BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Oct 27, 1922

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xgrandforks-1.0341069.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xgrandforks-1.0341069.json
JSON-LD: xgrandforks-1.0341069-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xgrandforks-1.0341069-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xgrandforks-1.0341069-rdf.json
Turtle: xgrandforks-1.0341069-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xgrandforks-1.0341069-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xgrandforks-1.0341069-source.json
Full Text
xgrandforks-1.0341069-fulltext.txt
Citation
xgrandforks-1.0341069.ris

Full Text

 GRAND FORKS ift
the center of Grand Forks valley, the
premier fruit growing district of
Southern British Columbia. Miniug
and lumbering are ning important
industries in districts contiguous to
the city.
1     Leuislati
Kettle Valley Orchardist
THF ^H"I\ '* tne favor'te news-
lllii IJULl paper of the citizens
of the district. It is read by more
people in the city and valley than any
other paper because it is fearless, reliable, clean, bright and entertaining.
It is always independent but never
neutral.
TWENTY-FIRST YEAR—No-»£-
OF
Donation of $25 Voted for
a Special Prize at the
Provincial Potato Fair
in This Gity
Mayor Hull and all the aldermen
were present at tbe regular meeting
of the city council on Monday
evening.
The session was mostly devoted
to rontioe business, only two or
tbree new subjects being brought
up.
A donation of $25 was voted for
a special prize at tbe provincial potato fair, wbicb is to be beld iu this
from November 27 to  December 2.
A letter was read from a citizen
expressing appreciation of the efficient manner in wbich the tbe
work bad been done at tbe cemetery during tbe past summer. The
council also expressed satisfaction
with tbe work done by the care
taker, and passed a resolution
recommending to tbe incoming
council that the work be continued
next year.
GRAND FORKS, B. C, FRIDAY,   OCTOBER 27, 1922
"Tell me what you Knew is trae:
I can guess ss well ss you."
1.00 PER YEAR
EGGS MUST BE
MARKED AS TO
PLAGE OF ORIGIN
Although Canada bas only a duty
of 3 cents per dozeu on eggs entering tbe province of British Columbia from tbs United States against
the Fordney tariff of 8 cents on Canadian eggs going into tbe United
States, new regulations are expected to belp in balancing tbe differ
ence.
Truck load   after    truckload    of
Washington eggs   enter  Vancouver
•every week for sale or for  storage.
The 3 cents duty means" practically
nothing to tbe vendors.
New egg marking and grading
regulations bave been enacted at
Ottawa which call for all eggs entering tbe country to be inspected and
certified to by proper egg inspectors
appointed by tbe Dominion government.
As the inspectors make their
headquarters in Vancouver and tbe
point at whicb tbe trucks enter
British Columbia from Washington
is thirty miles away, the truck
drivers will be forced to wait until
tbe inspectors travel tbat thirty
miles by automobile or train before
the eggs can be passed. Much of the
profit will be eaten up in waiting,
and poultrymen anticipate that it
will not be long before this competition will be eliminated.
W, H. Fairley, wbo is in charge
of this department of tbe Dominion
department of agriculture in Vancouver, staitM tbat it iB his intention
to prosecute firms tbat sell storage
eggs for fresh and to put into force
many new regulations under the act
which will revolutionize igg selling
in the coast city.
As an instance of the extreme to
which storage eggs are being* foisted
upon the public, Mr. Fairley stated
tbat he bad found one firm selling
stoiage e«gp as fresh In soldiers who
bave bem lying on tbeir backs in
the military hospital for years.
"If tbere is any place  fresh  eggs
abould be found it is in  tbe  hospi
tals," said Mr Fairley.
Foreign eggs will be marked for
eigil in tbe future and will also
carry tbe grade.
Cellar Wintering
In parts of Canada bees require protection from the wind
and cold during the winter
months. There are iwo meth
ods by which this protection
can be supplied—either by
packing the colonies in spe
eial outside wintering cases
or by placing them in cellar.
Although outside wintering
is gaining in popularity, cellar wintering will'give excellent results in. any part of
Canada where the conditions
in the cellar are such that
they will prevent the bees
from wearing themselves out
with too much activity; and is
advisable in the more northern localities where the winter
weather is usually very severe.
The cellar for bees, no mat.
ter whether it is built especially for the purpose or partitioned off from the cellar be
neath the beekeeper's residence, should be one that is
well insulated against the
variations of the outside temperature and can be maintained at a temperature of
about 48 deg. F. throughout
the winter. It should also be
dry in order that there is no
condensation of moisture at
any time and fitted so that it
can be ventilated when necessary.
Bees to be wintered in the
cellar will require less stores
than those wintered outside,
but these stores must be of|
the best, containing as little
indigestible matter as possible
or the bees may die of dysentery before the spring. Clover
honey or sugar syrup is the
best food for cellar wintered
bees. The bees should be
broughtinto the cellar immediately after the last good
cleansing flight, which is
usually about the first week
in November. It is far better
to put the bees in a week or
two before the last opportunity of a flight than to leave
them to the cold that is not
followed by a cleansing flight.
If the temperature is sufficiently low there will be no
need for closing the hive entrances when bringing them
in. The hives should be carried as carefully as possible,
with little disturbance to the
bees and they should be
placed on empty hive bodies
or other stands of similar size
in tiers of four high. The
covers ofthe hives need not
be removed. The entrances
should be left open full width
but if there is clanger from
mice getting into the hive the
entrance may be covered with
screening with {{-inch mesh.
No white light should be
used in the cellar. Dead bees
may be cleaned up from the
cellar floor at intervals, but
there must not be any disturbance to the colonies at
any time. If the cellar is properly constructed the bees will
require no further attention
during the winter.—C. B.
Gooderham, Dominion Apiarist. /
A Good Servant* But a Bad
Master"
John Barleycorn Is
Buried in Midocean
With Solemn Rites
London, Oct. 21.—Two days out
from New York John Barleycorn's
body was consigned to tbe waves by
the passengers of tbe United States
line steamship America after it bad
received wireless news of Attorney-
General Daugberty'e ruling and gone
dry.
The passengers who arrived ar
Plymouth today described tbe funeral, wbich followed all the traditions of the sea. The body was
brought on deck witb an empty
bottle in eacb hand. Eulogies were
delivered by the passengsrs. and by
the bartender, now out of a job.
Tbe body was then slid over the
side.
