BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Ladysmith Daily Ledger Oct 8, 1904

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xdailyledg-1.0348033.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xdailyledg-1.0348033.json
JSON-LD: xdailyledg-1.0348033-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xdailyledg-1.0348033-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xdailyledg-1.0348033-rdf.json
Turtle: xdailyledg-1.0348033-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xdailyledg-1.0348033-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xdailyledg-1.0348033-source.json
Full Text
xdailyledg-1.0348033-fulltext.txt
Citation
xdailyledg-1.0348033.ris

Full Text

 V,
St
'<;
p.-
Ladysthth- Daily Ledger
PUBLISHES IN THE LEADER OFFICE
VOL. 2, NO
7\
SATURDAY, OCT. 8. 1904.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
CUD SCANDAL
Trouble Takes Place at Coutv
try House of Sir Charles
Ross in England
Host Is Well'Known In British   Columbia, Where  He
Promoted Large Interests
|| SMITHS SUPPORTERS
TO MEET MONDAY
Gathering To Be Held in  the  Committee
Rooms For Purpose of Organic
zing Committees
Riley and Prior to be the Rival Candidates
In Victoria City This
Election
A late London despatch states that
society has been greatly excited
about another country house card
.scandal. It now transpires that it
took place at Balnagowan, the residence oi' Sir Charles Ross.
A titled visitor was suspected as
wrath and swearing vengeance
against all concerned. Now it is
the delinquent. There was a painful scene, he departing in great
liclicvcil tlie case will come into tho
courts, as the nobleman charged
knows his name has been bandied
about, and feels compelled to attempt lo clear his character.
It is said the discovery was made
through the instrumentality of n
parlor maitl, who confided to a lady's maid something she had obsei'v.
cd.
Sir Charles Ross is very well
Known in British. Columbia. He was
one of the chief promoters of Ihe
great electric power plant at Bo-
nnington Falls and also obtained Ihe
charter some years ago ,-for the Cas-
siar Central Railway. Me is also
the inventor of the Ross rifle which
the Dominion government is now
serving out to the forces in Canada,
from the factory established at Quebec, sir Charles obtained a divorce some years ago from his first
wife after a most sensational trial
in England and married later Patricia kllison.
Duribg the Boer war Sir Charles
equipped a battery of artillery ami
presented it to the British government Ho also went with it lo
South Africa and took Ids share in
the fighting.
DIVIDING
THE CITY
By-Law for Providing Wards
For the City to be Introduced Monday
At present Ladysmith has no
wards, the task of dividing the city
into such divisions being placed in
tbo hands of the council, which, according to the Municipal Act, must
undertake the duty. Last night the
special committee met and had a
lengthy discussion over the matter.
Tilings were advanced so far that at
the next council meeting notice of a
bylaw to divide llie city into three
wards will ho given and the following week the bylaw will be in shape
to place before the Mayor and aldermen.
A SHINING MARK.
London, Oct. 8.—Harry Marks, the
chief owner of the Financial News
of this city, ami a former New York
newspaper man, has been elected to
represent the Isle id Thiinel III the
House of Commons, though by a
greatly reduced majority, succeeding
the late James Lowther, who died
Sept 12. .. The IjgKres were: Marks,
(Con.) 4,(111; King, (Lib.) 3,11112.
The camapign was marked by violent personalities throughout. The
oifl '11!* I13!* s|S|UO|iin |U0|hss||,
Liberals in appealing to the electors to uphold the principle ol the
intergity ol public life rather than
party success. The Liberals however, claim that although many of
their party abstained from voting,
no great number o! dissident unionists voted for Mr^ King.
SET FREE..
Sandwich, Out. Oct. 8.—Jonathan
George, an aged colore:! man accused of murdering Mrs. Eliza Williams
who wns found dead in her l:ome on
April 5th lost, has been liberated because of insufficient evidence to convict him,
Next week the campaign In this
part of Nanaimo constituency will
begin in earnest, lor the supporters
of Mr. Ralph Smith, M.l*., arc called to meet iu the Committee rooms
on First Avenue at half past seven
aud prepare for organization. Mr.
Smith will be present and everyone
will be welcome. At this meeting,
tlie general committee will be chosen
In Victoria last night; both Liberals and Conservatives selected candidates for the election. Mr. Geo.
Riley, the present member was the
Liberal choice. C. II. Lugrin and
Dr. Lewis Hall being the other nominees. The result .was as follows:—
Riley, 383;   Lugrin, 147; ■"'' Hall 80.
Col. E. G. Prior was the Conservative candidate, the ballot being:
Prior 11)7;   Aid. J. L. Beckwith 59.
James McGeer, who claims lie is a
Liberal, announces himself as a candidate in Vancouver for the Commons.
EASTERN CANDIDATES.
Montreal, Oct. 8.—The following
nominations for the House If Commons were made yesterday:
Queens, P. E_ I.—z.Two scats)—
Judge Warburton and C, 10. i'rowsc,
(Libs.)
Kcsticouchc, N. B.-W. A. Moot,
(Con.)
Terrebonne, Q. — S. llesjardines,
(Lib.)
Chnleatfguay—G.  McGowan, (Lib.)
Ottawa—(Two seats)— T. Birkett
and N. Champagne, Cons.; R. Stewart mid Hon. N. A. Bclcourt, Lite.
South Ontario—P. Christie; Con.
North Toronto — Mayor Uruuliart,
Toronto, Lib.
East Toronto—10. A. Kemp, Con.
South Waterloo — G. A. Clare,
Ton.
Hiisscll-N. Wilson, Lib.
Norfolk-It. B. Donnelly, Lib.,    in
place of Hon. John Charlton,    who
retired owing to ill-health..
|   North Sinicoe—Major J. A. Carrie,-
I fun.
| West Middlesex- W. S. Calvert,
j Westmoreland, N.B.—II. A. Powell,
(Con.)
Chnrlnt,|.e-D. A. Gilmorc, (Lib)
Win. Fenton is reported as likely
to lie the candidate chosen by the
Socialists at   their meeting in Na-
ST. PETERSBURG ANXIOUS
St. Petersburg, Oct. 8.- The mca-
Kreness of the news from the front
is increasing, the uncertainty regarding the developments. There is
good warrant for the belief that
Gen. Kuropatkin is strengthening his
left flank to meet the Japanese turning movement, his troops occupying
a triangle from Fushiin to Mukden
and Tie Pass. Over three handred
guns have arrived at the front and
the activity of tlie Russian skirmishes below the Hun river creates
the ' impression that Kuropatkin
may contemplate assuming the oltcn-
sive. The war office gives no ui-
coiiragement of this idea llinudt ra-
natnrally if such a movement is contemplated the war office could not
be expected to admit it.
nainio to-morrow.    J. T. Mortimer
: will be the candidate of that party
in Vancouver.
CARIBOO OUTPUT. _
Over $1,000 per day was the average return of the operations ol the
consolidated Caribou Hydraulic Mining Company, which arc conducted at
Bullion in the Cariboo district,' under the management nf Mr. John It.
Ilobson. This season the company
had water sufficient for 83 days and
iu that time $80,000 was taken out.
During the first part of the time,
$1,500 per day was the high average-
Mr. II. C. Hammond, of the well
known firm of Messrs. Osier & Hammond, Toronto, who Is Interested In
the company, and who reached Van-"
couvcr a few. days ago from Bui
Hon, where he was present at the
final clean-up for this season, announces that the company will very
likely spend another quarter of a
million dollars in the endeavor to
get more water.
"The lack ot water is our whole
difficulty," Mr. Hammond said recently. "It seems rathet hard lines
that on Slough Creek wliere Mr.
John Hopp is manager, llie Company has been pumping eleven years
to get the water out of its. work,
ings, and has not yet succeeded,
while the Consolidated Cariboo suffers for the lock of it. The high
average yield of the ground at Bullion is a sufficient indication of what
gold can be obtained if water were
available. During 18112 and 1803 the
first years our Company operated,
there was considerable water, and
streams over which one may now
pass on stepping stones, had to he
crossed In those times by swimming
the horses. It has been dry ever
since, and the only thing the Company can now do is to spend another
$200,000 or $250,000 to get the water which they need so much, ft is
quite probable that I Ills will be
done."
TRY TO BURN
THE BARRACKS
Winnipeg, Man., Oct. 8.— An nt-
teinpt was made to set lire lo the
N. W. M. P. Barracks at Melfdrd
last night, but not much damage
was done.
