BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Grand Forks Sun and Kettle Valley Orchardist Aug 22, 1919

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xgrandforks-1.0179382.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xgrandforks-1.0179382.json
JSON-LD: xgrandforks-1.0179382-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xgrandforks-1.0179382-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xgrandforks-1.0179382-rdf.json
Turtle: xgrandforks-1.0179382-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xgrandforks-1.0179382-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xgrandforks-1.0179382-source.json
Full Text
xgrandforks-1.0179382-fulltext.txt
Citation
xgrandforks-1.0179382.ris

Full Text

 ^'  /'  and  Kettle Valley OrcharcSist  18TH YEAR���������No   43  GRAND FORKS   B. C, FRIDAY,   AUGUST 22, 1919  /  "Tell me what you Know is true:  I can guess as well as you."  $1.00 PER YEAR  Sanford Evans Declares  British Quotation of  $1.S0 for Wheat Not  Purchase Price  $2.10 for SO per cent No. 1, 20 per  cent .No. 2. Prices for Spies are  $2.75, Delicious $3.25 f.o.b. valley.  Some Macks and Jonathans are being offered-at $2.40. English buyers  have secured considerable apples in  British Columbia for export.���������Fruit  Markets Bulletin.  Winnipeg, Aug 20.���������In an interview tonight on the price of $1.80  set by Great Britain for Canadian  wheat, W. Sanford Evans, who represented the millers at the recent  c inference at Ottawa, said:  "The situation is quite simple.  This price of $1.80 mentioned in  the cable has unqestionably, to my  mind, nothing to do with the price  at which it will re~sell, in'conformity with its policy to insure the nine  penny loaf. Great Britain absorbs  he difference between the purchase  price and the price necessary to allow for the turning out of the fo_r~  pound loaf for nine pence. Canadian  twheatt grading No. 1 Northern, can  not be made into bread for nine  pence a loaf.  "'Last year it cost Great Britain  Ji23-3,000,006 to make up the difference between the price it paid for  wheat and the price at which it had  to be sold to allow for the nine  penny loaf. It had charged prices  lor wheat which were less than the  purchase price.  ''This $1.80 mentioned in the cable is the re sell price. The cable,  in my judgment, has nothing to do  with the purchase price.  '���������The British government will  purchase at whatever price it can  get the wheat, and then sell at a resale price of $1.80 in Eoglaud."  The Week in Calvary  This week has been: cloudy and  cool with occasional showers. The  outlook for feed in the province is  brightening; harvesting has started  at different points. . Business has  been fair considering the sugar shortj  age. The outlook for next week is  not so good. Fruit is hard to sell in  out of town places, owing to uncer  tainty of sugar supply. Eastern refineries 'are accepting orders for  sugar to be delivered as soon as possible. It would take fifty cars to  bring Alberta up to date. Some restaurants had to resort to using brown  sugar this week. A car of fine sour  cherrjes from -Victoria arrived this  week, but found slow sale. Two cars  of Yakima peaches, plums and apricots arrived; 'two cars.of straight  fruit and ten cars mixed fruit and  vegetables from British Columbia  constituted the week's arrivals. Last  week only eleven cars were received.  British Columbia field tomatoes and  cucumbers are arriving in quantity.  Latest wires from Ottawa are to  the effect tbatar. abundance of sugar  is roiling from the east to. the prai  ries, and it is anticipated that the  shortage will be relieved within the j  next few'days.  _ft LS WITH TIRE  RESPONSIBILITY  Property Owner or Occupier Responsible for Ne-  ^li^ence���������Alust Provide  Appliances Ordered  track and fairgrounds, the property;  having been sold for taxes. There  are only a few weeks left in which ;  rodemptioti can be made. A committee of five was appointed, of  which G. H. Hull and Fred Clark  were instructed to see the executors  of the Ruckle estate and endeavor  to make some aarangement in order  thaf-the property be not lost to the  citizens and the Agricultural association.  A Column of  News for the  Fruit Growers  Advance Apple Sales  Trading in Washington was heavy  last week.    Over 50 per cent of the  apple, crop   has   passed   from   the  growers' bands.  Over 100,000 boxes  changed bands daily. The feeling of  buyers is that "prices will increase,"  or "wait and pay more." .Prices are  good and the crop  is  heavy.    Late  winter   apples   are   predicted to go  from So to $7 a box   in   spring, f.o.  b. Yakima.  An   orchard   of  25,000  boxes (Jonathans) sold at $2 40, No  1 $2.20, No. 2 $2  and No. 3 ������1.50.  Deposit   paid.     Delicious,     $3.50;  Winesap, $2.75; Spitz, $2.75;   Jonathan,    $3 35, is   about  the   general  price at orchard gate. ���������  Okaoagan Valley, B. C.���������We find  crops good and demands better; most  all fall apples sold and a  large   pro-  Gonsignment vs. f.o.b.  Shipping  We   notice  a   very   wishy washy  article in the Chicago   Packer, "The  Best Method of   Marketing."    It is  an effort to   show that f.o.b. buying  and consignment are  on a par    The  writer apparently had in mind individual shippers only.    We  offer the  following: F.o.b. buying is   the   off-  spiug of organization.    Organization  was forced on   growers   by   unsatis'  actory    returns   from     consignees  Consignment is price setting by men  vyho do not own what tb,ey sell     F.  o. b. buying is price setting by   men  who do own what they sell.  Potatoes  Reports from British Columbia  indicate about same acreage as last  year with 75 pel cent of the yield.  Alberta same as last year. Saskatch  ewan and Manitoba less acreage than  last year, with yield somewhat  smaller.  The   onus   of   responsibility   for  fires is laid by   amendment to  the  criminal code to the.persons owning,  occupying or  controlling    property  upon which a fire  occurs   or   origi  nates,according to the recent amend-  rnent to the criminal code  of  Cana  da,    which has just come  into  the  hands of the local civic   authorities  It is also made an indictable offence  to   refuse   to make  alterations, re  move materials or to supply  appar  tus when ordered to do by the prop  er authorities.  Everyone is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to two years'  imprisonment who by negligence  causes any fire which occasions loss  of life or loss of property.  The person owning, occupying   or  controlling the   premises  in  which  such a fire occurs or on which  such  a fire originates shall be   deemed   to  have caused'the   tire   through    neg  iigence if such person has   failed   to  obey the  requirements   of any    law  ntended to preveut   fi-'-is o-    which  requires   apparatus   for   the extinguishment   of    fires   or to facilitate  t-������   .    , I ithe escape of persons in   the   event,  of fire, if the jury   finds   that   such  fire   or   the loss of   l.ife or the whole  or any substantial portion of the loss  of property would not have ncuurrpd  if such law had been complied with  When any   Dominion,   provincial  or municipal fire officer or authority  recommeuds to the   owner, lessee or  other person controlling or operating  any building, structure, factory,ship j  yard, vessel, ���������-lock, whajf, pier, s-uv  mill, or yard in which logs or  lumber are stored or held, that any reasonable change, alteration   or  addition should be made  in   or to such  properties, with a view to safeguarding life  or property   from   destruc  tion    by   fire, or that   any   material  Richard Michener arrived in the  city Saturday evening from Vancouver to attend tha funeral of his  brother,the late Pte. Ctaas.' Michener,  who met death by drowning last  week. The funeral was held at 2  o'clock on Sunday afternoon under  the auspices of the K. ''of P. lodge  and the local branch of the G.W.V.  A. The attendance was very large  and the floral offerings, which were  numerous, were very beautiful.  IHT YIELD OP  TO LAST YEAR'S  Vice-President of the Ga-  nadianNatibnal Believes  the Total Will Be About  170,000,000 Bushels  Ernie Miller, ex-M.P.P. for Grand  Forks, arrived in the city on Sunday evening and has been spending  the wsek here. He had been attending court in Penticton, and took this  opportunity of visiting his former  home." He has a big law practice in  Victoria now.  Comparison of Different Kinds of Winter  Stores   for Bees  F. H.McLeod, vice-president of  the Canadian National railways, has  just returned to Toronto from an"extensive survey of the railway property in 'western Canada, and states  }hat he does not think the total  wheet crop of Canada will be any  less than the yield of last year, and  perhaps a little better.  "I would estimate it at 170,000,-  000 bushels," he said.  He intimated that considerable  ehgineering work was about to be  commenced and that already a large  amount of grading on the branch  lines is under way. Some new  bridges are promised and 60 additional miles of track, leading from  the main line to the Peace River  country, are to be constructed in the  immediate future.  II. Rolston Again With  B. G. Telephone Go.  In the experiments with    bees   at  the   Experimental    Farms,    it   was  early recognized that the   nature   of  the   winter   stores   is   an important  factor in successful   wintering,    and  the experiments haveconfiuned this.  Experiments at the Central   Experimental    Farm   indicate    that clover  honey    (alsike   and    white   clover) | oms   |)(,fcU    delated  make reliable, stores for wintering  but poor results have followed the  use of stores that granulate hard  during the winter. A colony wintered on dandelion honey came out in  spring very weak; the honey had  granulated hard and the bees had  uncapped it but ould use very little  of it. In some years a mixed honey  that comes largely from clover,sweet.  clover and other plints, granulttes  hard with the same result and  causes heavy loss. Buckwheat honey  has   been    found    wholesome,    but  Pte. H. Rolston, of the 4th division has rettiined from service oversea- and has rej lined the British  Columbia Telephone company. Be  fore enlisting he was manager at  Kamloops, aud previous to that had  c-harg/i of the office in this <: tv.     He  again to the  Boundary district, J Gibson having  been transferred to Vancouver.  THE WEATHER  ���������e   been . found unwholesome,    especially    in    marshy  isomeofthe  other  honeys   gathered  should be removed   therefrom   withjjn    the    fall    have   b  such view or that any person should  be supplied therefor with such view, j places in Nova Scotia, and have}  and if such recommendation is ap-;CUUt,ef| dysentary and death. In one  proved by an officer in the service'season in northern Ontario, the fall  of his majesty, and if notice of such 'honey was not capped over and  recommendation and approval has | fniled to ripen and was soured, ous-  been personally served   upon   such ? jr,K     dysentary    and    heavy  loss.  The following is the minimum  and maximum temperature for each  day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on E. F. Laws' ranch:  Max. Min.  Aug    15���������Friday   S7 4$  111- Saturday   ....  95 52  17���������Sunday........ 97 54  IS���������Monday  98 51  19���������Tuesday  87 58  20���������Wednesday .. 90 5."!  21 -Thursday  90 53  hictien  Rainfull  0.00  Stirring Her Up  The salesmen are the men who  keep the world from falling fast  asleep. The good old world would  have to quit, and shut   its eys  and  On the Stream of Life  "Women all over the    world   ate  owner, lessee or other person, and  if |l-Jotley containing juices collected by j getting the vote.   Yet they had evry-  after the expiration of   thirty   days ! bees from over ripe   fruit,   killed   a i thing   before," said Col. George    K  from the receipt of such notice such ; ���������0lony   before   spring,   so  also   did J Reeves an antf-suffrage leader.  ' Woman's position reminds me of  a   young   man   and   a girl gliding  otvner.lessee or other person refuses,'Cane syrup   used   as   an   exclusive  neglects or  otherwise   fails   to carry'food    for   wintering     Syrup   made, - _     _        .  out such recommendations to the'from refined sugar, two parts of sii-jt,own a sun dappled stream in Flori  snore a bit, and let the spiders I satisfaction of the officer in the ser- gar to one part of water, fed to thelf,a- T!lRy both were si lent and sad.  please themselves by weaving cob ' vice of his majesty, such owner, ' bees in the early fall, has given fair- j 'J'ne y������ling man's vacation time was  webs o'er the shelves. The world I lessee or other person shall be guilty f |y _00d resul'.s as an exclusive win- j over and ne must go back to the city  would like it well enough to dodder'of an indictable offense and shall be ' ter food, aud na< been found to be ^'tomorrow,  portion of winters placed. Eastern | on with shopworn stufr.and not buy iitible to a fine not exceeding 610:0 the best practi<ai corrective for stores! " 'L^onrost,' he said,'will you float  Canada has bought more than last' anything that's new until its shelves or to imprisonment for any term that are slightly unwholesome. Year  year, New Zealand about same as: were bare to view. No doubt if it ������ot exceeding six months, or to after year at the Ontral Farm, col-  las', year, U S.A. three times greater  could have its way, the world would   both such fine and imprisonment       nnies   on    na'ural   stores that have  drone the live Jong day, and leave its'       - ! been fed liberally   with   this   syrup  business to chance, and gather mil- 7\)/->*_ i r������ ,0/ -rpt/} f^ir\y Cl-"������ ollt slmI)krf;r m spring than  dew on its pants. But, ah! Tbe/'^*^** U' l'1^ ^Uy those that have wintered on the  salesman, keen and fit, he prods the nu'ural s'ores alone.    Syrup   made  world and  chivvies   it, and   gladly      A   meeting  was   held   in the city  from raw cane sugar has  given  less  sales are reported to go across the  line. Prairies not so heavy as last  year. No American sales are reported at prairie points, prices being  prohibitive.    Saskatchewan     Grain  Growers will buy in B.C. this year,   squanders railroad fare to  keep   the  hall Thursday evening   to   consider satisfactory results than   that  I rices   of   ordinary    varieties   run I moths out of its hair. ways and means of saving  the  race from refined su-ar.  i'.le  always with me down  the stream of  life?'  "'The same as  now?'   she   murmured.  " 'The same as now,' said he.  " 'Yes,yes���������gladly,' the girl (Tied,  There was a glint as of  triumph   in  her eyes.  For he was rowing,   doing  all the hard work, while she, reelin  ing on a silken cu-hion,  -leered," THE   SUN.    GRAND   FORKS,   B. C.  News of the City  William J Pearson, a returned  soldier wbo is now with the provincial fire patrol for this district, left  for Nelson on Tuesday evening to  meet his fiancee, Miss Mabel Mansfield, of Leyton, England, who ar~  rived in Nelson on the Crow boat  that night. They were married on  Wednesday by F.H. Graham, of St.  Saviour's church. On their arrival  in this city, the couple will take up  their residence in the Larsen house  ou Victoria avenue.  W. P. Thomson, teller at the Royal  bank before the war, who has been  visiting Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Spink  since his return from the front, left  on Saturday for Havana, Cuba,  where he has accepted a position  with the same financial  institution.  city.  At one time be was a member  of the Grand Forks hockey team.  Mrs. King, wife of Capt. King, of  the Mounted Police, will arrive in  the city from Vancouver in a couple  of days.      . .  Mrs. Frank, of W-liace, Idaho, is  visiting, her uncles,- the Frache  brother's.  W. Blackburn was down from the  Kock Candy during the week visiting his family.  C. Newman, of Trail,visited at the  home of his mother-in-law, Mrs.  Zuelkie, over the week end.  LIFT OFF CORNS!  Apply few drops then.lift sore,  touchy corns off with  fingers  Peter A Z Pare thinks that the  people who think that he intended  to keep his barber shop closed forever because he took a one day's  vacation irip are badly mistaken.  He is doing husin^ss at the old  stand. ���������  Monday evet.ing Mrs.   E    Sprag  gett was taken to the  Grand   Forks  hospital, where she submitted to an  operation for   appendicitis    She  is  r ported to be recovering rapdly.  Tom Newby, B.   J.   Averil  J.   McDonald   came    down  Franklin camp on Monday.  and  from  Miss Jean Manson, of Chicago, is  visiting her brother, George Mau-  son.  A. D Morrison will harvest this  fall the biggest grape crop he ever  laised. Pie is unable to supply the  demand.  A  Complete  Stock  of  Jewelry and Silverware  "\  Everything that can please and charm your friend.  Before going elsewhere, give us a call and inspect  our stock.  "Quality Jewellers"  Bridge Street,'".- Next Door B. C. Telephone Office  Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty  J  to  Doesn't hurt a bit! Drop a little  Freezone on an aching corn, instantly  that corn stops'..hurting, then you lift  it right out.    Yea, magic!  A tiny hottle of ITreezone costs hut a  few cents at any drug store, but is, sufficient to remove every hard corn, soft  corn, or corn between the toes, and the  calluses, without soreness or irritation.  