Funeral cards were printed on the
ship's press, reading.
"October 2, 1922. At 10:30 a.m.
today Jobn Barleycorn was ruthlessly murdered aboard this vessel.
May death be visited on tbe perpe»
tra,ors of tbis hideous crime."
THE PRAIRIE
FRUIT MARKET
Slight Advance in Price of
Macintoshes, But the
Market Is Still Featureless
Calgary, Oct. 25.—Weather conditions have been ideal during tbe
week. Business bas been slow. Potatoes selling from $16.50 to $20 per
ton Some very fine shipments
from Vauxball, Alta., command tbe
top price, and are big competitors
with British Columbia stock. The
butter trade bas a healthy tone at
present.  Alberta   made   cheese  is
APPALLING RECORD OF
CARELESS DRIVING
12,500 persons were killed and 300,000 persons were injured in
automobile accidents in the United States during the
year 1921, and yet this appalling total seems
likely to be exceeded in 1922.
Calgary Car Arrivals
From October 16 to 20
From British Columbia—Apples,
15; onions, 3; mixed vegetables, 7;
mixed fruit and vegetableB, 1; cabx
bage, 1.
From Alberta—Potatoes,?; mixed
vegetables, 1.
Imported—Grapes, 2.
In spite of the jnost extensive educational campaign against railroad
highway crossing accidents ever carried on, figures just compiled by the
Insurance Department of the Pennsylvania Railroad System show that
in June, July and August, of this
year, such casualties increased 30
per cent, as compared with last season.
The period covered embraces the
first three months of the National
Careful Crossing Campaign," in
which railroads of the Uuik'd Slates
have joined in efforts to make plain
the deplorable results of carelessness.
During the three months, on the
Pennsylvania System alone, there
were 107 crossing accidents, In which
71 persons were killed and IIS injured.
That this year's large increase in
these casualties is chargeable almost
entirety to growth in the reckless and
inexperienced driving of automobiles,
is shown by the fact that casualties
at.highway crossings from all other
causes combined decreased.
There were 85 automobile accidents
at Pennsylvania Railroad crossings
in the three months'in question. They
caused the death of 56 persons, and
injury to 107 others, or an average
of two personal casualties for each
accident. Twelve of the accidents resulted in 39 deaths; four caused the
death of 20 persons, or.an average
of five for each car Involved.
In two of the accidents, entire families were wiped out. That these lives
were sacrificed to pure recklessness
ii particularly emphasized by the fact
that In both instances the drivers of
the ears lived close to the scenes of
the accidents and were entirely familiar with the lay-out of the railroad
tracks and roads over which they
were driving.
The responsibility of automobile
drivers.for the safety of riders In
their cars ia n» teas than that of lo
comotive engincmen for the safety
of their train passengers. It is,
therefore, impressive to note that as
against the Hues lost in only three
months by careless driving of motor
cars over tracks, there were no passengers killed in train accidents anywhere on the Pennsylvania Railroad
System during the entire year ended
May 31st, last. In that period no
less than 1,400,000 passenger trains
were operated and 152,000,000 passengers carried safely.
The chief reason for tbis striking
contrast is that locomotive engine-
men are thoroughly trained in every
detail of their work, and are required
to demonstrate knowledge and ability
to operate trains safely before being
entrusted with  their handling.*;
On the other hand, analysis of tbe
causes of crossing accidents shows
that the vast majority of motor car
casualties at' railroad highway crossings are attributable to a comparatively small percentage of inexperienced and irresponsible automobile
drivers who have neither the knowledge training or judgment required
for the safe operation of such machines. The result is often failure to
exercise even the most ordinary precautions necessary for the protection
of life when approaching or driving
over railroad tracks.
Moreover, reckless driving of au
tomobiles Is not confined to highway
crossings. This is shown by the
daily reports in the newspapers of
accidents caused by driving atttomo
biles into telegraph poles, or stone
walls and by skidding, sideswipjng.
turning over and colliding. From this
running chronicle of death and injury, the conclusion would seem war
ranted that what is needed at the
present time is not merely a Careful
Crossing Campaign to concentrate
ittcntion on crossing accidents alone,
but a national campaign i carefully
planned and directed against ail
forms oi careless automobile driving
finding a ready market.   Kresb eggs
are  "scarce   and   prices bigb.'   The
apple market is featureless.
Calgary wholesale prices:
Apples—Mcintosh Red, No.  1,
$2.00 to $2.25
Crates .'   1.40
Greenings, No. 1  2.00
Wagner and Jonathan, crates 1.40
Crabapples, Hyslop, per box ... 1.00
Grapes, Tokay, per case, $4 to.. 4,25
Grapes, Ontario, per basket 65
Tomatoes, local HU., per lb 20
Tomatoes, green, per pear case..    .75
Tomatoes, ripe, 65c to 90
Sweet ptatoes, per lb     .06
Celery, B.C, pel lb. 04
Cabbage, Danish   Ballhead, lb.. .02J
Citron, pumpkin and squash, Ib.  .02
Potatoes, B.C., per lb  014;
Lettuce, onions and radish' doz. ,0\\
Onions, per ton, $37 to 40.00
Local carrots, beets and turuips,
per lb ^ 02
Green corn, dozen 40
B. C. Pears, D'Anjou, No. 1... 3.75
Dutchess   2.75
Howell     2.75
Washington,D' Anjou,C grade 3 00
Washington,A' Anj'ou, No 2.  2.75
Cauliflower, local, doz    1.20
Cuulittower, pej doz    1.00
Vegetable marrow, per lb 02
Provincial
Potato Fair
The second annual provincial potato fair will be held in
Grand Forks from November
27 to December 2.
On account ofthe deep interest shown in the first annual potato fair held last year
in Chilliwack the department
has decided to give prizes for
table stock, as weil as for seed
potatoes this year.
It is hoped that the various
agricultural organizations and
all ethers interested will co-
operate with the department
to the fullest extent and help
make this fair a success. A
series of lectures on the potato industry will also bt*
given at the same time.
The Publisher's Responsi -
bility
More and more difficult every day
is the choice of good reading—tbe
kind tbat nourishes the young and
refreshes the old. One way to
avoid mistakes is to choose tbe book
or periodical tbat stands for something—that is not everlastingly supplying tbe sensational and silly. Tbe
Youth's Companion has always
been published by men who felt a
keen responsibility to tbeir readers,
and tbey have held steadfast to ono
purpose: to familiarize Companion
readers with the best things in the
world, and by means of original articles and stories to illusrrate tlie
truth that the practice of the old,
homely virtues brings the greatest
satisfaction in lite. Try it for a year
and see.