The body ol Alex. TiiHin has been
exhumed at Moosejaw and Identified
preparatory lo tho trial of F. W.
Watts for murder.
Fred Scott, a brakesman, was
crushed at Brandon by falling In
front of a moving yard engine. Ills
arm was amputated.
Winnipeg .luililing permits tills
are $8,000,000 to date.
PROSPECTS OF
THE ALSEK
11. McLaren, of the Dominion Gcologi
cal survey, who have spent the summer in thcAlsek country, near White
Horse, have returned lo Vancouver
on their way home.
In an interview Mr.McConnell said
he was favorably impressed with the
district from what he bad seen of it.
There were at present several drawbacks to the district, the chief lic-
Ing its distance from regular lines of
travel. Al the present time It costs
from 30 to -10 cents per pound for
freight brought in. These charges
would, however, be shortly reduced,
ns a road was being constructed to
the camp. Last summer was an unfavorable one tor mining operations
as far as climatic conditions were
concerned, as it snowed almost every day and winter set in early. The
season was, however, regarded as
abnormal. The diggings, too, are
what aro known as "deep diggings"
and it thus lakes considerable time
and expense to pcove the worth of a
claim. Some pay dirt had been
struck on Ruby Creek, but nol much
work had been done on the crooks.
Most of the people had come out for
the winter owing lo the cost of
living in llie district.
Mr. McCniiuclI mentioned that Mr.
W. L. Breeze was planning an ..amalgamation of llie claims ou Bullion
Creek, and if the scheme went
through work ou ., huge scale would
he started and a good idea ol the
value of the district would then lie
obtained.
Mr.   McCoiinell   said that he bad
not Iktii in Dawson, so did not know
anything about the political I roubles  there.  Mr. McConnel  is one    of
the ohlest members of Ihc Canadian
Geological Survey and for the   past
20    years   bus liecn engaged In exploration work in British Columbia
and the Yukon, lie expects that next
year he will again visit the same district, as owing to the short summer
it is Impossible to do much work In
one season.
The Earl and Countess of Lichfield arc on the way lo Winnipeg
from tho coast to spend a few days
shooting at Poplar Point with Com-
piisslouer Chlpinnn, ol the Hudson's
Hay Company. From here they
proceed lo Montreal.
Brandon's population is now over
|8,250. This year sonic 250 new
(buildings have been erected, not including the C. P. R., Civic or Asylum work'
AN OMINOUS SILENCE
CAUSES GRAVE ANXIETY
St. Petersburg Has No News of What Is
Transpiring at the
Front
Minister of Railways Says the Road Around
Lake Baikal is Working
Well
VATICAN OFFER.
New York, Oct. 8— The -u-isian
agent accredited to the Vativau, Mr.
Nariskino, has been In Iroqiteiit coil
ference recently with lie Cardinal
Secretary of State i' slali'il
tbat this talk has been upon i<< w lo
end the war in tbe Far East, ll is
asserted that the Pope -.nsenlod to
act in the interest of peaee t lie
solicitation of the German iOmn ir ,r.
who being informed by his poll.leal
advisors tbat it would be impj-cihlc
for Germany to undertake this task,
urged the Pope" to tender bis goud
ollicen.    So far the Vatican has i on-
fined itself to negotiations with \-
sia, but it is said that if H'Viiln
consents to the bead of the catholic
church making the first'proposal ol
peace the Vatican will open dinct
negotiations Willi Japan.
SEIZED BY JAPANESE
Shanghai, Oct. 7.-The Britisli
steamer Sishan, from Hong Kong,
lias liecb seized by Ihc Japanese oil
New Chwang. The Sishan carried a
cargo of cattle, and Hour Intended
for Port Arthur. The Sishan is a
steel screw steamer of 1,331 tons,
and is owned by Thos. W., Richardson, of London.
AROUND LAKE BAIKAL.
St. Petersburg, Oct. 8. — Prince
Pillkiiolf, minister of railroads has
arrived here after spending three
months ill' personally superintending
the construction of tlie Circum-Bai-
kal railroad. He says the whole Siberian line is working perfectly. The
Sirciim-Baikal branch Is open for
freight traffic but passengers aro
still crossing tlie lake on ferry boats,
that being the shortest road. The
ferry boats taking three hours to
steam across about thirty miles,
whereas the train take four hours
to cover tlie railroad route around
the Lake, about 73 miles. Work is
still proceeding day and night on tlie
Circum-Baikai road, so as to have
the line in complete order before the
lake freezes over.
RELEASE LOGGING PLANT.
The status of the cases of the impounding of logging plants recently
by officers of the provincial government has Wen partially c Icarcd up
through the investigations ol the
Department of Lands and Works. As
a result of inquiry the plant ol Messrs, Faher & McGraw, who were
operating on lands fronting on Scm-
iahmoo Bay, has been released, as il
was found that the operators were
working Dominion and not provincial
lands.
The timber dues chargeable against
the limits being worked by Kinley,
close to Seiiiiahnioo Bay, anil against
those operaled by Pierce. A, l'reniont,
up the Nicomeki River, have been
guaranteed to the department, and
it is understood that the question ol
Martin's rights is now under consideration by the department. Martin was working near Sciniahuioo
Bay.
According tn a statement made today to Mr. R. J. Skinner, Timber
Inspector, none of those who were
logging on provincial lands had any
intent to evade payment of taxation
tint there existed iu their minds a
question as to whether their inter,
ing been demonstrated by the dc
ests were taxable or not. It hav-
rarlmcnl to the loggers that their
output was taxable there have been
no complaints against payment. The
laud on which all the loggers were
working was alienated lo the province as far back as 1883, aud such
being the case those owning tlie Umber had every right, to export Ihe
same on. the payment of the provincial export tax. A sett lenient of
the amount ol taxes due llie Government by tho. loggers is being arrived at by negotiations between
Mr. Robic L. Rcld, Barrister of New
Westminster, and the Department of
Lauds ami Works.
TORONTO'S POPULATION
Toronto,    Out., Oct. 8.—Toronto's
population has reached the    quarter
million mark.
ROSS WILL HANG ON.
Mount Bridges, Out., Oct 8.-
Speaking at a meeting iu the Interest oi W. S. Calvert, Liberal nominee lor West Middlesex, Premier
Ross sat/ he had no intention of
resigning and intended to light the
hye-clcctions for the local legislature,
GRAND MASTER'S TRIP.
A Masonic record has been made,
as far as Britisli Columbia is concerned, by Grand Master W. J. Bowser, of Vancouver, says, the World of
Tuesday. He has just returned Irom
a Lour which embraced the interior
of tlie province south of the Canadian Pacific Railway. During an absence of several weeks he visited
practically every lodge of the craft
iu the Kootenays. His trip was one
rouiul of meetings and banquets. The
former record for Grand Master's
visitations was held by Superintendent Downlc, of the Canadian Pacific
Railway. Since his time, however,
other lodges have been formed and
Mr. Bowecr now holds the record.
One of the most notable ol the ban
quels held was the one at Fort Steel
where Masons from three countries
were officially present. Mr. Ilowser
himself was Canada's chief representative. Most Worshipful Brother W.
Burrow, of Devonshire, was the English guest, and Brother Staples, of
Stillwater, Mich., represented the
United States.
VETERAN'S
FAREWELL
Kharkoff, Russia, Oct. 8.-A touching scene was witnessed here when
(leu. Diagcniiroff, former governor-
general of KielT, bid farewell to-day
lo tbo fourteenth division, which lie
led across the DaiiuliC at the time
111 the Russo-Turkisli war. The old
veteran was so moved that he could
hardly speak. Finally be gave an
order for the division lo form around
]iilit iu a square and addressed the
troops, wishing them success and expressing llie hope that they will do
their duty as well iu Ihe Far East
us their lathers did on tlie Danube,
lie also advised the soldiers to
sland by each other and sacrifice
their lives for their comrades. The
General's words were frequently in-
itorruptctl by tears by the troops and
(lie vast crowd ol people present,
also wept. Driigcmlioff then kissed
the colors ami the color hearers,
shook hands with the officers and
then removed his busby and bowed
low to each battalion, murmuring,
"Farewell, God bless you and bring
you back safely."
