffs claimed damages io
the sum of $25,000 by reason of the
defendant's alleged omiseioo, mistake or misfeasance in wrongfully
graotiog to het Moo Kow iodefeas
ible certificates to 'aods at Bay aod
Mt. Stephen streets. The mistake
occurred under Registrar S. Y
Wootten.in 1909,
OLIVER LINE
Grading Contract Practically Completed—One
or Two Small Bridges
Yet to Build
Zeph the Optimist
"I see you've got a new hose,
Zeph," the mail carrier in a small
to-an said to one of the inhabitants
wbo was brushing a chestnut mare.
"Ye«up," replied Zep.
"Do you trade olteo?"
"Ye-up; Sat'day swapped three
times."
"You must be doing pretty well."
"Ye-up, pretty good; generally
come out second best—tbat isn't
doing very bad, is it?"
Strawberry Pests
and Their Control
Tbe small fruit industry has made
notable growth io British Columbia
during recent years. An example of
this is furnished by the aoreage uuder strawberries, wbicb quadrupled
in tbree yeara Tbis rapid develop-
ment has, however, been accompanied by an equally rapid extension of insect injury, the strawberry
root weevil .laving in some districts
assumed serious proportions.
As far back ae 1918 ao arrangement was arrived at by tbe Dominion department of agriculture witb
tbe provincial government for the
use of six acres of land io tbe center
of tbe strawberry growing distribt of
Gordon Head, Vancouver .island,
witb a view to demooetrating systems of crop rotation suitable to
strawberry culture and to elucidate
if possible tbe problem of weevil
control. Tbe results of tbe expert
mentfl and investigation tbat. have
been carried on are told in pamph
let No. 5 of - the Dominion depart
ment of agriculture by W. Downes,
assistant entomologist of the entomological   branch.    Of the   insects
Good Showing Reported
From Molly Gibson
fed Tersick, of Rossland, who has
been diieoiiog the development work
on fbe Molly Gibson Burnt Basin
Mining company's mine, near Paulson, has brought to tbe shareholders
of the mine in Rossland, where the
head office is located, some cheering
oews of receot discoveries at the
mine.
Six men are at work at the mine
at present, and Mr. Terxick reports
tbat the lead in tbe bottom of the
shaft at a distance uf 76 feet shows
up excellent ore of shipping quality
io tbe crosscut made recently. He
says the prospects are better than at
any time since tbe mine was discovered. ,
"An ore body eight feel wide has
been encountered," he said, "the
ore being gold-copper."
The bangiog wall has not yet been
encountered, and the size of the ore
body is increasing as the work pro*
grasses.
Mr. Terziok estimates tbat there
is at least 1000 tons of shipping ore
in sight.
Tbe work at preseot being done
is in the upper tunnel, where good
shipping ore has been encountered
on the whole face, well mixed, there
being two feet of clean ore.
The lead at the Molly Gibson can
be traced for a distance of 6000 feet.
Mr. Terzick left for tbe Molly Gibson on Tuesday evening. He will
also start a crew of men at work on
the Enterprise group of claims owned by him on Norway mountain,
near Paulson.
He is very enthusiastic over the
latest discoveries at the Molly Gib.
soo, the mine being principally
owned by Rossland  and Trail citi-
THE WEATHER
The following is the minimum
and maximum temperature for each
day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on E. F. Law's ranch:
Max.
Min.
ib
24—Saturday  90
51
51
52
52
28—Wednesday.. 87
50
29   Thursday  92
50
Inches
Prairie Crop Prospects
Reports from prairie points indicate that crop prospects are good.
Very little hail damage bas been reported so far. Moisture is reported
plentiful in tbe majority of districts,
rhe grasshopper pest is only reported from a few poiots. ' There is an
optimistic feeliog prevailing among
the farmers. In some districts warm
weather has caused the graio to
head out early with short straw.
Forage crops are uniformly good in
each province. Live stock is generally doing well with excellent pasture. From present indications an
early harvest is predicted in Manitoba. In the country north of Edmonton crops are looking well, but
can do witb a little more moisture.
Tbis condition is general throughout
the provinces. t
A report from Peoticton says that
it is expected tbat A. E. Griffin &
Co. will bave finished their contract
for the construction of the grade for
the Kettle Valley railway branch tc
Oliver by July 15. The work rex
oently has proceeded rapidly and at
the present time all that remains is
the completion of ooe or two of the
smaller bridges and some easy grad
ing at Oliver. The big rockcut south
of Okanagan Falls has been made
and the big bridge at the outlet of
Vasseaux lake is finished.
It is 'also reported that tbe car
barge which has been under construction at the north end of Skaba
lake ia practically completed, and
it will be used to convey rails aod
other materials to Okanagan Falls
when the steel commences.