The 52 issues of 11)23 will be
crowded with serial stories, short
stories, editorials, poetry, facts and
fun. Subscribe now and reieive:
1. The   Youth's   Companion — 52
issues fn 1923.
2. All tbe remaining issues nl 1922.
3. The Companion Home  Calendar
for 1922.
All for $2.50.
4. Or   include  McCall's  Magazine,
tbe monthly authority on fash
ions.   Both   publications,   only
$3.00.
the Youth's   Companion,   Com-
nnnwealth  Ave.   and  St..Paul St,
llostan,   Mass.     Subscriptions    received at this office.
Bridesville Crime Supposed to Have Been
Committed by Persons
Engaged in Contraband
Liquor Traffic
The coroner's inquest over tbe
remains of Wm. C. Patterson, prox
prietor of tbe hotel at Bridesville,
who was found dead withabu:let
hole through bis bead at his place
of business Friday morning, wag
held by Coroner Kingston at the
at tbe scene of tbe tragedy on Friday. Tho jury returned a verdict
tbat "deceased came to bis death
from a bullet wound in bis bead,
inflicted by some unknown person'"   .
Up to the present time no clue to
the perpetrator of the crime lias
been discovered, although it is sups-
posed to have been committed by
some party or parties engaged in
}be illegal liquor traffic.
Tbe funeral of the late Mr. Patterson waB held in this city on Sunday afternoon, and it was largely
attended, as deceased wae an old*
timer of the district und was well
tnought of.
Deceased is survived by his v. ife
and live small children.
The Youth's Companion
Home Calendar for 1923
The publishers of Youth's Cmn»
paiiion are sending to every mb-
scriber wbo has paid $2.50 .for ihe
52 issues of 1923 a calendar of tbe
new year. The tablets are printed
in red and dark blue, and eacb tabu
let, besides giving the days of ibe
current month in bold, legible type,
gives tbe calendar of tbe preced ing
and succeeding month in smaller
type in tbe margin The Companion
Calendar bas been published in
standard form for many years ami iB
eagerly sought for because of its
noveity and convenience.
Hobert Lawson is still on prairie
disposing of bis fruit crop. It is reported that be is meeting with considerable success, as about sixteen
carloads have already beea shipped
THE WEATHER.
Tbe following is the minimum
and maximum temperature for each
day during the past v\eek, as recorded by the government thermometer on E. F. Law's ranch:
Max. Min.
Oct.   20—Friday    70 44
21-Saturday   66 38
22- Sunday   70 49
23—Monday  54 37
24-Tuesday  52 40
25 -Wednesday.. 03 48
26 Thursday  60 52
Inches
Rainfall   0.21
Brewery Firm
Is Handed
$1000 Fine
Penticton, Oct. 21.- A fine ol
$1000 was imposed on tbe Van*
couver Breweries by Magistrate Pope
in tbe police court last week on a
charge of failing to label bottles of
be?r shipped to the government
liquor store at penticton. It is u-n-
derstood tbat an appeal will be enn
tered by the company or a Bt>il<d
case brought before tbe supreme
court.
Some men are born great, some
acqnire greatness and others put up
a successful bluff
Nothing is as  high
high cost of loafing,
as  tl
i j THE   SUN,   GEAND   FORKS,   B. C.
Ufa (Srani Stork* §««
AN  INDEPENDENT   NEWSPAPER
G. A. EVANS, EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) $1.00
One Year (in the United States)     1.50
Addresr • -" ~-——Nations to
-Tuk Guand Forks Sun
Piionk 101R Grand Forks, B. C^
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1922
The perverted ideal of success, that of attempting to get something for nothing, is at
the bottom of the social ills of the day. We
see a world gone monej mad, a universe
trampling under foot the law of social justice
that every man must get what he earns and
earn what he gets, and setting up in its stead
the old liurn.in gods of selfishness, greed, dishonesty and the unleashing of predatory instincts. Against these anti social influences
must be .placed bhe bulwark of the public
school, backed by all the power of the school
teachers, with their still untarnished ideals of
citizenship. If we mutely acquiesce in the
continuance and perpetuation of these causes
we are permitting a breakdown in our moral
standards. We are sitting idly by while a new
standard of morality is being adopted, a standard paralyzing to all our past ideals of civilization. We shall soon find that the common
practice of graft and getting something for
nothing will break down the morale of even
the teaching body and that an increasing
number of teachers will lose their faith in the
high ideals of honesty and justice.
for special reasons,   The soldier has given,
shortened or incapacitated his life in service
to his country, in defense of its institutions, in
preservation of the government itself  All material prosperity depends  upon this service
rendered. All  material  wealth, therefore,  is
obligated to that service, and if it took it all
to compensate, to provide for the care, decent
contentment and restoration of the soldier or
his dependents, left so by reason of his service,
there is no reason why it should not be contributed. Every consideration, religious, econ •
omic and patriotic, dictates the necessity of
adequate provision for and education of the
dependent or orphaned child of the   soldier.
This care and education should include the
manual and professional life of a child for usefulness in life as  well as scholastic and  religious training.
Colorado adds to the problems of many sister states distance and isolation. Nearly  one-
half of the state is still  unpopulated. Color
ado's 20,000  club women  are joining hands
across magnificent distances and incompatible
living conditions in serv:ce.   Out on the eastern plains they are planting i.iees; in the southern coal camps they are teaching eooking and
lowing; all over the state they are establishing
libraries and child welfare canters, supporting
c'.fl movement for'consolidated rural schools
a id statewide observance of "citizenship day,"
agisting in the catnpaiga agtinst tubarculosis
a i J for tb.3 >T s ir E ir. t'jli if; ■> ipp >rtin*  0 )!•
o.-ido products and laoouragiag Colorado fine
i'v.3. Tqey hive helped mire tli in three  hun-
l'")d girls to complete their elmttions.   The
v imoii of Colorado ara striving to  promote a
ii ;hteous civilization in all tin details of life,
v ,h its by-product of peace; to cultivate sine
i*.  izeuship by informing themselves upon the
is iues of the day, knowing if they would life
otiers they must stand upon higher ground;
if   they  would  lead they  must  walk ahead.