IST I! 1611101
man
Russsian Press Says That Any
Idea of a Compromise Is
Abandoned
Once For All She Must  be
Driven out of the Asiatic
Continent
St, Petersburg, Oct. 8—Replying
to the statement of Count Okuma,
leader of the Japanese Progressive
Party that the war vv.th Russia
would be long but that Japan would
win in the end, the Novoc Vremya
this morning declares that the idea
of a possible compromise with Japan
has been abandoned and that tbe
war must be prosecuted by Russia
in such a way that there can be no
possibility of Japan renewing the
struggle. Europe for thirty years
was under the menace of a war of
revenge for Alsoce. If wc conclude
peace with Japan all our efforts in
the Far East will lie valueless and
we shall have to send enormous
sums to keep up our armament there
'flic Japanese once for all must be
driven out of tlie'Asiatic continent."
It is now acceplcd here that the
naval experts of the newspapers
dwell on the difficulties which the
Port Arthur squadron must experience in breaking out after the disastrous sortie ot Aug. 10. Tbe general situation is that the squadron
thing bad happened to the Japan-
could not venture out unless some-
cse warships of which there is no
knowledge here In any case the
Russian ships could not go to the
neutral ports of Che Foo but must
head for Vladivostock.
O'
RECOVERED
FROM INDIANS
White Child Found at Fort Ru.
pert and Carried back to
Vancouver
The white child which was taken
north by an Indian woman from Van
couvcr a short lime ago has been recovered. When it was ascertained
last week that the Indian having
charge of the child had left Alert
Bay, Constable WoIIacott came to
the conclusion that she had beaded
for Fort Rupurt, at the northern
cud of Vancouver Island. Thither ho
went in a small steam launch, and
there he found traces of the woman,
and shortly after landing he located
her. The woman, who is reported to
travel .under various names, is known
Vancouver as Louisa Saunders.
When found by Constable WoIIacott
the woman had the child with her,
and she was disinclined to give it
up. In her efforts to keep the child
the woman was backed up by all tbe
Fort Rupert Indians, and they threatened all sorts of trouble it the child
were taven away.
Not in llie slightest disturbed by
he rather ominous demeanor ol the
tribesmen, Constable WoIIacott told
them he had como after the child
and Intended to take her, and without further ado he annexed the infant.
The woman went with the child lo
Alert Bay and through to Vancouver, although at. Alert Bay the little
girl was turned over to the care of
Miss Scott, matron of the Children's
Aid Home in Vancouver.
According to statements made by
Constable WoIIacott to Miss Scott,
the woman refused at first to make
any statement regarding ber possession of the child, but after several
days she made a clean breast of tbe
matter.
A HEAVY SUIT.
Toronto, Oct. 8.—Sir Charles Hib-
bcrt Tapper, of Vancouver, is one of
the defendants in a big three hundred thousand dollar suit entered by
certain shareholders ol the Cramp
Steel Company against officers and
directors. One plaintiff's call for
cancellation of three hundred thousand dollars' worth nf shares which
the directors voted for transfer to
the Northern Iron and Steel Company, j LADYSMITH  LEDGER
LADYSMITH LEDGER
Published every day except Sunday at The Ledger Building, corner
ol First Avenue and French street,
Ladysmith, British Columbia, by the
Ladysmith Publishing Company.
SUBSCRIPTIONj   RATES.
By    mail in   Canada and United
Slates.
One year (in advance)  $3.00
Six months (in advance)     1.50
Delivered in the city (per month) .50
ADVERTISING RATES.
Transient—Including Ibusiness no;
tices, calls tor tenders, applications
lor and transfer ol licenses,' legal
notices, etc., 10c a line first Insertion; 5c. a line each subsequent insertion; 12 lines measure to the
inch.
COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING.
Rates on application. Cuts for
regular use should be all metal.
Advertisements not inserted for a
specified time will be charged for until paid and ordered to be discontinued.
All changes of advertisements must
be received at this office on the
morning of the day of Issue.
Subscribers not receiving paper
regularly please report to this office.
All job work must be paid for on
delivery.
Transient advertisements must be
paid in advance.
front since Canadians dropped the
idea of securing reciprocity from the
United Slates. This has done a
great deal to arouse our neighbors to
the danger of losing our trade. When
they come to make overtures to us
for reciprocity they will find that we
are in a pretty independent position
and everything they get from us can
be secured only by their giving in
return something that is equally advantageous to ourselves. We are finding out now that ill many respects
are giving too great a benefit
without a quid pro quo, as for example the permission to ship rough
lumber tree into Canada, while our
lumber must pay a duty. In this respect the tariff is unfair to our mill
men, and before long we hope to sec
that matter remedied. Some months
ago British Columbia asked for ai
adjustment of the tariff en lumber,
and only a few days ago eastern
lumbermen sent a deputation to Ottawa to complain of the same grievance. From a business standpoint,
a country should look after its own
tercsts and this Canada has got to
do.
RECIPROCITY.
In the United States at present a
great deal of attention is being paid
to the question of reciprocity with
Canada, and especially is this the
case in the Stales,that border on
the Dominion. In Boston yesterday
the platform ot the Republican State
Convention over which United States Attorney-General Moody presided,
placed a plank in its .platform favoring measures of reciprocity with oilier countries and especially with Canada and Newfoundland "consistently
with the principals of protection,"
and without injury lo the United
States agriculture, labor or industries; or when, as President Roosevelt said in his message of 11102,
'the minimum damage done may bo
disregarded for the sake of the maximum of good accomplished." '
We Canadians do not expect    very
much in the way of reciprocity from
our neighbors in the south under present   conditions.   The spirit of high
protection in the United Stales    is
too strong for us to look for any offer that wc could accept with benefit to ourselves and our rapid mater
ial progress in the face of la high tariff   against   our   products has been
such that we havo become indifferent
to the question.   There was a time
when an   oiler of reciprocity would
have been gladly accepted by the Dominion; indeed, we sent time     and
again to Washington commissions to
endeavor to come to sonic arrangement.   But at that time the United
States   people   believed   that their
high tariff would eventually force us
to accept their terms which virtually meant the surrendering of our tariff   making   to   Washington. As wc
could not for a moment consent   to
this condition, wc finally abandoned
any hope of success.   Then wo    did
what we should have done in the first
place, looked around for new     markets, and w,th such success that   at
the present timo wo have increased
our foreign trade to something over
170 a head, while the United States
is approximately $35.   Canada    has
risen to such importance now    that
It   is the people ol Ihe States who
are eager for reciprocity.   We  havo
many    products which they require.
Our natural resources arc enormous
in such things as limber, wood, pulp
and many other things. Wheat, which
the United States used to export In
enormous quantities, will, in a few
years,    he    not greatly more than
their    own consumption requires.
Even now their millers are agitating for placing wheat on the free list
list, as they sec enormous increase
in the work being done by Canadian
millers, and that Canadian flour has
taken Its place In the world's markets as tho finest that can be made.
As shrewd business men the manufacturers of the United States want,
if possible, to secure our raw materials In exchango for their manulac-
turcs; but never again until Canadians allow themselves lo bo placed
in the position of hewers of wood
and drawers of water lor another Nation. Wo cannot sacrifice our manufactures. The question too, of imperial preference has come to     the
NORTHERN   PACIFIC   RY.  CO
Corner Government and Yates streets
Victoria, B. C.
THREE
3-TRANSCONTINENTAL-3
TRAINS DAILY.
If You Are Going to the
ST.   LOUIS   EXPOSITION,
Take  the    NORTHERN    PACIFIC
RY., either via St. Paul or Billings.
New Tourist Cars on all trains.
Fine connections made from Victoria
by night or morning boats.   Only
line having through service to St.
Louis without change ol cars. Tickets on salo October 3, i and 5.
Fare to St. Louis and return,
$67.50, good for three months, returning any line; also cheap round
trip rates to all points East, on account of the Fair. Parties going via
St. Paul to St. Louis or Eastern
points should not miss a trip on the
famous "North Coast Limited."
Steamship tickets on sale to all
European points. Very low rates
now in effect. They will not last.
Cabin accommodation reserved by
wire.
For further    information   call or
phone (No. 156) to the office.
A. D. CHARLTON,     C. E. LANG,
A.G.P.A.N.P.R.,       Gen'l  Agt.,
Portland, Or.        Victoria, B.C.