Kettle Valley railway officials report that jhe line will be completed
by about August 15, in plenty of
time for hauling out the Oliver tomato crop. The steel laying will -be
commenced practically as soon
the contractors for the grading ge t
through.
Railway News
One hundred and sixty-six of the
passengers aboard the Canadian
Pacific liner "Montrose," on her
maiden voyage from Liverpool te
Montreal have addressed a letter to
Mr. G. M. Bosworth, Chairman ot
the Canadian Pacific Steamships
Limited, expressing, their appreciation of the new liner. The letter
says:
"On the occasion of the maiden
trip of the'R.M.S. "Montroso," We,
the undersigned passengers from
Liverpool to Canr.Jian points, desire to express our great appreciation of the beauty ana extreme comfort of the ship in all ita details and
arrangements for both private and
public use.
"We alio desire to place on record
our great satisfaction with the
courtesy, kindness, and never-failing
efforts on the part of the Commander, Officers and Crew to make this
voyage one of real pleasure.
"The catering ana general service
have been, as usual, up to if not exceeding C. P. R. standards.
"We therefore beg to congratulate
the Company on having such a
steamer as the "Montrose" added to
its fleet, and ourselves on having
had tbe privilege of taking part ia
its maiden voyage."
The first Trans-Canada
train of the season  left
C. P. R.
Windsor
W, J. Hooper, unit insurance
representative of tbe department of
soldiers' oivil re establishment, J
Unit, ha8.arraDged.with the secre*
tary of tbe Graod Forks ^.W.V.A.
to; address a meetiog of returned
meo in this city on tbe evening of
July 12, the subject of the address
being "Returned Soldiers' Insurance."
True to Form
"Yes," said the specialist, as be
stood at tbe bedside of the sick purchasing agent, "I am sure I can
oure you."
"Wbat will it cost?" asked tbe
sick man faintly.
"Ninety-one dollars."
"You'll bave to shade your price
a little," replied the purchasing
agent. "I'have a better price from
tbe undertaker."
FOSTER'S FORECAST
Washington, June 26— Two
principal storm periods are expected
for July for the weeks centering on
July 3 and July 26. The severe
storms of the week centering on July
3 will be the most severe of the
month and very severe storms are
expected near July 1. Heavy rains
are expected on southern slopes
from botb storms. Best crop weather
of the month is expected during the
eleven days centering on July 13.
Tbat good weather will come during
Street Station, Montreal, at 6 p.m.
Sunday, May 21st, aad left Toronto
at 9 p.m. on the same day.
This splendid train, carrying stand.
ard sleeping car equipment only, and
making the fastest time between
terminals of any trans-continental
In America, leaves Montreal, Wind-
sor Street Station at 5.00 p.m., and
Toronto Union Station at 9.00 p.m.
Eastern Standard Time daily, con-
suming 88 hours between Toronto
and Vancouver, and 92 hours between Montreal and Vancouver.
Thn sehedulee are so arranged
that the train passes through all im-
fiortant point.* (commercial or tour-
st) at most convenient hourc of entraining or detraining, and during
the portion of the trip through the
Canadian Rockies open observation
cars from Field to Revelstoke are
special features. There Is no extra
charge made for this feature by
Canadian Pacific.
Although this Is the only de-luxe
train run in Canada in which sleeping car passengers only are carried,
there Is no extra fare required to
travel on same.
With the resumption of the full
summer trans-continental service
the Canadian Pacific will have at
8.00 a.m. every day thirty-six transcontinental trains moving on its
rails at various points between
Montreal and Vancouver (and 36 dining cars are serving breakfast),
among which art Included eight
"Trans-Canada" trains—of all this
vast fleet of high class trains the
Trans-Canada Ts the "Premier
Train."
The Trans-Canada Is tn addition
to the "Vancouver Express' now
operating, making two trans-continental trains dally between Toronto and Vancouver. Travelling by
the Trans-Canada a business day it
saved on the trans-continental trip as
the'business man hu had hit breakfast and is ready for business the
second morning In Winnipeg, the
third morning in Calgary, and the
fourth morning- ln Vancouver. The
Canadian Pacific will this summer
have four trans-continental tralne
eg h way every day over the mountains.
NOTED DIVINE
Dr. Campbell Morgan,
Eminent Preacher and
Bible Intepreter-Speaks
to Large Audience
A large audience at the Empress
theater od Monday eveniog listened
to Dr. Campbell Morgan, the eminent British divine, graphically ex«
pound the Scriptures. A lifetime
in a London pulpit, and years of
study aod Biblical research bave
qualified Dr. Campbell Morgao to
ioterpret Holy Writ. He is a
teacber ratber than a preacher. He
is a master at word pictures. He
throws a light upoo bis text with
such brilliance aod clarity bs to
make all things plain to those wbo
hear him. Never before has Grand
Forks been visited by an expounder
of tbe Bible combining scholarly
attainments, profound sioaerity ami
platform ability io such a degree as
evidenced by tbe Doted visitor. Hia
lecture here was highly appreciated
by everyone wbo beard him.