T ioy  acknowledge  their    responsibility   foi1
spiritual leadership, as well as  material   progress.; they believe that the highest mission of
the womanhood of the world today is to combat the growing materialism and  unrest with
faith and spiritual awareness.
BE CAREFUL.
You can't come out on top by keeping under cover.
Self-satisfaction is a treacherous chair
three cracked legs.
with
The optimist sees a better world through
all the smoke; the pessimist only notes the
destructioh of the flames.
Ideas are like pins; they should be picked
up wherever seen and put to some practical
use if there is any pointjto them.
Someone has said that a standpatter in any
business is a man that you cant't start. And a
progressive merchant is one you can't stop.
The man who looks for a long period of depression is quite as foolish as the one who
thought that war profits would last for   ever.
A postage   stamp can be liked once, bu t
after that it delivers the goods.
The real basis of power of a nation is its
u icrgy resources rather than its mau pow er
strength. The modern way to use the energy
of a man i.s to employ it in a way similar to
tne little detonator of the big explosive shel 1;
the little charge sets oil'the big one and does
an amount of work far in excess of its own
cipacity. The energy output of an average
workman is about a tenth of a horsepower.
The energy expended by a coal miner in an
eight hour day thus amounts to that available
from two pounds of coal. A miner who gets
out 1400 tons of coal a day thus multiplies his
energy by 700. It i.s something like planting
one grain of wheat and having 700 grow from
it. Another miner gets out 8800 tons of coal
in a day, and so multiplies his energy of 4-100.
The power minerals, coal, petroleum, and
water power, are therefore the real sources of
strength in an industrial civilization.
"Let's Get Together and Elect  Misers,
Sour-balls,Grouches and Tightwads''
Just now everyone is complaining about
high taxes. The real fault behind the unholy
burden of taxes is that we have elected  to
office good fellows, handshakers, name rememberers, baby kissers, spenders, good-natured
drunkards, heroes, relatives of relatives, orators, lawyers and prominent citizens.   Yet we
need stingy, successful business in public  life,
men who would be just as close with public
money as they are .with their own, and men
who would get a dollar and ten cents of worth
for every dollar of public money spent. There
are hundreds of such men who wouldn't  bear
to spend your money or my money recklessly
because their mind is developed that may, in -
stead of being warped to squander money be -
cause it is money.    We are now paying for
the orgies of friendly, neighborly and criminal
graft the handshakers,   good   fellows,   have
slipped us for years. Let's  get together   and
elect misers, sour-balls, grouches   and   tight -
wads, who havo made money for themselves,
lived within their incomes; men who wouldn 't
lend you a dime without a dollar security and
bonus. The remedy is easy; never vote for the
good fellows, lodge brothers, smilers, spenders
or orators, but for the miserly cuss you dislike because he wouldn't loan his money or
someone else's money to you or your sister's
husband, or uncle or best friend,  without
tlieir right arm  for security.—T.  W. Ross,
Somewhere in B. C.
Your Heart's Desire
In the way of Jewelry can be easily
satisfied if you come here. We carry
an up to-dnto stock of the most popular novelties aud the newest and
most artistic designs in
Fine .Jewelry
Come  in  and  see our display and
make selections.
Our prices are always moderate.
J. C. TAYLOR
Jeweller and Opt ieiiui
Bridfte Street Grand Forks
E.G. Henniger Go.
Grain, Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cement and Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks, B.C.
IS. T. HULL
Established 1910
Real Estate and Insurance
Resident Agent Grnnd forks Townsite
Company, Limiteil
Save Foresl Revenue to Develop B.C
Farms     Orchards     City Property
Agents at Nelsou, Calgary, Winnipeg And
other Prairie points. Vanoouver Agents:
PKNDKU INVESTMENTS
llA'CTHNBUKY LANDS LTD.
Bstabllshed in 1910. wo are in a position to
furnish reliable Information eotioorniug (his
district.
Write Ior free literature
GRAND FORKS
Transfer Company
Si DAVIS 8 HANSEN, Props
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Coal,  Wood and   Ice
for Sale
The ch Id life is the chief and most important asset. The duty of the state and the
government to dependent child life is supreme
from an economic standpoint were all decent
and humane considerations forgotten. To the
dependent or orphaned child of a soldier the
state and the government owes that duty for
cAncient History
Items Taken From The Qrand Forks Sun for the Corresponding
' Weak Twenty Years Ago
Work on tlie power spur of the Great Northern in be«
ing rushed and will be completed in two weeks.
T. Alfred Kennion, the mining and real estate agent
started this morning on his long journey to Orizaba
Mexico, at which point he has secured a good position
with the Vera Cruz y Pacifico railway.
Petor Donaldson mado a^ successful hunting trip to
Smelter lake Wednesday, bringing home three ducks for
his Thanksgiving dinner.
Money makes the maoe go, but horses make the money
fly. Ask some of the Grand-Forks visitors to the Spokane
Fair.
Mayor McCallum and Charles Cnmmiugs loft Sunday
morning over the V. V. or E. for Ottawa as dcle-ates
from Columbia and Grand Forki to attend the meeting of
the railway committee of the privy council on the 28th,
when the injunction Cases restraining the V. V. & E.
from crossing the Kettle Valley and Columbia & Western
tracks will come up for consideration.
Office at  R.  F.  Petrie's Store
Phone 64
C.V. Meggitt
Real Batiste and Insurance
OUCUAUDS.  FABM   LANDS   AND CITY
PKOPKHTY
Excellent futilities for selling; your farms
We have stents at all (Joust and Prairie
Points
WH CAIIKY AUTOMOBILK INSUKANCK.
KHALI!It IN POLKS, POSTS ANO TIBS,
AND FARM PRODUCE
Keltublo Information rcnrar.liiii! this distrct
cheerfully furnished. We solicit your inquiries.
K. SCHEER
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONIST
Dealer in
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery
City   Real Estate For
Sale
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by thc City, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Prices:—From $25.00 per lot upwards.
Terms:—Cash and approved payments.
List of Lots and prices may be seen at the
City Office.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
City Clerk.
FORTHE SPRIN6 GARDEN
■ AND LAWN
Rakes, Hoes, Spades, Shovels, Grass
Shears and Pruning Shears, Garden
Trowels and Forks. Wheel Harrows,
Lawn Mowers, Window Screen and
Screens, Screen Doors, etc.