Any
Kind
of
Job
Printing
Done Promptly and
WELL
At
THE
LEDGER
Office
On Ist Avenue
All Work Done at
Reasonable Rates.
The Ladysmith
Opera House
Can be secured for Theatrical
purposes, Dancing parties or Entertainments generally.
D. NICHOLSON, Prop.
F. McB. YOUNG,
BARRISTER and
SOLICITOR. . ..
Nanaimo
B.C
The City Market
R. Williamson, Prop.,
1st Ave,     Ladysmith
The Variety Store
is tAvenue.
U will pHy you lu go there for Household goods, or most anything, A too get
your Sewiog Machine repaired. Oil and
needles for maoliinep.
f\ W. Fletcher.
FARMERS'   MEAT  flARKET
On ist Avenue
Qeo. Roberts  - - . Proprietor
PAINTING,   PAPER   HANGING,
ETC.
Work done properly and at right
prices. Shop and residence in rear
of Ladysmith Hotel. »
J. E. SMITH, Prop.
II riches are a curse,
As many do maintain.
I should not he averse,
To being quite profane.
Belt acommodatloi   for transient rid
permanent boarders anil lodgers   '
GRAND HOTEL
This new hotel has'been comfortably
furnished  and the bar  is  up-to-d te.
Bates $1 00 and upward.
Wm. Bkvkkidcie. Prop.
E'planade Ladysmith
THE PRANK HOTEL
Esplanade, Ladysmith
Board by tbe week or month at reasonable rates.   The leading bar in the city.
V'etorla Pr>o«rilx beer.
FRANK BABY, Prop.
HOTEL DOMINION
—Kates $1.25 and (1.5(1-
Free bus to all steamboat landings and
rdilway;depote.   Electric cars every live
minutes to all pane ol tbe cily.   Bar
and table unexcelled.
F. BAVNE8, Proprietor,
AUBOTT ST.,   VANCOUVER., B.C.
Esquimalt &  Nanaimo  Railway
Time Table No. 50
Effective April 14, 1904. v
Trains leave Ladrtmitb, Southbound dally at 0:10 «. ,n.,aml on Saturdays
Sundays and Wednesdays at 5:08 p, m.
Trains leave Ladysmith, Northbound, atll :57 a. in. audjon Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays at 0:45 p. in.
Excursion tickets on sale from and to all stations, good fo'r going j.urney
Saturday and Sunday, returning not later than Monday.
aeOKQB L. COURTNEY,
Traffic Manager.
NEW WESTERN
HOTEL
A good Boarding House and Hotel
where there are good tables and
beds.
MRS. MARY DAVIS, Prop.
HOTEL
LADYSMITH
RATES-$1.00     per    day.     Finest
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
First Avenue, Ladysmith, B. C.
D. C. WHITE,   Prop.
KING'S HOTEL
Fourth. Avenue.
Board by the day, week, or month
at right prices.   Bar well supplied.
JOSEPH AND TASSIN.
He sat with two young ladies tluie,
Just one more than enough;
For one young lady was de trop,
The other was de stuff.
How Many People In Ladysmith?
A canvass of the city is being made for subscribers to
the Daily Ledger. It has been suggested by some of the
busiiii-sij men that it would be of interest and value to the
community to know how mauy people live in Ladysmith
and immediate vicinity, 'i his means all of the actual residents within half a mile of the postoffice in Ladysmith, exclusive of Chinese.
Each subscriber to the Daily Ledger will be handed a
card and asked to write down a guess of the number of
people our census, which will be taken with reasonable accuracy will show.
Envelopes will be given with the card. Write down your
guess, sign your name, put the card in the envelope and seal
it up; either hand it to the canvasser or leave it at the
Ledger office. All guesses must be in during October; none
will be counted after that date.
The census will be computed by the 15th of November.
The envelopes will then be opened and the following prizes
given:
1. To the person who guesses nearest to the exact number of people living within one-half mile of the postoffice
(exclusive of Chinese) $20.00 in gold.
2. The person coming second nearest, $10.00 in gold.
3. The person coming third nearest, $5.00 in gold.
If two or more persons tie for any place the money will
be divided.
This contest will be absolutely fajr.    No person in any
way connected with the canvass will' either give out any in-
I formation or be allowed to compete.
| THE DAILY LEDGER CO.
Coal! _^_ Coal! j
Wellington Colliery j
Company, Ltd. I
Wellington Coal   Best household coal ou the Pacific
Coast
Comox Coal—Best steam coal on the Pacific Coast
Alexandria Coal—First-class gas, steam and household coal
The above coals are mined only by the Wellington Colliery Company. Wharves at Ladysmith,
Oyster Harbour, and Union Bay Baynes Sound.
Head Office Victoria, B. C
San  Francisco Agency, 1
R. Dunsmuir's Sons Co'y j
340 Steuart St. \
♦ ♦»♦♦♦♦♦ «♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■»♦♦»♦-»>♦♦♦♦+ +++X
♦ »»♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦* »♦♦♦■»♦♦ ♦♦♦♦ ♦♦++♦♦♦ ♦ ♦ t T ?♦•*♦ ♦♦•?>•♦-►♦
I The Salmond Estate is now on
the market
J. STEWART, Agent.
Real Estate, Conveyancing, Loans, etc.     NOTARY PUBLIC.
Fire, Life and Aooident Insuranoe
Agent for the U. 8. Fidelity and Guaranty Co., Baltimore
♦♦♦♦♦•»-♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦>♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
4         1   l',l  ■ t
THE TYEE COPPER CO., Ltd
PURCHASERS AND SMELTERS OP COPPER, UOLD AND
SILVER ORES.
Smelting Works at
LADYSMITH, B. C.
Convenient to E. & N. Ry. or the Sea
|               .
I CLERMONT LIVINGSTON, THOS. KIDDIE.       f
| General Manager. Smelter Manager. |
RATES $1 oo I'HR DAY
SAMPI.B ROOMS
BAR SUl'l'MHI) WITH IIRST
WINKS, MQUORS, CIGARS
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
WITH WHICH 18 AMALGAMATED
The Bank of British Columbia
HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO.
Capital Paid Up $8,700,000
Rest 3,000,000
Agirrgate resources exceeding 83,000,000
Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. B, E. Wai.kku, General Manager.
London Office, 60 Lombard St., E.C.
The Bank haa 100 Branches well distribnted throughout the Dominion asd
elsewhere, including the fallowing In British Colombia and the Yukon Territory:
ATLIN GREENWOOD NANAIMO VANCOUVER
CKANRROOK    KAMLOOP8 NELSON VICTORIA
DAWSON LADYSMITH N. WESTMINTER     WHITE  HORSE
Branches in tbe United States
NEW YORK     SAN FRANCISCO     PORTLAND     SEATTLE    SKAGWAY
Every description ol banking business transacted.   Letters of credit on any
partof the world,
Savings Bank Department.
Deposits of one dollar ((1.00) and upwards received and Interest paid at car-
rent rates.   Depositors are subject to no delay in depositing or withdrawing funds
LADYSMITH BRANCH •     • GEO. WILLIAMS, Manager.
ABB0TSF0RD HOTEL
Best accomodation In town.  Splendid bunting and fishing in near vicinity.
A. J. McMURTRIE, Proprietor LADYSMITH, B. C.
«le«J»4*l»*«>M*«W»«i»a*«*^
! Happy Home "otel |
| J. Dyer, Proprietor. -1
5 Having taken over this hotel, alter having it all papered aid paint- $
Z ed and papered and improved throughout, we are In a position to offer tbe £
v best accommodation both lor regular and transient burners.   Bar sup* ?
J plied Willi the best wines, llquoia and cigars.    Dining room under the <J
K management ol Mrs. Dejer will lie found fliet-claas. *
ISLAND  HOME  HOTEL
BATES & KNIGHT, Proprietors.
First Avenue, - Ladysmith
Best supplied bar in Ladysmith, Finest accommodation lor transient guests aa
well aa tor regular boarders. Completely refitted and furnished. Dining room
and honaskeeping In charge ol Mrs. Tate.
NOTICE.
The undersigned firm has opened a manufactory and are now making the celebrated Empire Cigar.   Stock will be rsady lor the market about On. 10th.
THE EMPIRE C1QAR CO.
M. .R SIMPSON
Solicitor, Etc.
Monty to Loin
lit Avenue   • ■  •   UDYSMITh
Dr- W. j.