Freezone is the sensational discovery  ;f a Cincinnati genius.    Jt is wonderful.  C. Jensen came down from the  Rock Candy mine on Monday. He  expects to return to Lynch creek  and take a sub-contract cutting  posts.  Leo Milder and A E.S������.vage are  planniig to use a flotation for the  ore on the dump of the Cariboo mine  at Camp McKinney.  Mrs. J. Bn;wn his re'U'ne-i to  Christina Lake, afte-. sppndins two  we.i k������ in Grand Forks as the gue-ts  of Mrs. G. E. MassieT  R������v and Mrs. P. C Herman left  Wedneseay mornine for Spokanp,  where they will sp������nd a 'en davs'  vacation. During thi ir'ibserr-p Holy  Trinity church and the Sunday  school will be closed.  W. G. Campbell, of Kettle Falls*  Wash., visited with his daughter  Mrs. A 0. Frache, last week.  ��������� Miss Vera Kid well and A.  send, of Laurier, Wash, are  of Mrs   A. 0. Frache.  I own-  iiiests  If we don't get a rain pretty soon  we are afraid we shall soon be compelled to carry water for our bees.  This will 'bf another task that is  liable to bring premature grey hairs  to the apicultural editor's head  The system of coke   ovens   opera  ated by the Granby at   Anyox   cost  ������2,700,000, and have a capacity   of  270 tons daily.  ��������� Some ore is being taken   nut   and  sacked oy the lessees of the Yankee  Girl mine, west of this city. A ship  ment, will soon be "made.'"'  S G. Blaylock has been appoint  ed treneral manager for the Con  solidated company.  Reports from various parts of the  valley indicate that there will be a  fair fruit crop in the unirrigated  orchards.  James Hutton left on Sunday  night for Anyox. where he will  work for the Granby company.  W. B. Buckwortb, of Vancouver,  who is interested hi the Grand  Forks Townsite company, was a visitor in the city this week.  Arthur Baumgartner, of  Oroville,  Wash., is visiting his parents in this  Death of Mrs. Mudge  After a lingering illness, Mrs.  tanny Elizabeth Mudge, wife of  Charles Mudge, died at her home in  j this city on Sunday evening of can  cer. She was aged 54 years and 10  months. The family has resided  here for a number of years, Mr.  Mudge being a clerk in the govern  ment office. Her only daughter predeceased her last week. She is survived by her husband and two sons,  both of whom but recently rettm ed  from service overseas. Deceased had  a wide circle of warm personal  friends, all of whom extpnd their  profoundest sympathies to the be  reaved family.  The funeral    was   held   Tuesday  afternoon from Holy Trinity church  to Evergreen  cemetery,   R������v.   Hay  man conducting r,hn servir.e.  From experiments carried on on  an extensive scale this summer in  the Son Orchard it has been demon  straied beyend the shadow of a  dount that first-class Flemish  Beauty pe-yrs' can be growu with  less water than is required to grow  a second quality apple.  A strike at a depth of 242 feet is  reported from the Molly Gibson near  Paulson.  A Willing Sacrifice  We have a neighbor whom we knew  to be greatlv devoted to her own  family, but until we hud our first thun  .derstoi'iu in California,writes a friend,  we did tint- know that she-was entirely lacking in a proper sense of humor  1 heard her calling in the midst-'of  the storm, and opened my wnidow.  "Is Mr. Hunter at home?" she said  exciredly. '"I had a dreadful shook  when I took down the. telephone re  ceiver, and I want him to come over  and put it back on the hook."  ���������'Isn't Mr. Roberts at home?'' I  suggested.  "Oh, yes. He is in the garage with  the boys, but you know I think it is  very dangerous to handle the thing, so  I dou't want to call them."  Clothes Cleaned, Pressed  Repaired and Dyed  At the Singer Store  GIRLS! WHITEN YOUR SKIN  WITH LEMON JUICE  Make a beauty lotion for, a ^w centsto  remove tan, freckles, sallowness.  In  the Matter   of    the   Estate  of  Elmer Hill, Deceased  Grand Forks Transfer Company  DAVIS h HANSEN, Proprietors  City Baggage and General Transfer  Coal and Wood For Sale  Office at R. F. Petrie's Store  Phone 64  NOTICK IS HKliKBY GIVEN that all Creditors and persons havfug iinv claims or demands auuiust the Estate of Elmer Hi 1, late  of 11 rand i.orks, British Columbia, Intestato,  who died on the 25th day of January, 1919, are  required on orbufore the thirteenth day of  ScptembiT, jyj'J. to send in particulars of  their claims and demands, duly verified by  Statutory Declaration, to the undersigned  Solicitor for P. JetVerso" Davis, the duly ap-  p inted Administrator of the Kstate of the  deceased.  AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE, that after  such lust mentioned ilato, tin: said Adininli-  trator will proceed to distribute the Assets of  the deceased among the parties entitled  thereto, having regard only to thechiims of  which he shall have had notice, and that the  Administrator will not be liable for the said  Assets or any part thereof to any person or  persons ot whose claims notice sliuli not have  been received by him at the time of such  distribution.  And Further Take Notioe. that any person  or persons indebted to the Estate of the deceased, are required to pay the same tome  forthwith.  Dated this thirteenth day of August, 1919.  JAMES H. RYUiY,  1 and 2 Davis Kluck, Bridge Street.  Grand Forks. B. C,  Solicitor for the AdminJstrutor.  Your grocer lias tlie lemons and any  drug store or toik't countuv will supply  von with throe ounces of orchard white  for a few cents. Squeeze the juice of  two fresh lemons into it bottle, thou put  in the orchard white and shake well.  This makes a quarter pint of this very  best lemon skin whitener and complexion  beautifier known. Massage this fragrant, creamy lotion daily into the face,  neck, arms and hands and just see how  freckles, tan, sallowness, redness and  roughness disappear and how smooth,  soft and clear the skin becomes. Yes!  It is harmless, and the beautiful results  will surprise you.  BOOT   REPAIRING  TAKE   vour   repairs  to   Annson,  shoe   re  I     pairer.     The    Hub.     i.ooU   for  the   Big  Boot.  E. E. Gibson is moving from this  city to Penticton.  Sheet music, vocal and instrumental, 15 cents, at the Singer  Store.  Those wishing neat sign painting  to ornament their business places  should call on W. P. O'Connor, a  returned soldier.  CLEVELAND  RED BIRD  a n<  Cvcline  is  easy  when  you   ride  a  Cleveland or a lied Bird  S$cfc. tho wheels that run -o,tblyj"oar-alter    g JjJ^Q  SmewSain'toyoiiVny misy snle phm nn terms.    _  ir,t class repair work done in   Bhck.mithin^   Hni_inR,   An-  rninum   Soldering, Oxy-Acc.yleno  Welding,   Woodwork, fctc.  MOOYBOER aBXJftV &������k������T\\  Optn Siilnrilny Kv<m.mi������h Till 10 ..'Clock  ____S_BEBSS3HSESS5G!:������ESa_2  ,������i__^_ffi____*__S!8SBl  In   the Matter   of   the   Kstate   of  Jasper Marcinek. Deceased  NOTIl'E IS HEKEI5Y I'ilVKN that all Creditors mid persons having eluims or do  miindMittiiinst the Kstate of .Iitspc.r Viarelnt.-k,  Irttoof Hale, Hritisb Columbia, Seetion-tn -n,  who died on the '-'I'll dny of Jlny, WW, iir*.'  I ������r by ii -quired on or before tho thirteenth  day of Si*i>ieiiil>i'r, 1919, to Bond in particulars  oi "their clainiMind demands, only verified by  JTtiitntory Drclnnitioii, to the under?i;riied  Solieitol for I', .lell'ruon Piivls the duly up-  lioint.cn Administrator of the Estate of the  deceased.  AN) FUUTHEIS TAKE NOTICE, that after  mieli last nieiittoned ilate the said Administrator will proceed todistribute tue Assrts of  the dneoiiseo anion}; the purtiea entitlod  thereto, hnviHK regard only to the claims of  which he shall then have had notice, and that  Ihcxal'l Adtiiiul-trutor will not bo liable for  Ihe Jaitl Assets or any part tlioivof to any pot -  sons or persons of whose clniins notice shall  not have been received by h'tinui the time of  such distribution-  Anil Further Take Notion, that any person  or persons Indebted to the Kstate of the do-  neiiseil, are required to pay the same to me  forthwith.  Dated this thirteenth day of August, 1919.  JA'IKS II. ltYl,KY,  I and'JDuvb  'lock. Brh j:o Street,  Or:   ol l''orl:s,  tt   c.,  Solleitor I'm' tho Administrator.  Job Printing at The Sun office at  practically the same prices as before  he big war started.  Yale Barber Shop  Razor Honing a Specialty^  i  You can not reach The Sun's  numerous readers except through  its advertising columns.  War  Thrift.  Savings   Stamps   Promote  AND PICTURE FRAMING  Furniture  Made  to Order.  Also Repairing of all Kinds.  Upholstering Neatly   Done  R. C. McGUTCHEON  WINNIPEG AVESUF  P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor  Yale Hotel, First Street  P, C. PETERSEN  GENERAL TRANSFER BUSINESS  AND DEALER IN  AND  F. Downey's iiigar Sture  First Street  AT YOUR  SERVICE  Modern liigs  and Good  Horses at All Hours at  the  Model Livery Bam  M. H. Burns, Prop.  