BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland News Oct 15, 1902

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xcumberland-1.0176690.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xcumberland-1.0176690.json
JSON-LD: xcumberland-1.0176690-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xcumberland-1.0176690-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xcumberland-1.0176690-rdf.json
Turtle: xcumberland-1.0176690-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xcumberland-1.0176690-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xcumberland-1.0176690-source.json
Full Text
xcumberland-1.0176690-fulltext.txt
Citation
xcumberland-1.0176690.ris

Full Text

 k  /'Pry   ^^  If,  NINTH   YEAR.  CUMBERLAND,   B. .C. WEDNESDAY,   OCT.  15,   1902.  WESB528B������3&BEmBSSmE������BEgkWBS&  U '  THE Blft  ,,   ,   SUBSCRIPTION LIST &  HHAHCIAL ,- 8TATEM1HT  --    OF SPORTS COMMITTEE  ���������OF THE���������  Agricultural Exhibition at CouTtenay,  'September 25th, 1902.  COUNCIL   MEETING.  (r  \  \  GROCERY DEPT  :   O  N SATURDAY, the 18fch inst., we  will place on view  a Quantity'of TRAVELLERS SAMPLES, comprising'  .a  Large  Assortment* of  SEASONABLE GOODS at  VERY  '*lo\v prices..'.' ..' ..������:': "..   :.   .:   ":.' .;.  We, will also   Bhow.'. Many   Lines' of   NEW    GOODS    at!  '- ... '.-; ;'i.. .*;. .."���������."-."..'. .Exceptional    Value's...'.������'..'....' '.-. '..  "We  hope-that-every- Lady   in  the  District  will do us tho  honor to call and INSPECT THESE GOODS..".,..     '..     ..7  S. Leiser &  g������������������B������MHIK������aM^^ ''&&SSS98rIB������kSj  &a������������Z2������&&&s!&E!������^ S^SSs^S^i^SSSS^i  &Wa-5'  ji_  J   ,'-       6! -YATES STREET,    VICTORIA, B;: C.  "' .   , HARDWARE, MILL AND   MINING.' MACHINERY,. * j  . AND FARMING  "AND" DAIRYING'-IMPLEMENTS  ''!  - - OF- A LI'.KINDS.    ''.',. o    ��������� ���������     \       .' "1>  Apeiits for ���������M<jCorraick Harvesting Machinery^'  "Write for price-- and y.nrticnlare.    P. O. Drawer-563. ''M  T S Brown, ������2.50;   J Humphrey,  ������2 50; T Hxidson, ������1;   M Miinaon,  52; G A'MoLauchlin,������2; T Bever-  iclge, 81;   W Wil lard,  Mayor, S3;  Morocchi Bros. 82; F Dallos, $1.50  A JdcKmght, ������2.50; G W Clinton,  $2.50; R Short, $1; Wei. Col. Co.  ������25; T Horner, ������1; T E BaLea, $1;  S ShTo, %\\ W Gloaaon, ������2.50; A  H Peacey,   work basket value?!;  W Harwo.od, $2; ���������W Surgenar, $1;  J Hudson, SI; W B Anderson,' 52;  Simon Lois������r,-, good3 value" $2.50,  und ������2.50 in cash;   W- F, Ramsay,  $1; C A'Staples, $2; H^P Millard,  S5;   Courtenay Houoo (D McDonald) ������25;., R Surgenor,  ������1;   Prod  Crockett,- ������2 50;-W Grievea; $ I;. J  Storey, $1; 'H C Lucas, ������5;-;T D  Roberta, $2 50; J P Davis,'' 10 gal.  bear; G G McDonald,' ?5; C West-  rrup, $1;   S,JOiiffo, $5;   ,W Robb,'  S2.'50; J, - McPhee & Son,  85;,Robt  Duncan, ?2;   W J Carroll, .������2; W  Smith, $1;,T H Piffoct, Sl;;'Jho E"  Masou, ������2; K A Grievea, 50e; S-J  Piercy," $2;   Thos Graham^ 'SI;   A  Radford, ������2;  T Tnrnbull, $1: J A  Sailiday,-   ������1;   E   Diuacauf jl;   li  Crawford, $5;   T Swan,  ������1;    Wm'  Llurmaton $1; j'T Williams,- SI; Al  Reea,   $1;   J 3  Holmes,   91;   T A  Graham, 50c;   J McQuillan, $1;   J  Piercy,   50c;   Wm Laker,  50c;   Jtl  Smith, ������1;  M Halliday, 50c; Thos  Cairns, 50c; P Ohilda, ������1'; W Sw*.i  50c; E R Tliomart, $1; H Clark,'50o  A Church, ������1;   G,K>llaua, ,50c;  ,T  Urqxihart. jr., ������5;'Parkin Bros, $1;  Jas Reoa,~ ������1;   G Robinson, ������1;  J.  Adair,   ������1;   J   Crockett, 'SI   ' <���������'Total. ......  Surplus from last year........  Entrance Fees ."   ;Drew~froui Society.  SI73 50  1(5  50  33  00  ' ������228 Od  4  00  00  Up-to-Date- Home Furnishings,  Witfvi.UA.'kii  Every Popular  StySe of Furniture,  in ail Grades is  Stocked by us  or Made to Order  at our own Factory.  Paid out in Pvizoa   ������211 00  Yriiuint,-..'         9 00  General Expenses       12 00  ' ������232 00  '    ' H. M. McPHEE, Sect.  ������ WHARF    r^OTES. ^  "������gg?52  We FurniBh. Homes Complete ,and submit Estimates,  S&mplea and Illustrations frea. Drop us a-line stating your needs and you will hear from us promptly.  THE  ^G-IEIfcTTS'      JFOtt  WRITE  PRICES  MASON &��������� RISCH"   PIANOS.  CHIGKERIKG" PIANOS,  ... .AND THE! ...  VOCALION    ORGAN.  *  EASY  TERMS  GIVEN  ;!  12S HASTINGS ST.  Vancouver, B.C.  88 .GOVERNMENT ST.,  Victoria, B.C.  POE"  JOB    PRINT IN  r mottwnaxcvtaBmzrM&TAerjzx&xaizsicv-,  Work of Every Description  at Moderate Rates  Transfer made two trips to Union  Bay for coke this week.  SCS. Oscar was in on Friday for  a cargo of coal for Vancouver.  S.S. Tepic and scows loaded coal  for Vancouver consigned to G.P.R.  S.S. Flyer and scow loaded coal  on Saturday for New Westminster.  S.S. Amur was in on Sunday  for bunker coal. She was bound  for Skagway.  t ,  S-S. J. L. Card took bunker coal  Saturday. She was bound North  for a cargo of salmon from the canneries.  Barge Robert Kerr loaiod a cargo of coal on Thursday for Vancouver and was towed out by^the  tug Pilot.  S.S. Otter load a cargo of coal  for Victoria Friday ; ab-jo the s.s.  Danube took bunder coal bound  to Northern B.C. ports.  S.S. Inveric was in on Friday  for bunker coal. She had on board"  a cargo of 7000 tons of wheat and  oats, which she had loaded at  Tacoma for Cape Town.  S.S.--Wellington, oapt. J. Mac-  ICellar in command, sailed for Skag  way with a cargo .of* coal on Thursday. Captain. J. Butler of the s.s.  Lome went with her as Pilot.  S.S. Princess May called in on  Friday bound down from Skagway.  She had on board about 65 passen-'  gens. She bad been delayed on the  trip down by heavy fog, and was-  short of coal to complete her trip to  Victoria,  , Minutes read and'adopted. ���������  Communications ��������� From J. B.  Bennett, secretary of athletic association, re hall, &c.    Laid oh.table.  From Medical Superintendent  Lunatic-Asylum, re T, R. Brown's  transport.    Received and liied.     r ,  From T. Irwin re drain.     Laid  ���������  on table.  Accounts���������S. Leiser, bedding, &c.  to Isolation Hospital; $22.30 ;   H;  Martin, contracts, $15 and $11.75.  '.Referred to Finance Committee.'  ,'- Cumberland and Union Waterworks���������Water to stable, $12. Laid  on table.   ,  T.S.'Banks���������Transport of T. R.  "Brown, to Asylum. $,39.25-;'  1 pair^  -handcuffs, r$1.50;   S. Perry's- trans1  port'to Nanaimo, $7.75.;"  ��������� Deferred business.' - -'  7 Moved by Aid. Bate, seconded ,by  Aid. Robertsou,- that Scavenger bylaw-be read 3rd time. " Passed arid,  finftlly l reconsidered. t.rand   carried-  that, the amendmenfc'be published  in newspaper.        '    "'* ' .' '  ���������Report from. School Board,, that  average attendance for past'^ year  was 197:76:   ' '      *   "'���������     J      ':' '  ' Early Closing ' By-law Amendment. Moved Aid. Bate, seconded  Aid. Reid, that it receive 1st reading.    Carried.   , ,      *'  'Tenders for chairs���������C Segrave,  '$9.55.. $11, and $12.95 per doz; C.  H.-Tarbell, $7.35 per doz; S. Leiser,  $7.50 and $11.50 per doz'.  Moved Aid. .Bate, seconded Aid.  Reid, 'that 6 dozen at $7.35 from Mr  Tarbell, and' 6 dozen at $11.50.from  S. Leiser be,accepted%    Curried.-  '; Aid: Reid wished .successful tenderers to be informed thai, the chairs  be supplied at once,  ��������� Communication read from Fire  Department re new supplies. Laid-  o,ver until next meeting.  From ' J. Morrochi applyiug for  'wholesale liquor .licence. Laid over  until next meeting..  Re water,tap in Reading Room,  referred to reading room committee ,  Tap3 in passage way of No. 3 build-,  ing. ' -  Moved Aid. Reid, seconded Aid.  Bate, that Water Works be asked to  supply water for civic buildings  free.  Aid'. Bate asked why the charge ���������  ��������� of $10 was made in Mr Bank1 a account for transporting T. D. Brown  from- Vaucouver to New Westminster. Mr Banks explained that the  Train Co. had refused to carry convicts or lunatics on their line, and  he was forced to hire a hack at $10,  their regular price for the drive.  Re -Athletic Club communication  Aid. Partridge said that a motion  had been passed some time ago a-  gainst granting hall for such purposes. After discussion clerk1 was  instructed to inform the secretary  that'to grant the hall would be to  conflict with other arrangements.  Rates for Scales���������Moved Aid.  Reid, seconded Aid. Bate, that the  rates be as follows:���������1 to 5 loads*  25c; 5 to 15 loads, 20c ; 15 to 25,  15c;    25 to 50, 10c;  Moved by Aid; Robertson in  amendment, that the one scale be  unaltered. Result a tie, Mayor  casting vole for motion.  W  Wellington Colliery Company  MEDICAL   REPORT.     .  Annual'meeting of the  Welling- '  ton Colliery Co employees was held  in Piket's Hall,Saturday, Oct. 10th  1902 to receive the yearly report of  the Medical,and Accident Commit-  <  tee, elect a new board, and transact;  .any'other buisn������ps that might be  presented:,      Chair taken  A.  Mc-'  Knight, arid G. W.Clinton acted,,aa  secretary ;present, a quorum of em-  '  p'lpyees., ���������  ' .'  '  The Chairman  stated what the  object'of the meeting was called for  and requested the Sec'y to read the  ���������minutes of all meetings held by the  board during the year'and also the  \  financial statement,"'showing ^that.  the retiring Board had   taken good  ���������care of'the funds and in addition to '  "paying all claims for year had completed the new cemetery,  clearing,  grading and fencing the grounds in. '���������  Moved by Mr' Pai ks seconded by''.  Mr F. Harwood,  that minutes be- '  adopted'as read:  Carried." , .  ���������The'Chairman stated thatriomin-* '  ations were in   order -for  the  year  ending Sept. 30th,: ,1903, - and  the,  following, w.ere elected to serve ori  the board.    No. 4 Slope, James Reid  and F. Harwood;. No. 5 'shaft, Jas. ',  ���������Nelson-: ..No. 6 shaft;-Harry-King;; *-  outside, W. H. Campbell and R. H. ,  Robertson; Saw, Mill, H. Mounce;  ���������Wcl. CoL.Co., A1. McKnight arid'G.  W. Clinton, .' :        ''     ���������-'-.,"        \  ', Thei "Board requested a," ruling aa    ;  to sciatica, rheumatism, which doc-.  tor claimed could be caused by injuries as ;well as frorn" local causes.  -   After considerable.debate,it was- =-  i decided that no alteration be made:   7]  and continue as were'doirig:  The ,secy.. was "instructed to write- ;*.  to   the "ProV. Secy.1 requesting the-  appointcbent ofT)r Gillespie health  *-  officer for. Nelson District;"ahd also-., -  find out if health officer is, paid by  .Government. ���������"    ���������  ���������  Mr Maguone spoke of cases of ap- ,  pendicitis  being paid for,   but the-  sense of the  meeting was that this-  was making the> accident fund -a-  sick fund, and the meeting adjourned with a vote oi thanks to the retiring Board which   was  suitably  replied to by Mr McKnight.  DEATH OF TIM.  , Poor Tim is dead. He was only  , a little white horse, who had worked forryears in No. 4 slope, who met  his^ death last week. Wonderful  stories are told Qf his almost human,  sagacity in getting clear of danger  in the past. Even on the occasion  of his fatal hurt, it-is said that he  made frantic efforts to get clear of  the approaching runaway trip, but  the place was too narrow, and he  had to fall back and take his  quietus with his mule companions.  Many a man at the slope that day  did1 not. care if he cried for poor,  Tim. '.'���������','  See Here! Chicken Tamales at  J. McLeod's, the popular fruiterer,  from now on. Call there for tamales. :'������������������''  Council adjourned.  Engineers desirous oi obtaining temporary engineers certificates will have an opportunity for examination at the Court  Hou30 ou Saturday. 13th, and JVlouday,  20th inst. Candidates will present themselves at 10 a.m. ou each date, aDd bring  with them references and testimonials, one  of which must be frolil their last employer,  ���������S. Baxter, inspector of boilers.  Miss  Nash   has added  a   large,  stock of millinery, hat, &c, for her r;  fall sale.  Mr  Puckridge,  of St. Paul,  returns east this week, after visiting  his mother, and'his sister, Mrs Dr  i Staples.  Mrs Livesley, and and hex son  Duncan McKay, who have been on  ,  a trip to Scotland,   returned  last  week.  Hon James Dunsmuir and party  spent a few day last week at Oyster  River, returning by the Thistle to  Nanaimo on Saturday.  v- ���������  -v     ft ������.' ������������������  \N  A GIRL OF-  '���������By MA J OH    ARTHUR    GRIFFITHS.  '���������Copywright by R. F. Fenno & Co.  and Authority to detain the Fleur-de-  Lis."  - "That will I. by the Lord, and send  an officer of my own besides. 1 have  other   reasons ��������� official   reasons ��������� for  WHEN A BOAT TIPS OVER.  "The afternoon! Probably four good  hours hence. Absurd!" I cried hotly,  ''when every moment is precious.  'Why,  ���������this   pirate   yacht   has   already  'had  24   hours'   start.     Oh, ,cqme, , Sir  -Charles!    Let us go  somewhere else.  '���������There are.other ships besides warships  . '---steamers, yachts in dozens, for hire.  Why  do  you  hesitate?    Will  no one  *iielp me?"  ��������� !I asked this possibly with some  '���������warmth, for I heard some oue saj as  ���������-we went off. Sir Charles and I:  ,     ���������  "Af-yword, what a little fury!"  .'From Whitehall the general took me  "to Lloyds.   lie knew the secretary, he  ���������"said, and something of the ways of the  ���������'  -j)lac<*~-its wonderful organization and  'the vast machinery at its command,for  ,  ���������  knowing all about ships, almost from  hour   to   hour.    But' the   secretary,   a  ���������grave gentleman, with a sly twinkle,in  ���������his eye. shook his head very doubtfully  5     'when he heard the whole story. ���������  "I fear we shall not be able to lay  ���������    'our   hands   upon  that  yacht���������at least  for some time to come���������if she wishes  to keep out" of the way. , We can track  ��������� her down ,the river,  of course, as far  * as. Southend  on oue  side,  the: North  ,,' &"weland on ������the other. But If ..after  'that she steers a straight course east-  "Tvard till out'of sight.,she will be lost  'in (the German ocean."  He touched, a bell on .his table anil  ���������gave instructions to a clerk.  ' "Communicate  with  signal  stations  'down the Thames, aud thenNvlth'those  ..' ������on the east and southeast coasts, and  -������������������inquire   for   a   yacht   answering   this  f    '^description���������it' is  the  Fleur-de-Lis,  in  .  fact. ��������� She is registered here; you can  verify her from the books.    Ask if she  ������ias been seen or spoken with, and if  so, what course she is on.    That won't  take half, an hour.    In the meantime,  .-.   -you might be inquiring'.for a steamer  f$o send in chase.   That is your idea, is  "it  not?"  and again'he signaled  in a!  ���������tleslc tube,, summoning another subor-1  ;   *d.'mate. . < ��������� ' I  "Can 'anything come of It?"   asked!  *Sir Charles doubtfully.  ��������� ���������    "  "Why not? You will, of course, have  -      to send a posse of police  in her.    It  will  not' be  enough   to  overhaul  her;  - 'yen*-will have also to oyer .awe the ab-  ���������    ductors���������always  supposing   you   come  ^jp with and can positively identify the'  .. (Fleur-de-Lis. neither of which is'  *' '-probable." , '  .'."It   is  just  what I  toll  this  young  ���������lady. fWe've got first to catch'the boat,  i .ami them to be sure it is the Fleur-de-  :������Js, before we go a step farther."  ������������������   "Exactly.-  Ah, Trevor"���������this was to j  another clerk who now came in���������"let  ���������me    know    with    all    dispatch    what'  steamers could be hired for a special  mission.   Class of no consequence, but  i>he  must  have  a   speed  of   15  to,,lG  jknots. and bo ready for sea this afternoon.     Price   of charter  by   week or  month, all found���������crew, captain, coalg  on board.    Sharp's the word, you understand?    Who is going in her?    You  ���������should   have   some   police   officers,   in  ���������case there is any arrest to be made.  Perhaps   you   will    see   to    that.   Sir  "Charles?"  , **I should like to go in her," I now  -said.  "My dear child," protested Sir  'Charles, "that is pure nonsense. Ia  ���������-the first place. I think it is highly im-  rprobable that she will catch up the  .-yacht. But if she does there will be  '-some rough and tumble work���������fighting  'perhaps. Those villains, after going  such lengths, will not be very willing  tp give up their prize. It would never  ' do for you. Miss Fairholme."  "I cannot bear to remain inactive.   I  want to  be doing something."  I   contended. ��������� j  "I    expect    you   would   be   inactive  'enough on'board the steamer." said the  tve-emtary.    "itungmg: up ami novvu lae j  waters probably, a wretched sort of j  cruise and always in ignorance as to j  -what was goiug ou at home. -1 think j  ���������you would be wiser to find some other'  .':��������� -outlet for your energies." ^ ��������� .  At this, moment the.first clerk came  -In with a, slip of paper in his hand.  **' "A.small.steam yacht, flying no col-  'iirs.'' he read aloud, "was reported passing* the North   Foreland about S p.  iu.  '���������last night, and a steamer, the same no  ���������.-'unbt.   was   seen   from   Ilcachy   Plead  at 5 a. m.,'  Her course ap-  ,-suVV  Mr. Snuyzcr was pleased to express his approval when he heard what I had done.  wishing to "come up with that yacht  and detain her for search. Ou the  whole, I think that' this is the most  prompt and sensible course. You  would hardly get a .steamer off from  this or'any other port under,24 hours,  and that would be a fatal loss of  time." ,''���������',  "Caul go in the tug?", 1 still stuck  to my point. ���������  "Quite   impossible,"  replied the secretary.'   "They have no,.proper accommodation, and you'would have to pass'  ue  night in  utter discomfort ou the  open deck." ,  "I should hot be afraid of that. ,But  some one who knows Mr. Wood and  everything else must' aecompauy the  tug," I argued.  "Myo officer, Swete Tbornhill, knows  him, doesn't be?"  "Yes, "but, not the "others, or the  meaning of the whole thing."  "Send the Yankee then.- He will b.  quite equal to the emergency. Can  you get hold of him?"  '���������Easily. He is on the telephone. Besides, 1 know his address." ������������������  .  Then we left Lloyds; having given  carte blanche as regards expenditure,  and with full assurance that all proper  arrangements would be'made.'   ,  Later Mr. Snuyzer answered my sum-'  mons, and was pleased to express his  approval when -he heard what I had  done. ���������  "1 don't admire another night, out of  bed," he said grumblingly, "but it is in  a, good cause. There's sense in 'the  plan,and it may succeed. The chase  was -mere idiocy. You ,could never  have caught up the .yacht. Besides,  very i can be ,back in'London, on-Saturday  at latest, which is most important.",   /  "Yes?" I asked, rather indifferently.  "Yes   trulv.     Sunday    I    sail    from  ���������Southampton by the Great River line's  steamer Chattahoochee for New York."  "What! Why is this? What reason���������have you found out anything?"  "Here is a preliminary list of passengers by the Chatt; lioochee. Run your  eye over the names. See? Duke and  Duchess of Tierra Sagrada.'  "You are indeed wonderful,c Mr.  Snuyzer." and in sheer admiration I  gave him my hand.  "But,that isn't all. Have you gone  right down the, list?   Well?"  My eyes swam, my head turned  round. I felt giddy and faint, for there  at the end of all. was the name of���������,  "Captain William Wood!" '  "I was pretty right, you see, miss. I  see all their cards as though they were  on the table. The right man held up,  the wrong paraded with full papers of  Identification to make a clean sweep  of all they can acquire. It's time some  one should go over. Perhaps it will  be Mr. Wood himself. If 1 can pick  him out of that hooker and bring him  on shore, I shall put it to him that he  had better cross the pond right away  to protect his own interests. That  would be far tbe best. But some oue  must go."  "Mr.- Knuyzer," I said, with a sudden, irresistible impulse, "if you do not  return on Friday night. I will go ov������r  to New York."  Directly we sat down to lunch I  broke it to mother.  "I am '.-coing to New York on Sunday." I said very quietly. '  Tlie words had no meaning for her  at first. 1 had to. repeat the statement-  more than oucei when .'at last it dawned  upon, her. ,     '  "Of   course   T   cannot   20   alone."   I  Is  Is   M ell    for  V, 01:1c 11   to    Know   W li������l   i<>  Do  in an   h.i������it������ra������!iicy.  On the question discussed at the-  public bath, whether -a fgii'l's skins  ii she fell overboard would buoy her  up or drag her down there seemed to  be a diversion of opinion, finally,  it was "agreed that they might'buoy  her'up-for a few seconds, ��������� until tfte  air that was ia them escaped, but as  soon ,as they were wet they would  tend to drag her down,' aud 'make  swimming practically impossible. Oi".  course., how soon they got wot would  depend-ou the material of which they  were made.' Miss Clark, the teacher,  pointed out that when a woman dived, into the, water the air under her  bathing ikirt formed a big bubble  which hampered a swimmer, so that  she , reached back, and "pressed it out  as. soon as possible.' But this same,1  bubble -would ��������� undoubtedly tend to  buoy up a non-swimmer- for an inTin-  itesimal space of time.. On tho other  hand, , this' air chamber lusted much  longer in a wet bathing suit than in  a dry one, for in tho former' the pores  01, the material were to a cor tain extent filled with water and the air  escaped slowly.  Tho  suggestion   of     an    undressing  drill' seemed   to    particularly'   pleaso  Dr.     Moshciv-'says'    The      Brooklyn  Eagle.,,    Its   practical  value   was evident,  as in nine cases out of tea the  drowning accidents  are tho result of  an   overturned,    boat,'  and   its   occupants are not in'bathing, suits.     The  children   used   to  swimming .there    in  the  lightest��������� possible 'attire, 'for , except ,'with  the. . teachers-  the skirted  bathing suit is unknown,    would   ' be  hampered   almost   to   rendering    their  knowledge   of    swimming    useless   'if  thoy were called upon to  save themselves v.-;Mi  their,  high, shoes,  two  or  three  petticoats   on,   and   in  the case  of   the   older  girls,      long   skirts   and  probably  corsets..  It is not that undressing'in the water is particularly hard. IMost of1  those who swim for pleasure have  probably-done it, but the youngsters  should be tauglit that' they can and  that in an emergency they must undress suiliciently ' to be able to put  their knowledge of swimming to  practical use. Oue or two lessors  would be' all that would be 'needed.  The matron suggested, and the suggestion was 'a, good and practical  one, "At least teach them to pick upa  the front, of their skirts and hold  them.in- their teeth to keep them out  of the way. 1 always do that even  with my bathing suit ii I. am swimming  any- distance."  ALMOST IN DESPAIR  THE   CONDITION  OF  MRS.   JOHN"  SHOTT, OF OBANGEVTBLE.  Suffered From a Burning Sensation  in the Stomach���������Food, 1 Became  Distasteful and She Grew Weak  and Despondent.  H  ii,  II  Al  OUTFITS  /������������������  'From  The  thro 111  the   Sun,   Orangevillo,   Out.  Sun    is   enabled    this   week,  >h   the  courtesy   of  Mrs.     John  A    N<  1   believe,   there  has   boon, deposited  in  the, "London Zoo   a specimen  of a  chimpanzee which is said to" represent  a   new   form,   or   it   may .be   a   mere  variety only,  of that-species of manlike  ape.    It  figures  under.the  scientific name of anthropopithecus    troglodytes,  is said to have been brought  from  the   Cold   Coast;   and  has  been  pi es'ented, to   the  Zoological  Society  by   Cup tain   D.   A.   Donavan,        The  creature     is     described as  singularly  tame and intelligent,, and possibly in  it  we may  find  a  successor to    that  highly-educated  ape,   the late lamented   Sally.       Unhappily,   the     manlike  apes  are.all  deiicate  of constitution,  that   is',   as     represented   by   a     life  spent   inc captivity,   and   subject     to  marked   variations   of     temperature.  ��������� Whether   this   new   specimen   is  to  be  referred   to   the   ordinary   chimpan, e-"-.  species   or   not   will,   no   doubt,      ho  duly   determined   by   the   authoi ities  nt  the Zoo.    The question  of specific  differences   iu   tha  chimpanzee  branch  of   the 'ape    stock    is     not     settled.  ITai'tmann  remarks that it is a difli-  r.ult   question   to  decide,   though    he,  himself,   adds'that   he   is   inclined   to  admit   a   certain   constancy     iu     the  varieties  he has   examined.    The  new-  ape   at   the   Zoo   may   possibly    turn  out   to re. resent one of the varieties,  it    is   a   notoriously   difficult   matter  to   decide   where   we   leave   the  limits  of  a  mere  variety   behind   and  where  the   boundary   line   of   a  new  species  begins.���������London   Chronicle.  I  ���������'this morula;*  p:i!-ently VV.  semi of her  Li.v.ai'd have  look for her'  \'nM  OtUll!  S. W. westerly,  since. Start Point and  'been warned specially to'  mil report.* "  "She is making for the Atlantic. 1  ���������expect," was the secretary's commen-  7'invy. "At least that would be a fair  inference.. But once in the wide ocean,  who shall say what will become of  her?"       .-   -       '     "  "Could she not be intercepted, from  ���������Plymouth or Falmouth?" I suggested.  "'What would you calculate her rate  of steaming at the progress, she has  ���������made?"  ���������'it's a good suggestion. Miss Fair-  fiohne. I should imagine tho yacht  would be off the Start soon after midnight and Plymouth by early tomorrow  ..morning. I could wire instructions to  Lloyds' agent to send out a tug, and  no doubt Sir Charles could arrange for  /Dolice constables with search warrants  !)'������������������    i:  a "it of fact  :::���������;'.','��������� not: so you  v.::!i   'me.     Now.  Vi'iii't, !������<��������� disagree-  of ''!������������������ utmost I111-  continued,  in t'u^ sa:  voice,  "at least.  I'd  will   have   to. f-nme  darli::g."'I w-:is mi. '  able,    it is :���������  u.:i'importance.    I must go.    I cannot help  myself.'' '  "It is something to do with .that  wretched Captain Wood, of course?  Dear, dear, how I wish you had  never settled it that way. . I don't  know what to think of him ; whether  we ought to trust him. Suppose he  is deceiving you; suppose he has run  away?" '      ,  (To be Oontinued.)  in- 1 > 111������- ���������  "���������>".;   is     ai  e;-i  ,J������Ci|i-es Kracnur.  11!   ��������� li f   -������������������������ :m  -���������ode re'.atrd  bv M.  now m ait re d houl  ,-it     the  Carleton,   respecting  his    cx-  [.erien'-ii at the Savoy:  I was wa'ting on tho Duke of Fife  on.' ni<j;ht wh-n his grace was givin-r  a small private dinner party in Uu  '.'atvn e liopm; There was hardly  room to pass belvnd each guest. The  soups \yi;re Bdrtch���������a costly .Bussiun  ag''," made from boiled duck,  seined with sorrel, vegetables  cream, and just as T was serving  tound.     mi     accident    happened.  soup,  The  . ! O  and  mjhI  in   (  and  n i" hifiwl  I  h'ul a plate of  in  th'!  other   my   cream.  . !)ni:o  air'   ,  RENUNCIATION.  The lips we love and may not fclse������������  The self vre love and cast aside, '  The flowery ways we choose to miss  For paths Where rue and thorns abtfiej  Tho wlsful ��������� eyes that se* tire shore,  They may not seek beyond the sea*���������  Ah! Life to Come, hast than In store  A lit exchange for Rifts like these?  ���������Margaret, Ridgoly Schott*  was 'talking earnestly' to me,  ���������:o intently, did I listen to him,  that I did not know I wa.s dropping  all th*- cream in a hideous thick  stream down  his -back.       <������������������  I "made no fuss, I. gave no alarm.  Tho Duke went on talking- and laughing with his guests,' with the back  of his exqiuisitely-fitting dress ' one  .mass of thick cream. I got two  or three soft serviettes, and as I  t'orvod hia grace-'with each course I  gave him a rub. By the time we  had come to tho ice, there wa.s nothing left of the cream except certain  faint, traces, for which I fear, his  grace's valet was unjustly , blamed.  ���������London Daily News.  Pri'n������������ of \Val������'.<������  Hs** Opinions.  Contrary to general opinion,I hear  that the. Prince of Wales is a person  of most decided opinions, and that  his "yea" is "yea" and his "nay"  most distinctly "nay."���������Lally Bernard, in Tho Globe.  Shott,  a lady well known'and''much  esteemed by many of, the residents' oi'  Orangevillo,   to   give   the   particulars  of another of those'cures-  that   have  made    Br.    Williams'   -Pink Pills     a  household    remedy    throughout    the  civilized  world.,. iMrs.   Shott,   in  con-  versatior  with our reporter,    said :���������  "About three years  ago,   while' living   in   Ingersoll,   1  was  a great  sufferer   from   dyspepsia.'    rTli'e, trouble  lirst  began   with     severe   headaches,'-  di'/Riness,  and   sometimes    vomiting."  Next    J  sud'ered  continually  from     a  burning    sensation    in   my  stomach ;  food  distressed  me ;  J.  did   not' sleep,  well at night ; lost flesh and became  very   weak.    ,1   was   continually   doctoring,',   but it did me, no good.   < In  fact I  was gradually, growing  worse  and     despaired    of   ever     being  well  again.    One day'a friend who'  called  to see me strongly advised me,to try  Dr.   William's'   Pink Pills.   She  spoke  so 'highly of them  that, I .decided to  take her advice,- and I soon discovered that thoy were' not like the,other  medicines ] had been taking and that  1  had    at'last  found   something',   to  help, me    I continued using the- pills  for, perhaps a couple of months when  1    found    myself    fully ' restored   , to  health.    I have always  since enjoyed  my meals with relish,   and  have  had  no  return  of the trouble.    ,-AVith  my  experience I feel certain that if other  sufferers will give-Dr. Williams'  Pink  Pills'a fair trial they willriind,a certain cure."      ' . ��������� '  Dr. Williams' Pink Pills ..enrich and  nourish the blood.and strengthen the  nerves.    Tt  is   thus     that   they ~ cure  such     troubles  as    dyspepsia,  kidney*  ailment's,   rheumatism,   partial  paral-  sis,   heart- troubles,   St. .Vitus'- dance,  and the ailments that make the lives  of so   many  women .'a  source  of misery.      These pills never  fail  to  drive  away  pain,    bring  a glow   of  lVcalth  to the whole body and make despondent men  and women, bright, Votive  and   strong.    Do   not  take    any "pills  without the full'name  "Dr. Williams'  IMnk" Pills   for.Pale People',' 'on   -the  wrapper   around   the  box.    Sold " by  all "medicine    dealers  or     sent  postpaid   at 50 cents  a box or srx boxes  for  $2.50 by addressing the Dr: Williams  Medicine   Co.,  Brockviilc,   Ont  If- We supply-' at short  notice complete JOB'  PRINTING AND  NEWSPAPER OUTFITS.  If We sell what Printers want; Printers want  what we sell.    .  T We carry( a complete-  stock of Type and Sup-  " plies for-the.composing-  Room,  Pressroom- and'  ��������� Bindery. ���������   '     ���������    '  TORONTO TYPE FDRY  Company, Limited.  175 McDermat Avenue, o    Winnipeg,  Any man    can make  any thine; she wants to.  his-   wife   do  , iiuch'-.of'tlie charity," that "'begins;.at  home is too weak ,to'travel.     -'"���������  ���������  The London p'ostofuces are now using girlo as well as boys for ,the e:<-^  press   messenger   service.   The'-   girls  must be over eighteen years old, aud  they get'thirteen, shillings a week.  HOT WEATHER AILMENTS.  2Uo'rc   Little    Ones Die  Weather' Months Thau  Other Season'.  During  at Any  Hot  BEARDS AND GLASSES.  'ftvo     OrnaiiiPiils     That     Ar������:     llarety  Konutl   Upon   Hotel   V* altera.  ���������'Ever see a w:\iter wearing glusscs?"  demanded the inquisitor.  N*o" one   could    remember,  although  ���������Just why n  waiter should not be seen'  with glasses as well as any other man  was not apparent.  **It's .jusr like the wearing of beards."  went on the inquisitor. "The proprietors of our important hotels, restaurants nnd 'cafes will not permit either  beards or glasses to be worn by their  waiters. It is possible that in some  old fashioned family or commercial  hotel the" servitors may be found with  ���������rlndr noses straddled by optical helps,  but you won't find 'em along Broadway.'  "Now, this is a fact worthy of ne.te  because in every other calling in life  the number of persons wearing glasses  is on the increase, and even in our  schools a e:������;'-i,-ierable percentage of  very small children- will be found,  wearing glasses, and while, as I say.  ho;>'l. rest-'ui-.-int and cafe* proprietors  are uppes; .. to the glasses, still 1 have  seldom found a waiter whose eyes' indicated that he wa.s in the slightest  need of them.  "You may argue that restaurant  waiters are generally young men.  <! rant..': you that instantly, but all'the  samo/tho'usands of men of similar age  have7' to! wear them In almost every  other occupation.  "The-" majority of those servitors  commence in boyhood, and the demand  of their vocation causes no strain on  the eyesight. -Consequently that may  account iii a measure for the absence  of any necessity for the use of specs.  Moreover, the steam from hot viands  would render them -useless-probably."  A Sniumcr  Invocation.       ,,'*!  Oh, Jlght your living: fires,  Great sun, and let her .roll!  ;W������'ve spent tlie dreary winter  la freezing limb and soul!  And, growling here ���������-..  And howling- there.  Have prayed for brimstone and hot air!  Chine out and lure tho summer  From many a dim retreat;  Let slip the rolling thunder  Ana t>oU the rains that beatl  it'or   gro.wlihK hare  Anii gro.vhng there,  W<������ prated vor sn.-armer ���������avervwharei  jLoid ihen wh-.< sum������ier- strikes us,  He. fte-r-Jest riam^s unrolled,  Just hear us howling, growling  Aad crying out for cold!  And. winter gray  Or flowery May,  We'll growl our way to Judgment day!  - Jt is a lamentable fact  that  thousands  of   little   "ones     die     from'hot  weather  ailments,   whose'lives  might  be spared if mothers had'at nand-the '  proper remedy (to  administer  promptly,      tlbr weather ailments come sud-"  denly, and* unless promptly .'treated,a'.  ]irecious   little' life -may be lost  in'a  few     hours."     Babe's.   Own'    Tablet's  promptly   check, and   cure, -diarrhoea, '  stomach  troubles,'   cholera   infantum  and    other     hot    weather ' .ailments. J  They   also  give- relief- - to     teething  troubles,     and    prevent  the  ailments-  that come- at this period.    Every pru-,  dent mother    should  keep  a box    of  Baby's Own Tablets -in the house  at.  all times.    No other medicine acts so  promptly   and so surely, and the -Tablets are guaranteed    to    contain   no  opiate   or   harmful   drug. '    They    always do good and cannot possibly' do  harm, and   crushed   to   a  powder  you  can give them -to tlie smallest, sickliest,   infant.     Mrs.   Geo.    Eoote.     St.  Thomas,   Ont.-,  says : ''"My baby was  troubled with diarrhoea and was very  cross  and   restless,   and got so  little,  sleep, T .hardly knew what to do with  her". I, got  a box of Baby's'Own Tablets  and   after giving  her    some    her  bowels became regular and she could  sleep ' well.     T   think   the   Tablets   a  splendid medicine." ������������������   -   .  You can  get  the Tablets    at   'any  drug store  or  by mail  post  paid   at .  25 cents' a box by writing to the Dr.  "Williarns'   Medicine   Co.,   ' Brockvilie,  Ont., or Schenectady,  N.Y.  There is a wide difference between  the self-made man and the self-inflated man.  