DENTIST
Stevens Block, Ladysmith, B. O.
Dentistry In all Its branches j every new
appliance. LADYSMITH LEDGER
MR, BALFOUR'S
BUSY LIFE
ERRONEOUS BELIEFS.
.In the early years ol his leadership in the House of Commons Mr.
Arthur Baltour used joyfully to mark
its close by rushing oil to lie present at the Passion Play at Oberam-
mergau. That, of" course, assumed
that the date oi the prorogation
synchronized with that of the' play.
This year it docs not, ami the Premier was left at liberty lo undertake to deliver tlie Presidential address at the meeting of the British
Association.
For a hard-worked Minister, buffeted through a six-months' Parliamentary session, that seems an odd way
of enjoying one's self. The task has
apparently-been made the harder by
the circumstances attendant on the
closing weeks of tlio session. The
all-night silling, to others a crown
ing sacrifice of personal comfort,
Mr. Balfour welcomed as a special
intervention of Providence
"If," he said to a friend, "the
House had adjourned as usual at
midnight, I should have gone ofl
home and gone t0 bed, excusing myself as being too fatigued after a
constant grind ol ten hours to tur
to and complete my address. Having to stay at the House through the
night, I just sat down anil got tc
work." lie ratlicr hinted that the
final revision of the manuscript was
accomplished in tlie quietness of n
_ .Sabbath morning spent at Lore!
Rothschild's country house.
The Premier shares with Mr. Glad
stone the gilt, priceless to a bus\
man, of quickly resting. This is
largely due to the trained habit,
brought to perfection by the older
statesman, of swiftly, in intervals o!
rest, throwing oil all mental associations with the work temporarily se'
aside. Mr. Gladstone once said tba(
when be laid his head on the pillm
after whatsoever day or night of in
tense excitement, he pre-ehiptorih
dismissed all thought of the situa
lion, however critical, which had engaged his attention.. Sometimes, at
ter an exceptionally lively night n
the House of Commons, ho,- befor-
gctting into bed, read "someHlijij
light"—Horner, I fancy, by prefer
dice. As a rule he was able lo ge
right alt to sleep, completing hi:
minimum term of seven hours.
The Premier's habit, at least in
holiday lime, is to read far into thi
night and lie abed in the morning.
That is not possible when the House
is sitting. When, a fortnight ago,
the House adjourned at 0.3(1 a.m.,
Mr. Ballour, who had sat it out,
bad an Important public engagcincnl
for noon which was faithfully kept.
It is the week-ends, fruit ol the
new procedure rules, that keep him
going. Some overworked men liki
to enjoy their Friday night to Monday morning in the quietness ol
their country home, or such privacy
as is to be obtained at a seaside hotel. Mr. Ballour finds his rest with
hosts like the Rothschilds, wbosi
perfectly appointed country houses
are peopled from Saturday to Monday with brilliant company.
Asked how such conditions ol life
at the end ol the week spent In the
turmoil of Parliamentary and social
life in London could suit him. Mr.
Ballour answered:
"Well, it does. They don't get me
up on my hind legs. Practically 1
don't show up till dinner lime, and
have the advantage ol fresh air and
change of scene."
II is an old Parliamentary joke,
born at the period when Disraeli was
Premier, and bad got through a session distinguished by tack of accomplished work, thai be was "going to
the Lords with a little Barren Session." 1875 was, however,^ a fruitful year, compared with 111(11. Of a
dozen hills promised in the King's
speech, only ol first class importance
Was passed, and tbat only by the
machinery of the closure. Consider
ing that for legislative purposes Mr.
Balfour has had available a working
majority of at least forcscorc, this
simple sialcmeut implies gross mismanagement, or what, enquired in
to, will usually be ioiind to come to
the same thing, unredeemed ill luck.
lie has, however, one success to
bis credit, the magnitude and in
parlance of Which outweighs a sin
cession of lallures. He has kept
Parliament going till the usual date
of prorogation, and bus earned for
his ministry sin months'certain ?csl(
In the sanctuary of the hseess. That
Is an achievement which in the circumstances probably no other man
could have carried out. II should,
perhaps, lie added thai no other responsible Minister wrlild, for such
particular purpose, have displayed
equal cynlclsn in disregarding Parliamentary traditions.
ODD NOTIONS ABOUT ANIMALS THAT
ARE BORN OF IGNORANCE.
Edith-Is It true, Dolly, that Lar-
l.iii kissed you before he picked you
up'in that runaway?
Dully—Yes, dear; you iknow he Is
studying to be a doctor, and that
was first aid In the Injured.
Soma snperatltlona About Toad* «*#
BMkes Explained Away—NoetnraaJ
Animals and Their Erea — Laxtli«
and Sheep and Their Tall*.   *
It Is commonly believed that toads
cause warts. This la based upon the
following combination of (acts: Toads
■re tbo only common animals that an
naturally covered with wartlike lumps.
They eject a clear liquid. This Is sup,
posed to do something. Warts appeal
mysteriously, and no one Is able to ex.
plain the causes of their coming uud
going. It Is erroneously Inferred thai
they ire produced by this wart bear.
Ing, nocturnal creature with peculiar
habits, upon the basis of the doctrine
that "like produce* like." The common belief that tadpoles shed their
tails has for its origin the facts that
while living in water each possesses a
swimming tall, but when It metamorphoses into a frog or a tond It becomes
tailless. Is fact, the tall does not
drop off, but It is absorbed and disappears In tbe body, just ns a swelling
from a bump on the head disappears.
How often do we hear that frogs and
toads have fallen with rain, and ntiiost
evory Jnly we may read accounts of
such phenomena. These may have for
their basis the fact that during the
month of Jnly toads change from tho
tadpole stage and aquatic habitat to
the adult form and terrestrial habitat
and then migrate landward In great
numbers. They are active only nt
night or during hot weather, effectually concealing themselves In the moat
common places during tbe daytime.
However, when a rain falls at such a
time they appear ky thousands, as If
by magic, and give the Impression of
having fallen with rain.
There are doubtless more superstitions concerning snakes than any other
creatures. This arises in part from the
traditions of tbe form of the original
tempter and In part from the fact that
but very few persons are willing to
calmly observe serpents for themselves
and learn the truth directly. We have
met persons who believe that all snakes
ere venomous. This doubtless comes
from the old Roman rule, "a.i nnodlscu
omnes." How prevalent Is tbe belief
that horse hairs turn-to sunken! There
Is no other foundation for this error
than tbe resemblance of the so called
halrsnake (gordlusl to a common horsehair. Snakes are often supposed to
charm birds, but the fact Is thnt the
feathered songsters are paralyzed by
fright when they suddenly see the reptiles at close proximity.
The common erroneous belli"; that
snakes sting or bite by menus of their
tongues may come from tbe Scriptural
quotation, "It stlngeth like au adder."
The supposition that snnkes bite thom-
selves and die Is doubtless based upon
the actions of certain species, like tbe
hog nosed adder, which when tensed
will act as though dead and thus sometimes find protection. It Is very commonly thought that snnkes' tails "live"
or are active until sundown. This arises
from the prolonged activity of the tall,
due to the reflex action of tbe caudal
nerve centers, which may continue for
a longer or shorter period owing to tern-
perature and other conditions. Many
persons believe that there Is a glass
snake or joint snake, which may be
'iroken to fragments wben struck, but
can rejolnt itself and live. This may
come from the fact tbat a certain lizard (Ophlosaurus ventralls) readily loses
Its tail, and while the body escapes the
caudal member wiggles-and attracts
the attention of tbe pursuer.
The erroneous idea tbat turtles
breathe under water, as do fishes, is derived from tbe observations of their
having remained submerged for some
hours. But thlB is made possible by
their lung capacity, their limited need
of oxygen compared with that of warm
blooded animals and their ability to
store oxygen in their tissues and use it
as needed.
Both species of American cuckoos
(genus coccyzus) build nests, contrary
to the popular belief. The error comes
from the fact that tbe European
cuckoo (cucuIub) builds no uests, but is
parasitic, laying its eggs In the nests
of other birds, as does our cowblrd
(molotbrus). The old idea that "a sight
of tbe oriole cures Juundlce" doubtless
Is connected with tbe yellow color of
tbe bird and the homeopathic doctrine
"Slmllla slmillbus curantur" (like cures
like).
