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The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Jan 25, 1924

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vic:i ■■:■■
Bulk in itself is of little value.   There are many planets larger than the sun, but they are of no use to the earth
IN
L
Kettle Valley Orchardist
TWENTY-THIRD YEAR—No  13
"Tell i
loan
Victoria, January 23 —Tremen
doue strides are being made in the
lumbering and allied iniluslrrs in
British Columbia. Hon J D. Mac-
Lean, acting minip.t-r ol lande, Announces that the t')Ul timber t>c*le
for the yesr 1923 waa 2 642,280,000
board feet, an increase of nearly 34
per cent over 1922, when tbe scale
amounted to 1,899,158,000 bonrd
feet. Vanoouver district scaled I,
906,103,360 feet, or more tban tbe
amount for the whole province in
1922. An inore-.se of 60 per cent
wae made in the Priuce Rupert district for the year.
Lumbering is by far the most im-*
portant industry in iho province,
and through the following of sane
bonservation methods and fire pre.
vention, ae adopted by tbe department of lands, tbe timber resources
of British Columbia are nearly inexhaustible. Tbis province is estimated to bave four hundred billion
feet of standing timber, witb an annual increase through growth alone
of eight billion feet. Tbe capacity of
tbe sawmills is about tbree billion
feet, wbile a certain amount of
timber is destroyed each year
though fire. But the timber cut
and burned does not represent more
tban half the natural increase.
) what you Know is tru>>
sen si well u roe."
FRIDAY, JANUARY 25,   1924
In an endeavor to safeguard mo
torists and pedestrians, Attorney
General Manson announces a new
regulation a8ecting tbe use of spot
lights on motor vehicles. Tbe new
regulation reads:
"No motor yebicle shall be
ebuipped witb mdre tban one spot
ligbt and the beam of light therefrom
when sucb motor vehicle is io motion, must always be directed to tbe
right of tbe medial length line, und
rhe beam of ligbt from the said
spotlight shall strike the ground on
the right band side of the vehicle on
which th3 spotlight is mounted at
a distance not exceeding 100 feet in
front of tbe vehicle."
Determined to keep hie pledge
and eliminate the proprietary beer
olub, Attorney General Manson,with
the government, has taken tbe first
steps in this direction. A new regu
lation has been paesed relating to
applications for club licenses and
tbe forms call for tbe fullest information from all applicants. It is
understood tbat there will be few
licenses grauted and tbese will only
be well organized clubs, carried on
Strictly along old lines; that is.clubs
existing for tbe purpose of serving
meals and providing sleeping accomodations.
The attorney general's intention
is to kill tne club operated for pri
Tate gain. All applicants will be
required to state what purposes the
olub is operated for, giving date of
incorporation, ipformation regarding the premises, the number of
rooms furnished for bedrooms and
the number of meals served. A
balance sheet will be required,showing profits for 1923, as well as a
copy of the olub constitution and
bylaws.
Annual Meeting of the
B. G.  Division of the
Canadian Institute of
Mining and Metallurgy
Arrangements in connection with
the annual general meeting uf the
British Colombia division of tbe
Canadian Institute of Mining and
Metallurgy.in tbe Hotel Vancouver,
Vancover, on February 18, 14 and
15, bave now been completed, and
an excellent program has been prepared. All the subjects to be discussed at the technical sessions ere
of timely iiiteres' and involve considerations in which, tbe general,
public is equally concerned with
those directly engaged in. the min*
in-- industry iu tbe province.
The   mat-rial welfare of   British
Columbia  is   largely dependent on
the prosperity of tbe mining industry. All will agree that  everything
possible should  be done to ensure
tbat genera conditions   sball be as
conducive as they can be made to
an uninterrupted   and  progressive
expansion of the industry.   Certain
existing economic   aod  Industrial
oonditipos are exerting a retarding
effect   oo   our    mining   industry
These unfavorable conditions may
be removed or at least ameliorated.
Ways and means in otber directions
of   stimulating   progress need constantly to be explored. The promotion   of   tbe   welfare of tbe mining
industry is thc- principal purpose of
tbe  Canadian   Institute of Mining
and Metallurgy as  set forth in ite
charter. In keeping with this pur
pose, attention  at the forthcoming
meeting will be mainly   directed to
a survey of industrial conditions as
affecting   mining in the province,
witb   a   view   to their betterment.
The subjects to be immediately considered are included under   the respective heads of, "Conditions   Favorable and Unfavorable to Mining
in British Columbia,"  "The   Die
abilities of the Coal Minsng in British  Columb a  and Possible Remedies," "Tbe Possibilities for an Iron
and   Steel Industry in British Columbia." and "Research fn Connec
tion    with    Local    Metallurgical
Problems."
The meetings, it may be added,
are open to tbe public.
even in the hew party that "they
went too far," and that the elimina
tion of the Provinoials will follow the
enquiry. Mr. Bowser thanks tha new
party for carrying on his campaign
against the government at its own
expense, while Liberals are smiling
up their sleeves at the whole affair.
They have the assurance of Hon. Mr.
Sloan and Premier Oliver that the
party's'skirts are clean, and foresee
not only a sweeping vindication bnt
the hearty endorsation of tbe administration.
Tom
Eyerywti
ere
"Which Two Shall I Put Together
in the Scale?"
manent apple trees set thirty feet
apart is n practice of questionable
commercial value Tbe problem of
planting fillers and the time for removal is one which the individual
grower must decide for himself. In
making tbis decision, however, be
should remember that if he expects
his permanent trees to produce large
crops of marketable fruit he must
be prepared to allow tbem ample
space to develop.
addressee did not receive the article—
if possible, get a definite statement
covering this If you neglect the abave
pointB and rush in with your enquiry,
in many cases you canse unnecessary
work and expense to the post office
and delay legitimate enquiries or hold
up other mail—perhaps your own or
a friend's. You do not want to that,
we feel sure, so please cooperate by
avoiding basty enquiries.
A new record has been established
by the Department of Marias and
Fisheries in the number of whit*
fish eggs collected for hatchery purposes in the Great Lakes and the
Lake of the Woods. A total <rf 464,-
660,000 ergs were obtained, which
exceeds all previous eolloctioai ia
the province of Ontario.
Happiness is  neither   a   vested
right nor a self sustained state.
Orchard Fillers
Premier Oliver bas returned fiom
his trip to Alberta, where be addressed the United Farmers in Edmonton and another meeting in Calgary, on the freight rates question.
He reports tbat the prairie provtncee
•re behind British Columbia io the
fight for the removal of all discrimination It is now expejted that as
soon as tbe royal commission, which
will investigate Pacific Qreat East
em railway accounts and charges
against Hon. William Sloan and
Mr. Bowser, is out of the way, tbe
premier will go to Ottawa to con'
rinue tbe height rates case.
The biggest room in tbe world is
the room for improvement.
At the Summerland experimental
station the permanent trees in the
apple orchard were planted thirty
feet apart eacb way, making forty-
eight trees to the acre. Between
these permanent trees an equal num
ber of fillers or temporary trees were
planted. The orchard is only eight
years old, but the fillers are already
crowding tbe permanent trees to
such an extent that it bas been decided to remove tbe temporary trees
without further delay. Tbe yields
secured from these fillers to date
may be of some interest to apple
growers. Tbe varieties used were
Jonathan, Wagner, Cox's Orange,
Duchess aod Yellow Transparent.