Urge Growers to
Use Care in Packing
The fruit branch of the Dominion
department of agriculture strongly
urges strawberry growers to give
more attention to tbe picking, packing and shippiog of their fruit. It
pays, tbe laBt circular says, to put
enough berries io each box to assure
that when tbey arrive on the mar ■
ket tbey will not have settled lower
than tbe top of tbe box. It adde:
"Tbe imports into Canada of United
States strawberries this year bave
more tbao doubled those for a number of years past and the fruit-4
clean, well colored aod Id well-filled
boxes—brought good prices throughout jtbe season. Consumers are
therefore appareotly prepared to pay
a fair price for good well-colored
berries which have beeo properly
picked and packed in boxes wbicb
arrive on tbe markets properly filled
They are rgaio, however, demonstrating their unwillingness to buy
except at a very great discount tbe
majority of local shipments received
to date."
He    Probably    Got    His
Wish
Tommy, tbougb very young—he
is only four—has a precocious appreciation of tbe pleasures of tbe
table. His sister, who is a few years
older, has recently been suffering
from ooe of the common maladies
of childhood, and ae sbe became
convalescent Tommy frequently ob
served the most tempting delicacies
beiog carried into tbe sick room,
from which be wsb still excluded.
He decided to put in a word for
himself. The next time be saw bis
mother bearing a tray of especially
appetiziog food to tbe invalid's door
he made this plea:
"Mother," be aaid, "may I bave
the measles when Violet's finished
with them?"
Well Paid
The foreman was badly ia need
of some extra workers, and not getting many applicants, he stopped a
husky darkey on the street and
asked him if he wanted a good job.
"What is you all a-paying, boss."
"Oh, I'll pay you all you are
worth."
"No, sab, indeed! Nol I'se a-get-
ting mob dan dat oow." THE   SUN,   GRAND   FORKS,   B. C.
3h.e (Sranfli Jfeka §mt
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
G. A. EVAN8. EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) 11.00
One Year (in the United States)    1.60
'   Addresr -" -———'cations to
The Grand Forks Sun,
Phonb 101R Grand Forks, B. C.
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1922
It seems almost a pity that the members of
the growers' exchange should not be able to
arrive at some degree of unanimity as to the
appointment of a local man as manager of the
exchange to handle the current year's fruit
crop.    The season is now well advanced, and
quick action will soon be necessary in order
to ensui-e a proper pack of the fruit—and if it
is not properly packed it can not be marketed
to the bo«t advantage.    While this paper has
no desire to offer what might be unwelcome
advice (we believe too much advice of this nature is being tendered the growers by people
not actively engaged in the industry),it can not
help but point out that tho largest crop grown
in the valley was packed and marketed under
the supervision of a local man very advantageously to the growers.   The same man, we
understand, can be secured to take charge   of
the work this year.    We hold  no brief for
Mr. Rooke, but we believe that he thoroughly
understands the fruit industry,  that he   is
impartial and honest.    These are essential
qualities, and  they are  not always obtained
when strangers are brought in from the out -
side.
danger is then over until the hot days of late
summer cause the vegetation to dry out, when
a danger period ensues which lasts till the
first autumn rains. The moral of it all is that
Canadians ought always to be careful with fire
in the fiorest and doubly careful during these
danger periods.
CANADA'S MEDICINAL TREES
All Canadians have heard of the medicine,
cascara,but all do not known that this is obtained from the bark of the cascara tree, which is
found growing on the Pacific coast of this
continent. Owing to the heavy drain on the
stands of this tree in the Pacific states.British
is now one of the sources of supply, and carloads of the bark are now shipped out every
season. In order that all citizens of the province who have to do with work tn the woods
may recognize this tree and know how best
to conserve it, an illustrated pamphlet, written by Professor John Davidson of the University of British Columbia, has been issued
by the forestry branch of the department of
interior. It is known as Circular No. 13, T"*ie
Cascara Tree in British Colnmbia. It has been
widely circulated in British Columbia, but any
persons desiring the pamphlet, who have not
yet received a copy, may obtain one free on
application to the director of forestry, Ottawa.
"ABRAHAM LINCOLN'
SEE
E. C. HENNIGER
COMPANY
Grand Forks, B. C.
Beiore Buying
Your
SEED GRAIN
and
GARDEN SEEDS
S. T. HULL
Established 1810
RealEstate and Insurance
Resident Aeent Grand Forks Townsite
Company, limited
Farms     Orchards    City Property
Agent* at' Nelson, Calgary, Wlbnlpeg and
otber Prairie polnta. Vanoouver Agent.:
PKNDKBINVKSTMBNT8
BATTHNBOBY LANDS LTD.