Phone 68 Second Street VMS//  ���������/.  I    ZesislH  and  Kettle Valley Orchardist  18TH YEAR-No   43  GRAND FORKS   B, C,FRIDAY,   AUGUST 22, 1919  "Tell me what you Know is true:  1 can guess as wel! as you."  $1.00 PER YEAR  RED 10  SELLING PRICE  Sanford Evans Declares  British Quotation of  $1.S0 for Wheat Not  Purchase Price  82.'10 for SO per cent No. 1, "20 per  cent No. 2. Prices for Spies are  ���������2.75, Delicious $3.25 f.o.b. valley.  Some Macks and Jonathans are being offered.at ������2.40. English buyers !  have secured considerable apples in  British Columbia for export.���������Fruit  Markets Bulletin.  Winnipeg, Aug 20.���������In an interview tonight on the price of $1.80  set by Great Britain for Canadian  wheat, W. Sanford Evans, who represented the ���������millers at the recent  conference at Ottawa, said:  "The situation is quite simple.  This price of $1.80 mentioned in  the cable has unqestionably, to my  mind, nothing to do with the price  at which it will re-sell, in'conformity with its policy to insure the nine  penny loaf. Great Britain absorbs  he difference between the purchase  price and the price necessary to allow for the turning out of the four-  pound loaf for nine pence. Canadian  twheatt grading No. 1 Northern, can  not be made into bread for nine  pence a loaf.  "Last year it cost Great Britain  ������235,000,000 to make up the difference betweeu the price it paid for  wheat aud the price at which it had  to be sold to allow for the nine  penny loaf. It hat! charged prices  lor whtal which were Jess lhau the  purchase price. j  "This $1.SO mentioned in the cable is the re sell price. The cable,  in uiy judgment, has nothing to do  witti the purchase price.  '���������-The British government will  purchase at whatever price it can  get the wheat, and then sell at a reside price of $1.80 in England."  The Week in Calvary  This week has   been cloudy   and  cool with occasional   showers.    The  outlook for feed   in the  province is  brightening; harvesting  has  started  at  different   points. . Business   has  been fair considering thesugarsbortj  age. The outlook for  next   week   is  not so good.    Fruit is hard to sell in  out of town places, owing  to   uncer  tainty of sugar supply.    Eastern  refineries   are   accepting   orders    for  sugar to be delivered as soon as possible. It would  take   fifty   cars   to  bring Alberta up to date.   Some restaurants had to resort to using brown  sugar this week.    A car of fine sour  cherrjesfrom   Victoria arrived  this  week, but found slow sale. Two cars  of Yakima peaches, plums and apricots   arrived;  'two  cars of  straight  fruit and ten cars   mixed   fruit  and  vegetables   from   British  Columbia  constituted the week's arrivals.   Last  week only eleven cars were received.  British Columbia field tomatoes and  cucumbers are arriving in quantity.  Latest wires from Ottawa are to  the effect thntar. abundance of sugar  is rolling from the east to _ the. prai ,  ries, and it -is anticipated that the  shortage will be relieved within the  next few'days.  IS WITH FI  RESPONSIBILITY  Property Owner or Occupier Responsible for Ne-  ^li^ence���������Must Provide  Appliances Ordered  A Column of  News for the  Fruit Growers  Advance Apple Sales  Trading in Washington was heavy  last week.    Over 50 per cent of the  apple, crop   has   passed  from   the  growers' bands.  Over 100,000 boxes  changed hands daily. The feeling of  buyers is that "prices will increase,"  or "wait and pay more." .Prices are  good and the crop  is   heavy.    Late  winter   apples   are   predicted to go  from $5 to $7 a box   in  spring, f.o.  b. Yakima.  An   orchard   of  25,000  boxes (Jonathans) sold at ������2 40, No  1 $2.20, No. 2 $2  and No. 3 $1.50.  Deposit   paid.     Delicious,     $3.50;  Winesap, $2.75; Spitz, $2.75;  Jonathan,    B'-i 35, is   about the   general  price at orchard gate. ���������  Okaoagan Valley, B. C���������We find  crops good and demands better; most  Consignment vs. f.o.b.  Shipping  Point  We   notice   a   very   wishy wasbv  article in the Chicago   Packer, "The  Best Method of   Marketing."    It is  an effort to   show that f.o.b. buying  and consignment are  on a par    The  writer apparently had in mind individual shippers only.    We   offer the  following: F.o.b. buying is   the   off-  spiiig of organization.    Organization  was forced on   growers   by   unsatis  actory    returns   from     consignees  Consignment is price setting by men  who do not own what they sell     F.  o. b. buying is price setting by   men  who do own what thpy sell.  The  onus   of   responsibility   for  fires is laid by   amendment  to  the  criminal code to the persons owning,  occupying or  controlling   property  upon which a fire  occurs   or   origi  nates,according to the recent amendment to the criminal code of  Cana  da,    which has just come  into  the  hands of the local civic   authorities  It is also made an indictable offence  to   refuse   to make  alterations, re  move materials or to supply   appar  tus when ordered to do by tbe prop  er authorities.  Everyone is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to two years'  imprisonment who by negligence  causes any lire which occasions loss  of life or loss of property.  The person owning, occupying or  controlling the pretnises in which  such a fire occurs or on which such  a fire .originates shall'be deemed to  have caused the tire through nog  ligence if such person has failed to  obey the requirements of any law  ntended to prevent fi-'-JS'o1 which  requires apparatus for the extinguishment of fir^s or. to facilitate  ithe escape of persons in the event  of fire, if the jury   finds   that   such  track and fair grounds, the property j  having been sold  for   taxes.    There'  are only a few   weeks   left in which \  rodemption can be .made.    A  committee   of   five    was   appointed, of  which   G. H. Hull and   Fred   Clark  were instructed to see the  executors  of the Ruckle  estate  and  endeavor  to make some aarangement  in order  that--the .property be not lost  to the  citizens and tbe Agricultural association.  Richard Michener arrived in the  city Saturday evening from Vancouver to attend tho funeral of his  brother.the late Pte. Chas.' Michener,  who met death by drowning last  week. The funeral was held at 2  o'clock on Sunday afternoon under  the auspices of the K. of P. lodge  and the local branch of the G.W.V.  A. The attendance was very large  and the floral offerings, which were  numerous, were very beautiful.  Vice-President of the Ga-  nadianNational Believes  the To tal Will Be About  170,000,000 Bushels  Ernie Miller, ex-M.P.P. forGrand  Forks, arrived in the city on Sunday evening and has been spending  tbe wsek here. He had been attending court in Penticton, and took this  opportunity of visiting his former  home." He has a big law practice in  Victoria now.  Comparison of Different Kinds of Winter  Stores   for  Bees  F. H. McLeod, vice-president of  the Canadian National railways, has  just returned to Toronto from an'extensive survey of the railway property in western Canada, and states  jhat he does not think the total  wheet crop of Canada will be any  less than the yield of last year, and  perhaps a little better.  "I would estimate it at 170,000,-  000 bushels," he said.  He intimated that considerable  engineering work was about to be  commenced and that already a-large  amount of gradiog on the branch  lines is under way. Some new  bridges are promised and GO additional miles of track, leading from  the main line to the Peace River  country, are to be constructed in the  immediate future.  H. Rolston Again With  B. G. Telephone Go.  of property would not have, occurred  if such law had been complied with  When any   Dominion,   provincial  or municipal fire officer or authority  In the experiments with    bees   at  the   Experimental    Farms,    it   wasl    plft> H. Rol.-ton, of the   -Ith  divi-  | early recognized that the   nature    of Lj()n h���������H returned from service over-  the   winter   stores   is   an important Leaa   ;lnd   has   r.-j-lined   the Brinsh  factor in successful    wintering,    and | Columbia Telephone company.    Be  fore enlisting he was manager fit  Kamloops, aud previous to that had  cbarg'vof tbe office in thise ty. films been deb-gated again to the  Boundary district, J Gibson having  been transferred to Vancouver.  the experiments haveconfiimed this.  