Highest Quality Paint and Varnish
MILLER & GARDNER
Complete Home Furnishers
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Forks, B. C.
A friend told the other day how ho almost lost a good norse. The girl was
excellent in her position, but when she
unswored the telephone she spoke into it
as if she was standing on the back step
shouting across lots. It was pointed
out *.o her that the telephone was a very
responsive instrument and all that was
necessary was to speak in an ordinary
tone of voice.
"I guess I know how to answer the
telephone," she replied with a little heat.
And it took a couple of honrs to pacify
her.
How do you answer the telephone?
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
Tell The People
What   You    Have
to Sell THE   SUN,   GRAND   FORKS,   B.C.
NATION BUILDING IN CANADA
Universities to Follow the Railroad in Binding East and West Together
For the Cause of National Unity
Hand in hand with the material growth of Canada, with the
extension of her population, and
tbe development of her natural
resources,   moves forward  the
current of her intellectual and
spiritual life.   The race of men
and women whose adventurous
spirit and indomitable courage
are making a  nation, are not
tbe kind that are content with
tbe merely material things of life
Canada's   pioneers  of a little
while ago were young men who
saw visions, snd old men who
dreamed dreams, and their sons
and daughters are no less gifted.
Their'broadening horizon now
includes a new world of mental
•.odaDirit ual effort in which tbey.
in turn, must be pioneers. The
realization of this fact has become a living force in the fine
universities that are already
doing a great work at Winnipeg,
Edmonton, and Saskatoon and
Vancouver.
In the making of the Canadian
nation so far, avenues of transport and communication have
worked towards completion of
the structure the foundation
stone of which was the Act of
Dominion Federation. Canada's
national unity is founded and
fostered by the political and
physical links that bind east
and west, but it can be fully
developed only when tbe avenues
of Canadian thought move east
and west as do those of trade.
This is the thought that lies
behind the recent donation by
the C.P.R. of three annual
scholarships of the value of $500
each to Toronto University for
the purpose of inducing graduates of Western- Colleges to
complete their studies at that
great Canadian centre of learning.
The universities of Western
Canada are growing fast. Their
standard of instruction is high
and an ever growing number of
their students desire to pursue
post graduate studies beyond
the staee now possible at tbeir
provincial institutions. Through
these scholarships a constant
stream of the brightest and most
ambitious of western university
students will be enabled to spend
some time in Eastern Canada,
and thus become familiar with
methods of life and thought
there. As stated by Mr. E. W.
Beatty, President of the Canadian Pacific Railway, in his lettei
to Sir Robert Falconer, President of Toronto University,
announcing the granting of the
three scholarships. " The movement is one that will obviously
be of benefit, not only to tlu
students, but also to the communities in which they wil'
afterwards live"
B. C. Veterans Weekly  Football  Competition
M0,000 H^^H IN PRIZES
FIRST .PRIZE $5,000
SECOND PRIZE $3,000
THIRD PRIZE $2,000
INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILtlNG IN COUPONS
You simply imlicate whether tlio HOME TEAM will score MORE, LESS, or tlieSAME NUMBER of Goals tlmn they scored in the corresponding game of last year, by placing an "X" in the column provided in coupon. 25c entitles the subscriber to five weeks'subscription to the B. C.
VETERANS WEEKLY and one coupon; SOc entitles the subscriber to ten weeks' subription and two coupons;'j75c entitles the subscriber to fiftoen
weeks' subscription and three coupons; $1 entitles the subscriber to twenty five weeks' subscription  and five coupons.
(NOTICE—You will note that Si subscription entitles you to five additional
woftks' subription an doneextra coupon). There is no limit to the length of subscription and number of coupons whicli mny be sent in by any one person in one  week.
GAMES TO BE PLAYED NOVEMBER 1th
Competition No. 1 Closes Friday Midnight, November 3rd,
at thc oflice of the
B. C. VETERANS WEEKLY LIMITED
P.O. Drawer !KW, Carter-Cotton   lluiljiiiii. Corner llis.sliii£s iinnl Gamble Sis.
VANCUVEK, B. C.
COUPOM MUST BE OUI ALONG BOBDEB
fSSS** No. 4        FOOTBALL COMPETITION
a, o. vHraatANs weekly wo.
GAMES TO UK PLAYED SATURDAY, NOVEMBER -ith,  1922
Competition Closes 12 o'clock Mid night Friday, Nov. 3rd Mall Coupons to P. O. Drawer 938, Vancouver, B. C.
I sntsr ths B. O. Veterans Weekly Football Competition aad agree to abide by the rules as published In the B. 0. Veterans Weekly, and to accept tho Auditor's
decision as flnal and legally binding in all matters concerning this competition, and enter on that understanding. Twenty-live cents enclosed for five weeka' subscription entitle! competitor to one estimate; 60c ten weeka and two estimates; 76c fifteen weeka and throe estimates;   li.uu  twenty weeka and five estimates.
MOTE—Mark with Z In column provided whether you think tha HOME team will aeon MODE, LESS  or tbe SAME number of goal! aa In the corresponding
laat season.
SAME..
HOME ISAM
Mst
Tear's
 Scors
EVERTON
PRESTON N. E.
WESTBR0MWICHA.2
MIDDLESBOBO
NEWCASTLE U.
2
NOTTS COUNTY       2
WEDNESDAY
EXETER CITY
NEWPORT COUNTY 2
PLYMOUTH AROYLE 1
STALYBRIPGE 0.      2
WREXHAM
CLYDE
DUNDEE
SLASOOW RANGERS 2
Away Team
 East
Yost's
Score
M~is MOKE.
L it LESS.
ADDRESS..
S ls SAME.
ARSENAL
CHELSEA
MANCHESTER OITY 0
SHEFFIELD   V.
SUNDERLAND
BLACKPOOL
CRYSTAL PALACE   0
NORWICH   CITY
LUTON   TOWN
BRISTOL  ROVERS   0
ASHINGTON
DARLINGTON
GLASGOW  CELTIC  1
A1RDRIEONIAN8
PARTICK THISTLE 8
Coupon No. 1
MLS
Coupon Mo. S
MLS
t
1
1
1
1
1
.
1
!
Coupon Wo. 3
MLS
riCsUOS after eacb team denote laat season's aeen.
Coupon Mo. 4
MLS
Coupon Xo. S
ML!