Batabllshed In 1910, we are In a position to
lurniab reliable information concerning thli
distrlot.
Write tor tree literature
The latest news from the former kaiser in
Holland is, first, that he has become affected
with a kind of religious mania, and, second,
that he has virtually finished his memoirs.
Admiral von Tirpitz makes the first statements, the London Chronicle the second It
is reported that William demands one million
dollars for the foreign rights to hiss book, and
that he is likely to get it. In the opinion of
booksellers the foreign rights will be much
more valuable than the German rights.
Sir Almroth Wright, the English surgeon,
says that tears ure by no means so "idle" as
the poet imagined them to be. They are quite
actively hostile to most bacteria. A single tear
drop will clear a.test tube full of liquid cloudy
with millions of microbes. Sir Almroth calls
the bactericidal principle in tears "lysozyme."
He has not yet isolated it, but he says it exists in other secietions and tissues ofthe body
and in certain vegetables—for example, the
turnip, but not as anyone-might suppose, the
onion.
South Afriea is considering whether to
adopt a decimal system of coinage patterned
after the system in use in Canada and the
Tnited States. The convenience of dollars
and cents can not be denied.
SPRING FOREST FIRES
The theater is indeed a factor in education,
development and progress when it puts on such
a play as "Abraham Lincoln" by John Drink-
water. All history is but a series of Irogra-
phies; men have lived and left their names for
good and evil; the evil they did lives after
them, the good is too oft interred with their
bones. It was not so with Lincoln; the great
American natio: is largely his monument. No
storied urn nor animated bust can so eloquently remind us of the greatuess of his character
as the bare facts of his life, simple in its beginning, becoming grand and dramatic by accumulating incident moving to a tragic close.
Shakespeare commenced his dramatic work,
it is believed, by writing of Sir Thomas More
who, like Lincoln, was a martyr and a sacrifice. John Drinkwater, it is no flutter to say,
inspired by a similar grand theme has written
in the true Shakespeatean spirit, doing no
violence to historical accuracy, but presenting
a picture of lofty principle and patriotism
truly inspiring. Itis pleasant to reflect that
this fine play is an English tribute to American nobility, the nobility of character of which
a democracy can be proud. Played on British
and American soil "Abraham Lincoln" will do
valuable work in cultivating those ideals the
two nations hold in common and which are
the links which bind them together.—Vancouver Sun.
There are usually two periods of fire hazard
in the Canadian forests, in early spring just
after tho snow disappears and in late summor
when the vegetation has begun to get dry.
Exceptional seasons vary these periods, but
the two classes of "spring fires" and "summer
fires" remain. Many people understand why
the dry, hot period of late summer is likely to
be favorable to the starting of forest fires, but
they think that after the heavy snowfall of
winter the woods ought to be safe till early
summer at least. A little reflection, however,
, will show why the early spring period is par-
ticlar dajgeious. In early spring there is often
a short period of hot, bright days. The leaves
have-not yet come out and the sun shines
down through the leafless branches directly on
on the forest floor. The snow disappears as if
by magic and the dead twigs and last year's
leaves become dry as tirtder. If a glowing
mateh or cigarette stub is dropped among this
material the forest floor is ablaze over a space
of many yards in a moment. A few days at
this period are always most critical. After the
first spring rain the ground vegetation becomes green and damp, and the leaves come
out and shade the forest floor.    The worst
cAncient History*
Items Taken Prom The Orand Porks Sun for the Corresponding
Week Twenty Years Ago
Steel on the V. V. & E. has now reached to point uoar
Republic.
Peter B. ifjelson, of Nelson, Wash., and Miss Mary
Henderson wore married on Wednesday at tho homo of
the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B, Henderson.
The loan raised on the Columbia city debentures lias
been deposited in tho Eastern Townships bank, aud the
city council is p.iocecdiug with nil possible speed with the
preparations for the installation of electric light and
waterworks systems.
The V. V. & E. will run exeui'SOQ trains from Republic
for the Dominion day celebration, Mayor Palmer has
sent a telephone message to parties in this city, saying
that nearly the entire populotion of Republic will be here
on the second to help us celebrate.
\M§^^ddndh€rfistttis
W^Cltssoniw-.fo
XSBm     bpnice-and
- - was^lJ^'Sji.T* "**-
serve
in
silver „
tilings
'T'HE fact that most plated and sterling flatware can be
"*■ bought in open stock allows a family to purchase
different article for the dining table from time to time
We suggest that this is a most excellent way of coming
into possession of the proper amount of household silver.
Will you inspect our stock and allow us to make suggestions and quote prices?
We will test your eyes and expertly advise you    If you
are not in need of glasses we will tell you so.