Experiments at the Central   Ex peri  (ire   or   the loss of   life or tbe whole  merital    Farm   indicate    that clover  or any substantial portion of the loss   1)oney    (M|-ike   and    white   clover)  make reliable, stores for wintering,  but poor results have followed the  use of stores that granulate hard  during tbe winter. A colony winter  recommeuds to the owner, lessee or ed on dandelion honey came out in  other person controlling or ooeratir.g j sprin_ very weak; the honey had  any building, structure, factorship |granulated hard and   the   bees    had  THE WEATHER  Potatoes  Reports from British Columbia  indicate about same acreage as last  year with 75 pel cent of the yield.  Alberta same as last year. Saskatch  ewan and Manitoba less acreage than  last year, with yield somewhat  smaller.  yard, vessel, dock, whajf, pier, saw  mill, or yard in which logs or   lum  her are stored or held, that any reasonable change, alteration   or  addi  tion should be made  in   or to such  properties, with a view to safeguarding life  or property   from   destruc  tion    by   fire, or that   any   material J  should be removed   therefrom   with  such view or that any person should  uncapped it but could use very little  of if. In some years a mixed honey  that comes largely from clover,sweet  clover and other plants, granulates  bard with the same result and  causes heavy loss. Buckwheat honey  bus been found wholesome, but  'some of the other honeys gathered  in    tbe    fall    have   been .found un-  The following is the minimum  and maximum temperature for each  day during the past week, as recorded by the government thermometer on K. V. Laws' ranch:  1  Max.  Min.  Ann    15-  87  48  10-  Saturday   ..  .. 95  5_  17-  ��������� 07  54  1S-  98  5-1  19-  .. S7  oS  20-  -Wednesday  .. 90  5."!  21 -  90  5:i  hic.Iie*  Rainfall ...  .   0.00  Stirring Her Up  The salesmen are the men who  keep the world from falling fast  asleep. The good old world would  have to quit, and shut  its eys  and  wholesome, especially in marshy  be supplied therefor with such view, j p|ace3 in Nova Scotia, and have,  and if such recommendation is ap~; call^d dysentary and death. In one j Rainfall  proved by an officer in the service; season iu northern Ontario, the fall  of his majesty, and if notice of such1 honey was not capped over and  recommendation and approval has'failed to ripen and was soured, cms-  been personally served   upon   suchjj,,,,     dysentary    and    heavy    loss.,  owner, lessee or other person, and if j-l-j0ney containing juices collected by [getting toe vote. Yet they had evry  after the expiration of thirty days bees from over ripe fruit killed a | thing before," said Col. George K  from the receipt of such notice such   colony   before   spring,  so also   did ! Reeves an antf-sufTrage leader  On the Stream of Life  "Women all over the    world   are  an   exclusive  Syrup   made  .' Woman's position reminds me of  a young man and a girl gliding  down a sun dappled stream in Flori  owner.lessee or other person refuses,   cane syrup   used   as  neglects or otherwise   fails   to carry  food    for   wintering      ^..,   t  .w .,,���������  ������������������_  out such   recommendations   to   the  from refined sugar, two parts of   su-; "������-������������" il *>1111 uuppicu stream in non  j snore  a   bit,   and   let  the    spiders satisfaction of tbe officer in tbe   ser-'gar lo one part of water, fed to   the'(,a- 'L'hey both were silent and   sad.  'please themselves by   weaving   cob ! vice   of   his   majesty,   such owner, ' bees in the early fall, has given fair- I Tlje young man's vacation time was  . webs o'er  the shelves.    Tbe   world j lessee or other person shall be guilty ^ |y _ood resul's as an exclusive   win-{over and hmnust go back to the city-  all fall apples sold and a large   pro-J would like it well enough  to dodderof an indictable offense and shali  be  ter food, aud h<>< been found   to   be (r tomorrow  portion of winters   placed.    Eastern | on with shopworn stuff.and not buy  liable to a fine not exceeding  810:0 the beet practical corrective for stores  Canada has bought more   than   last! anything that's new until its shelves or tc imprisonment   for   any   term  that are slightly unwholesome.   Year  n.r        ri    ���������      ,     . i     - -   ��������� i -~ j    .^.i���������   tutu cim Rii^nu v iin .v noiesome.   i ear  '  year,   New   Zealand   about same as j were bare to view.     No doubt   if   it  not  exceeding   six    mouths, or   to after vear "at t'be Central Farm   col-1������  il������<   VPfir     ITS   A    thrufi  timou    "ra.iti.->  I.I   i    :. . .   . ..     l     .1 i     ,. ... * iujuj,   i-ui    ,  las', year, U S.A. three times greater could have its way, the world would   both such line and imprisonment  sales are reported to  go   across   the drone the live long day, and leave its        -  business to chance, and gather mildew  on  its   pants.    But, ah  line. Prairies not so heavy as last  year. No American sales are reported at prairie pointp, prices being  prohibitive. Saskatchewan Grain  Growers will buy in B.C. this year.  Prices   of   ordinary    varieties   run ' moths out of its hair.  onies   on    m.'ural   stores that have  been fed liberally   with   this   syrup  ;erThe" News of the City r,eo,> fl78er in Hpr7 thnn  ���������     1Qe ' <y   loose    that    have   wintered   on the  salesman, keen and fit, he prods the   ������������������,_,,,, s,MrP8 aIorie.    Syrup   made  world and   chivvies   it, and   gladly      A   meeting  was   held   in Ihe eity  from ra v cane sugar has  given  less  squanders railroad fare to   keep   the  hall Thursday evening   to   consider satinfa^ory results than   that   made  ways and means of saving   the  race  from refined sugar.  1     " 'Dearest,' he said,'will you float  always with me down the stream ot  ife?'  "'The same as   now?'   she    murmured.  " 'The same as now,' said he.  " 'Yes.yes���������gladly,' the girl cried.  There was a glint as of   triumph   in  her eyes.  For he was rowing,   doing  all the hard work, while she, recliu  ing on a silken cushion,   -teercd."  rif_*%ri^^ \������-< *\ ....tl'- i������j .f-n  ���������f-TMi5.J*.������T_tJ?/.'a?,-*/>-'������������r.-^ira...i,-i,(  SS&3  ���������SSsr  THE   SUN,    GRAND   FORKS,    B. G.  ������te (irattil Storks #mt  AN  INDEPENDENT  NEWSPAPER  G.  A.  EVANS, EDITOR AHD PUBLISHER  SUBSCRIPTION RATES���������PAYABLE IN ADVANCE  One'Year'(in Canada and Great Britain)....... ...SI 00  One Year (in the United States)' 1.50  Address all communications to  Thh Grand'Fouks Suk,  ] lor 101 R Ghand'Forties, B.C.  ���������OFFICE:    COLUMBIA AVENUE AND LAKE STREET.  FRIDAY, AUGUST 22.  1919  The greatest enemies of a city are the short-  visioned men who imagine that they can build  up their own particular section of the town by  tearing down another section. Most towns  have these people, and Grand Forks has been  very unfortunate in this respect. She has had  her sha.ie, and apparently some of them are  still operating here. The damage they have  done, and are still doing, will require decades  to- repair.  fr_ed' from this particular necessity, of toil for  otherand more useful work. Now that. the  price of labor has risen beyond the wildest  dreams of a faw pears ago, we are approaching an era when, wherever possible, human  energy will be replaced by pVechanical'or. electrical power. If we are to. attain a condition  of production that will give us a chance of  successful competition in the world's market,  it must be through the most determined efforts  at cheap power production and all possible  saving in the field of human labor. ��������� The great  power enterprises of the present day give opportunities such as have not yet been realized!  f-  In his suit again t the Chicago Tribune' for  libel, Henry Ford was awarded 6 cents damages. This amount will probably build a  Ford car.  :sV  A Practical Suggcrtion  ' Many of our.patrons have found it both convenient and  time saving to have an extra pair of "lasers on hand in  case they .break the ones they aje wearing. The extra pair  enables von to continue with vour work without the loss  of time consum������d iu waiting for repairs or  replacements.  AD.  JEWELER AND OPTICIAN  GRAND FORKS, B.C.  V  J!  It should not be very difficult for a sane  person to perceive that if he can not secure  an enterprise or a business concern for his own  immediate vicinity, he will derive an equal  amount of benefit from it if it locates in another part of the town, or even in a near by  town. But this is a viewpoint that can never  be acquired by some people, and many a  promising young town has been depopulated  by them.  In Grand Forks sectional strife and. bickering has retarded the growth of the city more  than the average person is willing to admit.  