Tbe total yield of eacb variety for
the eight years sin e date of planting, figured on the basis of forty
eight trees to tbe aore, is as follows:
Jonthan 377 boxes, Wagner 301.5,
Duchess 291, Yellow Transparent
220.6, Cox's Orange 163.
If is apparent tbat even the high
est producing filler, Jonathan, gave
an average annual yield of less tban
fifty boxes to tbe acre. When tbe
cost of trees, planting, culfivation,
spraying, pruning, is considered, it
doubtful whether even tbeJonathan
and Wagner bave justified tbeir
existence
These observaiions suggest that
the planting of Allien between per
A Wise Move
One of the wisest practices adopted by a member of tbe noaernment
is thatofHoo W. H. Sutherland,
minister of public works, in calling
an annual conference of district engineers. Last week out of seven
officials, six attended meetings in
Victoria. They passed on tbeir
recommondations for better road
construction and in turn were in-
structen by finance department
officials as to the best method of securing the fullest returns for every
dollar spent. Hon Dr. Sutherland
bas provided adequate office assist
ance for bis engineers, so that eacb
may give the greatest possible
amouot of attention to actual work
in tbe field.
Mr. Johnsing—Say.Mr. Doorman,
wbatam de meaning of dis bere line
on de ticket whar it says, "Not
transferable?"
Mr. Doorman—Dat means, Brer
Johusing, dat no gen'leman am ad
mitted unleesen be comes hisself.
Cooperative Charges
Charges to be deducted from fruit
shipments made through the Asso
ciated and subsidiary locals follow:
ABC
Apples, wrapped 53       5£      5
Apples, crated 43       5J      5
Central reserve fund deduction,
1 per cent.
A, Local; B, Central; C, Holding
Company.
Grow Tomatoes
on Bushes
Be Sure You Are Right
Before You Go Ahead
During the holiday season just pa
the public cooperated with the post
office in the master of early mailing,
and Postmaster Hnll says he is glad
to state that this cooperation helped
to a considerable extent to reduce
laBt minute rush. There is still an.
other way in which the public can
cooperate, and that is by avoiding
unnecessary enquiries Just because
yourfriend didn't receive that gift
when you thought he would, or neglects to acknowladge it, it is not
proof that it is lost. Perhads it wasn't
posted—it muy still be in some one's
pocket or tucked away in a cor
ner. First be sure it was actually
posted and correctly addressed, then
remember that some persons will insist on bringing their mail to the
post office at the last'minuteand there
is certain to be at least some conges.
tion and delay. For this reason, you
must allow more than the actual time
for delivery. Lastly, he sure tbat the
Spartanburg, S.C. January 19.—
J. M. Hilton, of Kershaw, South
Carolina, has successfully grafted
the tomato with a common plant
known as the Jimpson weed, and
from tbe "cross" has obtained bushes
bearing crops of tomatoes as wholesome and palatable as those grown
on tbe tomato vine and having a
more solid and finer grained meat.
The Jimpson weed is botb blight
and drought resistant, and if toma*-
toes can be grown on it on a commercial scale tbe chief difficulties of
taising tomatoes bave been overcome.
A new deposit of soapsten* has
been discovered on Trap Lake, a
small lake south of Wablgoon Uke,
in northwestern Ontario. The quality
of the stone has been reported as excellent for various industrial use*,
and practical trials are under way.
Water transportation ia available
direct from the deposits to Wabigoon
and Dryden, on the main line of tha
Canadian Pacific Railway.
It is announced by thc Canadian
Pacific Railway that two frea
scholarships covering four years'
tuition in architecture, chemical,
civil, mechanical ar electrical engineering at McGill University, are
offered, subject to competitive examinations, to apprentices and other
employees enrolled on the permanent
staff of the company and under 21
yeara of age, aad to minor sons of
employees.
Canada's fisheries' production during 1923 is estimated to be worth
$40,000,000. At the beginning of the
year it was not thought that anything like this mark would be reached, for Mm Fordney tariff had cut
deeply Into exports to the United
States. But as tha year wore on ths
demand and prices generally improved, thus giving fishermen along
the Atlantic coast especially a much
bettor market.
L
OF
L
The memb rs of the 1924 citv
council met in tbe council chamber
on Thursday morning for the purpose of taking the ootb of oflice,
wbich was administered by Magistrate McCallum.
Retiring Mayor Hull remained
in the chair longeooug.i to congratulate his successor and tbe new aldermen on tbeir election, after wbicb
he vacated it in favor of Mayor
Acres. Sbort addresses were slso
made by some of the retiring aldermen, in wbich they gave a partial
review of their operations during
the past year.
The speeches of Mayor Acre-- and
the incoming aldermen were mainly of a congratulatory nature, each
member extending felicitations to
his colleagues on iheir election.
Appreciation was also expressed for
the kindly words of good will tendered the new council by the retiring mayor and aldermen.
Tbe first business nifetir -* of tbe
uew council will be held next Mon«
day evening.
Approximately $5,000,000 win be
spent by the Dominion Coal Company to open up a new mine and
colliery at Lingan, Nova Scotia, and
construction of a branch line of railway to the new site has already been
started. The new colliery will be
equipped ~**ith every modern device,
and a model town will be planned in
its vicinity. It will hava a capacity
of some 2,000 tons daily.
The tenth annua] Ski Tournament
will be held at Revelstoke, February
Eth and 6th, in connection with which
ski-joring, tobogganing, snowsboe-
ing, skating, etc, will be featured
An endeavor is being made to secure
the attendance of Uno Hilstrom,
Sweden's champion ski-jumper, as
well as other famous ski-jumpers
from both Canada and the United
States.
Historical Association
Will Hold Reunion of
Pioneers of Province
The British Columhia Historical
association is contemplating having
a reunion of pioneers of British Columbia, and would be glad if tbose
persons who arrived od the. island
or mainland prior to 1871 would
furnish tbeir name and address to
tbe secretary, J. Forsyth, Provincial
Library, Victoria, wbo will issue
invitations when arraDgprnenif are
completed.
In order to have tbe list of pioneers
as complete as poesible, all  persona *
who may know old-time residents
will confei  a favor by furnishing
names.
Local organizations wbo are interested in the early history of the
province are also asked to cooperate
witb the Historical association. Tbie
body is affiliated witb tbe Canadian
Historical association, and is also an
auxiliary to the paovincial archives
department, wherein are preserved
the records, journals, diaries and
photographs relating to tbe colonial
days of Vancouver island nd British Columbia.
Prepared forms for the personal
records of pioneer residents may be '
had upon application to theProvinn
eial Library and Archives Depart,
ment, Victoria, B. C.
The Pacific Great
Eastern Enquiry
Attorney General Manson says it
will be another week before he has
completed plans for the royal commission to enquire into the affairs of the
Pacific Qreat Eastern railway and the
Northern Construction company; also
charges made by the Provincial party
against Hon. William Sloan, minis
ter of mines, and W. J. Bowser, K.
C, leader of the opposition.
Mr. Manson has not gone all
through the mass of material which
might come before the commission
and declares that while the enquiry
will be thorough, he has no intention
of submitting extraneous matters,
which would have no bearing upon
theissuA and only lead to useless sittings at a heavy cost to the public.