Anybody  who' has ever employed .a  lawyer can give you lots oi advice.   ���������  MINARD'S IJmm Mw >������������&  Superb.  "What a regal carriage he has'. There  is surely royal blood in his veins. Do  you know bim'?" whispered the enthusiastic woman.        . -  "Yes," replied the man. "he comesof  a   Ion0-  line  of   janitors."  Mnt-li  In Her Name.  Church���������She Is a Russian countes3.  Gotham���������Indeed! Has she much in  her own name?  "Has she? She's got nearly the entire alphabet!"'  Bad  TJejjiiininjss.       '  A bad begginning makes a good end-  'ing sometimes, but more often it makes  a very quick ending.���������Syracuse Herald.  N'������t   11 <it>!������-l-C iilert.  An English resident of Shanghai,,  having' made a good dinner from a  tasty but unrecognized . dish, called  his cook, V.'un IIoo, and congratulated   him on   the  excellent  meal.  "T hope you didn't kill one of  those dogs to provide the soup,"  jestingly remarked his daughter, referring, of co'irse, to the pariahs  which   haunt   Chinese  streets.  "Wun T-Too made a solemn gesture  of  dissent.  "No   kiilee   dawg,   missie,'  plained.    '  pickee  up!  Hi 111 a 11 ed d y  dead  he   c."-  wkoii I  >l  it  M'l  tt fl  ���������>     II  I ';'- >'f\  'A':-  t);jV  I  ;,r-."4":  '7!7'r  : -flfi- :���������--. ������������������::-:</;���������<  >':-":fe:'*\::  , " ''I* ���������"-:.!���������.:/  ".'.--;'...-':-,-.- ;;;:'^ ��������� -.',.--,';  I'  It  r  A-  Frt l  ���������AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAe  2 ' ' t  I Amusing Adventures of >  | Cupid, a Colonel and E  | Some Pug Dogs \ \ \ t  "Sylvia!"  ,"Yes, papa." ft    -  "That infernal dog ef -your"���������     ���������   ���������  ���������    "Oh, papa!" -.    '  "Yes; that infernal dog of yours has  been.nt my carnations again!" " '  Colonel Reynolds glared sternly across  the table at Miss Sylvia Reynolds, and  ,,Miss Sylvia Reynolds looked in a deprecatory manner back at-Colonel Reynolds,  while the dog in question���������a foppish pug  ���������happening to meet the colonel's eye in  , transit   crawled   unostentatiously   under  ' '   the-sideboard aud began to wrestle with  a bad conscience.       ' 'f  "Oh, naughty Tommy!" said , Miss  Reynolds mildly, in the direction of the  sideboard. .,,.,- , ,  "Yes, my dear," assented 'the colonel,  "and ,if,you could convey to him the in-  i    formation that if he does it .'once iriore���������  yes, just once more���������I shall shoot him on  the spot; you would be doing him a,kindness." " And the -colonel bit a large'cr'cs-  ,,'ccnt out of his toast .with all the energy  -arid conviction of a man'who has thor-  '   'bughl.y; made up his mind.1   "At G o'clock,  'this^ morning," continued he in a voice of  gentle melancholy,1 "I  happened to look  ���������out of my bedroom window aud saw him.,  lile .had1 then "destroyed ,two of my best'  plants and was commencing on a third,',  witli'-every appearance of , self ' satisfac-i*  tion.    I'-'threw two large brushes- and a"  boot at, him."    - " J  ':' -'*Oh,;papa"!   They didn't hit'him?','  - -./-"No, my 'dear, /hey - did( not.1' The,  -brushes"missed him by several yards,,and  ,the   boot   smashed   a-fourth, carnation.-  How,ever, I was so fortunate as to attract  his*attention, and'he left off."- -  ���������  ,  "I'can't think whatnial-.es him do it.  M, suppose  it's   hones.iV   He's  gotv bones  -buried all over tbe garden." ' '  ��������� ��������� . "Well, <if he does it'.again  you'll find  "that   there * will   he   or few   more  bones  ^'buried   in  the  garden!" ^said  the colonel  -grimly, and he subsided into his paper'  '"  Sylvia' loved the dog partly :forT its' own  sake, but principally for that of the giver,  -one Reginald Dallas, whom it hadystruck.  ��������� ���������at an early period of their acquaintance  , that he and  Miss Sylvia  Reynolds were  '-made for one another.   In communicating  ,,, this  discovery, to  Sylvia   herself  he  had  .found  that  her  views  upon  the  subject  were   identical-,,with   his   own,   and<_ all  would have gdrieT'well had ,it not been for  . a'melancholy^a'cciderit"."  One day  while1 out shooting  with  the  4colonel, with.whom he was doing his,best  '   to ingratiate himself -with a view to oh-  ,' taining:hi6 consent' to the,match, <he had  ' allowed   his- sporting  instincts   to  carry  him away lo'^such a;.degree that, in sport-  . ing  parlance, 'he   wiped t his   eye , badly.  Dallas  being in especially good .form, it  '; was found,   when  the   bag-came -to  be  - counted, that while he had shot seventy  ' brace the colonel had managed to secure  ,   only five and a half! c  The colonel's bad marksmanship destroyed the last remnant of his temper.  He swore for half' an hour in Hindoo-  stanee and for another half hour in English. ' After, that he felt better.., . And  when at-the end of dinner Sylvia came  to him with the absurd request -that she  might marry, Mr. Reginald Dallas he did  not/have a fit, but' merely signified in  fairly moderate terms his entire and absolute refusal to think of such a thing.  "This had happened a month before,  and the pug, which had changed .hands in  the earlier.days of the friendship*, still,remained, at the imminent risk of his" life,  ���������joined   in   until, tne   whole   coachhouse  rang with the noise.  'The colonel < subsided against a wall  and .began to express himself softly in  Ein'doostanee.  'Toor dears!" said Sylvia.i "How stuff3  they must be feeling." r,  She ran to the house and returned witi  a basin of water.  ��������� "Poo'r dear!'" she said  again.     "Soon  have something to drink!"  She knelt down by the nearest harnpei  and' cut  the   cord  that  fastened   it.     A  pug jumped out, like a jack  in  the' bos  , and - rushed   to the  water.     Sylvia  continued   her work of  mercy,  and   by  the  time the colonel had- recovered sufficient-  lv'to be able to exmuss his views in Rp<r  lrsli eighteen more, pugs had Joined their  companion.  "Get out, you brute!" shouted the colonel as a dog insinuated itself between his  legs. "Sylvia, put them back again this  minute! You had,no business-to let them  out.    Put them back!"    ,  "But I can't,' papa. I can't catch  them."  Sho looked' helplessly from him to the  seething mass of dogs and back again.  '   "Where's my gnu?" began the colonel.  ' "Papa," don't! You couldn't be so cruel!,  They    aren't    doing    any    harm,    poor  things!"-"-    , '���������'���������,.  '"  "If I knew-who sent them"��������� ������������������  ."Perhaps  there's; something  to'show.  Yes: here's a", visiting^' card in-this,, hamper." ,-������������������*./    - \ : ��������� ":���������   -       .   ���������-  ,','Whose is it?" , bellowed the, colonel  through; the; din'. < ' ' ,- .��������� ,.i  <"J. D'Arcy Henderson,'The Firs," read  Sylvia at the top of her voice.  ."Young blackguard!" .bawled the colonel. ."-'.,       \ -    "'   ' .  "I expect there's one in each-of the  hampers.' Yes; here's-another���������W. K.  Ross," The Elms."     -    ',,,    ,    ., -t     --      '  The-colonel came across and, began to  examine, the hampers' with his-* own  hand/' Each hamper contained a visiting  card; and each'card'bore the'-name'of a  neighbor. The colonel' returncd-to the-  breakfast room ;and , laid his nineteen'  cards out in a row on the table. ���������,        .  "H'm!" he said at last.' "Mr. Reginald  Dallas does not seem to'be represented."  Sylvia said nothing."  piece of meat is the tenderest' breakfast ���������  I have had in this house for some weeks." !  ���������London Tit-Bits.  FOUNTAIN   OF SALT.  THE BROOD MARE.  An  Attractive   Honweholtl   Ornament  TIsat  Is  Easily  Matte.  i  An   attractive   household   ornament,  bavini?  the   appearance   of   a   marble  Football In. Japan.  Among  the  many  things  that Japam  borrowed from China was football, said .. . - , ((  to have been introduced as early as the i fountain, can be made by putting some  middle of the seventh century. The em- I salt and enough water to d 'isolve it in  peror Toba II. was an expert player and i lt verv small glass fruit dish and from  got up a club at his palace.   Considering j (1:IV to dav addill������, a little'more water  w3l-a3S<\.;m��������� onenta s aY? t0 ha5d and salt. In a short time the salt will  work  and  rigorous, exercise-it may  be  supposed that the game was very different from either "Rugger" or "Soeker."  Nevertheless, the Japanese form seems j  tohave been popular, and we may "trace;  the beginnings of professionalism to ,an !  emperor and his court, of whom it.is!  told that in a time of poverty they earned ���������  a.little extra money by teaching the art;  of football.���������Cassell's. ���������   , ' ���������    '  y  i  to soothe-Sj Ivia^and ^madden her father.  ' ��������� ��������� ��������� * * * ���������  The day after the conversation above  recorded had taken place a terrible tragedy had occurred.  The colonel, returning from a poor  day's shooting, observed through- the  mist that was beginning to rise a small  form busily engaged in excavating in the  precious carnation bed. Slipping iii a  cartridge,'he fired.��������� and the, skill which  had deserted him during the day came  back to him. There was a yelp, then  silence, and Sylvia,- rushing ont from  the house, found the luckless Thomas  breathing his lastcon a heap of uprooted  carnations. -  The news was not long in spreading.  The cook told the postman, and the postman thoughtfully handed it on the servants at the rest of the houses on hip  round. By noon it was public property,  and in the afternoon, at various times  from 2 to 5, niueteen young men were  struck, quite independently of oue another, with a brilliant idea.  The result of this idea was apparent  on the.following day.  ..; "Is this all?" asked the colonel of the  servant as she brought in a couple ol  letters at breakfast time.   ,;      ; -  "There's  a   hamper  for Miss   Sylyia,  No; he seems not to be represented.;  I  did   iiot^ give   him   credit   for' so   much  'sense."  Then he dropped the subject, and  .breakfast proceeded in silence.  ,-A young gentleman met the colonel on  his walk that, morning.  "Morning,\coloriel," said he.   :    ,',     ;  ,    "Good morning,", said thescolonel grimly.       ���������' '   - ( "': '.:    -1    ���������  "Er ��������� colonel,   I ��������� er ��������� suppose   Miss  Reynolds got that dog all right?"       '-  -  ������ .'.'To which dog do you refer?", ,  "It was a pug, you know.    It ought to  "hare arrived by this time."       ,     '   l  ''Yes;  I  am jacliued to think it has.  Had it any^special characteristics?"/  "No; I don't think so���������just an ordinary  P������S-" "  ,        '7 ," 7    '  . "Well, young man, if you will go to my  coachhouse you. will find nineteen ordinary pugs,:and'if you would kindly select  your beast and shoot it I should be much  obliged." . ,  " "Nineteen!" said the other in astonishment. "Why, are you setting up as a  dog fancier in your old age, colonel?"  This was too much for the colonel. He  exploded.  "Old age! Confound your impudence!  Dog fancier! No, sir! I have not become  a dog fancier in what you are pleased to  call my old age! But while there is no  law to prevent a lot of dashed young  puppies like yourself, sir���������like yourself���������  sending your confounded pug dogs to my  daughter, who ought to have known better than to_ have let, them out of their  dashed hampers, I have no defense."  "Sylvia," said ,the colonel ou arriving  home. ;" .  "Yes, papa."  -   "Do you still want to-marry that Dallas   follow?     Now,   for   heaven's   sake,  don't start crying!   Goodness knows I've  been worried enough' this morning without that.    Please answer a plain question in a fairly sane manner.   Do you or  do you uot?"  "Of eourse I do, papa."  "Then   you   may.     He's   the  furthest  from being a fool of any of the young  puppies   who   live   about   here,   and   he  knows one end of a" gun from the other.  I'll write to him now."  "Dear* Dallas," wrote the colonel, "I  find ou consideration that you are the  only sensible person in the neighborhood.  I hope you will come to lunch today.  And if you still want to marry my daughter you may."  To which Dallas replied by return of  messenger: ���������  "Thanks for both invitations. I will."  An-hour later he arrived in person, and  the course of true, love pulled itself together and began to run smooth again.���������  Boston Heraldi  Tho World's Lar&eat' Fact. ,  A man who, is said to havethe largest  face in the .world graced the Hongkong  magistracy verauda with his presence jthe  other day. - He was a Chinese, and, while  not especially tall or broad, had a face  ' at least four times the ordinary size, even,  of a large man's face.' The peculiarity,  however, is,-that while his face' is'so  enormous-his head is of normal size, gir-  ing him the appearance of wearing a  Iargef mask.���������Bangkok Times. ���������-      '  Trne Hospitality. -  ' A -certain "amount   of , social, intercourse   is^  absolutely    necessary'   for  those who-desire to lead  happy, contented,  useful lives. ' "But our means'-  are   so    limited,"   says' some    young  housekeeper,   "that   we  cannot afford  to "entertain."    And she is right.    But  there'is a-great difference between hospitality  and  entertaining.    True  hospitality  is-never.'ambitious  of  doing  or having anything beyond what our  means;,'wilh allow.-.   If -you   have , a  friend or a .few -friends ,in- to dinner,  ,let your menu be  made' up of those  things that are in season, and you are  sure that they twill not be expensive,  and  yet .they will'Jbe':good.   -A plain  dinner -well  cooked, is  far  preferable  to any numbenof elaborate dishes badly'prepared and- illy  served. ��������� Young  married people who have-jiis(t started  housekeeping are not,expected to entertain'lavishly, but they can he hospitable' and 'see their  friends  quietly  without any' great  expense 'being incurred.     True  hospitality   means   the  doing-and giving, freely and heartily,  the, best-we/can and-of- the best we  have,   but  it  does   not .mean, having  anything the size,of,our purse will not  permit or attempting "more than  our  household is capable of accomplishing.  A .FOtTXTAI-N  OK. SALT.  .spread'and crystallize"over the edge of  -the glass,  then down around the out-  ,side.  The dish may then be stood-upon  anptlier; similar dish of larger size, as  -shown in the illustration." and.salt and  water   placed   in   it   regularly  ,in   like  manner.   The- same result will  follow,  when a third hi'rger fruit dish,and perhaps a ������������������fourth and, fifth may be added,  to the column.        ;  ,,  VVith'the constant'additions of salt  and water the ��������� crystallization will  spread over and -down the entire column, iappearing like a fountain ,or waterfall, white' and' sparkling... The salt  will harden, holding all the sections of  the marblelike pillar firmly' together'.��������� <  New York World.    -   ,       * "'  Should  Be  in  Good   I-'le>h  nnd  Prime Cesar,  diiion  :it I"oiilni2: 'lime.  If you are desirous that your brood-.'  mare produce good healthy foals, seo   -  to it' that she is in good flesh and io,  -prime     condition     at     foaling  timo.  Oats, w������th plenty of good, bright cut.  clover  in the  morning  and a feed' of  corn at night,  will do  the work.      I  always  stable    my brood mares   -aX  night,, turning them  out  during    the  day  unless  it  be  stormy,  and I find  it,, pays to  bed them well  at   night. '  It is positively injurious to let them,  lie  on" a hard,   cold  floor.      I prefer  good dirt for my mares at all times.'  Especially     is     this   desirable   when. -.  they are heavy in foal.     Do not put.  too  much   dependence in your breed*  ing table, but watch your mare close'-  ly,  for she is  liable to foal any timo  from   ten   to   thirteen   months    after  being bred.  ,'When the mare begins to.  make  bag   freely, put her into   a  box  -stall     about  ' fourteen     feet  square,  with plenty of bedding, being careful-  that the centre    is   lower   than   the'  outer'edges   of the floor,   for  if    tho,  e'er-tre is high and slopes' to the walJ  the mare' is .liable to' roll against it  and become cast,   and many a valu- _,  able,mare has been lost in this way.    '  There arc many little signs    that, if  watched   closely   will   tell, .when    th������  mare is  about     to  foal.'   When    my   '  mares  foal, -I  am    in  the barn  and  know just  what is "going'on.     I  do   -  not interfere   with' mare  or  foal  unless     my    assistance     is     absolutely,  needed.���������Charles     L.     Hardm'an   ,,ia   '  Prairie Farmer.      ,    - -   ���������'*        '  Measles  Caused -Death.  , Measles is one of the eruptive fevers  usually recognized by dts peculiar catarrhal' symptoms / and characteristic  rash.-      _,        ii..       ,  Its specific poison or infection is produced in the rash, which,-contrary to  common opinion,' invades the^ membranes of the'nose, throat, lungs and  bowels often more severely than the  skin. It escapes first in their secretions and "afterward from, the*'eruption on the skin. The first is the most  virulent and abundant and most difficult to control; the last is the least virulent and more readily destroyed.-  Most people and many physicians advise "that children be permitted to  catch the disease and be through with  it. as tho risk is slight and the mortality -trifling." - The time has passed to  advocate the "catching" of any disease.  Neither diphtheria nor scarlet fever  causes so great proportionate mortality  under two and five years of-age as does  mea'slcs.   -  sir.  'A hamper,  is there?    Well,   bring it  in." ���������   ;' ,. '. .',;' ;'r    _���������  "If you please, sir, there's several of  : them."- .'���������.,. ''-��������� -.;?..   ; ,':  >   "What?     Several?     How   many   are  there?" ' ,  "Nineteen, sir," said Mary, restraining  with some difficulty- an inclination . tc  giggle.  "Eh? What? .Nineteen? Nonsense!  Where are they?"  "We've put them in the coachhouse  for the present, sir. And,.if you please,'  sir, cook says she thinks there's something alive in them."  "Something alive?"  "Yes, sir. And John says he thinks  it's dogs, sir."  The colonel uttered a sound that was  almost a bark and. followed by Sylvia,  rushed to the coachhouse. There, sure  enough, as far as the eye could reach,  were the hampers, and, as -they looked,  n sound proceeded from one of them that  was unmistakably the plaintive note of  a dog that has been shut up and is getting tired of it.  Instantly the other eighteen hampers  Elusive Irish Brogrue.  There has always boena deal of bad  "brogue" written by Englishmen. G. W.  Steevens wrote "praste." evidently assuming that as the Celt says "baste" for  "beast" he will say "praste" for "priest,"  whereas he is more likely to say  "priesht." Thackeray, superexcellent at  depicting Irish character, made his Irishmen speak impossible brogue. He blended the barbarisms of a dozen dialects in  the mouth of- Captain Costigan. Kipling  did much the same with Mulvaney.  English dabblers in brogue copied Thackeray for years, then they copied Kipling,  and when the inimitable Dooley "came  to the fore" they took a fresh turn and  made all their Irishmen speak the brogue  of Mayo.���������George Bartram in Academy.  Pleasant For tlie "Landlady.  A cook at a certain boarding house  played a little game on a grumbling  boarder, a newspaper humorist, by serving him a piece of sole leather instead of  beef.steak. .  "You've changed your butcher, Mrs.  Hascher?" said the boarder, looking up  at the landlady after sawing two or three  minutes at the leather.  "Same butcher as usual," replied the  boarding mistress with a patronizing  smile.    "Why?"  "Oh, nothing much," said the humorist,  trying to make on impression on the  steak with his knife and fork, "only this  -',-' -LigrhtM and Small Room*.  The apparent size of a small apartment  may   be considerably   increased  by removing the chandelier and introducing side lights.' In a narrow parlor,  for example, a six arm chandelier set  in its plaster medallion,  the arrangement   repeated   perhaps   in   a   mirror  over the  mantelpiece, adds very perceptibly to the furnishing of the room.  Take it away, make the ceiling plain,  and you have gained an effect of space  that cannot be realized till the experiment is tried.   Side lights are understood now to be much more artistic in  lighting in any but very large and lofty  apartments  as well  as  more  convenient.   A  pair may be near the piano,  another over a corner seat or against  a   bookcase,   and   so- on. -to  give  the  light where specially needed. ;  Systematize the  Housework.  ". It is a very common fault'with, women to ruin 'their health and their tempers and to waste their energy by neglecting to systematize their housework  The good housewife makes plans overnight for the work which must be done  the'-following.day. .Probably a considerable share.of it falls to that' special  day in each week, but there will be a  number of other things to'do which are  out of the regular routine, and for  these she must plan so as not-to have  them all crowding in upon her, at once  and either being neglected because  there are so many or-taken in hand  and carried through at the cost of  health and spirits. In planning and estimating a day's work some allowance  should always be made for .interruptions -and for the work taking rather  longer than was anticipated. With too  many "irons in the fire" such hindrances as a visitor or having to console a crying child in some little trouble make it difficult to keep that calm.  sweet temper which is necessary to^ the  woman who is not merely tbe mainspring-of the machinery of the household, but its good angel, wTho makes it  home indeed to all who dwell there.  jJi^lit*aiifl> Convenient Crate.     >  -    J.   A., Macdonald sends The ;'Bree6t-������  e������rs' Gazette 'the description of a very  satisfactory, shipping, crate.'      In:th������  illustration "part of the, front, s'ido������is  cut away to     show   the inside     arrangement. ���������    A  good . size for  a pig  three ..months    old   is,,  :, Length -40  finches, ,-depth    23. inches', width   11'  inches.    For a pig eight' weeks old a'  length  of.,32  inches,  a  depth  of    18  inches  and  a width ot._9 inches    will  be about right.     Cra'tes for shipping  by express must be' made as light as  is,safe from breakage.    It is not fair  to  make  a" purchaser of  a- pig   two  months ,   old     pay   express  rates   on  thirty or .forty pounds of crate when  they  can  be  made  sufficiently strong  and .weigh but half as much.      For.  The  Baby'*  Position.  Uncomfortable positions often cause  prolonged crying in healthy babies.  Their stock of ignorance is exceedingly  large. They- will lie in a' crib in a  cramped, even painful, position and  cry apparently for ages and yet not  know enough to turn over. It is a,  standing rule among trained nurses  when a child cries, in the hospitals to  turn him over to his other side, rearrange the bedclothing. pat him a moment, and it is surprising to see how  often the baby drops off again into  peaceful slumber.  Tlie longest alphabet in Europe is  that of the Slavonic language. It  has 42 letters.  1 ���������     Egyptian Women, <  The Egyptian beasts of burden���������the  camel,  the  ox.  the donkey���������have  the  same  patient  look  as  the   people.    It  may not be improper to add another  beast of burden, woman.   There is the  look of sad patience in every Egyptian  woman's   eyes  as  in  the   melancholy  river boiling at its great task*" and in  the face of the camel, the donkey and  the ox.   They all look at you with the  same   expression   of   patience.    They  seem   content  to   live,   no   matter  the  conditions of their wretched life,  and  not desirous of making change or re  sistance.  The long swing of the camel,  the measured stride of the ox or buffalo, the half trot of the donkey, are  seen everywhere.  The woman's face is  covered���������at least her mouth is always,  ���������for no Mohammedan woman may expose her mouth to the vulgar gaze of  passers by.   All have the same expression in their eyes as the camel'or other  animal.  The Idea.  Mrs. Nuritch���������I want" a pair of the  most expensive gloves you've got  Salesman���������Yes'm. Do you want them  long?  Mrs. Nuritch���������Don't be impertinent,  young man. I want to buy them, not  hire them.  PomiotfiiiM. ,  Phil Brick���������What's the difference be.  twe.en an honest and a dishonest politician?    l   .  I'hil Ossifer���������One is in politics for the  good he can do his fellow citizens,  while the other is in politics for any  amount he can do his fellow citizens.  Lens Avenue of Trees.  Japan has an avenue of trees fifty  .miles in length. The trees fire the  cryptomera. and every one is a perfect  specimen, quite straight, from 130 to  150 feet in height and from 12 to 15  feet in circumference. The avenue  extends from the town of Namada to  Nikko.  '       SHIPPING  CKATE ?OK  SWIXK.  ���������nds  and    .bottoms     take five-eiguts  inch   seasoned 'spruce , or   other ,tough  light  wood,   one-half  inch  stuff    for  sides and, cover  with &paos   between  slats.     In  front  ia a v trough,   T,   for  feed   and     water.     J list  above is    a  sloping  board,   P,   running     to     tha  top, through which the feec* in transit is given.     The upper compartment  is  provided with  a slide,-S,   on top,.  and inside is the  bag,  B,  containing  the  meal   and   grain  fare   ample    for  the journey.    ,3n     cold  weather    tha  sides may ( be    boarded    up   almost,  tight.     To pigs weighing seventy-five,  pounds  a standard  of  one-half   inch  stuff  is  nailed  in  the centre    of    the  sides.     Shavings  from  a shir.gle xXjdlS  make the best bedding.  Good'Soil Need* Good Seed,    s  If we wish  to     attain   "������uccess   aa  farmers,     we  must first become    acquainted with the soil and be particular as to, the kind and quality   of  seed we intend    to sow,   says P.  J-.,  McGlynn     in     Prairie     Farmer.       A1  large number of farmers spend mucb  of their, time and money buying *jid  planting poor seed.    Many plant poor  seed because  they     are     cheap,     &ut'  which ofttimes prove most expensive-  Experience  has   taught   me  that 'th������  better  the- seed  the better the crop.  Great care  should ,be &<iven    to    the  soil  as   well  as     to the seed.      tOn������  variety   of  seed   might   do-  extremely  well in a soil, while another of a different nature     would  be  a. complete  failure under similar conditions.   The  cultivation   of  a  crop  is  only  oi ao-  condary importance in comparison to  either  soil     or     seed.     Therefore    it  should be obvious  to 'every, one that   ,  these, two   particular  points   are    of  paramount   importance   and   arc worthy of much  thought from those interested, in  agricultural  pursuits.     It  is . essential    that     every  farmer   be  thoroughly  acquainted  with   the soil,  for  upon , this  knowledge  hir.  success  largely-depends, and I can truthfully  say  that, if  this  particular  point    ia  carefully  considered  a crop could  be-  easily -expected���������that   is,   if   the  season be a  favorable  one^���������and not regarded as merely a matter of- chanco.-  Clieese.  Cheese will not go moldy if it is  wrapped in a cloth wrung.out of vinegar and then in one of. paper. Si ore-  it in a cool place.  A  Tennessee Tree."  A Tennessee paper announces that  out cf a single tree in Dyer county a  citizen got four cords cf 11 re wood, three  gallons of heney and five raccoons.  a  A   SteeT   Secret.  India   was   in   possession   of  secret once  which   is lost  now.  was   the   inlaying   with   goid   of  blades   in   such   a    manner   that  si eel  This.  steel  Slip.  strength of the blade was not impaired nor its temper spoiled.  Hoiikcm   In   GlRsprovr.  Out of luU.OOU houses er flats in Glasgow 30.000 wen- found to have but  one room and 70,000 but two rooimv  V't.-.1' 'i;  v'*':w>'-  ���������    o    A  ; ,o| ' ���'�����.'*" \<te
%
A' GffiL OF ��IT.
'���By MAJOR'   ARTHUR    GRIFFITHS.
'���Copy-wright by It. F. Fenno & Co.
""The afternoon!    Probably four good
hours hence.    Absurd!" I cried hotly;
"when    every    moment    is    precious.
"Why,   this   pirate   yacht   has   already
'had  2-t   hours'   start.     Oh,   come,   Sir
���Charles!    Let us go somewhere  else.
'-There are other ships besides warships
'���steamers, yachts in dozens, for hire.
Why  do  you< hesitate?.   Will  no  one
liielp me?" - '
<     -''I   asked   this   possibly   with   some
'warmth, for I hoard-some oue say as
**\ve wont off. Sir Charles and I:
"My,-word, what a little fury!",
���'    From Whitehall the general took me
"to Lloyds.   He'knew the secretary, he
,-safd, and something of the ways of the
'plactt-rits wonderful organization and
the vast machinery at its command for
knowing all about ships, almost from
hour  to   hour.     But  the  secretary,   a
���grave gentleman, with a sly twinkle in
^liis eye. shook his.head very doubtfully
'-jsvhen he heard'the whole story.
'' "I fear we shall not be able to lay
-���our  hands  upon  that  yacht���at  least
for some etime to come���if she -wishes
to keep out of, the way.   We can track
her down the river, of course, as far
as' Southeri'd  on  one' side,   the' North
.S-foreland on the other.    But if ..after
���that-she steers a straight'course east-
'-ward'fcill out of sight; she will be lost
- 'in the German ocean."
, He,-touched a bell on his table and
.-.gave instructions tot, a cleric.   -i
.    "-Communicate   with  signal  stations
������down the Thames, aud.tben with those
/<>n the east and -southeast coasts,-and
������inquire   for   a   yacht   answeriug   this
--^description���it' is���the Fleur-de-Lis,  in
fact.    She Is registered here; you can
' verify her from the books.    Ask If she (
' -has been seen or spoken with, and if |
and authority to detain the Fleur-de-
Lis." - .
"That will I. by the Lord, and send
an ofiicer of my own besides. I have
other   reasons���'official   reasons���'for
WHEN A BOAT TIPS 0\'ZT\.
Mr. Snuyzcr was pleased to express his approval when he heard what l had dune. '
wishing to come  up with  that yacht
and   detain' her   for  search.     On   tlie
��� whole;   I   think  that this  is  the  most
prompt   and    sensible    course.      You
would hardly-get-a steamer off from
this or any other port under 24 hours,
, and   that   would   be  a   fatal   loss  of
time." ,    .      ,
"Can I go iu the tug?"' 1 still stuck
to my,point.
"Quite Impossible." replied the secretary. "They have no proper accommodation, and you would have-to pass
Ue, night in utter discomfort on the
open deck." '  , , \   J
"I should not be afraid of that." But
"some one who  knows  Mr.  Wood and'
everything' else- must accompany  the
tug," I argued.
"My officer, Swete Tbornbill, knows
him, doesn't he?" *'
""Yes,   but   not   the   others,   or   the
meaning of the whole'thing."
"Send the Yankee, then. He will b.
quite equal to tbe emergency. Can
you get hold of him?"
Easily.  He is on the telephone.  Be-
so, what course she is ou.   That won't' Bll]eSt j kaow nis address
take half an hour.    In the meantime,
you might be inquiring for a steamer
���Then   we  left  Lloyds,  having given
carte  blanche as regards expenditure,
to"send in chase.   That is your idea, is j RUfl wjtl, full assurance that all proper-
���it not?"- and  again "he signaled  in  a, arrangements 'would' be made.     ���  ���
,-desk tube, summoning another subor-j    Late,. Mr> snuy/er answered_my sum-
���dmate. , j noons, and was pleased to ^express, big
"Can  anything'come of  It?"  asked j approval when he  heard what I   bad
doue. '
��Sir Charles doubtfully
"Why not? You will, of course, have
to send a posse of police in  her.    It (
'\vill   not  be  enough   to  overhaul   her;!
-���you will have- also to overawe ,th'e ab- j
-ductoi-s���always  supposing  you  come '
���>up with and^can positively Identify the
Fieur-de-Lis. neither of which is very
-probable."
, . "It .is just what I tell this young
--lady. We've got first to catch the boat,
���nuci then to be sure it is the Fleur-de-
Lis, before we go a step farther." J
"Exactly. ��� Ah. Trevor"���this was to j
nnother clerk  who  now came in���"let
me    know    with    all    dispatch    what
steamers could  be hired  for a special
mission.    Class of no consequence, but
"I don't admire another night ou^of
bed," he said grumblingly, "but it is iu
a good*-'cause. There's sense in the
plan and it-may succeed. The chase
was' mere idiocy.' You could never,-
���have caught up tbe yacht.- Resides,
1 can be back in Loudon on Saturday
tat-latest, which is most important."     ��
"Yes?" I asked, rather indifferently.
"Yes truly.1 Sunday I* sail from
Southampton by'the Great River line's
.steamer Chattahoochee for New York.",
"What! Why is this? What reason���have you found out anything?",
"Here is a preliminary list of passengers by the Chatt: joocbee. - Ruu your
eve over the names.    See?    Duke and
It Is   VJ ell   for Vi oiju'ii  io   Know   U !i��f   i"
iio  in  mi   hi��it*rs;��Mit:y.,
On- the question discussed at the
public- both, whether ��� a gill's skirts
if sho,fell o\ erboard, would buoy he:-,
up or'drag her down there seemed to
be a diversion of opinion. .Fimxlly,
it-'was ��� agreed that they might buoy
her up for a few seconds, until the
air that was ia theni escaped, but as
soon as they were wet they would
tend to ,drag her down, and make
swimming practically impossible. Of
course, how soon they got wet would
depend on the material of which they
were made. Miss Clark, the teacher,
pointed out that when a woman .dived into the water the air under her
bathing skirt formed a big bubble
which hampered a -swimmer,- so that
she readied back and pressed it out
as soon as possible- But this same
bubble' would undoubtedly -tend to
buoy up a non-swimmer for an infinitesimal space of time. On the other
hand, this air chamber 'lasted much
longer in a wot bathing suit than in
a dry one, for in the former the pores
oi the material were to a certain extent filled with witter and the air
escaped slowly.
The- suggestion of7 an undressing
drill seemed to particularly t please
Dr. MoshQr, 1 says The .Brooklyn
Eagle: ��� Its practical value was evident, as in nine cases out of ten the
drowning accidents are ,the result of
an overturned boat, -and its occu--
pants are not in bathing suits. ' The
children used to. swimming there in
the lightest possible attire, for except 'with theo teachers, the skirted
bathing- suit is unknown, would-/' be
hampered almost to rendering" their
knowledge of swimming useless if
thoy were, called upon'to save themselves -.v:*��h .their high, shoes, two or,
three, petticoats on, arid, in the case
of the. older girls,' long skirts and
probably corset's..
It is not that undressing'in the waiter is particularly hard. Most of-,
those who swim for pleasure have
probably done it, but the youngsters
'should be taught, that' they can ani
,that in an emergency they must undress sudiciently to bo'-able to put
their knowledge of swimming to
practical use.' One ,or two lessors
would,-be all that would be needed.
The matron suggested, and the suggestion ' was ' a good - and practical
one, ."At least teach them to pick'up
the front of their skirts and -'hold
them.in their teeth to. keep them out
of the way. 1 always do that eyen
with" my bathing suit' if 1 am swimming  ativ  distance."
ALMOST IN DESPAIR
THE   CONDITION   OF, MRS.   JOHN
'"SHOTT,  OF ORANGEV3LLE.
Suffered From a Burning Sensation
in the' Stomach���Food Became
Distasteful' and She Grew 'Weak
and Despondent.
NEWSPAPB
. OUTFITS
:n
A
'4
I
she  must  have  a   speed  of   15 to. 1G; Duchess of Tierra Sagrada
tnots. and be ready for sea this after
noon.     Price  of  charter  by   week  or j
month, all found���crew, captain, coals ,
ou board.    Sharp's tbe word, you un- ���
i-derstand?    Who is going in ber?    You '
���should   have   some   police   officers,   in
-ease  there  is any  arrest to be made:
Perhaps   you   will    see   to, that.   Sir
������Charles?"
��� "I should like to go In her," I now
- -said.