Had it not been for this unfortunate element  in our local life, there would be twice our  present population in the city today. One section of the town has, in fact, been partially  torn down, but the part that expected to benefit by it has gained, nothing. On the contrary,  it has lost. Anyone who has eyes can see this.  The same is like warfare. Even the winner is  loser.  It may interest those who wear artificial silk  stockings to know that they are made of gun-  cotton. One of the most difficult problems  that Count de Chardonnet, the inventor of artificial silk, had to solve was to make it non  explosive; but he succeeded in doing so, and  during his experiments with artificial .silk he  made discoveries about manufacturing high  explosives that .-von for him the cross of a  chevalier of the Legion of Honor.  Once again the Khyber' Pass, which is fa"  miliar to all bvvIio have read Mr. Kipling's  stories and poems of India, has been the storm  centre..of a border war between the followers  of the Ameer of Afghanistan and the soldiers  ofthe British empire. Since the beginning of  history that nairow defile, winding between  cliffs of shale and limestone, has been the hisjh-  way into India from the northwest, whence  came once upon a time the hosts of Genghis  Khan and of Alexander the Great. There has  been so much fighting and slaughter in the  Khyber Pass that the very stones on its arid  hillsides might well be the bones of men killed  in its defense.  The above remarks apply with equal force  to the people in our rural district. Many a  prospective settler has gone away disgusted  because some man with a parcel of land for  sale got a-hold of him and attempted to make  him believe that he had the only land in the  valley worth owning.  There is a difference between sectional strife  and good natured rivalry. Strife is warfare,  and destroys the property of both the vanquished and the victor. Rivalry is keen competition between neighbors in an endeavor to  excell in improving their property. The two  elements are antipodal.  The subject of water power is one of great  interest in Canada. The benefits which we  have a right to anticipate from our wealth in  this valuable resource arc being more and  more truly appreciated in this country. In connection   with   the   value of water powers, the  The real leaders of men, who alter the fate  of uations and mould the destiny of mankind,  must be thinkers, must have some sort of hieh  conviction, some far-envisaged purpose, even  if it be only that of their own lofty mission to  carry out the will of fate. A frock coat, a  pleasant smile, a kindly and sympathetic word  for everyone, even an abundant and unfailing  flow of platform eloquence, although they may  give temporary political success, can never insure lasting glory or permanent accomplishment. Those come to the man of ideas and  ideals, says the Youth's Companion, -On the  other hand, if the great statesman must have  convictions, he must not. be too set or fixed in  the pursut of theni. He must be "ready to  yield, to adapt himself, to adjust himself. He  must consult others, defer to others, at least  in non essential; be able to see the good in the  ideas of others as well as in his own. The road  to success, even to ideal success, in this complicated world is rarely direct and forthright;  it often leads through obscure and winding  ways to final find entire achievement. It is  noble to resist compromise, when compromise  is base: but compromise is often far from base  and may be essential. Opportunism is an unpopular   word,   but   it is a word that in many  Of all present-day Sewing Machines.  Why buy* a machine at which you have  to sit in an awkward position, when you  may just as well have one with which it  is a pleasure to sew? The White Rotary  Sit-Strate is just the machine you want  Sold on easy monthly payments bjj  chiller (2& Gardner  Complete Home Furnishers  no  IClectrial World, commenting on remarks by leases represents a valuable and useful thing.  Dr. George Otis Smith, director of the United j Wo need not approve ihe profoundly ironical  States geological survey, states that, in tlie remark of tlu; comic-opera statesman, 'Tt is.  run, the utilization of water power means the j by never thinking where I was going myself  saving of human energy for purpose to which jthat I. have learned to lead others." But it is  power-driven machinery is not yet adapted. j true that a leader who ha.< eyes always on a  The mere change from steam [lower to water j high and distant goal will sometimes appear  power is not only significant of lower costs in '  urn   pi  reduced to $5 an acre; second-class to  $2.60 an acre.  Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.  Becorda -will be granted covering only  land suitable for agricultural purposes  and which is non-timber land.  Partnership pre-emptions abolished,  but parties of not more than four may  arrange for adjacent pre-emptions  with Joint residence, but each making  necessary improvements on respective  claims.  Pre-emptors must occupy claims for  five years and make improvements to  value of J10 per acre, including clearing and cultivation of at least 5 acres,  before receiving Crown Grant.  Where pre-emptor in occupation not  less than 3 years, and has made pro-t  portionate improvements, he may, be-f  cause of ill-health, or other cause, be'  granted intermediate certificate of improvement and transfer his claim.  Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent of  $300 per annum and records same each  year. Failure to make improvements  ������r record same will operate as forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained in  less than 5 years, and improvements  of $10.00 per acre, including 5 acres  cleared and cultivated, and residence  of at least 2 years are required.  Pre-emptor holding Crown grant  may record another pre-emption, if he  requires land In conjunction with his  farm, without actual occupation, provided statutory improvements made  and residence maintained on Crown  granted land.   .  Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20  acres, may be leased as homesites:  title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.  For grazing and industrial purposes  areas exceeding 640 acres may be  leased by one person or company.  Mill, factory or industrial sites on  timber land not exceeding 40 acres  may be purchased; conditions include  payment of stumpage.  Natural hay meadows inaccessible  by existing roads may be purchased  conditional upon construction of a road  to them. Rebate of one-half of cost of  road, not exceeding half of purchase  price, is made.  PRE-EMPTORS'      FREE  ACT.  GRANTS  manufacturing and of the saving of the earth's  to disregard it or fo.iget it, for the sake of taking advantage of paths that momentarily turn  stored fuel for its more important uses, but it-in another direction. There are two essentials  relieves the labor necessary in milling the coal j of the very highest leadership: a real belief  and the still greater burden of transporting it. jthat humanity is capable of advancing farther  Every water power harnessed  and   displacing ] and farther toward ideal good, and a ma<>"ical, irich man wIl0,wi11 f !"e yT princo,y  -- .        -. ! o o        '   allowance,    ri wo dollars, pleaso.  The scope of this Act is enlarged to  include all persons Joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The  time within which tho heirs or deviseea '  of a deceased pre-emptor may apply  for tiUe under this Act is extended  from for one year from the death of  such person, as formerly, until one  year after the conclusion of the present  war. This privilege is also made retroactive.  No fees relating to pre-emptions are  due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26, 1018.  Taxes are remitted for Ave years.  Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August  ���������4, 1914, on account of payments, fees  or taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.  Interest on agreements to purchase  town or city lots held by members of  Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired  direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31. 1920.  SUB-PURCHASERS   OF   CROWN  LANDS.  Provision made for Issuance of  Crown grants to stu-b-purchasers of  (.'f.,\vn Lands, acquiring rights from  purchasers who failed to complete  purchase. Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, ln-  Uiu.a :ind t.-ixcs. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original par-  col, purchase price due and taxes may  bo distributed proportionately over  whole area. Applications must bo  made by May 1, ll)_0.  GRAZING.  Ornzlng Act, 1919, for systematic  development of livestock industry provides foe grazing districts and range  adtnlni.sj ration under Commissioner.  