Little is heard in   political   circles,
but discussions   of the investigation, i
Adherents of the third party are hop (
ing against hope that "something will
happen," but tbe feeling is growing
Canada in 1923 produced more
coal, lead, cobalt and asbestos than
during any other year since mining
records have been kept. The output
of coal waa in the neighborhood of
17,300,000 tons, or 685,000 tons hotter than the best previous record,
ai d 2,000,000 tons over that in 1922.
Thc output of copper, nickel, cement
and asbestos was also much above
tbat for the preceding years. Gold
production was down somewhat, but
this was due more to a power shortage than anything else.
As a result of efforts on the part
of Hon. J. A. Robb, Minister of Immigration and Colonization, a 20 per
cent, preference rate on Atlantic
passages for all British immigrants
settling in Canada has been ar-
langed to come into effect on March
1 and continue until the end of the
main immigration season at the end
of November. It will apply only
to British immigrants coming direct
to Canada from the British Isles,
and will affect all Unas coming to
Canadian Atlantic ports.
Three delightful cruises havo been
awarded to agents of the Canadian
Pacific Railway for services rendered the company during the past
year. One of them, J. J. Forster,
general agent at Vancouver, will
sail on a round-the-world cruise on
the "Empress of Canada"; W. C.
Casey, general agent at Winnipeg,
will spend sixty-eight days cruisi-ig
the Mediterranean on the "Empress
of Scotland," while D. R. Kennedy,
general agent at Buffalo, will enjoy
it twenty-nine-day cruise in the West
Indies on the "Empress of Britain."
The trips were awarded by the company in recognition of last year's
work in connection with cruise book-
iaga.  -.
Stranded Harvesters
Refuse to Take Work   ^
on Canadian Far   s
Toronto, January 20. — That Brito
isb harvesters stranded bere have
positively declared themselves unwilling to go on farms and tbat a
report on tbeir stand bearing "proof
that tbey bave refused to adapt
themselves to Canada's conditions,"
is on its way through immigration
authorities to tbe Dominion government, was tbe statement made yesterday by C. H. Hudson, superintendent of the government employment bureau.
THE WEATHER
The following is tbe minimum
and maximum temperature for eacb
day during tbe past week, as recorded by tbe government thermometer on E. F. Law's rancb:
Max.
Min.
Ja«.   18-Friday	
23
-6
19—Saturday....
3
-17
,  11
-11
,  28
10
.  28
a
23—Wednesday.
.. 34
25
.. 32
12
Inches
..   Bl
Higb interest  generally
low security,
means IBB BUN: GRAND FORKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ufa (Srattu Storks %\xn
AN INOEPE.MOEI r   N£-U»4P = 1
G. A. EVANS. EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER
S t SUBSCRIPTION1 RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year (in Canada and Great Britain) $1.00
One Year (in the United States)   1.50
Addresr -" ~——--'cations to
Thk Grand Forki Sun
Phonk 101R Grand Forks, B. CJ
OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.
FRIDAY, ,TANUARY 25. 1924
Notes, Notions and Notables
A number of our proviaoial oxclian^es are
anxious to learn what a "piker" is. AcoojrJ •
ing to our dictionary, a pike is a very long-
lived fish. A piker must therefore be a fisher,
or fisherman. Peter was a fisherman before
he became a disciple and a piker (of which he
quicdly repeated) at the trial of Christ. We
hope this information will satisfy our contemporaries' craving for knowledge.
Tha Canadian government invites people
who are in search of a sumier home to buy
an island in Georgian Sty, Clie.ce are some
thirty thouaand islands the shores of that part
of Lake Aura, and the islan Is vary in size
from tiny eyots to islands many acres in ex ■
tent. They are rocky and bear no great
vegetation, but many are ideal for summer
camps. The price of an unoccupied island is
twenty-five dollars plus ten dollars an acre.
consumed in great quantities in European
countries are cultivated on snail farms. These
are patches of moist, clayey ground, fenced
separated by little water canals and provided
with bushes and shrubbery for protection
against the sun. The snails are fed principally
on lettuce and other green stuff. Fruits and
aromatic herbs are sometimes fed them to impart a special flavor to the flesh. Paris is the
best customer for the snail breeder aud
fancier, for that metropolis consumes an average of 50,000,000 snails a year. In Switzerland and Bavaria these little animals are sjill
a considerable article of commerce.
The proposal to make coffee from Manitoba
grain has been put forward jby C. E. Fern, of
Rosenfeld, Man., who has asked  the Winni
peg board of trade to  help him patent the
idea.
The Michigan Health Bulletin gives the
following recipe for preserving children. No
alcohol is required: "Take one large, grassy
field." one half dozen children, two or three
small dogs, a pinch of brook and some pebbles. Mix the children and dogs well together
and put them in the field, stirring constantly.
Pour the brook over the pebbles. Sprinkle
the field with flowers. Spread over all a deep,
blue sky, and bake in the hot sun. When
brown, remove and set away to cool in a
qathtub."
A race of white Indians with flaxen hair is
said to have been discovered in the almost
impenetrable forests of eastern Panama. The
story comes from an eminent explorer just returned from territory hitherto untouched by
Europeans. He says: "I was in a native village when I noticed three girls passing into
the jungle. They had bodies as light as a sunburned white girl, and decidedly light hair. I
was told they belonged to a white race living
living up the Chucanaque river. The gegroes
told me these whites all had light-brown or
yellow hair and were wild and warlike The
skin of the girls' faces was tanned, but free
from that colored pigment so distinguishable
in all brown and darker races. The features of
the eldest girl were of a high oval face, thin
lips, well shaped chin and uquiline nose. They
spoke no Spanish."
A good story is told of an encounter between liudyard Kipling and Sir James Barrie.
Both were starting on a railway journey, and
Kjpling was in need of light literature, The
time was short, but racing round a corner he
collided with Sir J. M Barrie, armed with a
sheaf of magazines. According to Barrle
Kipling seized the magazines, flung him some
money and rushed away. Barrie told some of
his friends that Kipling had not flung half
enough, when this story was recently told to
St. Andrews stndonts the audience roared
with laughter, in which Kipling joined. In
reply he assured the guests that he never
robbed Barrie of anything. "He is too rich in
all the things that count for that to be possible," said Mr. Kipling.
A heavily capitalized syndicate has been
formed to recover a huge meteor supposed to
have fallen millions of years ago in Dene's canyon, Ariz. For miles round the district is plas
tered with meteoric fragments, such as might
be thrown off from some giant meteorite in its
fall, while a peculiar sort of dust, which the
Indians count as sacred, is probably the pow
dor of the rocks and mountains crushed by
the impact. Meteorites are known to contain
certain quantities of valuable metals, and in
one oi the size that must have fallen in Arizona there, may be almost anything! It is
therefore conceivable that there lies buried in
the wilds of the Indian couutiy the largest
treasure on earth, a gift from another world.
The syndicate is prepared to spend, a lot of
money to find out.
A new kind of field glass picks out khaki
clad figures as easily as if they were dressed
in bright red. The lenses disintegrate the
blend of red, orange and green light and so
make the soldier's figure stand out sharp and
clear.
From an expensive burden on the Dominion
government, the Wainwright buffalo park is
now producing a substantial revenue for Canada, according to A. S. Duclos, of Edmonton,
who had the contract for the slaughter of the
2000 surplus animals in the park this fall
Good prices are being received by the govern
ment from the sale of meat, hides and heads,
and old timers all over the country are enjoying the opportunity to eat real buffalo steaks
and pemmican!.once more.