BBIDG8 STRBBT    f       f-      TiVinR    JEWBLRR
URAND FOHKS     ••    ***-'*    M A M MAMMA       OPTICIAN
GBAND FORKS
Transfer Company
DAVIS 8 HANSEN, Props
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Coal,  Wood and  Ice
for Sale
Office at R. F.  Petrle'e Store
Pfcone 64
C.V. Meggitt
Real Estate and Insurance
ORCHARDS. FABM  LANDS   ANO CITY
PROPERTY
Excellent facilities foi lelllDg your farm!
We have age-its at all Const and Prairie
Points
WE CABBY AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE.
DEALBR IN POLES, POSTS AND TIBS,
AND FABM PRODUCE
Reliable Information roirarrlliiK this distrct
cheerfully furnished. We sollolt your inquiries.
K. SCHEEB
Wholesale'and Retail
TOBACCONIST
Dealer Sn
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Forks, B. C.
A. E. MCDOUGALL
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Aftent
Dominion Monumental Worka
Asbestos Products Co. Roofing
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
BOX 332     6RAN0 FORKS, B. C.
Nothing Else is Aspirin—say "Bayer"
DON'T HESITATE!
PHONB 101R
FORFINE PRINTING
Warning! Unless you see name
"Bayer" on tablets, you are not cutting Aspirin at all. Why take chances?
Accept only an unbroken "Bayer"
package whioh contains directions
worked out by physicians during 21
years and proved safe by millions for
Colds, Headache, Earache, Tootaohe,
Neuralgia, Rheamitisin, Neuritis,
Lumbago, and Pain.  Made in Canada.
All druggists sell Bayer Tablets of
Aspirin in handy tin* boxes of 12 tablets, and in hottle* of 24a nd 100.
Aspirin is the trade mark (registered
in Canada) of Bayer Manufacture of
Monoaceticaoidester of Salicylicacid.
While it is well knowh that Aspirin
means Bayer mauufacture, to assist
the publio against imitations, the
Tablets ot Bayer Company will be
stamped with their general trade
mark, the "Bayer Cross."
City   Real Estate For
Sale
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the City, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Prices i--From $25.00 per lot upwards.
Termst—Cash and approved payments.
List of Lots and prices may be seen at the
City Office.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
City Clerk.
FORTHE SPRING GARDEN
AND LAWN
Rakes, Hoes, Spades, Shovels, Grass
Shears and Pruning Shears, Garden
Trowels and Forks. Wheel Barrows,
Lawn Mowers, Window Screen: and
Screens, Screen Doors, etc.
Highest Quality Paint and Varnish
MILLER & GARDNER
Complete Home Furnishers
IPS
In every centre of population in the
lower part of the province is a telephone
exchange and an organization of skilled
workers to facilitate commerce. Every
circuit must be tested; every inch of wire
watched and kept in repair; every switchboard operated day and night. Not only
that, but there is always new construction to meet the increasing needs of the
telephone-using public. Crews of linemen andcablemen, and installers of every
kind of telephone equipment carry on
this work as the province progresses.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
!
The Gentleman's Defense
Somtimes cl.iLir.jn eviu*.) a discun -
certing ability to close a conversation
and to avert rebuke or chastisrment.
Ih a school situated in ohs of the
suburbs there was a slight disturb
ance one day among the smaller
pupils...
A small boy had slapped a little
girl. The teacher was quick to rebuke
the youngster.
"Jackson " she said, "no gentle
man would strike a lady."
The boy replied, "Well, no lady
would tickle a gentleman."
AUTO LIVERY S£
Modern Rigs and Good
Horses at All Hours a'
the
Model Livery Barn
JM. fl. Burns, Prop.
Phone 68 Second Street THE   SUN.   GBAND   FORKS,   B.C.
INTERESTING    SCENES    FROM   MANY    PARTS   OF   THE    WORLD
-■
mt     ■
[ atrtauiTrtsYorc./tjf
(1) Winnipeg Carnival Queen and her bodyguard et
forty boyt aad girls, from tke C. P. R. General Ofl.ce,
Winnipeg, who were in constant attendance during the
Carnival. Hiss Hazel Tompkins, the Queen, is in the
centre.
(2) The Talalieator, which did good business with the
punters during -the Kempton Park Races, in England.
(8) Garden Party at Rangoon, India, ln honor ef the
Prinoe of Wales' -visit.
(4) Walter Damrosch, the world famous conductor
of the New York symphony orchestra, who was recently accorded a triumph on his reran from an extended European tour;
(5) The Prince of Wales inspecting Burmese **•
service men at Mandalay, India.