Annual grazing permits issued based  on numbers ranged; priority for estab-  lijj'i.ed owners. Stock-owners may  .form Associations for range management. I''roe,.or partially free, permits  for m/i Hers, campers or travellers, up  'o ten he;.d.  Fortune Teller���������You will marry   a  steam power implies, therefore, a great  band | magnetic, inexplicable poworof conveying that  of laborers in tho mine and   on   thn   railways belief to others.  Customer���������I'll pay you out of   the  allowance.  Good dny!  Good  Printing  nPHE value of well-  printed, neat appearing stationery as  a means of getting and  holding desirable business has been amply  demonstrated. Consult us before going  elsewhere.  Wedding invitations  Ball programs  Business cards  Visiting cards  Shipping tags  Letterheads  Statements  Noteheads  Pamphlets  Price lists  Envelopes  Billheads  Circulars  Dodgers  Posters  Menus  And commercial and  society printing of every  description.  Let us quote you our  prices.  New Type  Latest Style  Faces  Columbia Avenue and  Lake Street  TELEPHONE  R101 THE   SUN,    GRAND   FORKS,   B. C.  mg  istaiice Telephone  In the days that are ahead, the enterprising business man will seek no doubt to  have his air machine. When he wants to  interview an out-of-town customer, a few  minutes' glide through the air will bring  him and his man together.  Meantime, he has to be content with  something short of that. He finds that  most efficient substitute in the Long Distance Telephone. This brings him voice-  t"-voice with his customer, and gives him  all that is necessary of the personal touch.  BRITISH COLUMBIA-  positions FOUND FOR  10,317 APPLICANTS  sources will soon restore the balance  of trade and incidentally obliterate  the present discount on our currency  in the United States.  A report on the work of employment offices established last March  uuder an arrangement between the  provincial and Dominion governments shows that during the period  from March 1 last to July 12 positions' were found for 10,317 appli  cants in British Columbia. The total  fir Canada was 79,540, of whom 72,  31S are males and 6727 females.  Tbe figures for the provinces are as  follows: Quebec, 53,600; Ontario,  29,864; Manitoba, 7G86; Saskatchewan, 9917; Alberta, 10,677; British  Cokimbia, 10,317. In addition to  the above some 71C0 individuals  were provided with casual jobs.  Quite An Easy Matter  "Of course, my dear girl," said the  indulgent parent, "I know you are  fond of Cecil, and that he is a good  good fellow, and all that sort of  thing; but there is one little point  you appear to have overlooked,  How do you propose to live after  you are married?" "  "We haven't overlooked the point  at all," said the daughter. 'We've  considered it well, and it's till arranged."  "O h, is i t? I a m very pi eased, to  bear it."  "Yes papa. You see, this is   what,  we've arranged. You know Aunt Be-  Goals to Newcastle linda gave me a hen last year?"  Referring to the fact  that   a   few!     "Well?"  days previously a carload of sulphur j     "Well, I've been reading up poul  arrived at Prince Rupert all the way j try, and they say that  a good   hen  from Louisiana,and was transhipped j will raise twenty chickens in a  sea  at Swanson Bay,-the Prince  Rupert {son.   Well,   next  season  there'll be  Daily News points an obvious moral   twenty one hens, won't there?    And  by calling attention to  a   mountain   so,    of   course,    the following year  of ore on the Esctall river  which is ' there   will   be  420. chicks, and the  The Great: Big 'Uns  Althuugh he was a country squire,  he was a good-natured man, and  when he came across a couple of  youngsters who were not only trespassing on his land, but also trying  to catch linnets, he did noi fly into  a rage. He knew the terrible distress  prevalent in the * neighborhood, and  was not disposed to cavil at the attempt to turn in a moderately honest  penny.  "Now, then, my lads," he said  kindly, "you haven't any business  here, you'know'. But here is sixpence each for the birds you have  caught."  "The   youngsters   touched    their  caps, received their   sixpences,   and  were about   to  scamper thankfully  off; but before they went the squire''  patted'their curly heads.  "I hope," he said gravely, "that  before very long you will find a  more profitable occupation than  bird-catching."  "Oh," said little Dan Mathers,  "it ain't so bad, so far as profit goes.  These ain't much; but sometimes  feyther he catches great big 'uns, as  big as hens, with long tails,and they  pays all righe. You 'ave to catch  'em at night, though!"  And then the kindly squire knew  wheie his pheasants went.  Policeman (to suspicious stranger  at midnight)���������What are you doing  in thia store?-  Burglai���������Can't you see  I'm   tak  ino stock.  GENUINE ASPIRIN  HAS "BAYER CROSS"  Tablets   without   "Bayer   Cross"  are not Aspirin at all  40 per cent sulphur. The News adds:  It is also 42 per cent iron and 'there  is enough copper in it to pay for  mining and make a profit. This is  being explored by the Granby com  pany. If it were developed there  would be no need for us to import  sulphur. We should dig it from the  mountain close by.  The development of Canada's  re-  next 8,400, and   the next   168,000, ,  Get genuine "Buyer Tablets of Aspirin"  in ft '"'Bayer'" package, plainly marked  with the safety "Bayer Cross.'  Genuine "Bayer Tablets of Aspirin"  are now made in Canada by a Canadian  Company. No Gcrm'tui interest whatever, all rights being purchased from the  United States Government.  During the war, acid imitations were  sold as Aspirin in pill boxes.and various  other containers. The "Bayer Cross" .is  your only way of knowing that you are  getting genuine Aspirin, proved safe by  millions for Headache, Neuralgia, Colds,  Rheumatism, Lumbago, Neuritis, and for  Pain generally.  Handy  tin  boxes  of  12  tablets���������also  ,, or,������������������^r ,..i larger  sized   "Bayer"  packages   can  be  and }he next 3,oG0,000. Just think, | i,iU'i at drug stores.  papa!     if    we   only get six shillings       Aspirin is the trade mark  (registered  ..    ��������� in   Canada),   of   Bayer   Manufacture   of  each tor them, we shall clear  ������900,-   Monoaceticacidestcr "of Salicylicacid  000, and that will be plenty for us  to live on, and perhaps we will help  you a little, you dear old thing!"  Slow and sure wins the race,   but  don't over-exert yourself.  R. C. McCutchfon has received a  carload of dry lumbor, and he is  now better prepared than ever before to execute all orders for cabinet  making.  GUARD  AGAINST FIRE.  ^<vf^T?y;r^j������'-wr_-ij<aw,-'.w-w.i.^iHH--.l |IT���������TTT-rr..f... -nrrrrn���������^-il^rir-Tnffi7in-^rT7~������~rr-.rT^--rnr- -^..r-r<..f~rii*,r\rM\MiK������i*ii\tMak\c\WM*t\nvtrirmrni^-rjrTyjT-ijiJB  One Reason Why.  7  rings  tlie Steady  Isn't the news of your  store something like the  news of the whole city?  There is news every week  in Grand Forks ��������� some  weeks more than others���������  but   every   week    there    is  - news.        Isn't there news in your  store every week? Isn't there  something to advertise?  Your customers are shopping every week. Aren't  you losing many of them  the weeks you do not advertise?  It's the steady trade that  counts with a store���������-it's  the steady advertising that  brings the steady trade.  RESOLVE���������To use newspaper space regularly, and  be sure it is in THE GRAND  FORKS SUN, the paper that  reaches the most consumers  in this valley.  J*  iio  ? SUN  eaders    Want   to   Hear  From    You   Every   Week ***>���������������'_ *���������*������������������   ������,->.  L ^^^ A' i -j-- ^.i -iV^'Lt' <"; f :.-ti>;ivt;'iVr f. f?. i1**������ *. i^j.T-iV 'i-j'.l-iL^.'ii'i-1H-^. Ti'_i _u';.^ ��������� > .vt :. - -v ti % .to K'.'i������ v. w^i-v-"!1-: jrr'j  .SSS^  THE   SUN.    GRAND   FORKS,   B. G.  News of the City  ������/  v John Simpson, M.A., who is well  known in this valley, having an  orchard of nine hundred bearing  apple   trees   on   the   west side  of  ���������Ward's lake, has been appointed  principal of the Rivers high school  at a salary of $1700 a year. Rivers  is the first divisional point of Win  nipeg on the main line of the Grand  ��������� Teunk Pacific railway, and Is about  twenty miles from Brandon by auto  mobile.  Machine drills are being used at  the Maple Leaf mine in Franklin  camp.  J. D. Campbell, one of the old-  timers, of Grand Forks, left for  Vancouver on Saturday. He will  continue in the employ of the Granby company either in that city, in  Cassidy or in Anyox.  where they intend to reside in fu  ture. The family are pioneer.? ol  this' city, and their many friends  here regret to learn of their departure, but wish them iuck in their  new home. There are other people  in this town that we could have  spared better than this family.  