E, C, Henniger Co.
Grain, Hay
Flour and Feed
Lime and Salt
Cement and Plaster
Poultry Supplies
Grand Forks, B. C.
S. T. HULL
JBf-labluhed 1910
Heal Estate and Insurance
Sealdeut kg ont Grand Forka Town-site
Cuinpany, Unlit*!
Farms     Orchards     City Property
"■.'Agent, at Nelson,  Calgary, Wlhnlpeg and
otber Prairie pulnta.  Vancouver A-renti:
PBNDEK INVUSTMBNTS
HATTON KURY LANDS LTD.
Batabllshed in 1910. we are ln a poilllon to
furnish reliable Information (-onoerniu-r this
district.
Write lor Iree ' Iterature
GRAND FORKS
Transfer Company
DAVIS 8 HANSEN. P*op.
City Baggage and General
Transfer
Coal,  Wood and   Ice
for Sale
According to report a donkey of the ordinary four legged variety was responsible in
1905 for the location of the celebrated Tukh
el-Karamus treasure, ofthe Ptolemaic period,
now among the Cairo Museum's most prized
possessions. The donkey, trotting along a
road, stumbled and smashed with its hoof the
mouth of a great earthenwure jar just projecting above the soil. A number of gold vessels
were scattered about the road, and the peasant who was riding the donkey, on descending
to the ground, found that the jar was literally
crammed with marvellous statuettes, trinkets
and the like, in gold and silver. By rare good
fortune, as he was stealing away with part of
the booty, he was intercepted by the local native assistant inspector, and eventually the
whole of the treasure was recovered.
Offloe at R.  F.  Petrie'i Store
Phone 64
C.V. Meggitt
Beal Estate and Insurance
OBCIIABUS.  FABM   LANDS   AND CITY
tPROPKKTY
Bxoellent facilities- for •elllnti your fat me
We bare agenta at   all    Coatt and Prairie
Polnta
WH CABBY AUTOMOBIL8 INSURANCB.
DKALBB IN POLKS, POSTS AND TIBS,
AND FABM PRODUCE
Sellable Information regarding tilts dlitnu
cheerfully furnished. We soltolt your inquiries.
K. SCHEER
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONIST
Deale-tfnS
Havana Cigars, Pipes
Confectionery |
City   Beal. Estate  For
Sale
Applications for immediate purchase of Lots
and Acreage owned by the City, within the
Municipality, are invited.
Prices t—From $35.00 per lot upwards.
Terras t--Cash and approved payments.
List of Lots and prices may be seen at the
City Office.
JOHN A. HUTTON.
City Clerk.
AMMUNITION
We have a complete line of shot shells and
rifle ammunition. 16, 20, 12 and 10 ga. shot
shells. All sizes rifle ammunition.*- Let us
fill your requirements for the hunting season.
For the dark evening try an EVER-READY
FLASHLIGHT.    A full stock of batteries.
FRUIT LADDERS at reduced prices.
8 ft. $1.80        10 ft. $6.00       12 ft. $7.20
MILLER & GARDNER
Hardware and Furniture
S-
Most Britons in Canada remember with
moist lips the succulent winkles which are
procurable throughout the old land. These,
as all know, come from the sea; the smell of
the salty deep is still upnn rh-*-m Ff*w know,
ho •" *  i, that the edible land snails winch are
c/incient History*
Items Taken From The (irand Korks Sua for the Corresponding
"Week Twenty Yeara Ago
At a well attended meeting in the Yale
hotel last Saturday night the following delegates were elected to attend the Conservative
convention in Kamloops ou the 2lst iust,: M.
Burrell, \. McLellan, Thos. Crosion, Jeff
Davis, C. A. S. Atwood, Wm. Dinsmore, D.
MoCallum, E. A. liainey, Dr. Kingston, Geo.
Chappie, Ceo, Urlin, J. H. Hodson, W. H. M.
May, H. S, Cayley, A. C. Sutton, A. W.
Fraser, Jeffrey Hammar, H. C. Hanington,
Joseph Bone, Wm. Spier and Frank Hutton.
Winter is not going to pass without at least
reminding'he people that Jack Frost is still
doing business in the west../ The past couple
of days have put the ice men in good  humor.
August Sohnitter, the well known rancher
across the river, returned yesterday from a
holiday trip to Buffalo, N. Y.
At the Conservative convention at Kamloops on the 21st inst., Martin Burrell was
nominated on the second ballot as Conservative candidate for Yale-Cariboo.
The complete city ticket was elected by acclamation on the 12th inst.
Imperial Billiard Parlor
Grand Forks, B. C.
PICTURES
IS IT WORTH WHILE RORROW-
ING THE TELEPHONE TO SAVE
TEN CENTS A DAY?
Of course no one enjoys having to use
a neighbors's telephone. Yet the phone
has become such a necessity that, if one
hasn't a phone, it can't be helped now
and then.
Good neighbors don't say anything
but it must annoy them. Naturally your
neighbor says she doesn't care, but she
does. It would annoy you if the conditions were reversed.
A party line, is $1.50 net a month. It's
a popular service. Get particulars at
the office. s
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
AND PICTURE FRAMIN6
Furniture Made to Order.
Also Repairing of all Kinda.
Upholstering  Neatly   Don
R. G. McCUTCHBON
tWINSIPBG AFMUI
It's Lhe worst wheel that
makes the most noise in the
world.        	
Don't regret too mu*h your upland downs; after all the only man
wbo has none is in the cemetery.
Canadian   Blind    Ifabies'   Home
Nursery, Hospital aad -£iader£arten
Dominion Charter,   Without Stook Subscription.
DIRECTORS—Hon, Martin Uurrell, Hon. President; Hou. J. Q. Turriff,
President; A. U. Fitziin mm, VioaPreiident; Biw*rd Grand, Saoretary,
C. Blaokett Robinson, Cor. Seoretary; J. F, MoKinloy, Treasurer; Lt.-Col.
Whiton, M.D., R. H. Campbell, Thomas Mulvey, K.C, A. E. Provost, W.
Lylo Reid, A. J. Freiuiau, Charles H. Pinhey, C.K, W. J. Cairns, and Tom
Moore.
TRUSTEES—C. H. Pinhey, O.E, Thomas Mulvey. K.C, A. J. Freidman
Le£fil Adrian Banker* Auditor
John I. MaoCr token, K.C.    Royal Bank of Canada.     A. A. Crawley, C. A.
The Objects of thi • Institution, for which Incorporation was reoently ob -
tained, are: "To provide a Some and Refuge for Baby and Infant Blind; to
provide free Scientific Care, Training and Maintenance* to Save the Lives of
even a few of tbe m -sny of such unfortunates, who, for the laok of suoh ser«
vice, perish every yd ir; and to return these little ones to their parents, at
school age with nor nal, healthy bodies and sound minds."
This is a large and graatly needed Child Welfare Service. Careful enquiry
at the Government offices in the various provinces reveals the fact that there
are at the presant time nearly 250 Infant Blind in the Dominion. Nothing
has yet been done for those helpless little ones. In the United States, 16
years ago, the first home was opened in New York City; they have now homes
in 13 States, all doing excellent work.- In England, some time ago, Sir Ar-
-(hur Pearson organized "Sunshine House,V Chorley Wood, for Blind Babies,
and he claims that it is the only one iu the British Empire. Let us have the
SECOND in Canada. To reach this worthy end money is urgently required.