Most persons believe that owls, cats
and other nocturnal animals can see
In absolute darkness. This error arises
from the fact that In these auimnls the
pupil of tbe eye Is very largo or dilatable, and In subdued or very feeble
light they can see much better than
can man. One can readily demonstrate
the fallacy of tbe supposition by taking an owl or other nocturnal animal
Into a perfectly dark room, as wo have
done, and touching It with the hand.
It does not move, even though It be nn
untamed animal. Cats and other nocturnal animals are erroneously thought
to emit light from tholr eyes because
when looking toward the light tbe
crystalline lens of tbe eye produces a
glaring reflection. Tbe Ideas that swans
sing when dying and moles open their
eyes at tbe time of death aro handed
down from tbe writings of Pliny and
represent Ignorance of the facts of
•oology.
We were once seriously asked by a
teacher, "At what age do the, little
lambs' tails drop off?"   He bnd accurately observed that the tails of the
lambs are long, while those of the old
sheep are short, and he had obtained j
■ false Idea, wblch Is, however, prevn- I
lent.   Of course he wns shocked to j
learn that sheep ralsere amputate the ,
tails to prevent the soiling of tbe wool j
-Forest and (treats.
JAPANESE PATRIOTS.     '
Wc are often reminded that old
Japan is still with us, and that its
survival adds not merely a picturesque, but also a noble, clement
to the character of the nation.
An illustration has just occurred.
Nearly .'Klfl years ago, when Togu-
gawa Iseyasu captured the castle of
Osaka from the Taiko's widow,, Yo-
do, and her son, Hldeyori, he found
there a large part of the treasure
that, the great captain and statesman had accumulated. It was in
llie form of gold horses, lor the Taiko's fancy lias been thus to stamp
upon tile precious metal an indication of tlie warlike uses to which
it was destined.
TluT-Takugawa leader distributed a
great part of tlie treasure among
his chief retainers, and to his second
son, Norinao, he gave 30(1 ingots,
with an Injunction thai the gold
should lie held as a reserve lor use
in a national emergency.* Norinao
received in lief tho iiroliiuce of Owari
and in the vaults of the colossal castle built by hill .1 Nagoya the ingots lay untouched until the fall of
feudalism In 187-1.
The feudal chiefs were then reduced to the position of simple gentlemen, with incomes representing a
mere fraction of their previous revenues. But no official scrutiny was made into the contents of
their strong rooms, and thus many
emerged from Hie debacle in a much
better financial position than the
bald figures of the state's commutation scheme suggested.
The Owari ingots, however, being
reserved from ordinary uses by the
injunction of Iyeyasu—an injunction
of absolutely binding force In the
eyes of his descendants—remained inviolate until a few days ago, when
their owner, Marquis Girea, present
representative of Ihc Owari family
decided Unit the. national emergency
contemplated by his illustrious ancestor had conic. The iugols have
a value of 1,0(10,000 yen—illlMl,llllll—
in modern money.
It would have, been more than natural that the head of one of the
three principal nraiiches of the To-
kiigawa clan, which hail been driven
from adm.uistralive power and robbed of all its ancient splendor hy Ihe
present government, should have kept
the treasure for his own enrichment,
and that to hand it over to the national exchequer would have been
his last thought. Ilul Japanese pa
triolisin is superior to vicissitudes
of individual fortune.
Marquis Grid repaired to the
tomb of his forefather Morinao, and
there, in the presence of his sons,
his principal relatives, and some of
his family's former vassals, Invoked
Norinao's s| It I to witness that the
trust reposed iu him by the Toku
gawa chief had been faithfully observ
ol through three centuries, and that
to transfer flu' treasure now to the
Millers of the state seemed a true
Interpretation of the purpose ol
Iyeyasu.
The gift has not evoked much comment in' Japan. It appears to be
considered too appropriate to be extraordinary But it constitutes an
Interesting link between the old anil
the new—Toltlo Correspondence of
London Times.
It Is said there la nothing which diffuses Itself more quickly.In a family
than the coolness, Indifference and dis-
tf>ntent which manifest themselves In
Kae countenances of one of its members.
this thought Is not absolutely true.
There are some things which communicate themselves with as much rapidity
and more force. They are a bright
smile, a frank and open manner, a
cheerful face, a happy heart—Selected.
A Mean Dler.
Maude-Mr. Willing asked me to accompany him to the opera tomorrow
evening.
Clara—And you accepted the Invitation?
"Certainly."
"Strange!   He asked me also."
"There's nothing strange ubout it at
all. I told bim I wouldn't go unless he
provided a chaperon."
Hli Own Craflr Way.
FuBlIby-Hduian nature Is a funny
thing. It was Bald I had quit drinking,
and everybody I met asked me to take
something.
Glnssby—And yon couldn't accept?
Poor fellow!
Fusllby—Oh, yes, I accepted every
time: It was I who started the rotor
matlon slory, you know.
She "Hoped" Tor Their Happlncaa.
Tbo Newly Wed-Edltb did tbe bnle-
fulcst thing at our reception, and I'll
never forgive ber.
Cousin Jane—Why, what could It be?
Tbe" Newly Wed—She addressed
Charles In the most pitying mauuer
end said, "I hope you'll be happy." Tbe
way she uttered tbat word "hope" was
positively unbearable.
Ihe Wanted One Saved For ller.
Young Miss Wllgus—Where are yon
going, papa?
The Rev. Mr. Wllgns-To the ten-
pernuce meeting. We intend to Inaugurate a movement to save tbe young
men of the country.
Young Miss Wllgus-Try and save a
nice oue for met will you, pupa dear?-
« »
| Union Brewing Co, [
I nanaimo; b. c.
4 '
riaiiufacturers of the_
BEST BEER
^■i In British Columbia
'j'V'J"t"l r|tt{l-jt^<rjlr|«lj<r|«(j> r£l l|l||w|>ljtl|l
Lager Beer and Porter Guaranteed Brewed
from the Best Canadian Malt rnn Hops.
| TEN DOLLARS REWARD.
|} The Union Brewing Company will pay $10 reward for information
w wliicli will lend to the urreet.anri convict'on of any pcruon or persona
i destroying Union Brewing Company's kegs or bottles, or failing to re-
vfr turn the eame.
t t
miners' Drilling Machines,
Made'lo order end Repaired at B'mrt notice    Drills sharpened by ue
BlwavEgives satisfaction.    Picks handled and repaired.
Shipsmitliing in all its Branches.
Horseshoers and General Blacksmiths.
David Murray
Buller Street --.-■- Ladysmith, B. C
A. 0. MeAdic,
icei'ssor lo R. Kilputrirk, Kxtrti-
sion'miii Nuuaimo.
funeral Director J Maimer
Residence, Alibnlsl
In nee p
Ladysmith,
Residence, Alilinlsfiiril  Hold; Iuiik ill*
Innee phone   '
B. C.
Commercially Eipi*r«sed.
The father of ten daughters listened
silently to tbe solemn words that united
his eldest to a millionaire.
"Therel" he rauriMred ns the tying
•X the knot was weesssfully eouclmWl
That's t» par «Mt«*T tor ctgmr
W (ssssi were no sues tford as fall
seme dishonest man would won Invent
It-Chicago News.
r'^rWWl
Carpenter-, Builder, Contractor and General Jobber
Oblivion Is tbe rule and tame lost •*•
Motion of biimoulrjr.
^sssssfssKSjSijssisaifjsssainjsJsssssafisaisi
.'• .•!,•.«.»v«L
iwsssssss.ssvjssssesjpi'
I. E. HUBERT
Fumral Director
Special attention given to calls iiijjlit
or day. Long distance 'plioiie tn.
NANAIMO. II  C.
Bubai. Cigar Factory
Manufacturers of the Famous
CUBAN
BLOSSOM
None but Union Labor employed
M. J. BOOTH, - Proprietor.
NANAIMO, 11. 0.
W.G.Fraser
Merchant Tailor
(ist Avenue)
Full Stock Just Arrived. Call early
nut get your pick of the largest and beat
stuck iu town.
ItAKRBR   SHOP A BATH ROOMS.
The KSVLANADK,   between the
<-rami ami Ahbottsford,
William PowtiKS, Prop.
W. Mun-.'Ik, Secretary. John W.Oouukn, Manager.
'Mephnue Iti,
The  Ladysmith Lumber Co., Ltd.