"My     dear    child,"     protested     Sir
'Charles,   "that  is  pure" nonsense.     Ia
"the first place. I think It is highly im-
'-probable   that  she   will  catch' up  the
���yacht.    But if she does there will be
-some rough and tumble work���fighting
/perhaps.     Those   villains,  after  going
such lengths., will not be very willing
to give up their prize.    It would never
do for you. Miss Fairholme."
- "I cannot bear to remain inactive.    I1
want  to be doing something."   I  con-
'-tended. |
"I    expect    you   would   be   inactive
'enough on board the steamer," said the
wsiretan.    "ivaugiujj up mju no��vu tut! '
waters  probably,  a  wretched  sort   of
���cruise aud always in  ignorance as to j
-what was goiug on at home.  -I think
/you wtould be wiser to Unci some other
outlet for your energies."
At this moment the first clerk came
'in with a slip of "paper in his hand.
"'���A small steam yacht, flying riocol-
���ors.' he read aloud, "was reported passing the "North Foreland about S p. m.
'last night, and a. steamer, the same no
'.doubt, was seen from r.eachy Head
tliirf morning at 5 a. m. Her course apparently V.'. ii. YV. westerly. Nothing
seen of her .since. Start Point,.-mid
Lizard'have .been warned specially to
look for her and report.' "
���'She  is  making for the Atlantic,   1
'������������expect,"  was the secretary's comaien-
������tnry.    "At least that would be a fair
inference.   But once in the wide ocean,
-who'shall, say   wiiat   will'become   of
her?"
"Could she not be intercepted, from
���Plymouth or Falmouth?" I suggested.
*"Wb:it would you calculate her rate
������of steaming at the progress, she has
���made?"
' "it's a good suggestion, Miss Fair-
-iiolme. I should imagine the yacht
would be off the Start soon after mid-
���nightand Plymouth by early tomorrow
..-morning. I could wire instructions to
Lloyds' agent to send out a tug, and
no doubt Sir Charles could arrange for
police constables with search warrant.3
"You are indeed wonderful, Mr.
Snuyzpr." and in sheer admiration I
gave -him my hand.
"But that isn't all. Havo you 'gone
right down the list?   Well?"
My eyes swam, my head turned
round. I felt giddy and faint, for there
at th*-- end of all. was tbe name of���
"Captain William Wood!"
"I was pretty right, you see, miss. I
see all their cards as though they were
on the table. The right man held up,
the wrong paraded with full papers of
Identification to make a clean sweep
of all they can acquire. It's time some
oue should go over. Perhaps it will
be Mr. Wood himself. If 1 can pick
him"out-of that hooker and bring bim
on shore. I shall put it to him that he
had better cross the pond right away
to protect his own interests. Thai;
would be far the best. But some oue
must go."
"Mr.  Snuyzpr,"  I   said,  with  a sudden, irresistible impulse, "if you (\o not
return on Friday uight, i will go ov��r
1  to New York."
Directly we sat down to lunch I
broke it to mother.
"1 am going to New York on Sunday." I said very .quir-ily. ""/. ���
The words had no  meaning for her
at first,    i had to. repent the statement
more than once. when.iu last it dawned
upon ber. ' .
."Of   course   I   cannot   tro   alone."   I
!))'���   v
irnr of fact
;::���:���.��������� not: so you
v,-::!!"' me. Now,
'il-m't be disagree-
o!" "m- utmost 1m-
continued, in the ^.-i
voice,  "at least.  I'd
���will   ha ve   to  '-iime
dnrli::;**." I w<>;i* m-i.
able.'   it is :���  <n:i'importance.    I must go.    I cannot help
myself."
''.It is something to do with that
wretched Captain Wood, of- course '?
Dear, dear, how I wish you had
never, settled it that way. . I don't
know-.what to think of him ; whether
we ought to trust him. Suppose he
is deceiving you; suppose he has'run
away-?"
(To be Continued.)
1   believe,   there  has  been  deposited
in   the "London  Zoo  a  specimen   of  a
chimpan'-'ec which is said to represent
a' new   form,   or   it   may   bo   e_   mere
variety? only,  of ^that .species of nian-
iil-e  ape.    It-figures  under  the  scientific  name, "of anthropopiihecus    troglodytes,  is'said to have been brought
from  the  Cold   Coast,   and  has 'been
presented   to   the   Zoological   Society
by   Civ;>tain   D.   A.   Donavan. '     The
creature     is     described as  singularly
tame and intelligent, and posi-ibly in
it  we may find  a  successor  to    that
highly-educated ape,  the late lamented'  Sally.      Unhappily,   the     manlike
apes  are all  delicate of constitution,
that   is,    as     represented   by   a      life
spent   in   captivity,   and   subject     to
marked   variations   of     temperature.
"Whether   this   new   specimen   is   to  be
referred   to   the  ordinary   chimpan. e-v
species   or   not   will,   no   doubt.      ho
duly   determined   by   the   authoi ities
at the Zoo.    The question  of specific
differences   iu   the  chimpanzee   brunch
of   the   ape    stock    is     not     settled.
Hart munn  remarks that it is a   difii-
cult   question   to, decide,   though    he,
himself,   adds   that   he  is  inclined   to
admit   a   certain   constancy     in     the
varieties  he lias  examined.    The  new
ape   at   the   Zoo   may   possibly    turn
out  to re. rodent one of the varietVes.
It   is   a   notoriously   difficult 'matter
to   decide   where  we  leave  the  limits
of  a   mere  variety  behind  and  whom
the   boundary;  line   of  a   new   species
begins.���London   Chronicle.
RENUNCIATION.
The lips we love and may not klstf,      ' '""'
The self we love and cast aside, '
The flowery ways we choose to mtsa
For paths where rue and thorns abidej
The wlsful eyes that 9cft tire shore,
They may not seek beyond tee seas������
Ah! Life to Come,  hast thou In store
A fit exchange for gifts like these?
���Margaret. Rldgely Scnott.
hi'   1 > 11 K��-      m!   -Iit>   ""-ip
iV-v is- a:i episode re'.atr-d '->v ?���!.
.Jr.c.|res Krne.mir, now maitre d ho it!
;it. I'm Carleton, respecting his ex-
l-erien'-e at  the Savoy:
I was wa'ting on the Duke of Fife
one night when his grace was givin";
a'- small private dinner party in Uu
'.'at'i-n. e 1'ootn; There was hardly
room t o pass belrrid each guest. The
soups were Bortch���a costly Itussian
���������o'age," made from boiled duck,
and served with sorrel, vegetables
nnd cream, and just as T was serving
i-��� sound. nn accident happened,
in cni'liniwl I hid a plate of soiip,
and in. llvj other, my cream. The
Dui.'C' was talking earnestly to nie,
air! yo intently did -I listen to him,
that l did not know I was dropping
'all th:.- cream" in- a hideous thick
stream down his back.  ���-
I made no fuss, I gave no alarm.
The-Puke , wont on talking and laughing with his guests, with the ''back
of" ' his 'exquisitely-fitting dress one
mass of thick cream. I got two
or three soft serviettes, ami as I
served hia'grace with each course, f
gave him a rub. By the time we
had come to tho ice, there was nothing left of the cream except certain
faint, traces, for which I fear. his
grace's valet was. unjustly blamed.
���London Daily A'ews.
Pri'ni!�� <>T Vt'fili-s  Hsu Opin Ions.
Contrary to general opinion, I hear
that the. Prince of Wales is a person
of most decided opinions, and that
his "yea" is, "yea" and his "nay"
most distinctly "nay."���Lally Bernard, in The Globe.
From  the   Sun,   Orangevillo,   Ont.
The    Sun    is   enabled    this  ,v."eek,
through the  courtesy  of  3Irs.    John
Shott; a lady  well known and'niuch
esteemed by many of-the residents of
Orangeville,   to .give 'the   particulars
of another of those cures   that   have
made, Dr.    Williams'     Pink Pills     a
household ' remedy     throughout -  the
civilized  world. ' Mrs.   Shott,   in  con-
versatior  with, our reporter,    said :���
" About  three years  ago,   while    living  in-, lngersoll, '1, was  a great  sufferer,   from    dyspepsia. ' "The 'trouble
first  began    with     severe    headaches,
dizziness,  and   'sometimes    vomiting."
Xext    j'.suffered cbntinually  from     a
burning    sensation    in  my  stomach ;
food  distressed  me ;   I ,did "not  sleep
well at night ;  lost flesh" and, became
very   weak.     I   was   continually- doctoring,    but it did me no' good.      in
fact I'was  gradually  growing" worse
and  , despaired'   of   ever     being  well
again.    One day a friend' who    called
to see me strongly advised nie to try
Dr.   Williams'- Pink'  Pills.' She  spoke
so highly of them  that I decided "to
take her advice,  and I soon discovered that they were not like the other
medicines I had been taking and that
1' had    at  last  found  something     to
help me    I continued' using the pills
for perhaps'a couple ol months when
1    found- myself    fully    restored    "to
health.    T have  always since enjoyed
my meals with  relish,  and  have.had
no ���return  of the trouble.     , "With *my-
experience I feel  certain that if other
sufferers will  give Dr. Williams'  Pink
Pills a fair trial they will find.a certain cure."
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills ���enrich and
nourish tho blood and strengthen the
nerves.' 3t-is thus that they r ' cure
such *" troubles 'as dyspepsia,' kidney
ailment's, rheumatism, partial paral-
sis, heart troubles, ��� St. .Vitus' dance,
aiid'the ailments that make the.lives
of so many women- a source of misery, These pills never fail to drive
away pain, bring a glow of health
to the whole body and make despon-;
dent, men and womcn.^briglit. active
and strong. ' Do not take any -pills
without the full name "X)r. Williams'
Pink Pills for Pale People" on '-the
wrapper around the <box. Sold by
all "medicine", dealers or. sent postpaid at 50 cents a box or six'boxes
for 82.50 by addressing tho 'Dr., Williams  Medicine   Co.,   Brockvjilc,   Ont.
If We supply, at short
notice complete JOB'
PRINTING AND
NEWSPAPER OUTFITS.
"1[ We sell what Prints
- ers want; Printers want
���what,we sell. '
^[ We carry a-complete-
- stock of Type and Supplies-for the composing-.
Room,  Pressroom  and' ���
Bindery. .'",.'    < '
TORONTO TYPE FDRY
Company, Limited.
175 McDermat Avenue,'   ' Winnipeg,
-    A
Any' man    can, ruake '
anything she wants to.
his ', wife, do
ilu'choOf-AKe charity that- begins "at
home is too weak to travel.
The London postoflices are now using girls as we'll as boys for the express messenger service. The girls*
must be over eighteen years old, and
they get thirteen shillings a week.
WEATHER AILMENTS.
More    Little".   Ones  Die   During    Hot
Weather Months Than <al, Any
<. Other Season.
jBZARDS  AND  GLASSES.
'Two     Oi"��:ijj;eiit>��    Tliat     Arir     llarc'y
Komid   J,'i>ou   Hotel  Wsltcrn.
"Ever se" a waiter wearing glasses?"
demanded the inquisitor.
N*o one could remember, although
Just why n waiter should not be seen
wilh glasses as well as any otheivmnn
was not apparent.
"It's jusr. like the wearing of beards,"
went on the inquisitor. "The proprietors of our important hotels, restaurants and cafes will not permit either
beards or glasses to bo worn by their
waiters. It is possible that in some
old fashioned family or commercial
hotel the servitors may be found with
.heir noses straddled by optical helps,
but you won't find 'em along Broadway. ,     6
"Now. this is.a fact worthy of nnte
because in every other calling in life
lh'.�� number of persons wearing glasses
is on the increase, and even in our
schools a e!>:--iilerable percentage of
very small children- will be found,
wearing glasses, and whjle. as I say.
hot'-l. resf-urant and cafe- proprietors
are oppose*. \o the glasses, still 1 have
seldom found a waiter whose eyes indicated that he was in the slightest
need of them.
"You may argue that restaurant
waiters are generally '.'young men.
Crunt.,'you that instantly, but all the
samo;th</usaiids of men of similar age
hiive'' to: wear them in almost every
other occupation. '
"The-' '���majority of those servitors
-commence in boyhood, and the demand
of their vocation causes no strain on
tlie'eyesight. Consequently that may
account iii a measure for the absence
of any necessity for the use of specs.
Moreover, the. steam from hot viands
would render them useless probably."
Jt is a lamentable1 fact that-thous-'
ands ,of   little     ones     die     from hot
Aveat'ner  ailments,   whose  lives  might
bo spared if mothers..had at hand-the   ,
proper remedy to   administer -prompt- "
ly.     Hot weather ailments come suddenly, and   unless, promptly, .-treated,a
precious  little life may be lost' in a
few" -hours.* ,-7 Baby's    0w.n     Tablets-
promptly   check   aud 'cure 'diarrhoea,
stomach troubles, - cholera   .infantum
and    other ' hot    weather,    ailments.
They    also'give    relief-   to     teething   -
troubles. , and   'prevent  the  ailments
that come at this period.    Every prudent  mother     should  keep   a box    of
Baby's  Own  Tablets  in -the house at
all times.    j\"o other medicine acts so ,
promptly and so surely, and the Tablets are guaranteed  ' to    contain , no
opiate   or   harmful   drug. ���    They    always do good and cannot possibly do
harm, and  crushed  to  a powder you
can give them to the smallest, sickliest    infant.     Mrs.   Geo:    Foote,     St.
Thomas.  Ont/.  says : " "My baby was
troubled with diarrhoea and was very
cross  and  restless,   and got so  little
sleep, I hardly 3-cnew what to do with ^
her. 1 got. a box of Baby's "Own Tablets  and .after  giving  her    some    her
bowels became regular and she could
sleep    well.*    I-think   the   Tablets   a
splendid medicine." - ,   *
'" You can get the Tablets at any
drug store or by mail post paid at
25 'cents a box by writing to the Dr.
Williams' Medicine Co.. Brockville,
Ont.,  or Schenectady,  N.Y.
There is a wide difference between
the self-made man and the self-inflated man. " * '.     .
Anybody  who  has  ever employed  a
lawyer can give you  lots ol ndvice.
MINARD'S IOTENT Hflli^ NgaralLla.
Saperlj.
"What a regal carriage he has! There
is surely royal blood in his veins. Do
you know him?" whispered the enthusiastic woman. ���.--���:'��������� ,
"Yes," replied the man, "he comes of
a   lono   line  of   janitors."
A Summer  Invocation*      w,]*i
Oh. Hght your living: fires,
CJreat sun, and let her roll!
;W��Vve spent the dreary winter
la freezing limb and soul!
And, growling here ������:.
And bowling there.
Have prayed for brimstone and hot air!
Ghme out and lure the summer
From many a dim retreat;
Let slip the rolling thunder
And boU the rains that beat!
X^or  growling here
Ano gro.vling there,
���W<t prated vor &u.mmer -svernvrHrel
*��.2id ihen wb-��> summer strikes U3,
He. fiercest ns.m��s uifrolled,
Just hear us howling, growling?
And crying out for cold!
And, winter gray
Or tlowery Mas",
We'll growl cur way to Judgment dayl
Much  In. Her Name. ,
Church���She is a Russian countes3.
Gotham���Indeedl Has she much in
her own name?
"Has she? She's got nearly the entire alphabet!'"
Bad nc^lnnlnKS.
A bad begginning makes a good enduing sometimes, but more often it makes
a very quick ending.���Syracuse Herald.
Vor   ll or>s��- K iile<i.
An English resident of Shanghai,
having made a good dinner from a
tasty hut . unrecognized-dish, called
his cook, WiJu Hoo, nnd congratulated   him.  on   the   excellent  meal.
"T hope you didn't kill one of
those dogs to provide the soup,"
jestingly remarked his daughter, referring, of course, to the pariahs
.which, haunt   Chinese  streets.
"Wun TToo made' a solemn gesture
of   dissent.
"No killee dawg, rnissie," ho explained. "Him alleddy dead when I
pickeo up!"