Fifty Thousand Dollars is the present objective of the Boajd. While the
Home is to be located in Ottawa it will take in the Baby Blind from evdry
province, so that this APPEAL for funds will be Dominion wide, and an
early and generous response is confidently expected. Cheques should be made
payable to tbe Canadian Blind Babies Home Association. All remittances
will be promptly acknowledged.
Tell The People
What   You   Have
to Sell
r*.. %
THE SUN: GRAND FOEKS, BEITTSH OOLUMBU
From   Everywhere
Newsprint production in Canada
-for the?eleven months of 1928 ending in November was 1,166,226 tons,
as compared with 993,988 tons for
the same period in 1922, the increase
fceing equal to 17 per cent. The
estimated production ior ths year ia
1,270,000 tons, or 189.000 tons over
that for 1922.
The value of Canada's 1928 grain
crop ts estimated by ths Dominion
Bureau of Statistlos at 1892,572,300.
Of this total approximately $460,000
is credited to the three prairie provinces. It is interesting to note that
while the figures for Manitoba and
Saskatchewan are below those of the
year 1922, those of Alberta are above
er over $45,000,000.
Grain marketed along the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1923 totalled
187,642,224 bushels, an increase of
88,824,619 bushels over any similar
period in the railway's history. The
Increase ln bushels shipped was 18,-
086,730, or 9.2 por cent over 1922,
•nd 88.1 per cant of the total amount
marketed had been shipped by December 8rd.
Government statistics estimate the
apple crop of Canada for 1923 at
10,794,600 boxes, which, at an estimated average of $2 a box, makes
the value a little over $21,000,000.
By provinces the estimated production was as follows: Nova Scctla,
6,250,000 boxes; British Columbia,
8,124,000; Ontario, 2,275,000; Que-
fcec, 110,000; and New Brunswick,
86,600.
A herd of 20 b-*ffalo is soon to
be shipped from Wainwright Park,
Alta., to the Yukon, where a frame
preserve is to be laid out in the central part of the territory. This announcement was made here by Robert Lowe, of White Pass, Yukon
Territory, on hie way back from
Ottawa, where he arranged for rhe
shipment.
Magnificent Specimen of Moose Head
The Banff Winter Carnival is to
tie held from February 2nd to 9th,
1924, both dates inclusive, and will
run concurrently with the Banff
Bonspiel, Which will be held from
February 4th to 9th, inclusive. A
widely varied and attractive programme has loon arranged, culmin-
atin-r in a Grand Carnival dance,
when the Carnival Queen for 1924
will be announced and crowned.
Among the New Year** honor* for
1924 one of the most popular is the
award of bhe C.B.E. by Bis Majesty
the King to Captain S. Robinson,
R.N.R., who. it will be recalled, so
distinguished himself in command of
the Canadian Pacific SJS. "Empress
of Australia" during the Japanese
disaster and is now commanding the
*r*.sn<.s*inn Pacific S.S   "Empress of
THIS record moose head from
an animal shot in Northern
Ontario has been secured by
the Canadian National Railways to
be placed in their building at the
British Empire Exhibition in London. The head has been specially
mounted for display and is one of
the finest specimens ever secured.
As far as is known only two larger
moose heads have ever been secured and one of these was presented to the late King Edward
VII. by Canadian sportsmen.
The particulars of the head
shown in the photograph are interesting. The spread of the antlers
is 70% inches from tip to tip. The
weight of the antlers, before
mounting, was 64 pounds. The
length of the right antler from tbe
base of horn to the tip is 37%
inches and that of the left antler
39 inches. The width of the left
palm at the widest point is 15
inches and that of the right 14%
inches.      The points total 28 in
number, there being 14 on each
antler. The weight of the animal
waa 1,400 pounds.
Before being shipped to England
the head will be displayed in the
windows of ticket offices of the
Canadian National Railways in
various cities. It is now on exhibition at the ticket office at the
northwest corner of King and
Yonge Sts., Toronto, where it :'s
attracting much attention and com-
ment.
Canada" for that ve-**»*M*s rortneom-
ing world cruise
The beauties of the -jaurentian
Mountains, which have already attracted the attention of moving picture producers, are continuing to
draw such companies. The latest to
make use of this location is the Distinctive Pictures Corporation, starring Alma Rubens and Conrad Nagle,
which has been shooting at Gray
Rocks Inn, Ste. Jovite iver the New
Year holiday period. \ feature of
their work has been the co-operation
of the Chateau Frontenac dog team,
led by Mo'.-ntie, « veteran of five
veara service in th" North.
*■ - ■   rt-y,.,;.-..-■-,.,.-■{-■—.ly-m.-:?.*.:. Wa^s
"Miss America"Declares Tanlac
Wonderful Health Giving 1 onic
Definite Policy of Immigration for
Canadian National Railways
WHEN, a little more than ai    Dr. Black is a man wbo is thor-
year  ago,   Sir  Henry  W. oughly   respected,   both   for   hia
Thornton,     K. B. E.,     was opinions   and   his    achievement!,
chosen to head the Canadian Na-1 throughout Canada.   He carries •
occasions.
^holograph by Atlantis! I
l Service.
Dr. W. J. Black
Miss Mary Katherine Campbell,
twice proclaimed "Miss America,"
haa taken TANLAC and endorses
it Id a statement recently given to
the women of America throtigh International Proprietaries, Inc., dis
tributors of this great tonic. In tbis
statement, Miss America declares
that Qood Health is tbe basis of
all Beauty, and advises women wbo
would be beautiful to "flrst find
good health."
Her complete statement as given
is aa follows: "I consider it a great
privilege to be able to tell bbe
thousands of women everywhere
what a great tonic TANLAC is.
Health is the basis of all beauty.
Without good health, one is apt to
be run down, nervous, underweight,
high-strung, anemic. Indigestion
drives the roses from a woman's
cheeks and robs her of that radiant
quality of womanhood that   is resi
beauty.
•'I bave taken TANLAC and I do
not hesitate to say that it is a wonderful health-giving tonic. Il bas
brought relief and good health to
many women, and with good health
one may have a measure of beauty
tbat will overcome shortcomings io
face and figure.
"Rosy cheeks, sparkling eyes, a
well-rounded figure, a lovable disss
position, go hand in band with good
beatb. To tbose searching for
beauty, I would s*y—'First of All,
Find Good Health.' The TANLAC
treatment bas proven itself a boon
to womankind, and I recommend
it."
Miss Campbell has written a
booklet on Health aod Beauty
wbich may be secured by filling
out the coupon below.
INTERNATIONAL PROPRIETARIES, INC.
Department Y 102. -Atlanta, Ga.
Gentlemen: I herewith enclose 10 oeote(stamps willdo), for wbicb
send me a copy of Miss Mary Kather'ine Cempbell'c BnHn u
"Beauty and Health."
Name Street	
Town
State.,
tional Railways,
one of his first
acts was to put
into motion machinery for aiding in the colonization and ile
velopment of Canada, particularly
along the lines of
the National System. He realized
that one of the
crying needs of
Canada was for
toore population.,
and he has since
been quoted, on
several occasions
as saying that if
Canada had a
population of
twenty-five mil
Ion people, Canada would have-
no railway problem.