(6) Tke Prince of Wales inspecting Burmese Goi
Guides at Government House, Rangoon, India*
Fur Farming Supplements Nature's Efforts in
Filling the World's Demand for Pelts
I
iiiiiuijiiiiiiiiiMiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiMiiiitiiiiiiiniiii/HiiiiniiMii^iinH^iinnnM/iifnrrwiimmuiiuimiTWii^j
Prince Edward Island was the Mrth- I
Si-mat *tm   *l||j ■    \t*U
several breeders were engaged there
In the business of raising silver
black tones, but they guarded with
great secrecy their methods of
handling and breeding the foxes and
of marketing the pelts.   In 1910 the
4 LIKELY SUMCH OC SILVSK SLACK TOK PUPS SOU* AND RAISED IN CAPTIVITY
Conservation and propagation are
the slogan of those Interested in
the fur Industry of Canada. Without conservation, whioh means wise
laws for the protection of fur-
bearing animals and strict enforcement of these laws, these animals
would soon be exterminated. Even
with conservation of the best sort.
wild ssirs sis oaanot be protected
from starvation In bad years, nor
from > ths ravages Inflicted by
large- oantora, so man has turn,
ed to the domestic propagation of
many fur-bearers.
The fox bleeding Industry is, of
AN SXPENSIVS oouO.tr
POX AHD ERMINE WITS FROM MM I
raccoon, martin, fisher and skuakc
If they are provided with sufflcieai
Und on wbich they can live as in
their wild stste, snd are supplied
with food when ths weather or unusual conditions demand it, they
will thrive and multiply and yield
the farmer rich returns.
Each  yesr  sees  mors
meat end fabulous price* were paid
for breeding stock. Fox ranches are
to be found sH over Gonads to-day,
but Prince Edward Island continues
to leu. In 1016 (Hi province exported sboot 1,000 foxes of a value
Mflfmr Mw —
But ths fox does not monopolr*.-**
ourse. the biggest money producer, the mr farmers' efforts.   There nre
I'he   little   maritime   province   of in Canada ranches for the props/
nadfl ranches for ths propagA-
si   **********   wssm**,   ***-k.
Canadian farmers setting apart n
section of their holdings for the
raising of fur-bearing animals.
Where wild animals ars sana.it snd
used for foundation stock, the cost
of starting a fur ranch is very small.
To show the beauty of Canada's
furs a winter fashion show was carried out on Dufferin Terrace, Quebec, thia winter. Messrs. Holt,
Renfrew Co., furriers to H. M. the
King, co-operating with the Canadian Pacific Railway, displayed
hundreds of thousand* of dollara
in valuable garments. These were
shown to advantage on pretty
blondes snd brunettes before the
movie men and the visiter, st the
Ancient Capital. One coat alona
waa valued at 186,000. THE   SUN.   URAND   FORKS.   I. C.
i
1/
News of the Gity
C. M. Tobiessen returned from
Cedar cieek on Tuesday. Mr. To
bissseo was not very highly impressed with the new placer gold
fields. He says be saw some people
with nuggets there, but he thought
he saw the same nuggets in
Vancouver last winter. Tbe ground
haB all been staked, he says, but oo
work is being done on tbe claims,
not even on the discovery claims-
He thought tbat everybody were
holding their properties either for
the purpose of selling them or for
selling stock.
A. A. Frechette, of Trail, was ia
the city on Tuesd-Ty exploiting a
patent hook he bas invented. He
is torming a company for tbe manufacture of the same, and is disposing of 100 shares of stock at $100
per share, wbich he thinks will furnish sufficient capital to equip a factory and supply the necessary work «
ing capital. He intends to locate
tbe factory in this city. He will return to the city next Tuesday to
take the final steps in connection
with tbe incorporation of the company.
day he went up to the Rock Candy
iqine. It is reported that bis visit
to the city waB in connection with a
couple of small btidges on the North
Fork branch that require rebuilding.
The Norris Lumbnr & Box company shipped the first carload of
fruit boxes of tbe season to the
Okanagan tbis week. A carload
will be shipped to tbe Similkameen
next week.
W. T. Ross, who haB been seriously ill for about a month, has recov»
ered sufficiently to vacate tbe hospital. He went out to bis ranch last
night.
Today school books in the Qrand
Forks public school went into tbe
kiscard for the summer holidays.
The fall term will commence Sep..
tember 5.
James Copeland, of Rock Creek ,
one cf the oldest pioneers of the
Boundary, was a visitor in the city
on Tuesday,
D. D. McLaren, of Greenwood,
a pioneer of the Boundary, was in
in city Monday and Tuesday.
Vernon folks-like the city market
plan of shopping and showed tbeir
interest in tbe new undertaking by
turning out in large numbers brigh t
and early Saturday morning, says a
report from that town. The farmers
who were on hand quickly sold thei r
berries, eggs, and other groen stuff ,
but more farmers will have to be
on hand next Saturday, as the demand was mucb greater tban the
supply.