(Copyright applied  lor)
Battleships
Are Not the
Only Things
Being
Scrapped
These Days
0 Lots of other things
were scrapped before
the Washington Conference became even
a possibility—old prejudices—old grudges
—old methods of diplomacy had to be
discarded before it
was possible to ask
for bids from the junk
man for a few billion
dollars worth of "war
L
•*•*
canoes,
d If   you  are  to  make
the    most    of     your
opportunities selling
Merchandise,  it will
pay you to take stock
of your   methods  of
doing   business   and
scrap  ruthlessly   the
old systems or prejudices that new conditions   have  rendered
obsolete.    And above
all  court  publicity-
secret diplomacy is as
bad for your business
as it is for the business of running a nation—
Advertise THE   SUN.   GRAND   FORKS,   B. C.
PHONE 101R
FOR FINE PRINTING
The work nf draining Smelter lake
was commenced yesterday by a
start being made in taking out tbe
Granby dam. An engineer from
Auyox is in charge of tbe work.
City Electrician  Meakes  has  returned from his vacation trip.-
WATER NOTICE
News of the Gity
E. (J. Henniger, M.P.P., left on
Tuesday night for ihe coast, where
he will attend a few caucuses before
the opening of the provincial parliament on the last of this month,
Mrs. Henniger accompanied him.
The children will will make their
home with Mr. and Mis. P. J.
Miller during tbeir parents absence.
W. J. Hadden, of New Denver,
and Miss Gwendolyn Williams, of
Rock Creek, were married at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Griffith,
Winnipeg avenue, in thi« city on
Tuesday evening, llev. Hillis Wright
performing the ceremony. The
couple will make their home in
New Deliver.
APPLICATION for a I k'l'iioo to  take   und
use Water will   be   made   under    the
"Wator Act" of British Columbia, as follow
1. Tliu name of the applicant Is, *it uii'l Kurks
Irrigation District'
2. Tho ul'Irt'sH of thc applicant lsliruml
Corks, 11. C.
3. The name of the stream in Kettle Kiver.
I'he stream lias lis source betweon Okanagan
aii'l Lower Arrow I,alien, down In a -Mitflliern
direction antl empties, into Columbia River
ahout Marsmg. U.S. A. .approximately :ll, miles
South-east of (irunil Forks, 11. 0.
4. The water is to be pumped from the
strum un thusouth Hide itl»"ut l1, miles South
oast from Urand Forks. II.C,in north-east
corner Lot 531. ■
5. Kile purpose for which the water will lie
used is irrigation.
It. Tlie laud on which the water In to lie
used is dosorlbed as follows: District Lot 1.-2
anil luucres in North-east oorner Lot 534.
7. Tlio quantity of water applied for ls as
follows: -2111 acre feet.
8. This notice was posted ou tho ground on
tho 12th dav of October. 1922.
9. A Copy of this nol ieo anil an application
pursuant thereto and to lhe requirements of
the "Water Act" will be Hied at the office of
the Wator Recorder at Grand Forks, It. C.
Objections mny bo filed with tho said Water
Recorder, or with tho Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, H. C.
GRAND FORKS 1RKIGAT10N DISTRICT.   '
Applicant.
By 1). A. Giuham, Agent.
WATER NOTICE
DON'T FORGET TO ASK FOR YOUR COUPON
We give coupons ou Silverware
with all cash sales or   thirty
day cash sales.   Don't forget to
ask for yours.   Call and see the
Silverware.
THE CITY GROCERY
II. II. HENDERSON
PBOPBIBTOB
LiWBIMlW
Phone 25
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Werner, of
Spok ne, are visitors at tbe home
of Mr. Werner's mother, Mre. E.
Bailey.
Specials
For Saturday Only
As tbe result of being defeated in
baseball game, the K. of P. lodge
entertained the Oddfellows at a very
pleasant   dinner   in the Davis hall
last nigbt.
Pure Fruit Jams
Strawberry, Raspbsrry and
Loganberry. ff j AA
4-lbtins  JM.VU
TIMBER SALE X3575
SK'^KD TENDBKS will be received hy the
Distrlot forester, Nelson, not later than
noon the 80th day of Ootober, MB. for the
l,'",;c,ha»e ?' Licence X8SM, „ear Pile, to eut
21X10 Hewn lies and 10,000 lineal  feet of Pols.
One year will be allowed for removal o
timber,
Further particulars of the Distrlot  Fores-
sr. Nelson, B. C.
C. W, Clark left on Tuesday even
ing for a business trip to hia old
home in Killaruey, Man. lie took
along with him a. carload of apples
to give away to Imh friends or to
dispose of in lbe public market.
Four members of tbe American
dry squad were in tbe city yester*
day investigating the liquor situation.
APPLICATION for a Licence to take and use
Wator  will bo made   under the "Water
Act" of British Columbia, ss follows:
1. The name of the applicant ls Grand Forks
Irrigation District.
2. The aduress of tho applicant la Gran
Forks, B.C.
8. Thc nnme of the body of water Is Huokle'
Slough, In ClsirictLot S'.ll. (irand Forks.
4. The water is to bu pumped from the
Slough ou thu south side, about Y, mile from
Grand Folks.
5. Tho purpose for wbich tho water will be
used is irrigation.
li. The laud on which the water ls to bc used
Is deserihed as follows: Northern porflon of
District Lot 5B4.
7. Theqiiantlty of water applied for is as
follows: su acre feet.
H. Tills notice was posted on thc ground on
tho 12th day of October, 1922.
9. A copy of tills notice and un application
pursuant thereto and to the requirements uf
the"Water Act" will he filed fn the office of
tbe Wntsr Recorder at (irand Forks. B.|C.
Objections may he filed with the said Wator
Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water
Bights. Parliament buildings, Viotorla, B, 0,
GRAND FORKS IRRIGATION DISTRICT,
Applicant.
By D. A. Giuham. Agent.
String Beans
Per tin	
15c
TIMBER SALE X4481
SKALKD TENDERS will be received by tbe
Distrlot Forester, Nelson, not later than
nuon on lthe 80th day October, 1922, for tbe
purchase of Licence X4481, near Lynch
Croek, to out 200,000 board feet of Sawlogs
and 1500 Hewn Ties.
One year will be allowed for removal of
timher.
Further particulars of the Distrlot Forester
Nelson, B.C.