LIFT CORNS OR  CALLUSES OFF  Doesn't hurt!    Lift any corn or  callus off with fingers  ' Mrs. Ei. Ward, of N-l.-wi, is visit  ing in this city at the home of Mr.  and Mrs. H. Weber.  A. B. Buckworlh, of Vancouver,  who is interested in the Graud Forks  townsite, was a business visitor here  on Monday.  Tim Sellis'has gone to  Penticton.  Dan McDonald returned to   Van  couver   on    Friday, after  a   week's'  visit with Mr. and Mrs. P. Barker.  Mrs. Brewer, of Vancouver, arrived in the city on Saturday evening to attend the funeral of her  father, the late Mr. Burke Jewell.  The funeral was postponed from 4  to 6 o'clock in oder to give her a  chance to be present. All. the children of :he deceased were present at  the service.  Frank Coryell is shipping poles  from Lynch Creek to Minnesota  points.  The first cacload of summer fruit  Uas shipped from the Carson packing house to the prairie market on  Tuesday James Rooke is in charge  of ibis packing hoube this year.  Recent   births   in   this   city:   To  Mr. and Mrs. Carl Jenson, a   son; to  Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Markell, a daugh  ter; to Mr. and  Mrs. John  Donaldson, a daughier.  A ' Complete  Stock  of ,..  Jewelry ancLSilverware  ' Everything that can please and charm your friend.  Before going elsewhere, give us a call and inspect  our stock/  "^^e^SoB ������k G0.9  "Quality Jewellers"  Bridge Street, - Next Door B..C. Telephone Office  Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty  B. C. onions are are at 850 per  ton. If we had bud water we could  have grown 100 tons on the Sun  ranch "this year.  It is unfortunate that the .-.Prince  of Wales should visit Grand Forks  a little too late to inspect our cherry  crop and a little too early to sample  our home-grown peanuts.  Don't; suirer! A tiny bottle of  rreezonc costs but a few cents at any  drug store. Apply a few drops on the  corns, calluses and '"hard skin" on bottom of feet," then.lift" thcin off.       f-  When Freezone removes corns from the  Iocs or calluses from the bottom of feet,  the skin beneath is left pink and healthy  and   never   sore,   tender   or   irritated.  Eve's Skinful Style  Saved Adam's Pile  "'Twixt optimist and pessimist,  trie difference is droll. The optimist  the doughnut sees, the pessimist the  hole."  The Kettle Valley train Look up  a carload of fire-brick on Wednesday fur the new roaster in tbe Con������  solidatecl compauy's mill at Lynch  creek.  W. 0.  Miller, C.P.R. district   su  periniendeut,   passed   through    the  city on Sunday in  his private car.  He    was   accompanied    by    J.  H  Shinni'.-.k,   inspector  for the railway  commission.  A mining development company  bus been launched in Vancouver.  It will develop claims for prospectors and sell ihem to investors  The preliminary hoard of directors  are Noral Thompson, A M White.  sid<%J. H. Gre^r.A. Erskine Smith,  and Adam  H    Wailhndge.  At the sale ol remounts for the  JNorth West Mounted Police at' the  barracks in this city on Monday  twenty-four horses were purchased.  Most of the animals were brought in  from south of the line.  C. H. Hacking left on Monday for;  Coykendahl, B.   C,   where   he   intends   to   make   his   home   for the  present at least.  E  DeLisle,   rural   route  delivery  man at Bridesville,  motored   to  the  city on Sunday to visit his wife, wbo  is in the Graud Forks   hospital   suf  faring from an attack of fever.  Mrs. E. Spraggett  is   rapidly   recovering in the Grand  Forks   hospi  tal from the effects of a recent  operation.  M, J. Quinliven   and  family   left  on   Monday   for   Everett,    Wash.,  A customs sale of American  horses, seized for grazing on this  side the line, were sold by auction  at Osoyoos last week. Forty horses  were sold at an average price of $6  each. The highast price was $28.  Some old nags sold for 81 each.  Of the 200 horses seized, 150 were  redeemed by the owners at a costs  of 87.50 each. '���������'  Eve  wore  her skin  un-  blushingly  because there were  no cops to see.  She swabbed  no powder on  her nose  or spent  her hut)  bie's dough  on clothes.  She wore  no hats  and did  not. drape  but frank-  mm  1  t   r.  a  v  e  1  led,  o.  n  h    -  e  r  s  h  ape  Clothes Cleaned, Pressed  Repaired and Dyed  At the Singer Store  Potatoes  wood.  are   scarce   in   Green-  Mrs P.'T. McCJIum if  cation trip to California.  on   a va  Trout fry from Gprrard  were put  in Loon lake near   Eholt   recently  "Pat, here is that dollar y.)U  gave me the loan of a week or two  ago"  "Bpdad, Mike. I had forgotten  all about lending it to you."  "Och! why the divil divil didn't  you  tell me that before?"  ran  Forts Transfer Company  DAVIS 8 HANSEN, Proprietors  aggage and General Transfer  GityB  Goaf and Wood For Sale  Office at R. I?. Petrie's Store  Phone 64  Moses and Advertising  The Bible is the greate.sfc encycl'ope  dia of human nature in the world.  Any man who wants to know how a  crowd will act can learn all about it  by studying the gang that Moses led  around in the wilderness. Tremen  dously grateful to him for getting  them out of slavery���������grateful, yes,  for about, five minutes. No sooner  were their feet a little wet in the  wilderness, and their backs bitten a  little by mosquitos, than they began  to criticize Moses and wish they hadn't come. People haven't changed one  single bit since those days. Moses  ���������found he couldn't keep them sold for  twenty four hours at a time; all the  sales work had to be done over and  over again, constantly.' We've discov  ered the same thing; that's    why  onr  advertising  runs   all the year ronnd,  in season and out.  SECOND EDITION  WRIGLEY'S B.C. DIRECTORY ISSUED  ^   CLEVELAND  RED BIRD  and  Hird  Cycling  is  easy   when   you   ride  a  Cleveland or a Re<  Jiicycle, tho wheels that run smoothly  year  after    ^C7 Cfi  year.    Price      ^JiiOU  Let me explain to you my easy sale plan on terms.  First class repair work done in   Hlack-mithing,   Brazing,   Alu  minum   Soldering, Oxy-Acctyleno   Welding,   Woodwork, lite.  I'".   Ciiirngo  'OKKS, JJ. C.  Open S.'id.ril.M.v Kv<,Tiin>;s Till If) o'CIook  B__3BB_3_2H___S������<ft^i^^  R. MOOYBOER !���������������&  The 1911) edition of W.-iglpy's  Briti-h Columbia Directory is- just  off the  press.  The ()d<t ypar naps-pen an increase  of -i'2 places in the province that  Inst year were not on the m!ip. In  all, '201- cities, towns and settle  merits are described, giving geographical location, local resources,  population, e'e, followed by a list  of business firms, residents and  farmers.  Hoy F. Wrigley, editor, states  that the increase in number of pages  from 900 to MOO in this ye-ir's edition is made up mainly in new  names and occupations of returned  citizens who were last year on active  service.  The Directory is an index of   the  whole province, and in addition to  the description of-2042 ' places, contains a classified business directory  under 446 headings, a trade name  and brand section, and also gives a  100 page y������ar book containing not  only a list of all provincial government ministers and departmental  officials but a synopsis of the jurisdiction of each department, of the  functions of nearly every important  official, and a summary of impor  tant legislation. There is also a concise history of the province, illustrated.  The price of the Directory is $10,  aud is published by Wrigley Directories, Ltd., Metropolitan Building,  Vancouver.  BOOT   REPAIRING  TAKE'-your   repairs  to   Armson, shoe   re  paircr.    The   Hub.    Look  for  the   Ili^  Bool.  /  Sheet music, vocal and instru^  mental, 15 cents, at the Singer  Store.  Those wishing neat sign painting  to ornament their business places  should call on YV. P. O'Connor, a  returned soldier.  Job Printing at The Sun office at  practically the same prices as before  he big war started.  You can not reach The Sun's  numerous readers except through  its advertising columns.  War  Thrift.  Savings   Stamps   Promote  O   F  DON'T HESITATE!  PHONE 101R  FORFINE PRINTING  Yale  Barber Shop  Razor Honing a Specialty  P. A. Z. PARE, Proprietor  Yalk Hotel, Fikst Street  AND PICTURE FRAMING  Furniture  Made  to  Order.  Also Repairing of all Kinds.  Upholstering  Neatly   Dono  R. C. McCOTCHEON  WINNIPEG AVEKUF  , C, PETERSEN  GENERAL TRANSFER BUSINESS  AND DEALER IN  AND  j  Office !  F. Downey's Cigar Store  Ffrst Street  AT YOUR  SERVICE  Modern Rigs and Good  Horses at All Hours  at  the  Model Livery Barn  IVI. H. Burns, Prop.  Phone 68 Second Stree!

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xgrandforks.1-0179382/manifest

Comment

Related Items