The    organ iza
tion of a depart- 	
ment to look after colonization and
development was entrusted by Sir
Henry to Mr. W. D. Robb, Vice-
President, and Mr. Robb at once
proceeded to build up the necessary
organization to look after this most
important national work, investigations, conferences and careful
planning gradually brought into
being an effective department, the
effort of the year culminating in
the engagement of Dr. W. J. Black,
Deputy Minister of Immigration
and Colonization in the Federal
Government, as Manager of the
Colonization and Development Department of the Canadian National
Railways, with headquarters in
London, England. That was early
in the Fall of 1923. Dr. Black proceeded at once to Great Britain,
where he spent some weeks carrying out a series of investigations.
These completed, he returned to
Canada and a general conference
of all officers of the department
was called and a definite plan of
colonization and development was
drawn up and announced. This
was the first definite announcement
on immigration to be announced
in Canada.
Dr. Black's Career
In engaging Dr. Black, the Canadian National Railways secured
an officer who is probably better
acquainted with the immigration
needs of Canada, and the best
methods of remedying those needs,
than any other man in the country. All his life he has been connected with the argricultural industry and has run the gauntlet of
all its intricate phases. He was
born and brought up on a farm in
Dufferin County, Ontario, and in
1902 graduated from the Ontario
Agricultural College with a Toronto University degree. At his
graduation he was appointed editor of the "Farmers' Advocate,"
Winnipeg, Manitoba, and he held
this post for two years. In 1905
he joined the Government of Manitoba as Deputy Minister of Agriculture, a post which he left the
following year to became President
of the Manitoba Agricultural College. He remained in this important position until 1916, when he became Commissioner of Agriculture
for Canada. At the conclusion of
the Great War in 1918, Dr. Black
was appointed Chairman of the
Soldiers' Settlement Board of Canada, a position he held until his
appointment, in 1921, aa Deputy
Minister of Immigration and
Colonization for Canada.
lasting and genuine enthusiasm
into his work, and
as a quiet but eloquent and convincing speaker
he is well fitted
to broadcast the
message of hia
important mission.
The Poliey.
There are seven
points to the programme  which
has  received the
approval   of   Sir
Henry W. Thornton, and the principles   of   policy
will be placed into
effect    immediately.   Dr. Black
sailed   for   England    again    on
January 5th, and
on Mb arrival in
London   his   department   commenced   to function
actively.   The thorough character
of the policy can be judged from a
recapitulation of the  seven principles, which are as follows:
1—To influence the immigration
and satisfactory settlement in
Canada of the largest possible
number of people of productive
capacity that the country can
absorb and assimilate.
2~To contribute to the dissemination of information concerning the vast and extensive natural resources of the Dominion and the widespread opportunities for industrial development, so that capital may be
attracted from other countries
and invested where enterprises
will be legitimately rewarded.
3*—To promote the land settlement of new Canadians under
conditions that will ensure the
maximum possibility of success in their farming operations, and enable them to enjoy such social and religious
institutions as are necessary to
individual happiness and contentment.
^—To encourage improvement in
agriculture, that more diversified methods may be employed
in farming, and that crop,
livestock, and dairy production
may be increased in accordance with market demands and
prospects.
g—To assist by organized effort
in the immigration of young
people of desirable type anil
character, especially . from
Great Britain, and in their
placement in respectable rural
homes where they may become
qualified to participate in constructive activities and acquire
citizenship of distinct value to
Canada.
g—To aid in the development of
new opportunities for service
and to facilitate every effective
means of selecting immigrants
physically fit anti anxious for
work.
7—To co-operate with the Federal
and Provincial Governments
and business organizations
throughout   the Dominion   in
firomoting all measures catenated to contribute toward an
increase in immigration of
adaptable people, and in their
settlement under the most
favorable conditions possible.
The shortest
thing in the
Hworld--
isn't a mosquito's eyelash or a gnat's
whisker, or any other part of any insect
whatsoerer--.IT IS THE MEMORY OF
THE PUBLIC.
'-.It you doubt this ask the first men
men you meet the following questions*
SI When did the R31 cross the Atlantic?
Who was her pilot? On What date was
Lord Kitchener drowned? What was
the name of the ship that blew up and
almost wiped out the city of Halifax?
What German submarine torpedoed
the Lusfrania?
It is a safe bet that you would not
get one correct answer.
Now do you see the necessity of persistent advertising? When -the details
of events of world wide importance are
so soon forgotten how do you expect
the public to remember you unless
YOU TELL'EM-and keep telling them?
ADVERTISE!
I
1
One step won't take very far,
• J You've got to keep on walking!
One word won't tell folks who you are,
'si You've got to keep on talking;
] '-One inch won't make you very tall,
You've got to keep on growing}
One little ad. won't do it all,
You've got to keep them going.
r
Brown started out without a cent!
He's rich now and still rising!
Some say 'twas luck! some say *tw.
pluck;
HE says 'twas advertising. THI BUN: OBAND FORKS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
"THP  ^sTTiV 's '''e tavo,'te news-
X 11LI  KJULi   paper 0f tho citizens
of the district.    It  is read   by   more
people in the city and valley than any
other paper because it  is fearless, re
liable, clean, bright and entertaining.
It is always independent but never
neutral.
DON'T HESITATE!
PHONE 101R
FORFINE PRINTING
News of the Gity
During the heavy snowfall of the
past couple weeks the roads of the
district, and especially the school
routes, have been kept passable by
the provincial public works department, under the direction of Qeneral
Foreman P. H. Donaldson, witb tb
use of the road grader aud otber
implements in lieu of  a snowplow
This is poor weather for joy riding, as it takes about twice tbe
quantity of gasoline tbat would be
required to do tbe same amount oi
w rk when the roads are free of
enow.
Forks district tbe road department
has hsd the grader al work cleaning
off the loads and autoe can get
around without any trouble. Tne
cost is not much and it is a great
convenience for thegene.al public."
Dr. R. D Laioson, chiropractor,
visited Greenwood the first of the
week.
Tie making is reported to be a
thriving industry around Midway
this winter.
Constable W. B. Stewart, who
was in the city during the tria' of
the "hijackers," haa returned to
his station in Midway.
Eli Plecneh, of Printeton, who
was convicted io the couoty court
here last week of conversion of trust
funds, was sentenced by his honor
Judge Brown last Friday to tbree
years in the penitentiary.
E. Spraggett left this week for
Kimberley, where he will work for
the dnsolidated.
L>.   McPherson  left ou  Tuesday
for a short trip to Nelson.
J. D. Campbell, who is suffering
from a mild attack of pneumonia,
was taken to tbe Grand Forks hospital this weak.
Barnard Lequime, after  visiting
friends in this city for a number  of
days, returned to his home in Mid
way this week.
W. Madden of Qreenwood and
Mark F. Madden of Chicago are in
the city today.
Nothing could be more appro.,
priate than a cent sale after tbe
efficient manner in which tbe growers' affaire have been looked after in
tbis province during the past year.
It shows tbat the farmers' last cent
is not despised.