MILLS  AT  FIDDiOK   AND LADY SMI'I'II-Slilngles a Specially.
—Mnliufrtcliwura    ol—
Rou.li and Dressed Fir and Cedar Lumber, Laths,
Shingles, Mouldings, Etc, of the Best Quality.
Seasoned  and   Kiln   Dried   Fluorine and  Finishing Lumber slwuya In Slock
AT IAST
We are among' you and shall be
pleased to see all our friends at our
new store on First Avenue.
H.&W.
MEAT   MARKET
LIVERY, BOARDING AND
SALE5 STABLES
DAVID JOHNSON,
I   PHONE 66 LADYSMITH, B.C.
We Are Slaughtering:
All our Choice Assortment of Beef.
Mutton, Pork and Veal ourselves and
can guarantee everything to be the
Nicest, Freshest and Cleanest on the
market ;	
PAN NELL & PLASKETT
SI-EVENS BLOCK, QATACRE STREET, LADYSfUTrl, B.C
c "^LADYSMITH TRANSFER CO. *
PIANOS, ORGANS AND HOUSEHOLD  FURNITOBE  MOVED
PROMPTLY AND SAFELY
Staples hi rear of Lailysiniili Hotel.   Leave order* at the Abbottsford.
t WILLIAMS AND WASKETT
I Delivered in Any][Part of the City |
I        Every Afternoon f
j The Daily Ledger I
t *
I 50 Cents per  Month |
»^;«H-:«^»'i;».|'».i'».K»''f:*^»^«^»^»H->^»y«.|;eat-e^>^«'4:>^t))<
DAY SCHOOL.
Usual subjects taught; also languages, drawing in pencil and crayons, painting in oils and water colors, pianoforte ami vocal lessons,
given In classes or Individually.
MISS BERTRAM.
Ladysiuilh, B. C.
NOTICE
I Messrs. Blair and Adam bars secured the agency ol the Chrystal
Laundry Co. to Victoria, All parcels and orders left with them  will
1 receive prompt and careful attention
«_^___» Ladysmith daily Ledger
WANTED—For Ladysmith a lady or after it. He caught the deer and af7
gentleman to introduce our rapid
sellers; experience unnecessary; a
rustler can make big money.- Apply
quick, J. M. MacGregor Publishing
Co., Vancouver, B. C.
LOCAL ITEMS
J. W. Bowes arrived in town today
by the Nanaimo train.
Judge. Harrison passed through
town this morning on his way to
Victoria.
I. Gould and his nephew returned
yesterday from a fishing trip to
Somenos Lake. They were extremely lucky, catching uo less than 189
lish.
AT THE ABIIOTSFOUD.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Little.
J. A. Col vert.
J. G. Polls, Montreal.  .
A. D. Mowatt,
F. S. McKcc, Vancouver,
Rev. A. Ewing, superintendent of
Chinese Missions in Canada, and who
has spent ten years in China, arrives today ami will preach in the Presbyterian church tomorrow morning.
Mr. Ewing is a very fine speaker. He
goes to Chcuiainus in the evening.
Yesterday Government Agent Mr.
Thompson held an informal investigation into tlie trouble between two
white lads and a Chinese boy. The
affair apperently was not as serious
as at first supposed and the hoys
were dismissed with a caution on
promising to purchase a new lantern
for the Chinese hoy in place of the
one broken by aAiteW The white
boys slated they were in fun and
that the breaking of the lantern was
accidental.
tcr an exciting struggle which
watched from the shore with breath
less interest, and iu which the boat
was almost capsized and the hunter
thoroughly drenched with salt water, he succeeded in getting the deer
into the boat and in lying it secure-'
•     MARINE     *
&•*•$•*•$•$•&•*•$•*<
Tug Lome, which. was In port this
morning for hunker coal, is again under the command of Capt. Butler,
who, after a year's absence in California, has quite recovered his health
and this morning was welcomed back
to Ladysmith by his many friends.
Captain Cutler, who, during Capt.
llutlcr's absence, has been in command of the Lome, returns to the
collier Wellington as captain. The
Wellington, now lying in Esquimau
harbor, will soon be in commission
again. Mr. A. Matthicson has gone
to Esquiiiialt to join her as first officer. The Lome left today for Vancouver to tow the bark Harold to
sea.
Mr. James Fowler, surveyor for
Lloyds, is in Esquimau making the
survey ol the Wellington belore she
goes into commission.
2,000 Ions of eooTJ'daily by the end
of December aud expect to , reach
the maximum capacity of the plant
by next June. We are employing
three hundred men, including median
ics engaged on construction. Our
coal tipple, now nearing completion,
is designed to handle 4,000 tons of
coal daily. It is the largest tipple
in the Crow's Nest district. The C.
P. R. has already built two and
three-quarters miles of .tracks and
sidings on the coal company's property. A battery of 101 coke ovens
have been completed and coke is now
being shipped to the British Columbia smelters. We anticipate no difficulty in finding a market for our
output, as the coal is adapted for
cooking, steaming and domestic purposes. At this juncture the C. P.
It. is one of the largest consumers,
the coal being used as fuel iti the locomotives along the main line and
branches."
*N*W*VWWArV»rWWVV
DRESS GOODS
FIRE INQUIRY OI'ENS-
A small number of Interested spectators gathered at the Provincial
Government olliec today to hear the
evidence given at tlie inquiry before
Mr. Thompson, into the fire which
occurred in tlio latter purl of Sep
temlier at P. Zinkovitch's house on
High street. Air. F. McB. Young
represented the city, while Mr. Riis-
scl Simpson looked after the interests of Zinkovitch. Mr. Zftnkoyitch
was examined at length upon the
question of insurance and the condi
Hon of the house; but as her evidence had to be translated from the
Austrian tongue, tlie proceedings
were rather lengthy. The Inquiry
was still in progress when the Ledger went to press.
H4*H'WIH+H+H+tHtH+;
SPORTS
CHECKERS.
Tlie members ol the Checker Club
last night had an informal talk over
arrangements for the approaching
game with Nanaimo, which will be
played here on October 22nd.
PRACTICE TOMORROW.
A final practice will be held tomorrow morning lor the association
football match between the Black
Diamonds and Snowilakes which
takes place Oct. 16th.
BASKETBALL.
A Basketball match between the
Shamrocks and Leaders has been arranged for Wednesday evening and
a good deal of interest will be centered on the event, as both teams
can turn out strong combinationa.
NANAIMO FOOTBALL.
The Nanaimo Athletics beat     the
the Mosquitoes yesterday at  Rugby
by a score ol eight to seven.
SHAMROCKS DEFEAT CAPITALS
Montreal, Oct. 8.-The Montreal
Shamrocks, champions of the world
and holders of the Mint? Cup, yesterday defeated Ihc Capitals of Ottawa by llie decisive score of six
goals lo one in the first match of
the post season series. The match
was played on the M.A.A.A. grounds
in the presence of two thousand spectators.
A telegram     from    San Francisco
last night states:
"Tlie Merchants' Exchange has received a cable despatch from London stating that the steel steamer
Mincola, of 1,802 tons, bound from
Petropavlovsk, Siberia, for this port
struck a reef off Tigil bay on September 5th, and became a total
wreck. The officers and crew were
rescued and taken to Hakodate, Japan, by the British cruiser Algcriue.'
lie Minoola is well-known lo people here as for a long time she carried coal between the Vancouver island mines and San Diego lor the
Southern Pacific, railway. She is
owned by the Pacific Coast Steamship Co., and her master, Capt
Kirkwood, was married to a Nanaimo lasy, formerly Miss Ritchie.
Wheels!
Yes, we've all kinds of wheel*; we are
iKentB (or the Canada Cycle and Motor
Co., of Toronto, and (tarry their "Perfect wheel in atoek."
Wealaorepair wheels; if yonrs doee
not .un to suit yon, *end it tip tone.
All kinds of light machinery repair**.
We are gasoline lannuh txperta
R J. Weiiborn
FYaser Street,
Nanaimo
GEORGE YUEN
Merchant Taylor
All kinds of clothing cleaned and
repaired.
Just received a Large Consignment of New Dress
Goods which consists of
TWEEDS, CASHMERE and
LADIES CLOTH.
FRENCH
FLANNELS
50 pieces of French Flannels.
No two alike. In Blouse
lengths at 5(1 cents a yard.
FURS
30 furs in Brown, Black,
Grey and White. From $1.00
up.