Christie's Tin Sodas
Special Price for       ffb
Saturday only OUC
Christie's or Mc-
Cormick's   Sodas.      OC
In cartons       delC
Donaldson's
Phone 30
The Silk Worm and His. Productl
Wkm*
rv*-j*?:'-'*W^WmW Weaving lho .silk is<a Gome j Hndustty in Japan.,
**«,■• .v-   Tl
■ <<*■■¥■
wmm
HI Unwinding tfi&>silk.
• . 'i    .":! from Inecycoon.
, j   -y-^. ■ Jfiewaler is kepi
JS f        hoi! -;/a charcoal
Canadian. RicjfTc. Steams Errsrye*! erf r^utrW.
JAi*AN hun u monopoly nl' llio silk
industry of the Orient. Tlio Jap
anosc lipvc aohiovod t-iiis triumph it*
the result of uu oarly appreciation oi
thc value of organisation and slim
dardixing, and by reason of thoir skill
in perfecting ;i raw silk adapted tn
high [lower Ajnorican machinos, sill.
is  t.ho  chief   rapanoso  export.
The silk  worm  therefore is the Bpi
eial   pet  and   pride    of   the  Japanosi
people, nml nil thought tyid caro is de
voted   to   making   his    surrounding*
such a* will rondure to his comfort)
health,  and   happiness.     This   iH   no
slight tank.    At leant  4,000 yours ol
breeding for silk nlone has told on hb
probably once robust constitution; uie
tho silk worm is now a temperamental
little   fellow,  subject   to   dovastnlini
•ipUlcinicB ttn<l greatly  influenced b\
atmospheric changes of an unfrienill;.
nature. ©Tt  is only  fair to say, how
ever, thnt while  with  tis he devote
his  little   mind   entirely   to   busmosi
and wastes nol   one  uf Ilie compare
tively   fow  moments  grunted him  it!
this life.    He  comes   into   the  worl<!
as  a  tiny  pink   egg   accompanied  le
five or Rix hundred brothers and sis
ters, and for a few days rests in the
dark   of  small    trays    covered    with
paper in whieh  liny "holes arc made
On omorging from  (he ee;r; his atten
tion is attracted by  Hie bright Hghl
of theso pin-holes,    lie climbs up  I'
enquire what fhey mean, and working
his way through  them   finds himself
betrayod into a world of toil and trou
ble, as many a humnn being has been
and will coatinue  to bo aa long   as
bright lights glow.
The only thing he brings with hiu
is a first elans appetite, and the mul
berry he loves must be chosen with
tender enre in order lo work up his
strength to the tnsk of productiuji n
fine strand of silk. Tor about n
•xmth he jjgvntoo his court- attention
to meals, which amount to a practically eonlintiotis performance, with tho
exception of (jkreu or four short
jieriods during whiujjl ho changes his
skin lo one thai more comfortably
conforms to his fnal increasing bulk.
\i those limes cure is taken to keep
Ui in trim disturbing noisos, although
modern writers on Ihe subject do not
-late thai he is inspired to greater
iifforl by music served with his meals.
If nol, it is porhavi.. because Oriental
music would more favor distraction
than the contemplative calm most
conducive to tho s'ik worm's task of
: lilting on weight. t
Having   become    ;i   full grown   silk
orni, he sets about the serious busi
eess of life, thp I'nnning   of the eo
oon and eight to wolvo hundred eon
Millions yards of rilken ihrend. This
lakes three or foe. days, and in most
'•uses, his life shoilly aflerwards ends
in hot wafer, as mighl bc expected of
me so oarly showing a predilection
for bright lights. The hot water enables the silk fan.ier to easily unwind
lho cocoon into a skein of glossy
golden colored, re •■/ silk all ready for
ho mills.
A few of hii relations arc picked
nut to curry on Iho gi>od work, but
even for these lil'o has few joys, tt
is a long sleep of soveral months, an
emerging from th • cocoon as a winged
10th that cannot fly, nnd the immedi
•ito sotting about lhe business of lay
ing another five or six hundred tiny
eggs. When that supreme (ask Is completed the little life goes out, probably tired of a world in which most of
the fun has to be got out of eating.
But the silk it leaves lives on, an
its first few weeks of life are swift.
There are n dozen processes of wind
ing, Washing, weaving nnd polorin*
through which it must go. andlfrthi
less time that those processes take
the better.   A train load of silk rejvre-
osnts u tjrcat amount of money. Tke
interest on its value, and the premiums on its insurance total np tre
uiendously. That is why overy effort
is made to get tho finished product
into the dealors' hands at the eariml
possible moment.
A record iu the trans-shipment oi
■ilk from Japan to New York was ro
eeatly made by tho C.P.B. On Aprii
-9, tho Canadian Pacific steamer
"Empress of Bussla," loft Yokohama
■limine, in hor cargo il,UO0 boles of
silk for New York. Two minute*
Inter the "Buy State," another Paei
fie liaor, left a near-by dock with
1,600 bales of silk bound for tto
same destination. It was a raee across
lhe Pacific Ocean and tho American
continent, nnd silk and shipping men
of two continents watched for tho re
suit. On arrival at Vancouvor thc
''Empress of Russia"silk was placed
on a special train, which wns ordered
(o make all possiblo spcodCto New
York. The silk was delivered there
at 5.20 p.m., May 12, while thc cargo
■ f the R.S. "Bay State" was de
livered 7.30 a.m., May 15, the Oana
dian Pacific through time from Yoko
hanin to Now York having been 62
hours and 1 minute faster than that
of the rival lino, and a record between these two points was thus ee
lahlishod. Despite the fact that It
wus 17 car train, the tlmo consumed
betweon Vancouver and Prescott, Ontario, was only 3 days, 17 hours, and
57 minutes. Canada's fastest regular
passenger train iB thc C.P.B. "Trans-
Canada Limited," which runs from
Montreal to Vancouver in 92 hours,
and from Toronto to Vancouver in 88
hours, leaving both cities daily.', *****
'hipping of this silk has definitely
settled the supremacy of the Cnnadian
route as the quickest to and from the
Orient, snd means much to tho future
trade ofCssnaoa
CORBPOATION OF THE CITY OF GRAND
FORKS, B. C.
NOTICE
Licenceholders aud householders of
21 years of age or over (including
women) who have paid their Road
Tax for 1922 of $2.09, or who are exempt by statute, must register at
Gity Office on or before October 31st,
at 5 p.m., in order to have their
names on the Municipal List of Voters
for 1923. All former declarations
are now void.
JOHN A. HUTTON,
City Clerk.