S
1-J
���m
if
* if
I
A* lit  4-  ���������AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA*  \ Amusing Adventures of  Cupid, a Colonel and  < Some Pag Dogs *. ���������. v  ���������4  ���������  ���������  w  "V  I  "Sylvia!"     '-  "Yes, papa."  "That infernal dog ef your"���������    ,  -   "Oh, papa!" ,  "Yes; 'that, infernal  dog of yours has  been at my carnations-again!" \ r   ��������� ������  Colonel Reynolds glared sternly across  the table at Miss ,'Sylvia Reynolds, and  , Miss-Sylvia Reynolds looked in-a depre"  catory planner back at Colonel Reynolds,  while the'.dog in question���������a foppish pug  ���������happening to meet the colonels eye in  transit 'crawled unostentatiously under  " the sideboard and began to wrestle with  a bad conscience.     , - <"  , ' "Oh. naughty Tommy!:' said- Miss  Reynolds mildly, in the direction of the  sideboard. '  , ~     '   ' "     '','<,  ,f'"Yes, my dear," assented the colonel,  , "and-if-you could convey to him the information that, if he does'it ouce more-  yes, just 'once more-rl shall shoot him on  '   ' the spot','you would be doing' hira a kind-  '    ness."   ,'And.vthe colonel hit a large* crescent out of his toast!,.with all the energy  'and conviction | of''a 'man'who has thor-  roughlj-'made'up-his mind.r   "At" 6 o'clock,  this morning," continued he in a voice'of  - -gentle'melancholy, "I-happened to ���������lookout of my bedroom window ami saw him.  "He had then destroyed  two of "my best  - 'plants and was commencing on a third,  with  every  appearance of .self "satisfaction. [- I threw two large brushes and a  'boot at'-him."-    - ,    -  ' "  ."Oh, papa.', They didn't hit him?"  ''No,   my   dear,   they, did " not.' ' The  'brushes missed him by several yards, and  the   boot   smashed   a   fourth'  carnation.'  'However."I was so fortunare as to attract  his attention,'and he left off."   ."  ,    "I .can't think what makes him do' it.  VI   suppose 'it's   bones.     He's  got-, b'ones  -buried, all over the garden." *  * ,>..,'��������� Well, *-if he does it again you'll find  -that   there-will   be ,a   few   more' bones  '''buried  in  the  garden!"  said  the'colonel  grimly, and he subsided into his paper.  ',    Sylvia' loved the dog partly;for its own  sake, but principally for that of, the giver,'  "-one Reginald Dallas, whom it had struck  <;at an early ��������� period of their acquaintance  ', that he and Miss Sylvia  Reynolds'were  '  made for one another.    In communicating  ��������� this  discovery  to  Sylvia  herself  he  had  found' that  her  views.upon  the" subject  were   identical.^with   his   own,   and- all  would have'gone .well, had it not been for  .- a melancholy/accident." %   , ���������  "<���������     One  day  while out  shooting with sthe  " colonel, witb/whom~,he was doing;his best  to" ingratiate ,iiimself with a view to ob-  C ' taining-hie consent to'themiatch. he bad  * allowed   his  sporting-instincts   to^ carry  him away to such a degree that/in sport-'  ing  parlauce,   he   wiped   his   eye   badly.  Dallas' being in especially5 good form, it  - was  found,   when   the   bag  came  to  be'  1  ' counted, that while he had shot seventy  - brace the colonel had managed to secure  only five and a half.'  The   colonel's   bad   marksmanship   de-  , ,stroyed the last remnant of his temper.  He swore for half; an  hour  in  Hiucloo-  stanoe and for anqthcr\half hour in English.     After "that" he''felt   better^  And  when at the end of .dinner Sylvia came  to him with the absurd request that she  might toa'nxMr. Reginald Dallas he did  .   not/haW a  fit,, but merely   signified  in  faijfty moderate terms his entire and absolute refusal to think of such a thing.  '//This   had   happened   a   month , before,  ;jand the pug. which had changed .hands in  -,'  the earlier-days of the-friendship; still,remained, at the imminent risk of his" life,  to soothe Sylvia and madden her father..  a ��������� * * * * ���������  - The day -after the conversation above  recorded had taken place a terrible tragedy had occurred.  The colonel,, returning from', a pool  day's shooting, observed through the  mist that was'beginning to rise a small  form busily engaged in excavating in the  precious carnation bed. Slipping' iii a  cartridge, * he fired, and ,the skill which  had deserted him during the day came  ' back to him. There was a yelp, theD  silence, and Sylvia, rushing out L from  ��������� the house, found the luckless Thomas  breathing his last on a heap of uprooted  carnations.  The news was not lohg in spreading.  Tho cook told the postman, and the postman thoughtfully handed it on the servants at -the rest of the bouses on hip  round. By noon it was public properly,  and in the afternoon, at various times  , from 2 to 5, nineteen young men were  struck, quite independently of one another, with a brilliant idea.  The result of this idea was apparent  on the following clay.  "Is this all?" asked the colonel of the  servant as she brought in. a couple oi  letters at breakfast time. .  "There's   a   hamper   for' Miss   Sylvia,  jomed   in 'until,  tbe   whole   coachhouse  rang with the noise.   '���������  The colonel subsided against a wall  and began to express himself softly in  Hindoostanee.  "Poor dears!" said Sylvia.i "Howstuffj  they must be feeling." -  She ran to the house and returned witfc  a basin of water.  ���������   "Poor dear!"  she said  again.     "Soon  -have something to,drink!"  She knelt down by the nearest hampei  and cut the cord that fastened it. A  pug'jumped out like a jack in the bos  and rushed to the water. Sylvia continued her work of mercy, and by thf  time the colonel had recovered sufficiently'to be able to express his views in piy.r  nsli eighteen more pugs bad .joined tnelt  companion.  "Get out, you brute!" shouted the colonel as a dog insinuated itself between his  legs. "Sylviaj put them back,again this  minute! -You had no business'-to let them  out.    Put them back!"   ��������� ,  "But I can't, papa.1 I can't catch  them."  She looked helplessly from him to the  seething mass of dogs and back again.  , "Where's my gim?"'began the'colonel. ,  ' "Papa, don't! You couldn't,be so cruel!  They aren't doing any, harm, poor  things!" ; , -'/ - '������������������- , ...  '  "If I-knew who sent them"������������������  //Perhaps there's _ something , to show.  Yes: "here's a'-'visiting;card in this hamper.'-    ������������������"     -    ;'   -"     H  > ���������      i  1 "Whose,,,is-it?" bellowed the, colonel  through the, din. '       ) -j       -   "���������'''���������  "J.' D'Arcy Henderson;'" The Firs," read  Sylvia at the top' of her voice.  "Young blackguard!" bawled th������ colonel. ''."���������    ' . '- , .  "I expect there's one in each of the  hampers. Yes;-'here's another���������W.., K.  Ross," The Elms."       ',.,.'        ���������     '  The colonel came across and began to  examine "the hampers -with his- ow.n  hand.' Each hamper contained a visiting  card, and each' card bore the' name of a  neighbor. The colonel returned to the  breakfast room' and laid his nineteen  cards out in a row on the table.  "J-I'm!" he said at last. "Mr. Reginald  Dallas does not seem,to be represented." ,  ���������- Sylvia said nothing.  '"No"; he seems not to be represented.   I  did   not   give   him   credit   for  so   much  sense."  Then he dropped the subject, and  .breakfast proceeded^ in silence.  ,    A young gentleman met the colonel on  his walk that morning.'<���������' .   . ,  "Morning,- colonel," said he.    ' .,      ,:  "Good morning," said the!colonel grim-  ly. ^ -     -    -        : ;      '   ���������, ''   ^  "Er ��������� colonel, I ��������� er ��������� suppose Misa  Reynolds got that dog all right?"'  "To which dog do you refer?"  "It was a pug, you know. It ought to  have arrived by this time."   ,-'  "Yes;  I "am inclined to think it has.  Had it any special characteristics?"-  - "No;-1 dou't think so-^-just an ordinary  ;p������s-"   . , ���������.-_",  "Well, young man, if you will go to my  ,coachhouse- you. will find nineteen ordinary pugs, and if you would kindly select  your beast and shoot it I should be much  -obliged." D ���������' . .'���������  -^'"Nineteen!" said the other in astonishment. "Why, are you setting up as a  dog fancier in your old age, colonel?"  This was too much for the colonel. He  exploded.  "Old age! Confound your impudence*  Dog fancier! No, sir! I have not become  a dog fancier in what you are pleased to  call 'my old age! But while there is no  law to prevent a lot of dashed young  puppies like yourself, sir-���������like yourself���������  sending your confounded pug dogs to my  daughter, who ought to have known better than to have let- them out of their  dashed hampers, I have no defense."  "Sylvia," said the colonel on arriving  home. .  "Yes, papa."  "Do you still want to marry that Dallas fellow? Now, for heaven's sake,  don't start crying! Goodness knows I've  been worried enough this morning without that. Please answer a plain question in a fairly sane manner. Do you or-  do you uot?"    ^  "Of course I do, papa."  "Then you may. He's the furthest  from being a fool of any of the young  puppies who live about here, and ho  knows one end of a" gun from the other.  I'll write to him now." c  "Dear- Dallas," wrote the" colonel, "I  find on consideration that you are tha  only sensible person in the neighborhood.  I hope you will come to lunch' today.  And if you still want to'marry my daughter you mny."  To which Dallas replied by return, of  messenger: ���������  ��������� "Thanks for both invitations.   I will."  An hour later he arrived in person, and  the course of true love pulled itself together and began to run smooth again.���������  Boston Herald^  FOUNTAIN   OF SALT.  piece of meat is the tenderest breakfast;  I have had in'this house for some weeks." j ,    ���������London Tit-BitS.  | A���������   Attractive   HoTi*eholcl   Oruanicnt  Football In Japan. |   / 'll'at Is EttS">'   Uade'  Among the many things that Japaa j An attractive household ornament.  borrowed from China was football, said I having the appearance of a marble  to have been introduced as early as the j fountain, can be made by putting some  middle of the seventh century. The em- \ salt and enough water to d ---solve it in  peror Toba II. was an expert player and i a very small glass fruit dish and from  got up a club at his palace.    Considering} (i:lv Z"Q $.iy adding a little more water  THE BROOD MARE.  how averse -most orientals are to hard i  work and rigorous< exercise it may be j  supposed that the game was very differ- |  ent from either "Rugger" or, "Socker." I  Nevertheless, the Japanese form seems !  to' have been popular, and we may trace ,  the beginnings of professionalism .to "an '  emperor and his court, of whoin it isj  told that in a time of poverty they earned -  a little extra money by teaching the art ���������  of football.���������Cassell's.  and suit.   In a short time the salt will-  The World's Largest Face.  A' man who is said to have the largest  face in the .world graced the Hongkong  magistracy veranda with his presence the  other day.VHe was a Chinese, aiid, while  not especially'tall or broad, had a face  at least four times the ordinary size, even,  of a large man|s face. , The peculiarity,  however, is that while his face is so  enormous his head is of normal size, gif-  ing him the appearance of wearing a  large mask.���������Bangkok Timea. . ,  o ', " '  Trnc Hospitality.-  - A -certain , amount of 'social, intercourse is^ absolutely necessary for  those,' who desire to lead happy, contented, useful 'lives.���������" "But our means  ��������� are0 so limited,"'says' some young  housekeeper, "that, we cannot afford ���������  to "entertain." And she is right. -'But  there'is a great difference between hospitality anil entertaining. ^ True hospitality- is never, ambitious of doing  or haying anything beyond what our,  means willisal.low. - If you have'a  friend or a fewr-friends in-, to dinner,  Jet your menu be, made up of those  things that are in'season, and you are'  sure that they will not be expensive,  and j-et they will -be good. A plain  dinner well cooked is far preferable  to any number of elaborate dishes badly prepared and illy served. 1'oung'  married people who have just started  housekeeping are not expected to "entertain slavishly, but they can be -hospitable and see their' friends quietly  without any' great expense being incurred. True hospitality means the  doing',and giving, freely and heartily,  the b'est we can andt of the best we  have, but it does not .meanJ having  anything the size of our purse'will_ not  permit or attempting more than our  household is capable of accomplishing.  Sleasles   Can sen Death. '  Measles is one of the eruptive fevers  usually recognized by its peculiar catarrhal symptoms and characteristic  rash. -  - "   -  Its specific poison or infection is produced in< the rash, which, 'contrary to  common opinion,-' invades the membranes of the nose, throat, lungs and  bowels often more severely than the  skin. It escapes first in their secretions and afterward from the eruption on the skin. The first is the most  virulent and abundant and most difficult to control; tbe last is the least virulent and more'readily destroyed.  Most people and many physicians advise "that children be permitted to  catch the disease and be through with  it, as the risk is slight and the mortality -trifling." Tbe time has passed to  advocate the "catching" of any disease.  Neither diphtheria nor scarlet fever  causes so great proportionate mortality  under two and five years of age as does  mea'sles.  sir.'  'A hamper, is there?    Well,  bring it  'in," '���������   ���������.''-...''"'. !  "If you please, sir, -there's several of  them."     ��������� :���������  "What? Several? How many are  there?"  "Nineteen, sir," said Mary, restraining  with some difficulty'��������� an inclination . tc  giggle. '        - ��������� .  '   .  "Eh? 'What? Nineteen? Nonsense!  Where are they?"  "We've  put   them  in  the  coachhouse  for the present, sir.    And,.if you-please,  sir,  cook  says she thinks there's  something alive in them."  ,   "Something alive?" -  "Yes, sir. And John says he thinks  it's dogs, sir."  The colonel uttered a sound that was  almost a bark and. followed by Sylvia,  rushed to tho coachhouse. There, sure  enough, as far as the eye could reach,  were the hampers, and, as-they looked,  a sound proceeded from one of them that  was unmistakably the plaintive note of  a dog ihat has been shut up and is getting tired of it.  Instantly the other eighteen hampers  Elnslve Irish;Brogue*/  There has always been-a deal of bad  "brogue" written by Englishmen. G. W.  Steeyens wrote "praste," evidently 'assuming that as the Celt says "baste" for  "beast" he;will'say "praste" for "priest,"  whereas he is more likely to say  "priesht." Thackeray, superexcellent at  depicting Irish character, made, his Irishmen speak impossible brogue. He blended the barbarisms of a dozen dialects in  the mouth of Captain Costigan. Kipling  did much the same with Mulvaney.  English dabblers in brogue copied Thackeray for years, then they copied Kipling,  and. when the inimitable Dooley "came  to.the fore" they took a fresh turn and  made all their Irishmen speak the brogue  of Mayo.���������George Bartram in Academy.  Pleasant For the "Landlady.  A cook at a certain boarding house  played a little game on a grumbling  boarder, a newspaper humorist, by serving him a piece of sole leather instead of  beefsteak. ,  "You've changed your butcher, Mrs.  Hascher?" said the boarder, looking up  at the landlady after sawing two or three  minutes at the leather.  "Same butcher as usual," replied the  boarding mistress with a patronizing  smile.    "Why?"  "Oh, nothing much,"' said the humorist,  trying to make an impression on the  steak with his knife and fork, "only this  ���������" L-igrhtu nnd Small Room*. --.-  The apparent size of a small apartment may be considerably increased  by removing the chandelier and introducing side lights. In a narrow parlor,  for example, a six arm chandelier set  in its-plaster* medallion, the arrangement repeated perhaps In a rnirror  over the mantelpiece, adds very perceptibly to the furnishing of .the room.  Take it away, make, the ceiling plain,  and you have gained an effect of space  that cannot be realized till the experiment is tried. "Side, lights are understood now to be much /.more artistic in  lighting in any but .very, large and lofty,  apartments as well as more convenient. A pair may be near the piano,  another over a corner seat or against  a bookcase,-and so on.vto give the  light where specially needed. ���������  The Baby'* Position.  Uncomfortable positions often cause  prolonged crying in healthy babies.  Their stock of ignorance is exceedingly  largei They will lie in a crib in a  cramped, even painful, position, and  cry apparently for ages and yet not  know enough to turn over. It is a  standing rule among trained nurses  when a child cries in the hospitals to  turn him oyer to his other side, rearrange the bedclothing. pat bim a moment and it is surprising to see how  often the baby drops off again, into  peaceful slumber.  The longest alphabet in Europe is  that of the- .Slavonic language. It  has 42  letters. . . '  The  Idea.  Mrs. Nuritch���������I want' a pair of tbe  most expensive gloves you've got.  Salesman���������Yes'm. Do you want them  long?  Mrs. Nuritch���������Don't be impertinent,  young man. I want to buy them, not  hire them.  w&m  *>   ���������  !/'  ���������   1. ���������?  ^ ������������t5UEUUIlK-.nll������,,U*   r   A  FOUNTAIN  OF'SAI/T. -- <,>  .spread and crystallize-over the edge'of  the glass, then down" around .the out1  side. The dish, may then' be stoodsupon  'another similar^dish of larger size, as  .shown in the'illustration.' and,salt and'  water placed in it' regularly in like  mitnner., The same result 'will follow,  when a;third larger fruit, dish and per  haps a fourth and fifth' may.be added  lojhe column.       , ������������������ f  V������:!tb "the constant additions of salt'  and    water    the    crystallization    will-  spread over and down the entire,; column, appearing like a 'fountain or waterfall, white and sparkling.   The salt  will harden, holding'all the sections of,  the marblelike pillar firmly together.