DRYSDALE-
STEVENS0N
Co., Ltd.
NOTICE.
Persons   found   using our   Patent
Bottle or Stoppers after this notice
will be prosecuted.
RUMMING BROS.
Pioneer Soda Water Works.
Ladysmith, B.C.
METHODIST CHURCH.
Rev. W. C. Schlichtcr, pastor.
Morning Service—01:00    a. m.
Sunday School—2.30 p-m.
Evening Service—7.00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Rev. 11. Boyle, pastor.
Morning Service— 11.00 a.m.
Sabbath School-2.30 p.m.
Evening service at 7 o'clock.
Bible study class, Wednesday evening at 7.30.
Rev. A. Ewing, superintendent of
Chinese Missions will conduct morning service
CHURCH OF ENGLAND.
Rev. R. Bowcn, Rector.
Morning Service—11.00 a. m.
Children's Sunday School—2.30 p.m
Evening Service—7.00 p.m.
BIO HARVESTS.
Saratoll, Russia, Oct. 8.—The railroad officials here are unable to
handle the enormous accumulation ol
grain from tlie big harvest in the
Southeast of Russia.
ALL ARE 1113.19.
Dessau, Germany, Oct. 8.—All ol
the eighteen miners imprisoned h a
sudden inrush of water and mud in
the Leopold Brown coal mine near
Koclben on Thursday, are d'.ad The
bodies of the men cannot ie rjiohed.
NO MEETING.
The public meeting to decide about
■what should he done with the Dominion Day celebration fund surplus
did not take plarc Inst night owing
to the small attendance and apparent want nf Interest taken in the
matter. Another effort wIlHIkcly he
made to get a gathering together
later on.
CAUGHT A DEER.
Wbilo the mechanics employed at
Protection Island shall were enjny-
llng their mid-day meal yesterday,
Bays the Free Press, they oliserveil a
klccr In the water swimming to
Jack's Point. Mr. .1, Gillespie
(speedily   launched a boat and pulled
Trunks
Valises,  Telescope Grips, Deess
Suit Cases.   All Leather Goods.
20
Per Cent Loweithan
—Rlswhcre—
20
rnterpriae Harness Store,
.    :.; YANT,    Proprietor
i.: .ii.  Ureseent, Nanaimo.
Knljhi'a Book Store is the place lo
<et stationery, etc.
Kicvllent eoda water from the new
fountain at Jessop's Drug Store.
Get your school
Book Store.
books at Knight's
♦♦♦♦   ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
f    Our $7.50
; GENUINE DIAMOND rings,
tset in Ilk gold are winners.
Should yon S .ink of getting
.  a larger size diamond,     we
have them in different styles
and prices up to $125.00.
Call and see us.
B FORCIMMER
Jeweler - -
- = Optician
STEVENS BLOCK,
Ladysmith, B. C.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
It/
FRESH TODAY
9\
*
9)
9\
9}
m
9\
9}
KIPPERED HERRINGl
9}
9\
tfOAL AT COLEMAN.
Our colliery at Coleman, in the
Crow's Nest Pass, will lie producing
a daily tonnage ol 500 tons by the
end of next week," said Mr. A. C.
Flumerfclt, president of the International Coal & Coke Company, to the
Winnipeg Free Press on Saturday
last, on his way east from British
Columbia.
"The bituminous coal lands acquired by the International extend about
seven miles north and south on the
strike of coal measures, and have u
width of one mile. The Crow's
Nest branch ol the O. P. R. passes
within 200 yards of the main entry
of the mine. Development work was
started last October. We have already extracted 35,000 tons of coal
and are in 2,000 feet in No. 2 scam,
which lias a uniform thickness of
fourteen feet. There are in all seven coal seams which outcrop at dar-
ious points across,our property. Mr.
Baton, a Pittsburg coal mining engineer, who designed our plant, estimated the coal resources in sight
on our lands, above the level of the
Old Man River, at 01,000 000 tons.
"This plant," continued Mr. Flumerfclt, "is now nearing completion,
is designed to handle an output    of
jjjSMOKED SALMON
$ AND
iti
vl/
il
9\
ili
9\
9\
SEE OUR WINDOWS
BEST BATH
CITY-Ladysmlth
High Street.
ROOMS  IN THE
Shaving   Parlor,
BLHIR&HDHM
CARLISLE    BLOCK
♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦
♦    MOR RIS O N * S i%
JUST RECEIVED o
Fifty boxes hand packed  ap- B
'   -■       -    ■-        Sel-J
  0
  z
ist Avenue    -   -   -   Ladysmith, B. C.      (/j
MORRISON'S
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<
jj: pies in Prime  Condition.
DC ling at $1.25 per box.
THE RIGHT PLACE
D. j. MATHESON,
HERCHANT TAYLOR
■st Ave. Ladysmith
FIRE WOOD.
Shingle spnlts, good cedar wood,
(2 a load, (cord, more or less), delivered.   Leave orders at office of
LADYSMITH LU.WB PR CO.
>ooo<x
Our Animal Stocktaking being now
completed^ we Must get rid of many armies QUICKLY. These will be offered at Greatly Reduced Prices in or.
der to make room for our New FALL
GOODS consisting of Dress Goods,
Gents' Furnishings. Woolen Underwear
Whitewear, Hats, Caps, Rubbers Boots
and Shoes, etc., etc., which have been
arriving daily.
Simon Leiser &
Company, Ltd.
GATACRE STREET LADYSMITH
)000000000000000<>0»000<XX
SEE
Harry Kay
(or artistic Painting and Paperhang-
ing. Picture Framing.
FIRST AVENUE, Ladysmith.
PAINLESS   DENTISTRY
Dentistry in all its branches as fine as
can be done in the world, and absolutely
free from the SLIGHTEST PAIN. Ei-
tractinir, filling, fitting ol crowns and
bridges without pain or discomfort.
Examine work done st tbe West Dental Parlors and compare with any you
have ever seen and then judge lor your
seir.
Painless,
Artistic, and Reliable.
ABB THE WATCHWORDS OF OUR OFRICS.
WlthHtPlltlt.
Consultation and your teeth cleaned FRKfi
Pull set, $7.50; sliver fillings, $t up; gold Billings,
I 2 up; gold crowns, $5 up. In Tact, alt operations
aa reasonable as our watchwords can make them.
Will be in ladysmith, Friday, Aug.tath
and same date of each succeeding
month, and remain 3 days only,,..
home obficb:
The West Dental Parlors,
THE IMPERIAL BANK CUMBERS,
Corner   Yataa   and   Government    Strut..
Office honrs, 8 a. m. lo 0 p. in.; evenings, from 7 lo 8.30.   Offlice in P. O.
Now is your time to get your winter
supply of wood, we will deliver you four-
foot dry wood, whicli ie eqnpl to time
rleke of 16 inch wood, for 42.1)0
'J. M.LEIGH,
BOOTS AND SHOES AT RIGHT
PRICES.
Repairing and making to order   a
speciality.
THOHAS MCEWAN
1st Avenue,  Ladysmith, B. C.
Take a Trip East
•      »* '    OVER THE
Canadian Pacific
AND QElT
YOUR MONEY'S WORTH.
REDUCEDRATES
Tickets on Sale   October 3rd, 4th,
and 5th.
2 TRAINS DAILY.
FINE ACCOMMODATION.
B. C. COAST SERVICE
SS. Princess Victoria sails daily
at 7 p.m. lor Seattle, and at 7.30
a.m. lor Vancouver.
Steamers for Skagway, West Coast
and Northern B. C. ports.
H(«W»5M)K«SK»*»$«3I(«#«$«
Cupous
Given
IT PAYS TO BUY AT
With Every |
$i Purchase *
    *
WEINROBES
Cupons
Given
With  Every
$i Purchase
•*•*•*•*•*•*•*•*•*•*•* •^•X*************** «,;
KYNOCK& VULCAN SHELLS
Are the'BEST.   We have them.
BROWNING AUTOMATIC SHOT GUN
Is a  PEACH.     We  have it.
SAVAGE  & WINCHESTER   RIFLES
EVERYBODY knows them. We have them
E. ROLSTON
PRICES ARE
RKIHT
Ladysmith
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED
f»)ininiiiminittmtvini*MiiniiniiMMiiii|»:

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xdailyledg.1-0348033/manifest

Comment

Related Items