At Penticton last week, Judge J.
R. Brown dismissed tbe appeal of
the municipality of Penticton against
the decision of Magistrate T. A.
Pope in tbe Herbert Baker case.
Baker was oharged last October with
selling hard cider containing '4.75
per cent alcohol, contrary to the
government liquor act, but the magistrate dismissed tbe caBe.
Mrs. S, R. Almond has been confined to her home by illness this
week.
Fruits  and Vegetables
The time has now arrived for this season's
Fruits and Vegetables, and we havfe-an abundant supply. Try our Teas, Coffees and
Staple Groceries.   They are all Fresh.
THE CITY GROCERY
Phone 25 H. H. Henderson* Prop.
BIDE THEM. ON CLEVELAND
IT brinfp the whoje country for miles around within easy reach.
Have you seen the new models? They're as graceful as swallows! As
bright as new coin! As weatherproof as aduck? Automobile Steel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Real Quality. Real
Value. Easy Terms. We are tbe people to mount you right.*
J. R. MOOYROER 8EMiK«
Open Saturday Evenings Till 10 o'Cloek
Neil Matheson, who has been
the hospital for over a week, is
proving.
in
im-
Frank Hartinger left on Wednes*
day for a short visit to Haloyon.
FOREST FIRES
PRICES OF FRUIT
Superindent McCulloch, of the
Kettle Valley line, spent a couple of
days tn tbe city tbis week.   Yester
by burning tbe sapplings of to-day
destroys tbe forests of to-morrow
The following are tbe ruling prices
for fruit, as set by local growers,
f.o.b. Grand Forks:
Strawberries, 13.00 per crate. The
bulk of the strawberries are in now,
but thore will be some everbearing all
summer.
Early Richmond Cherries, 91.50
per 4-basket-crate.
Olivet and Montmorency Cherries,
$1.75 per 4-basket crate.
Royal Ann Cherries, $2.25 per 4»
basket orate,
Black Tartarian Cherries, 82.50
per -Inbasket crate,
Red Currants,' 12.50 per strawx
berry crate
Black Currants, $3.00 per straw*
berry crate.
PUT THEM OUT
$2.50 per 4-basket
strawberry
Gooseberries,
crate.
Raspberries, $3.25 per
crate.
Blackberries, $3.50 per strawberry
crate.
Peach Plums, $2.00 per 4 basket
crate.
Bradshaw   Plums,   $1.50   per 4*
basks) crate.
Plums, other varieties, £1.25 per
4»bas_]et crate.
Peaches, $1.25 per box. -
H "?W<1
-ejW-f
W THE PRESS
Prunes, $1.00 per box.
Pears—No. 1, $2.50; No. 2, $2 00:
No. 3, $1.60. *
Appples-No. 1, $2,00; No. 2,
$1.75; No. 3, 1.26.
Cherries, Ted currants and goose*
berriev will be ready about July 1st;
black currants, raspberries, peach
plums, peaches about July 15th;
pears, plums and apples about.August 1st.
An Arabian Proverb
He who knows and knows no
that he knows is asleep. Awaken
him.
He wbo knows not and knows
that he knows not is simple. Teaob
him.
He who knows not and knows not
that he knows not is a fool. Shun
him.
He who knows and knows that
he knows is wise. Follow him unto
the end.
m bj
Sixty-Four Pages
of Bargains
for the Western
Householder
This Sale book has juat been
mailed to all EATON customers
in the West.
We invite you to profit by theae
bargain offerings. If thu book
doea not reach your houae shortly
through the mail, write to ua for
a copy.
W« send it free on request.
•T. EATON Ctrnrx.
mm-ta c_ut»p»
IlL
MID-SUMMER SALE
-a CATALOGUE
m B o o k of B a rq a i n s"
TIMBER SAL! X4I85
Sf>4i5D.Ti'")BB8 V*1' *** ««lva<l by tke
Dlsttlet Forester, Nelson, nol later than
noon on tbe 7th day ol July. IBM. Iar tht
purchase of Uoenae X4185. near Christina
Lake, to eut WOO lineal feet of Cedar Poles.
One year will be allowed for removal of
timber.
Further pactiouler* of the District Fore-tar,
nelson, B.C.
Counter
CheckBooks
We have secured the
agency for Grand
Forks of a large
Western Publishing
House which manufactures a superior
grade of Counter..
Check Books—carbon back and carbon
leaf styles.
Prices Are Right
Encourage Western
enterprises and keep
Western money in
the West.
Any Quantity
from 100 up to 2500
books.
The Sun
Job Department
Our
'Hobby
is
Good
Printing
rpHE value of well-
printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means pf getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Bail programs
Business cards        " N
Virit'ng cards
Sh*p"ing tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads .
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
THE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.  ARMSON
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty*
s2U
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Yalk Hotel, First Stbbbt
Synopsis of
Land Act Amendments
Minimum price of ftrat-elaaa land
reduced to to u acre; seeond-alaa* to
11.60 an acre. -
Pre-emption now confined to -surveyed lands only.
. ********* ***"}>• ********** covering only
land suitable for agricultural purpoea*
and which la non-timber land.
Partnerehf
but partlaa i
ananse for adjacent pre-emptions
with Joint realdence, but each making
neceasaiy Improvementa oa respective
clalma. m
Pre-emptor* must occupy clalma tor
PJS T**f**'m make Improvementa to
value of |1S par acre, Including '
 _.  lm j     j^J-J
nerehlp pre-emption, abollahed,
i ol not more than four may
THE SUN
Colopsbia Arena* and
Lake Street
TELEPHONE
R101
Ing and cultivation i . .
b^ore receiving Crown Grant
.J: ..** t>**-**ap*'>* •» occupation emt
****..***** *,*•"*. and haa made proportionate Improvementa, he may. became ef til-health, or other cauae. be
E. F. LAWS
BEAL ESTATE
&
INSURANCE
.OFFICK WINNIPBQ AVBNUB
torrosrrs oiowiis sxc-UNas
PHONE 164
PACIFIC SHBBT MBTAL WORK*. LTD.,
VANOOUVIB
MKTAL
IRRIGATION
PIPES* and      FLUMES
B. F. laws:
sou W-rraiCT aosnt
PICTURES
srantod Intermediate certificate of ln»-
I'-nispiiit andjranafer hla claim.
Reeorda without permanent real-
*£!*__■W *• ********. provided applicant makee Improvementa to extent ot
WS par annum and reoord* aame eaeh
Ct. ffcllwro to muke Improvementa
reoord aame will operate aa forfeiture. Title cannot"STobtoiirtl,.
!?\__?2? * ******* ***a Improvementa
of SUM per acre, Including b acre*
•toared and cultivated. iSTroaldeoS
«* »* '«*Bt I yearn an required.
Pre-emptor holding Crow* grant
aar reoord another pre-.____iition.irhe
tS!Sn!L,^.*nJ0*^n*^^ti* ***
HJS "J4*0"* sMtial occupation, pro-
lS?"_!{5tutonr IraP'O'saionta made
l*^..***1?**** ************** *** Crown
granted land, a* *-"
_____EHbuS!^k *"?■•■■*-?* •"•"■Sinn *S
*xtJm**:- CfJ'**! *?***? ¥ homeiTtee;
2HS.5 b-»?,>t»1'»*«aftarSlillli-g residential and Improvement condition*.
.Hi V*^S. -»n*.toduatrial purpose,
area*   exceeding  S4S  acre*   maybe
'•SS    'ZJ!*   f******I*   SO"******
Mill, factory er induatrialaltae on
Umber land not exceeding ,0 acre*
™X* Py*"*: oondltton. IncM*
Payment of stumpage.
J,**& **££***<>** lnaeoaaa-bl*
«S!W^5s^'e?a^a
psi-iWTD__r   nn
^5Gf^^23ntv-
[SS \t*2? ^.*!"L*» ******* *t
w-^Thi. privily tamtam** tana tatrn i
ORANTS
< 1*14, oa amount <rf pfcruMaU.TS
or te-Mn <%%% ■otdiorw' •r**********axi*Vz!!m. ^^km
Itatmeat to Manh SXvST T^
SUS-PUBOHASBM OT CHOWN
ProvWen   aade   fer   Imimiii   **
Crown null to   t *1 inaih     ot
Own laada. aaqwliing Hghu fram
purelia-a-r* who failed ta complete
purohase Involving forfettwe, on ful-
flUment ef eondKlone ef pmUn, to-
tares* and taxea. Wbere eub-p«e_has-
era do not claim whole of original oar-
i"* 52Sf^ ****** **** ***** ******* may
OflAZINO.
Oraxing Act. ISIS, tor   i_   	
development of ltvaatock tndu'etry pro-
rl_?**^ !°f *7?ait** *****-***!** and range
administration   —•*—  '*—'—■
Annual erasing permit* taaaad
Snu'Smb™'a ***>****'*J**mWEr,
llshed    owner*.     btock-ownen    ,
form AwxHatlon* tor range management.   Free, er partial? fra^jwrSlU
for settlers, t  -        -*^
>o ten head.
estab-
may
*?&*£,?
up
AND PICTURE FRAMIN6
Furniture Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds,
Upholstering Neatly   Don
R. G. MoGDTCHBON
WIUWMAVH0I
NEW HARNESS SHOP
I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and 'do all kinds of repair
work. Shop equipped with
modern machinery*All work
guaranteed:
C, A. Crawford
N«s

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