A farm bureau report says
lambs are short. But there
are plenty in town.
Never count your chickens
before they return from a
friend's garden.    .
It took six days to make
the world and you can't
change it in one.
A. E. MCDOUGAIL
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
,  .Agent
Dominion Monumental Works
Asbestos Products Co. Roofing
ESTIMATES FURNISNED
BOX 332 I6RAND FORKS, B. C.
Counter
Check Books
We have secured the
agency for Grand
Forks of a large
Western Publishing
House which manufactures ^a superior
grade of Counter
Check Books—carbon back and carbon
leaf styles.
Prices Are Right
Encourage Western
enterprises and keep
Western money in
the West.
Any Quantity
from 100 up to 2500
books.
The Sun
Job Department
P" ™ ON CLEVELAND
IT brings the whole country for# mile9 around within easy reach.
Have you aeeo the new models? They're^as graceful as swallows! As
bright as new coin! As weatherproof as a duck? Automobile Steel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Real Quality. Real
Value. Easy Terms. We are tbe people]to mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER ^££\&g'ST
Open Saturday Evenings Till 10 o'Cloek
Our
Hobby
is
Good
Printing
rpHE value of well-
printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Bail programs
Business cards
Vi.i^ng cards
Sh'p'ing tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars „
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
THE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe' repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ARMSON
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty
Wt\S\W^^m\M(m\
P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Yalk Hotkl, First Stkbkt
New Type
Latest Style
Faces
THE SUN
Columbia Avenue and
l>ako Street
TELEPHONE
R101
E. F. LAWS
HEAL ESTATE
INSURANCE
OFFICK WINNIPBU AVBNUB
orrtHUTK sjHowmumxCHANaii
PHONE 164
PACIFIC .SIIKKT MBTAI. WORKS, LTD..
VANCOUVBB
MBTAL
,  IRRIGATION
PIPES and      FLUMES
.   B. F. laws:
[HOLM DIBTUCr AOKNT
PICTURES
AND PICTURE FRAMING
Furniture Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinds.
Upholstering Neatly   Don
r. g. McCutcheon
;WUUnWM .WHOP
Synopsis of
Land Act Amendments
Minimum price of first clans land
reduced to %£ an aore; socond-olaaa ta
13.60 an acre. .
Pre-emption now eonflnad to nr-
veyed landa only.
, KScorft.AH1Jl>e «nuitod coverlnt only
land suitable for agricultural niiriiinsa
•Jid which U non-thnbar land. vatvmm
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
but parties of not more than four mar
WTSiiife for adjacent pre-emptions
with Joint residence, but each making
necessatr Improvement* on respective
claims. ■» a
Pre-eaaptors must occupy claims for
■JS '•*?". ***** ******* Improvements to
value of |10 per acre, Including clearing and cultivation of at least t acrea
before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor la occupation not
^HiT"1? •,>'ear». ""id has made proportionate Improvements, he may. bsv.
iz***^,^-***^ °****** <=««•. **
granted Intermediate certificate of Im-
provasuesit and transfer bis claim.
K«conlB   without   permanent   real-
aaST-Sl ** **""** P"«M«« awS-
osuit makes Improvements to intent of
bts* perannum and records same each
r**** Failure to make Improvements
or record same will operate as for-
fetture.    Title cannot So obtained In
ww?!? J •*****• ***** Improvements
ji. ****** Par acre. Including 6 seres
•Jfawd and cultivated, and residenoe
ef at least 1 yeara are required
Pre-emptor holding Crown m-ant
may record another pTe-emptlon.^ to
!J2u.lr—.'an<l In conjunction with his
farm, without actual occupation, pr0-
*xMt* **»*.***°rr Improvements made
and residence -■■—-ln.nl on Crown
granted land. 0 v-Town
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding U
*S_f! *_?** 1«»»<1 as homesTtell
title to be obtained after fulfilling rosl-
aanual and Improvement conditions.
nr graaing and Industrial nurnoBas
area,   exceeding   Sts   acreT nily^be
«S? °7 on* P"»sn or companyT
-tm. factory or Industrlalsltes on
Umber land not exceeding « icras
maybe pMohnsed; conditions Include
payment of stumpage.
Natural   nsyjsasadows  Inaccessible
hy existing
eondtUonaT i
,        — may be purchased
QRANT*
enlarged at
- and serv-
-rcos.    The
or devisees
■as
PRB-BMtn-ORsV     FRes
AXT.
Thaiscape of this
Ing with^HfTMaJeasj
Ume within which the
yS? JSTtSe WE^fs«La
Tr^t^**^*^**^^*^^
S&sSS*--1^-
sn,'£.dQ* "*• ***** I**** since Aucust
*.  mt. on acruunt ifpaymenui  t*m
v*^L*0D*r,''i'*n' ***+****v8£*
. tssmem ett agreements to purchase
AUMTbraa. "^ ^JS. »-*«0|
it. ^*?^- "* dependent* acuulred
direct or Indirect, remlttsssTfromlsn-
Ustment to Maiwh mTmSST ^^
•UB-PURCHA8BM OS* ot\OWN
UANDg.
Provurion made for Iseuanoe af
Cmwn grants to sub-pufchaaers eel
Crown Ijuids, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
Pu^aoe, Involving forfettura, on fulfillment of conditions of nnnlisss 5
terest and taxes, where sub-pwenas-
ers do noUuaim whole of original nar-
Cel,   (UIM^MBA   ***** A...  . ■  TT -^
be   _.
whole  area.      App
made by atay 1. lit*.
ORAZINO.
Grazing Act, UU, for s
development of Uvestock taslustrTpro-
vldes for graslng dlstrlcta and ranm
udmlnlsiration under CooixntasnoneV
Annual Kra»lng permits Issued based
on numbore ranged- priority for established owners. Btoek-owners may
form Associations for range manaaa-
ment. Free, or partatOy free, permits
for settlers, campers er tramttsna sin
•o ten head. ——-s  *r
i ao noixualm whole of original nar-
' 2ff3f*,Jrt0* au* *"* ***** may
distributed    proportionately   over
of   area.      Applications   must   be
NEW HARNESS SHOP
, I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and do all binds of repair
work. Shop equipped with
modern machinery. All work
guaranteed:
C. A. Crawford
N«u TaleplMiM Offim

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xgrandforks.1-0341069/manifest

Comment

Related Items