•uado s| ■*,] ipu-sv, ui t-q^uoui mass
eqi Sujjnp auop vseufinq -jjodxe jo
Eistjq aq} uo piiqj pun s;jod s.p'joM.
sifl Suouis q;x;8 s*-*u*u '■Be.iiuojti
%iod s,t}pt*uBQ jo euo 'jeAOMojy
*x[s Suipao.ixa }OU f&jod Stq *t*%
'SJIBJJB '{-sun 'asanoo jo '»i*a '/tyjof
-sta aqj, *npBuBO jo s;sboo sx*% uo
sios-prsq pus sjaod 008 sis waqj,
•[buuou o*| dn --qSnojq
uasq s*nq ;no [mo; eqj pun 'mous jo
6|j»j »;b[ iq 'isAOMoq 'pa-fsnfpt* uoaoj
s»q 'aoqsaaoj JsiqQ 'aqoij' upi oj,
auipjoaoB 'hofltnfts sjqj,' *90u'Aoad
eq-| ui suo*-,Bj->do Jlufjaqum* pajap
-uiq i([-)-tex8 st-juaaaa flfjun oaq-mft
ui   aut[iBai8jd   joqi»sM-i   p[iui  oqj,
-Suims
\\tlf uj sis 'aaBaaaj, uueijnQ 'uo
e-|nqo yp^m-mof aqr) uo auipi;s ub3
-*8oqo-| 8uipn|oui '-*puji[ \\s jo s^aods
pus uoi-(afdui03 Suusau ai« (Baiujbo
2uiui0Dq}joi aqj joj siuauioSuBj
-iy 's^suno; SuiAO'-joqu;.-*. jo uooajsj
oqi Suiulooaq ui«3b si X-jp aaqonft
GROCERIES
Our Groceries are constantly moving,
and they are therefore always fresh and
in prime condition. We make a specialty
high grade Teas and Coffees.
CITY GROCERY
Phone 25        H. H. Henderson, Prop.
bid*- THEBE 0N CLEVELAND
IT brings the whole country for miles around within easy reach.
Have you seen the new models? They're as graceful as swallows! As
bright as new coin! As weatherproof as aduckl Automobile Steel
Bearings. Frame of English Seamless Steel Tubing. Hard Maple
Rims. Hercules Brake. Everything complete. Heal Quality. Real
Value.  Easy Terms. We are tbe people to mount you right.
J. R. MOOYBOER SBSSSrAKW
Open Saturday Evenings Ull 10 o'Cloek
New Student—Do they ring two
bells for school?
Bright Junior—Nope; they ring
tbe same bell twice.
Being everlastingly oo the job
beats carrying a rabbit's foot for
luck.
KETTLE BIVER ASSESSMENT
DISTRICT.
Three rinks of curlers from Qreenwood played three Grand Forks
rinks on the local ice last Saturday
night. Nine-games were played,
Grand Forks winning four and
GreeuWood four, wbile one game
ended in a draw. After the play the
local club devoted the balance ofthe
evening to entertaining tbe visitors.
The Providence mine at Greenwood resumed work od Saturday
morning after a few days' close
down, caused by the burning of tbe
coil in tbe starter of the compressor.
.TheGrand Forks Junior hockey
team will play Creenweod jeniorsat
Greenwood next Friday night.
J. T. Lawrence has returned from
Vancouver, wbere he attended the
annual convention of the B.C. Fruit
Growers' association as delegate
from fbis city.
A. Setterlund, who is in the pole
business at Cascade, was in the city
on Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. ft, W. Taylor, of
BrldesvjM, were brought to the
Grand Forks hospital line week.
Mrn. Taylor recently hnd her leg
broken and ber husband has been in
poor health for some time.
N. I. Mclnnes returned from a
trip to Spokane on Wednesday.
Miss Katbryn Wren, daughter ol
Mr. aud Mrs. J. L Wren, wae mar
ried at Bellingham, Wasb,, last
Friday to Lome Peck, of Abbots,
ford, where the couple will make
their home.
Thomas Wiseman, Danville, was
brought to the Grand Forke bospi
tal on  Thursday, suffering from  i
severe attack of kidney trouble.
"The residents of Midway," says
the correspondent of tbat town to
Greenwood paper, "would like very
much to see the road department do
something in lbe way of cleaning off
the roads. It ie hard for women and
children to get around, plodding
through deep enow.    In the  Grand
Business neglected is often   lost.
vtOtIGE IS HE11KUY GIVEN, in accordance
*■ * with th* Statutes, that all assessed taxea,
assessed and levied under the "Taxation Act"
and "Public Sohool Aet". arc due and payable
on Februury 15th, 1924.
All taxea collectable lor the Kettle Kiver
Assessment District are due and payable at
my offloe, Government Building*, Pentioton,
B. 0.
This notioe, in terms of law, ls equivalent
to a personal demaad by me upon all peraona
liable for taxea.
Dated at Penticton, B.C.. thia 22nd day of
January, A.D. 1924.
E.T. COPE,
Collector, Kettle River Assessment DUtrlot.
TIMBER 8ALE X5710
SEALED TENDERS will be received by tbe
Diatriot Foreater, Nelson, not later than
noon on the 2nd day of February 1924,
for the purchase of Licence X5710, near
Paaa Creek, N.W. Humming; Bird, to cut 140,
000 board leet o? Sawlogs and 1200 H°wn Ties.
One year will bo allowed lor removal of
timher.
■further particulars ol the Dlatriet Fores
ter, Nelsou.
Ship Your Cream to
The Kettle Valley
Creamery Go.
We par the highest price and assure
you the most accurate tost Give your
ocal creamery your trade.
KETTLE VALLEY CREAMERY COMPANY
UNLESS you see the name "Bayer" on tablets, you
are not getting Aspirin at all
Accept only an "unbroken package" of "Bayer Tablets of
Aspirin," which contains directions and dose worked out by
physicians during 22 years and proved safe by millions for
Colds Headache Rheumatism
Toothache       Neuralgia Neuritis
Earache Lumbago Pain, Pain
nandy "Bayer" boxes of 12 tablets—Also bottles of 24 and 100—Druggists.
Aspirin Is thc trnric mnrk 'refflstrrcr! In Canada) of Bayor Manufacture of Mono-
acctlcaclflcHtor of fcnIJcylicacld. Whllo it is well known that Aspirin means Bayer
manufacture, to assist thu publio against imitations, the Tablets of Bayer Company
will be stamped wltb their general trado mark, tho "Bayer Cross."
DEAFNESS CAN BE|
DBAVNBS9, NOISBS IN TUB UKAD AND
NASAL CATAKBH
|The new Continental remedy called
"LAKMALKNK" (Begd.)
Is a simple harmleaa home-treatment whioh
absolutely curea deaf neai. noise* In the head,
eto.  NO KXPKNSIVK'APi'LlANCBS NBBDKII
for thia new ointment, instantly operates
sou the affected parts with oomplete ano*
irmaueist aucoeas. SGOBBS OF WON UK R
JL CURBS KBPOKBI-.
KKLIABLB TESTIMONY.
RADIO for 1924
The most up-to-date Radio sets today are oar YELCO brand
of Receivers. Onr prices are less, our products better. We
will install it for you and turn on the current the same day
you order the phone.
If yon want your home to be the most attractive place in
town for your boys and girls and for yonrself, put in a Radio,
phone (built with the now Myers tubes) in your most cosy
ronni Not only attractive, it's wonderful! It costs but little;
it entartains must.    Let Us Demonstrate to You.
P.S. — Did you know that last week 50,000 people stood by
and listened to messages sent to citizens of Grand Forks (the
first time) out of the blue sky! But it will happen often here-,
after.
WE ABE IN THE GAME TO STAY
YALE   GENERAL   ELECTRIC
WINNIPEG AVBNUE
Mn.K. Wilk.iiioD, of Slad Road, Stroud,
writes:—"Piea-je oould trouble you to ■end
me another box of the Ointment. It la not for
mytm.i, but for a friend of mine who It at bad
as I wag,and ca -.not get any rest for tba noise i
In the Head. 1 feel a new woman, and oan ko
to bed now and tret a food night's rest, ivnleh
I had not been able to do for many months.
It Is a wonderful remedy and I am most delighted to reco amend it."   :   .   ,
Mrs. E. Oro w.?, of Wltitehorse Boad, Croydon, writes:—"f am pleased to tell you that
thesmall tin ut ointment you sent to me at
Tentnor, has proved a complete suodess, my
hearing U njw quite normal, and the horrl •
ble head noise-t have eeased. The notion of
this new remedy must be very remarkable,
for I have be in troubled with these complaints for nearly ten years, and have had
some of the very best medical advice together
with otber expensive instruments all to no
purpose. I net.11 hardly Bay how very grateful lam. for my life has undergone an aiitlre
change. 	
Try one box t>day,whlch oan beforwarded
to any address on receipt of money order for
11.00.  THBltKISNOTHIdBETTBrt AT  ANY
PHICB.
Address orders to:—
;^1     THB "LAKMALBNH" CO.,
10,South View, Watting St., Dartford,
Kent, England.
WINTER WEAR FOR
iMIN
Men's all wool underwear,
Stanfields and Wool nap
Brand, at $5.00 per suit.
Men's all wool Winter Pants
at $5.00 per pair.
Men's Mackinaws, the very
best, at $12.68 each.
Also full lines of Men's Heavy
^Rubbers, ranging in price
from $3.% to $6.00.
Call and see our stock before
purchasing. We think it
will pay you.
Donaldson's
Phone 20
A. E. MCDOUGAL
'CONTRACTOR ANO BUILDER
Agent
J Dominion Monumental Works
tI)Aab«8tos Produota Co. Roofing
."ESTIMATES FURNISNED
BOX 332
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
Counter
Check Books
We have secured the
agency for Grand
Forks* of a large
Western Publishing
House which manufactures a superior
grade of Counter
Check Books—carbon back and carbon
leaf styles.
Prices Are Right
Encourage Western
enterprises and keep
Western money in
the West.
Any Quantity
from 100 up to 2500
books.
The Sun
Job Department
'Miss Mar.v»i Townt, of Berlin,
N.H., who in tbree years since she
first put on « ski, has achieved
fame throrgh her daring and graceful Jumping, has expressed her desire to cor.:pete with Canada's best
girl ski junipers at the winter sports
carnival in Quebec on February 21,
22, 23 and 24th, during which time
■bs will make exhibition jumps.
Further indications that the year
1923 will create a record in ocean
traJiic are sl-.own by figures given
out at the h-.-adquarters of the Canadian Pacific Steamships. Bookings
for westbound sailings were exceptionally large, while those for sailings to the Old Country for Christmas and the New Year were in advance of the traffic of any previous
year.
The Calvary Board of Trade is
taking interest in the proposal of
large British interests, which involves the utilization of western
straw for the manufacture of paper
and other products, and is getting
all possible information with respect
to the development of industries.
'Hundreds of thousands of tone of
;stmw are burned in the prairies
every year, wbich it is claimed has
•t commercial value.
St. Jovite, Quebec, has been chosen
ence more as a movie location, and
arrangements have been made by
Conrad Nagle and Alma Rubens foi
the transportation of themselves,
partj of 17 and equipment to that
place during the early winter. Last
winter Lionel Barrymore and Seena
Owen located at St Jovite for the
filming of "Snow Blind" prior to
taking other parts of the picture
tround the Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, and Windermere, British Columbia.
Our
/Hobby
is
:Good
Printing
-T<HE value of well-
printed, neat appearing stationery as
a means of getting and
holding desirable business has been amply
demonstrated. Consult us before going
elsewhere.
Wedding invitations
Bail programs
Business cards
' Vbiting cards
Sh'p-ing tags
Letterheads
Statements
Noteheads
Pamphlets
Price lists
Envelopes
Billheads
Circulars
Dodgers
Posters
Menus
New Type
{Latest Style
Faces
THE SUN
Columbia Avenue and
tnke Street
TELEPHONE
R101
THE HUB—Bring your boot
and shoe repairs to my
shop for neat and prompt
work. Look for the big
boot.—GEO.   ARMSON
Yale Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty
P. A. Z. PARE. Proprietor
Yalk Hotrl, Fibst Stkrkt
SYNOPSIS f
UND AMENDMENTS
•RI-IMriONI
Vaoant, ■wreservee. awvere*
Crown lsuuU may be are-ernvtasl ky
British subjeot* over ll yean at age,
ind by aliens oa dsMMrtag IntenUea
o become British suhjeota, ooaal-
lonal upon residenoe, eonaaatten,
nd   Improvement   ter    agrtoaltaral
Full Information naaearnlng ram-
atlona regarding pre-emptloM U
?lven ln Bulletin No. 1. Land iertse.
How to Pre-empt LaM," oosiM W
vhloh can be obtained free M anarfe
•y addressing the Depisrtinent ot
.nnds, victoria, B.O, er ta aar *ba*r-
nment Agent
Records will be Ranted ooveriaa
niy land suitable for agrioultarml
mrposes, and whioh Is not tlmber-
and, i.e., carrying over (-400 beard
.'.-et per acre west of the Oaast lUase
md 8,000 feet per aore eaat of tali
Range.
Applications tet pre-emptions are
be addressed to the Land Oral-
liswloner of the Land Recording Dl-
 » land s
s situated, and are made on -printed
Islon, In whioh tba '.
■ooi-dlng
satr*****
*******
orms,  copies of which oan be eb-
uned from the Land Ceaunlssloaer.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and Improvements mada
to value of (10 per aore. lnoludlng
clearing and cultivating at leaat Are
acres, before a Crown Grant oan be
received.
For more detailed Information aaa
i lie Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PUROHASE
' Applications are received for purchase of vaoant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland,
(or agricultural purposes; minimum
prloe of first-olass (arable) land Is M
per acre, and second-olasB (graaing)
laud $2.60 per acre. Further Information regarding purohase or lease
of Crown lands ls given ln Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purehaae and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exosedlng M aores,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESITE LIASES
Unsurreyed areaa, net exosedlng M
acres, may be leaaed as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
orected In the flrst year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For graslng and   Industrial-   purposes areas not exosedlng 640 aores
may be leased by one person er a
company.
GRAZING
Under tbe Graslng Aot the Provinoe Is divided Into graslng districts
and the range administered under a
Qraalng Commissioner. Annual
graslng permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
'o established owners. Stook-ownsrs
may form associations for range
nanagement. Free, or partially free,
".-rmlts  are available   for    settlers,
't-npers   nnd   travellers,   up   to   ten
• d.
NEW HARNESS SHOP
I have opened a new harness shop and am prepared
to make harness to order
and do all kinds of repair
- work. Shop equipped with
modern machinery. All work
guaranteed:
C. A. Crawford

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