���������  New,York World. '        ,    ��������� .  Systematize the Housework.,  . It is a very common fault with women to ruin their, health and their -tempers and to .waste their energy by neglecting tto systematize their-housework  The good housewife makes plans overnight for the work which must be done  the following day. Probably a consid-  crable",share%of it falls to that special  day in each week, but there will be a  number of other thingstto do which aro  out of' the regular routine, and for  these she must plan so as not to have  them all crowding in upon her at once  and either being^ neglected because  there are so many or taken in hand  and carried through at the cost of  health and spirits. In planning and es-'  timating a day's work some allowance  should always be made for interruptions and for the work taking rather  longer .than.was anticipated. With too  many "irons' in the fire" such hindrances as a visitor or having to console a crying child in some little trouble make it difficult to keep that calm,  sweet temper which is necessary to tbe  woman who is not merely the mainspring of the machinery of the household, but its good angel, who makes it  home indeed to all who dwell there.  ���������    Egyptian -Women.  The Egyptian beasts of burden���������tbe  camel, the ox. the .donkey���������have tbe  same patient look as the people. It  may not be improper to. add another  beast of burden, woman. There is the  look of sad patience'in every Egyptian  woman's eyes as in the melancholy  river boiling at its great task and in  the face of the camel, the donkey and  the ox. They all look at you with tbe  same expression of patience. They  seem content to live, no matter tho  conditions of their wretched life, aud  not desirous of making change or resistance. The long swing of the camel,  the measured stride of the ox or buffalo, the-half trot of the donkey, are  seen everywhere. The woman's face is  covered���������at least" her mouth is always.  ���������for'.no Mohammedan woman-may expose ber uiouth to the vulgar gaze of  passers by. All have the same expression in their eyes as the camel or other  animal. '  Should  Be in Good  I-'Je������li  and  T'rim* C#>2v-  dition   itt,  1 oH-luiS   lime.  i -  ���������If you are desirous that your brood-. '  mare produce good healthy foals* seo  to it that she is in good flesh 'and in,  prime     condition     'at     foaling  time.  Oats, with plenty'of good, bright cut.  clover  in  the morning  and a feed "of  corn at night,,, will  do  the work.   , I  "always  stable^   my'brood  mares    at  night,   turning  them   out during    the  day .unless it be  stormy,  and I find  it pays  to  bed them,well at   night. ������,  It is positively  injurious to let thera  lie  on   a  hard,   cold  floor.      I, prefer  good dirt for my'mares,at all times.;,  Especially     is      this 'desirable   when, \  they are heavy in foal.    Do .not put,.,  too'much  dependence  in your breed-*-    '  ing table, but watch your mare close-,  ly,  for --she is liable to  foal any time  -from   ten   to   thirteen   months    after  being bred.    When the mare"begins to  make  bag   freely, put her into, a ,box  stall'   about     fourteen     feet  square,  with plenty of bedding, being "careful ,  that the. centre    is    lower   than   the*  outer  edges' of  the  floor, ,for  if   .the  centre is high and slopes,.to the wall-  the mare; is liable to roll against- it  and become cast,   and many  a valu-  .  able mare,,has been lost in.this way'.  There arc many'little, signs 'that   if  watched   closely   will' tell   when    the  mare is  about     to  foal.'   When    nay -  mares lfoai;-I  ana     in   the barn  and,,  know just' what'is going' on. / I do,.-,  not interfere  with  mare ,or  foal  unless   -my    assistance     is-   absolutely:  needed.���������Charles     L. ���������   Hardman     ,ift  Prairie Farmer.       '   - .���������.,.���������  JLil'lit ami   Convenient Crate.'  " J.  A.-Macdonald  sends The" Breeds  ,e������rs' Gazette the description of a very -,  satisfactory  shipping  crate.  %|   In the  illustration part of the ,fi*ont side is   .  cut away to     show    the inside i   ar-    ,  rangement.    "A   good  size for' a pig  three   months    old    is,  :,Eength -40  inches,     depth    23. inches; width   ,11'v t  inches.    For a pig eight weeks'old a '\t  length  of 32'inches,,'a  depth  of    18  inches and-a width ' of^.9 inches.- will  be about right.     Crates for -shipping  by express must be made as light as  is safe from^breakage.    It is not fair  to ��������� make  a  purchaser  of a "pig-" two  months'",   old     pay   express.- rates   on ,/.  thirty or forty pounds of crate when  they  can  be made  sufficiently'strong  and weigh but half as  much.      -For  ���������A  '',������.���������;  S        ,.    r  PolltlclnixiM.  Phil Brick���������What's the'difference .be,  tween an honest and a dishonest politician ?      .  I'hil Ossifer���������One is in politics for the  good he, can do his . fellow citizens,  while the other is in politics for any  amount he can do his fellow citizens.  Lorsjcr Avenue  of Trees.  Japan has an avenue of trees fifty  miles ��������� in length. The trees are il;e  eryptomera. and every oue is a. perfect  specimen, quite straight, from 130 to  lot) feet in height and from 12 to \o  feet in circumference. The avenue  extends from the town of Namada to  Nikko.  A Tennessee Tree."  A Tennessee paper announces that  out cf a. single tree in Dyer county a  citizen got four cords of firewood, three  gallons of honey and five raccoons.  A   Steel   Secret.  India  was  in  possession  of  a  secret  once  which   is  lost now.  was   the   inlaying   with   gold   of  blades . in   such   a    manner   that  sloe!  This-  steel  the-  strength of the blade was not impaired nor its temper spoiled.  < -- -V  ,������-f  '- ���������^.SHIPPING  CKATE FOR SWINE.    ,.    -A  ���������nds and ( bottoms - * take five-eignts  Inch seasoned spruce or othe>* tough-  light wood, one-half inch' stuff for  sides and cover with, &pace 'between  slats. In front is- a trough, ,T, lor  feed and water. Just above is a'  'sloping board, P, runrdng ��������� to the  top, through which the feerf in transit is given. The upper compartment  is provided with a slide, S, on-top,  and inside is the bag, li, containing  the meal and grain fare ample for  the journey. In cold weather the  sides may be boarded up almost  tight.' To pigs weighing seventy-five-  pounds a standard of one-half inch1  stuff is nailed in the centre of the  sides.     Shavings  from a shir.gle xcilS  make the best bedding-  -      ���������  Good Soil  tfved* ������nod >ce<f.     -.  If we wish to attain nuccess as  farmers, we must first become acquainted with the soil and be particular as to the kind and quality of  seed, we intend to sow, says P. J\  McGlynn in . Prairie Farmer. - A1  large number of farmers spend much)  of their time and money 'buying and  planting-poor seed.' Many plant poor-  seed because they are cheap, ' &ut'  which ofttimes prove most expensive.;.  Experience has taught me that the  better the seed the better. the crop.  Great care should .be fidven to ��������� the  soil as well as to the seed. On*  variety of seed might do extremely  well in a soil, while another of a different nature would be a. complete  failure under similar conditions. Th������  cultivation of a crop is only. oi secondary importance in comparison to  either soil or seed. Therefore it  should be obvious to every one that  'these two particular points are of  paramount-importance and are worthy of much thought from those in-,  terested in -agricultural pursuits'. It  is essential that every farmer be  thoroughly acquainted with the soil,*  for upon this knowledge his success,  largelv depends, and I can truthfully  say that if this particular point ia  carefully considered a crop could be.  easily-expected���������that is, if the season be a favorable one���������and not ro-  garded as merely a matter of- chance.:  Cheese.  Cheese will not go moldy if it is  wrapped in a cloth wrung out of vinegar and, then in oue of paper. 'Store-  It in a cool place.  >, i'  IIotiMes   lo   GIitsGrovr.  Out of JD13.000 houses or (hits in 'Glasgow 30.000 wen- I'mind to have but  one room and 70,WW but two wtouj^ Svrrillo-rvSnjr  Abilities of Snakes.  The jav/s of the cbiol'.en snake, says  n Texan, are bung ou hinges that can'  be   taken   apart   or  displaced   for  the  time being, as tbe case may be.'and an  entire Texan cottontail rabbit can   be  ���������persuaded to enter. be,ad and all. with  little effort, and the body, being made  '  of iudia rubberlike material and  very  stretchable,  the   kicking, little  animal  Boon,finds a lodgment In the stomach.,  His   suakesbip   then   carefully   resets,,  hia jaws so tbat  his mouth assumes  its normal size ,and  blissfully reposes  , for   the   succeeding   six- hours.     The'  powerful   gastric  juice does the  bal-  'auce. and no Texan can testify that he  - ever heard a chicken - snake suffering  from indigestion or-chronic dyspepsia.  -. ri iie capture and digestion of chickens,  ��������� si.ng' bird.--, turkey eggs and rats con-  \ stitute simple pastiine to the,chicken'  ;snake and "do not call for a six hour  1 layoff in feeding time.  Acrobatic.  Knicker���������Do   you   practice  at  plng-  jpong? ','  '  Bockor���������Yes.   I open a soft boiled egg  jt'or' breakfast   every   morning.        q  ,: , Self  Confidence.  j   'Tho man who thinks that he is great, ''  :    ��������� And thinks it. loo, with all his heart.  May claim to have one man convinced, -  And that is something ot a start.  He  Knew   tlie  Sex.   .  Sbe-r-Oh. pshaw!    You, men are all  alike:  " Ue���������-Now, what have I said or done  k'   tbat   requires   an' apology?  , A  Rich   Widow.  His death, though It would grieve her,  .Had one con-soling touch. ' '  The thought "How so.on he'd leave her"   ���������  Was merged * with this: "How much?"  ,  Great   Love.       ,,  Miss Talkerdef-  Mr. Golmin says he  IWoulcf never marry n light'haired girl:  ' Miss Blond���������Oh. I'd dye for him.  ' - And'ni tiff.  j In life's melee, ���������,  ; ���������      "    Mighty* io'ugh*.      -, -       ,  I,,'   - " .Don't t'ofR-et "    "    '���������   '   7  '���������'' . ',,   , Brains and bluff.   -      ".      '-    '  .   .-    . --Detroit HY** Freem ���������  I       ' " ' "'.'.      :       ,   'W  ,-Hlw   l,nt  jSni,.!!   Ka:s:������>   One.-'     '^  Ifirsi Itouiidsman- ,('asey, mot - new  I pohiceiuan is alwiis eiround whin tha re  lis ii'nuy tlirouhlP ,   ,  , ������  1    Seeond*5 Roundsman��������� Faith,- he's on-.  fluciiy! .  Sees a Dl.sndvantage In It.  "You ought to be a good boy." -  "Yes. but If I was a good boy people  nvonldh't say how bright I am.*'���������-Indi-  nuanoJis Newa.  NOTICE  NOTICE is hereby given that 30  (thirty) days after date I intend to  apply to the Honourable the Chief  Commissioner of Lands and Works  for permission to lease the fore.-hore  and-rights thereof fot fishine purposes in Comox District commencing at a post planted on the shore  at the north corner of Cape Mudge,  and about 220 (two hundred and  twenty) chains in a north-westerly  direction along the bench from the  Cape Mudge Lighthouse and marked J Skinner's S.W. corner, thence  N.W, following tbe shore 40 (forty)  chains more or less and extending  seaward, and including tbe fore7  shore and land covered with water.  Dated this 27th day of August, 1902  JOSKRH SKINNER..  ���������sjmrzurvzmxzt-czii mrrt, ���������m.~nr*fc������c-citvnrw-,tfg-.ccm.ncM  NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given that 30  thirty, ciays- after date I. intend to  apply to the Honourable the Chief  Commissioner of Landsand Work������  for permission 10 le-s.su the fort-shore  and rights thereof for fishing purposes in Comox District cunrnenc-  ing at a post planted on the shore-  on the south end of Valdes Island  about 20, twenty,-chains in a north  westerly direction from the Cape  Mudge Lighthouse, nnd marked J.  j.l. "vValsou's N. JL ���������corner, thence  south castor*y .following the shore  40, forty, chains more or less, and  extending seaward aud including  the foreshore and land covered with  water.  Dated this '27th dav of August, 1902.  JOHN R. WATSON.  T. U3-UC/SM JiKKtA t������i."*M tML'MUt/fWKn^V  NOTICE.  NOTICE is he:oh.y given that 30.  1.Iih-ly, ti.-iys ������������������il'i.f-r dal-f I intend to  applv to the H1 n'-'Uralde the Chief  C/omrnissioner of Lands nnd Works  for permission to ���������lease lhe foreshore  and right-; thereof for fishing purposes ii Comox District, commencing at a t-on phtnted oh the  nhorc on the south end of Vai-  dea Island and ahm-i 140, one  Uuadrtrjd  and   forty?   chains along  tho h.f.ch from tho Cape Mudge  L-ig it-,oust- ��������� in a 11.nth easterly  iliio tion :nid marked H. W atson's  S.W. con er. twence northerly following t-'e shbie 40, forty, chains-  in< ;,e ur-ie.-s'ai.d extending s-oawaid  and luciuiliiiji (iln-l foi'eshore and  Ian if covend w;ith water.  Dated this 27th day of August, 1902.  HUNTER WATSON,.  fit  NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given that 30,  thirty, days after date i intend to  app'y to 1 he-Honourable th*- CMef  Cornoiissiouer of Lauds and Works  c t y  ��������� for pr-i-rniR������ii>n to lease the foreshore  'and rights tnere.-f for  iibhiiig purposes in Comox District, conirnenc-  ing at a post planted on the shore  on ;he south end of "Valdes Inland  about  100',' one  hundred,   chains  'along  the be.ich'from   the   'Cape  Mudge Lighthous-e, in a north'east-  eily direction, and marked J. John-.  son's,  S.W.  corner,   thence ' north-  easierly   following  the, shore,- 40,  forty, chains more or-less and extending   seaward,   and I'including,  tho fort-shote and land'covered with  w titer,       '     ,,        ��������� ,   n...     ������,  'Dated this 27th day of August, 1902.  .   ' JONAS JOHNSON.  ','  ^mr^mrmmmmmtmvmm^BWmrmm^mmamwm������mssmiai^urjm^Yimemuiemswtammam^  .   NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given that 30,  thirty, davs after-date I intend to  apply to the Honourable.the Chief  Com mi-si oner of Lands and Works  for permission to lease the foreshore  and rights thereof for fishing purposes in Comox District^corvmen.c-  in������ at a post, plan ted on the t* bore-  on the south end ,of Valdes Island,'  and about 180, one hundred' and  eighty, chains alone the beach.fiom  the C'ipe Mud������e Lighthouse, in a  north easterly direction ink! marked  G. Skinner's S.W. ooroer, thence  Northerly -foV.:--v::ng the shore 40,  forty, chains m re or less and extending -seaward, and including  the foreshore and land covered with  water, -        "  Dated this 27th  day hf August,- 7902.  GEORGE SKINNER:-'  ��������� -    .      | NOTICE.  >���������- ���������'   ,       ���������      J  , -v' '    ���������  NOTICE is herehy given _ that 30,  thirty, days-after df>te I intend to-  "apply to the Honourable tl,e  Chief Coinmisioner of - Lands  and -Works1' for permission  to lease' the foreshore and r is lit?  thereof for, fishing purposes- in  Comox District, commencing at a  post planted on the shore oh the  south end of "Valdez Island about  20, twenty, chains in an .Easterly  direction from ' the Cape Mudge  Light-house and marked (t. Mc-  Keen's  N.W. corner  thence, east-  er'y follo'ving the shore 40. 'for-y,  chaiiiB more or'le=> and ex.enu.ng  s-eaward, and ii.cluciii'g .t >e ,fon-  shoreaud land covered with Writer.  '.Dated this ��������� 27th day of August, 1903.  GEO. MCUEEN     '"  ���������     NOTIOE. '   -.   ,',  1 * r  t x  NOTICE  is hereby riven' ��������� hat 80,  thirty, days after date   I   in.tei-d to,  ������������������ pj'ily   to    Hontnir .b!e.   tr^-o- Chief  Cpnimisioner of   Lands aud Works  for   permission   to  lease  the  fore  shore and rights   thereof!for''&.-hing  purposes'in  Cornox  District, -com-  mei.cing at'a post planted'-cm   the  shore,on'the S mth  end 01   Vahh-z  'Island about 60, sixty, chains in'   a  north " easterly direction  from 'the  Cape Mudge Light Houseand marked W.   A^Wadhaim,', Soutlv West  corner,   thence northerly following  the shore 40, forty!"chains more  or  less and   extendi' g se.ivvard,   and  including the foreshore and  land  covered with water.  Dated this 27th clay of August,  1902.  WM. A.'. WAD HAMS.'  a*^������,      System..  Our facilities for Soring Perishable Articles are now  complete. Eggs, .Butter,' Game, Fowl aud Meats of  kinds Stored at  Reasonable   Ttr'atcs. ...'.' ' ''.���������'  T C ������������������0R1)El?,s   fur   putside  Ports' promptly filed'  at   Lowest  p'< B ^*"r* Market.   Prices   --,-,/ ( ������������������ -  r     .  <  UNION   BREWING, CO., Ltd.    .''  Pbone    37.  DUKSTiiaiR STP-TJBT.  ���������BBKaHHatraMnBoaHM  P. O. Drawer   45  1. iTiin 11 im ������miwi TTri-TTii������--n-Tnnri*><nrOTr-n-riT������niTfrii-Min<nwin  ���������, nn n ���������.    niwnm ��������� i   mi   >  =        .������������������ i' - -> -j      ^  ESTABLISHED    (877. INCORPORATED    1898. J  . '     '   - , AUTHORIZED   CAPITAL,   $100,000.   . '    '   '     '    '���������  DEALERS    AND    EXPORTERS  NOTICE.  NOTICE is herehy,given that 30,  thirty,,days after date ,1 intend to  apply'to'>.the Honourable the 'Chief,  Gommis'-ioner of Landsand Works.'  for'permission to leaee-the forshore,-  and rights thereof for :fishing purposes in' C >mox- District,-commencing at a post,planted on7 the -shore  of Vancouver Island  in'Discovery  ���������Passi>ge, and,about,40.forty, chains'  from,the. corner of Pierce's Ranch,-  ,in "a" northerly direction, and marked H- J.-'Hutcherson's S..W. corner-  thence northerly following the'rhore  40, forty,'chains more or'less and  extending seaward, and including  the foreshore and land covered with  water. ,;  Dated this,27th day of -August, 1902.  '.      "  HARRY J- HUTOHERSON  \ ��������� ' i    NOTlbE. ,_ '  NOTICE is .hereby given 'that -3o, ���������  thirty, d.-.vs :\fter>late I intend to'  apply to the Honourable the Chief ^  Commissioner of Lands-.and .Works  for permission ,to1 lease the ioreshpre i  and rights thereof for fishing  purposes iu Comox District, commencing at a post planted on  the. shore  ot Vancouver-Island  in>Di������covery  Passage, and   about  35 fee*, thirty  five   feet,    from,'   the    corner    of  Pierce's      Ranch,     and   ' ma;ked  J: llayner's   S.W.  corner,  , thenceb  northerly following   the  shorn 40,  forty, chains m->re or less and,extending seaward'-and including the  foreshore aud land  covered   with  water.' ''  Dated this   27th  cUy of August," 1902  ,      -    JOHN'RAYNER.     -.  For  Downright .Satisfaction,  1%8/ifpiaeni    aiier   Shipment.  ShtpTiYour   Goods   to   Us.  Ft!II,.   Pt?ces ,' and ..!ri;m e-  dlate   Payment    tv'ery    Time.  fiecs,  Established , 24    Yohrs.r  Wrlie  for Prices.     Make Trie!  Shipment.    Convince Yourself.  sulfas.  ���������?���������������  200-212-FBRST AVEi/W.  ' MISSNEAPOLBS,  BHBNNSSOTA.  ASTHMA GURE PRE  Asthrririlene Brings Instant Relief and permanent  Cure in All Cases.  r>  SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL.  Write Your Name and Address Plainly.  ���������r  There is nothing like  Asthmalene.  It  brings instant relief,   even   in the. worst,  cases.     It cures when all else fai.s.  The Rov. O F. Wells, of Villa Uidge,  IU., say������: "Your trial hottlo of Asthma-  line received iu good condition. 1 caunot  tell you how thankful I feel for the good  derived from it. I was a sIjvh, chained  with putrid aor-' throat and Asthnn fur .ten  years. I despaired of over being cured. I  saw your udvert'sement. for tho cure of this  dreadful and toruieating disease, Aatlinia,  aud thought yqu.had overapoken ypurselvos  hut resolved to ������ive it a trial." To my  astouialimeut, the trial acted like a charm.  Send me a full-sized bottle."  1   %  BE ILIS P.  Geri-.leinen:    I write this testiniosua.1  Rev. Dr. Morris Wechsler,-.  Drs. T.fiT Bkos'. Meuicisb Co:,  ��������� ti-eiitlfaiiien: Yonr A������tii:.\:i,lone is un excellent remedy for "Aathma and Hay Fever,  and ics oo.-nyosit.iuu allevinles all, troubles  which combiuo kvit-h AsthiiKi, Ita success is  astonishing and wonderful.  from a sense of duty,'having tested the wonderful ���������eiy.?.et oi" your Awthmaleue, for the cure of A.-ahaia. My wife.has been afflicted with  'spasmodic asthma -for the pasi- 12 years. Havii-j; .exhausted my own .skill ' aa well as  many others. I chanced to aee your sign upon your wiudowa o������ 130l.li Htrei.t. New York} 1.  at oaee obfcaii ed a bottle ot Asthmalene. My wife commenced taking it about, iiie first <,f  NoV'.mib.-r. I very soon noticed a radical improvement. Aster using one bottle her  Asthma ban di:-aupeared and sho is entirely free from all symptoms. I :eel that I can consistently rue-jmmi-i-d the medicine to all who are afflicted with this distressing disease.  Gentlemen: I was troubled with Asthma for 22 years. I have tried numerous re.mfi-  dicf, bnt thoy hit-'-all failed. I ran across your advertisement and 'started with a trial  bi: tit-, [imiu 1 tilief at tuice. I ha������-������ aincu purchased *-oui CuP-.-uiio bottle, and I am  ever gratefu . I have family of four children, and f<-r six years was unable to xvorb. I am  now in the besb of health and doing business every day.    This testimony you can make use  TRIAL BOTTLE SENT ABSOLUTELY  OF -POSTAL.  FREE ON RECEIPT  SOLD   BY    ALL    DiiUGGI8TS.  WRITE.   FOR     PRICE    CIRCULARS.  ^VCSUHVMKM!  I^^W-jm!TfL������|Wl^MtUfc'.3CTn?^'  ������������������ff  s  ' \  \  - A  ���������Kspiinait I Il&namo. Ej  t),r  -������y'V������..������'  li\  -/ii! v-   ���������'  ^^rsk- ioiv-  1  StearriFhip Poheflule Effective Tuesday, January 21, 1902  s. 3. 'City of Nanaimo..  Leaves Victoria Tuesday. 6 a.m., for Nanaimo,   calling  at  Not th Sarnich,  Cowichan,   Musgraves,   IJurgoyne,  ��������� Maple  Bay, Vesuvius,: Ghemainusy  . Kuper, Thetis and'Gahriola.  Leaves ���������Ncina.mo  Tuesday^  3 ; p:m.,   for.  Union Wharf and Comox direct.  Leaves Cornox and Union Wharf Wed-  'V.' nesday, ,12 noon, for Nanaimo and  ?'    way ports. , .;.'    '���������'���������'.,;  'Leaves'-Nanaimo Thursday, 7 a.m ^ for  '.-"Co/yibx and way ports;  ��������� Leaves Comox Friday,  7.a.m.., for  Nanaimo direct;  Leaves Nanaimo Fridav, 2 p.m., for' Vic-  .'foria/tinllmtf.-at <.'Vabno!nv Fernwood,  *    "Gar-t-ea,��������� Fuifurd and North Saanich.  Leaves   Vicfcria   Sauiniay, ��������� 7  a.m.,  for  l-hind PiM'ts, cailin������: al North Saan-  ' ic!i. Cowichan, Mtts^i-avos, Uur^nyne  Maple   Bay,   Vesuvius,   Chcmainus,  Kupef,  Thetis,   Fernwood, Ganges,  Fulford and Victoria, wheti freight or  passengers offer.  ������������������Special nn-ange-ment.a cah bn made for  stoi-.nier to Crill at other-ports than those  abnvc mentioned when sufficient business"  is 1 ffere'd,    ' -  'I'hc Company reserves the. ri������>ht to  change sailing- da'.es and houta of sailing  without previous no:ice.  Geo. L. Courtney,  Traffic Manager.  Black Eiamnnd Jursery  QUARTER WAY,Wellington Road  HUI0B1BSQB  ���������&  PERRI  20,000 Fruit Trees to choose from.  I^arg-p Assoi tment of Ornamental  Trees, Shrubs and Evergaeens,  Small Fruits   in   Great   Variety.-  Orders   by   mail   promptly   attended to.  K!2'k I������. O   BOX. 190.  KURTZ'S OWN  KURTZ'S PIONEER, or  KURTZ'S SPANISH BLOSSOM  "The Best in  B.C.. and made  by Union Labor in  IMoneev Gtoar 3Factot  Vancouver,   B-O.  <r  -1  TO THE rEAF,  A rich lady cured of her Oeaf-  ness*ancl Noip^b in the Head hy  l)r. Nicholpon's Art if cial Ear  Drums, gave $10,000 10 his Institute, s*o that deaf people nnnble to  procure the Ear Drums may have  them free> Address No, 14517.  The Nicholson Institute, 780  Eighth Avenue, New York, U.S.A. B:  f?  t^  ���������i ^  |\,  ��������� THE  CUMBERLAND   KEWS  Issued Every "Wednesday.  \V. C.'aNDKRBOK,       -      - BDITOJi.  i'ae uoiu'aius oi xnu jNiisws arc 0^,1 to ������il  ' who wish'Do uxpi'ua's uiureiu views o     uiutt-  ra of puolie   laitsreBt.   .'   ' '  Wuile we do uoi hold ourselves re inai-  ble for the utterances ot coi respondent, we  reserve the Tight ot declmiug to insert  o .i.uuuisauioua unueceaauiii-y personal. .  "vVKDiN^SDAY, OO i\ 15,1902.  ma^mmamMim^imt^mmmmmammm������maammmmma^tamammmammmmwmammmmawmmmaammmmmmmmm������  SOLD BY ALL NEWSDEALERS: 10c  , Our fee returned if we fail.    Any one sending sketch and description of  'any invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerning the patentability of same.    "How to obtain apatcnt" sent upon request.    Patents  secured through us advertised for sale at our expense.  Patents taken out through'us receive special,notice, -without charge, in  The Patent Record, an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted  by Manufacturers and Investors.       -     ��������� '.  Send for sample copy FREE-, Address?  VICTOR. ������A EW&NS &  GOmm ,  .--'   ',���������    (Patent Attorneys,) c ���������������  Evans BssUdBisg,     -      WASS-mmTON, D. G*  Espimit" & Sa-Miino llj  TIME TABLE, EFFECTIVE  - NOV. 19th, f89S  -  VICTORIA TO WEJaJLTtiGTON.  No. Sa  Furaiahen Monthly to all Lovera ot Music a  . VJkst volume <f New, Choice, Copyright  . Cou pjsitioua by the moat popular authoru.  32a "Pages     of    Piano     Music'  "��������� ''   5 Sonos,       5 Instrumental,  10 ''Complete   Pieces -for.Piano,  ' with iutereslute! Musical Literature.  -"'- ���������-    '.������*-"       .        .    '   ���������    *". ���������  Once a, mon<!i for:10cv.   '  ������ ���������''  " '"   "''- "Yearly Siibscription,/$,l.oo.  In' one-year you' pet. neaily 400' pages  of  Musiic.'comprii-'.iig'120 complete pieces for'  ' the Piano      It-bou^hc m <vny anisic otoie at  one-hulf off, would coat S30.     If you  will  OHt-n'd us.tho uame aud ad-tress of-Hve p<r  former* 1 mi'..'(he Piano nr Organ, we will  Bead you a sample nopy free. ;    ,  -. J   W. PEFPEE,, ?ubli$- r.-     - '  C.it\h>g B.irid & O ������:���������'*   Millie & In������i.���������Free.  J������iarrnY'&' LocuVt Sts", ' ;  '  ,']'"        ' PuihADisLPniA,'" Pa.  '���������   .'/��������� '-    SUBSCRIPTION  "   ' '���������  For the J. W. 'Pepper Piano'  Music'Mng'/inc, price One "Doll. ������r  P<m ,voa'r'"(pi-st.-iue paid,). ' car; 1><J  nlif'^ed hy nppjyjnt! to.the ofiico of  'Nk-vp. 'ii-'w .iio-hir'l, .B. 0.. wh':n  ��������� ,", ������v(-i-i'lrv - ~   '(T-Von V>p P������->on.  Printing  7���������^y  No. 2 Dnily.  A.M ���������  De   9:00 Victoria:   '    9:28 GoldPtruam   "   10:9  Koen gs. ...  TL"   10:48., Duncans   r.M.  ,r"   12:14        Nanaimo 7:41  A. 32:3   Wellington  At. 7 55  . WELtltl^GTOlsi   TO  VICTORIA.  ...Do. 4:20   ���������'   <L:h&  ... "   5.34  ........6:1  P.M.  \ JAS. A. CARTHEW'S  iLiverv. Stable  ; Teamster   and Draymen  : Single and  .Double" rigs  ��������� fok Hire.    All, Orders  : Promptly   Attended  to.  I Third St., Cumberland,B.C  No. 3 Siitvrday..  A.M.  s  rlii tin  No. 1 Daily.  A.M.    .  ��������� De.8:()5 Wellh^ton.. ���������.....'.. De. 4:25  ''   S:-0 .' Nanaimo    " i:'S-i  '    ������:-'2 Jhuictuis  "   C:05  ' 10:37  Kuemg's  "   6:4(5  "11:18     Goldslreani "   7.3?  Ar. 11:4 5    .        . ..Victoria.:   lAr. S:00 P.M.  Rerluccil  rares lo  p.ncl from  .all riohits  SaLurd 13-3 and Sundays good t6 return Mon  day.  For  rai.es  and   al    information    apply  at  Company's Offices.  A. nUNSMUIR  -    PltlSt-TDKNT.  GRO. L. COURTNEY.   .  Traffic Manager  -OF EVERY CLASS AND  DESCRIPTION  At /LOWEST     R AXES;  . c-  N otice.  Riding on locomotives and   rail  way cars of   the   Union   Oolliery  Company hy any   person   or   per  sons���������except train crew:���������is strictly  prohibited., ' Employees   are 'subject to dismissal for allowing same  By order ���������  ���������     - '"      Francis ,D. Little  ��������� Manager.'  N*-Sg!5?**l  CIRCUr.AUS.,  NOT'iCES"  .   BILL-HEADS    ' ' "  LETTER HEADS '.' -.  ���������    -   . MEMORANDUMS  ;   '      en,velopij:s';'.   .  ' - '.  '' businkss^cards  LABELS & RAt-iS '] _  ��������� '���������'/': . ' ��������� iUM.'S OF FARE  Etc.,-'     ,   Etc., ",  -  ��������� Etc.  The Best and Most Influential  Mining Paper in   the.   World.  Published Weekly, Ss.oo per year.  SPECIMEN   liOPY   FREE.  253 Brba.dwaLy(   - -Now York.  CONCERT PROGRAMMES  BALL PROGRAMMES  -DISPLAY BILLS  ' /  POSTERS  ���������" "     ' CONCE [-IT TICKETS  ."   ,  BALL TICKETS  <MENUS  RECEIPT'FORMS '.     f   ,  ABSTRACT of ACCOUNTS  Etc' l     " Etc.,*'    ..-Ere,  ORDERS   EXECUTED WITHOUT DELAY.  I Have  Taken   Office  in the  Nen,n      Building,  Dunsmuir Avenue,    Cumberla  a."-*  1 and am agent  for the  following  reliable    insurance     companies:  The1 Royal   London   and   Lancashire and Norwich ' Union..  am   prepared to -accept -.risks  a  ��������� ' current   rates.    I am -also agent  ,for the Standerd Life  Insurance  Company 01   Edinburgh and the<  ^-JDcean Accident Company of England. " Please: call   and   investi-  ." gale before insuring in <iny other  ,.   Company.  .- -.' -' :      ,  '    ' - ���������    -       'JAMES ABRAMS.'C/'  Cumberland,,  Hotel -~'  COR. DUNSMUIR AVENUE  '. ,AND     SECOND     STREET.  CUMBERLAND, B. C.      ,  1 ���������>  Mrs. J. H. Piket, Proprietress.  When in Cumberland be  sure  and stay  at  the'' Cumberland  Hotel,  First-Class   Accomodation for transient and permanent boarders. -   '  Sample Rooms and   Public Hall  Run in Connection  with  Hotel  Rates from $1.00 to $2.00 per  day  **1*r> >  mm 'AUiiBiiMiB;  VANCOUVER.1 B.C.1" '  ' Fruit & Ornamental Trees,  TnntTicKN-. Ackks, all. produced   l������y  ,, i 1" io: 1 ii'.e* 11   W'/-itt:  Labor.  ���������' Let;-  tlian Ear-torn Piicrs  Clean Certificate from Inspector.  No   Sap   Jose Scale   or Borers.  GARDEN������& FIELD  Seeds  and   Bulbs  for Fall & Spring Planting.  Death Intimations . I  Funeral   Invitations 3  IVIemoriam   Cards !/  On ,Siiortf,st Notice.  -      THE DEMAND FOR fe .  Stevens Pistols  IS INCREASING RAPIDLY.  . Have been making for 37 years the  TJP UP���������.22 Short E. F $2.50  The DIAMOND, 6-inch blued barrel,  nickel frame, open or globe and peep  sights ������5.00  Same with 10-inch barrel 7.50  TRADE MARKS*  DESIGNS,  COPYRICHTS  &ti,  Anyone sending a sketch and description may  Quickly ascertain, free, whether an invention 19  probably .patentable. Communications strictly  confidential. Oldest a������ency for securing pateata  in America.    We have  a Washington office.  Patents taken through Munn & Co. recelva  ,  B^ecial notice in tho   -        ���������   ^ ^  ������������������  SCiENTIFIG  AMER1GAN,  , beautifully illustrated, largest'circulation of  ^XS^ienuiWc .ipurna'., weekly,termsf3.C0 a ye������:  i-LjOsix months Specimen copies and-ELAND.  t>ooi������ os Patents ncnt free: - -Artdrois^^  MUNN   &   CO.,     "  '���������3Kt a"5:<->.i������',>:->       "'    .---'���������  Fertilizers, Ayricullural Implements, &c.  .   Catalogue   Free.  m. j: henry  3009 Westminster Road  VANCOUVER, B.C  t   n l������ll������BIII IITIW  GREAT  WE  Ottt^WBUCIKSa  ,' "���������'���������"'. ������������������tii'r.'.  LIFM  PI HE   reason  why the Great   West  JL.. .'.Life Assu.rance Co. has more  business in furce than any other. Company ever had at the sarne age, is theii  promptness in Faying Claims, ���������,and the  Libera^ Contract given, free; from al.  annoying, restrictions. -  Any  information  asked   for   will   bt  promptly and cheerfully, given.  A.  ANDERSON,   ,  Genkral Agent.  Drawer, 5. Nanaimo, B.C.  If Will  3F?!fflf  \j  TO   ADVERTISE   IN   THE   U  P  The most Northerly Paper published on the Island.  5  1*  The Diamond Pistol will shoot a C. B.  cap, .22 Short or .22 Long rifle cartridge.  STEVENS RIFLES are also known  the world over. Kango in price from  Si.00 to &75.00.  Send stamp for catalog describing our  complete line .and containing information to shooters.  The J. Stevehs Arms m Tool Co?  B  OOOOOOOOOO-OOOOOOUOO-  o  a  a  o ,  o  O  ���������  o  o  o  o  lvery  P. 0. Bos  aming  O I am, prepared., to O  q furnish Stylish Rigs ������  O and do Teaming at O  q reasonable rates. q  g D. KILPATRICK.     ������  o Cumberland ������  670  CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS.   |    l OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO  Subscription,  $1.50   per an  ������  -OCT  -w-  (?  Ad������ertl������ilns  V^fi  ������  ,������  :K^i  RODS  REPAIRED  Flies of any Pattern Tied to Order.  Dunsmuir Ave.,  Cumberland, B.C  ^-^^  Office  Hours:���������8a.m. till 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 8 to   12.  Fancy Inlaying wood in and metal.  French Polishing.  Apply  NEWS OFFICE, rM <*������^UUIb1 nU L--  FORGOTTEN.  ���������A litlic j-eir or so a so  Shi sparkled everywhere.  Wuft shoulders Ur.re and fa '0 a^lox,  Xiie fsirc-sc of the fnir.i ,  i We read about her every day  As having been at this or that,  At club or tea or bail or play,  Attraction centered where she sat  JL little year cr bo ago i  She swayed a certain set.  Without her functions failed, but, ok, .  How quickly we forget!  Tlie men who flocked around her then  Now flatter other girls, and they '  That read her name with envy when  ���������   She swayed ne'er think of her today.  A preacher said some words, and, lo,  A maiden ceased to be!  The fair one people used to know,  Oh, where, oh, where is she?'  There's one who bends with loving gaze  O'er something small ar.d frail and sweet.  I wonder if she mourns the days   -  When all the world was at her feet? '  ,    ���������Chicago Record-Herald.  ��������� *���������'#���������#���������#���������*  -I-  ���������  ���������  > ->:- ^ vr^ -if o w <p %-:-<> %���������:��������� ^ -*:- <^ *:- <���������*>  *  ���������t  !i:  4>  i MARRIAGE- AT  THE SCAFFOLD  In' the seaport of Calais, which  for''  over 100 years was under the power of  the English, there once lived a bachelor, Josse Dullart, who had come there  to carry on business. He was a native of  , BailleuI-en-Flandre,'well qualified to secure for the London merchants the wool  of .which- .the Flemish weavers make  '. their various materials and, to derive  , an honest profit from each.   Naturally,  because of his commercial subtlety and  because of the pleasant and comfortable life which came to'him in cons'o-  quence, our, man became exposed to the  "jealousies  and   ill  will  of  the  other  tradesmen, English for the most parr.  He did not know it,  since the hypo-  ���������   crites allowed nothing to become evident, but," on the contrary, made every  .endeavor to present an agreeable'exterior to him,, so as not to compromise  in the least the, slight advantages which  accrued.to them through his kindliness.  Nevertheless they decided to ruin him  and to that end contrived a device so  black and  so* wicked  that  Sir  Satan  himself in his demoniacal mind could  not have imagined a better.   In pursuance of the scheme one of them secret-*  ly concealed in the house of Josse'Dullart a leather bag containing a sum of  100 livres sterling in gold crowns. Having clone this,' he1 went to the*criminal  -  magistrate with two comrades as witnesses to accuse his colleague of having robbed him.    _      .      .;  '' At that remote period there had not'  yet appeared under the canopy of heaven any of the impudent sharpers, sluggards and swindlers who in the course  of time have shamelessly said and written that ownership means theft, and  the money earned by some is so much  lost by others, with the sole intern, that  they  may put everything intoeonfu-  .sion and be able easily to slip into their  purses that which is another's.  The world has indeed heard of much  folly and seen many iniquities, but not  that,- and human justice, which had never known of any jesting upon the matter, would hy.ve hung their like high  and In short order, -dealing with them  precisely as she' would with veritable  robbers.  Who was amazed at seeing the policeman of the provostship invade his  ' home, ransack his coffers, and chests,  produce from them a sack of gold of  which he knew nothing and a legal  clerk take down disquieting notes of  . the affair in his illegible scrawl? It  was the ill fated Dullart.  The poor fellow strove with them in  vain, vowing to God bis innocence, but  , words could not prevail against deeds.  !Now, he could not explain how the  sack, the evidence of his crime, had  come into his possession, whence it followed that the innocent man was condemned to the halter as if he had been  guilty.     ; ";"���������''���������'���������    ���������"'.-'  , The affair, however, let loose in an  uproar all the devils of Calais. Think  of it���������a great merchant, with a house  of his.ow,nti.. convicted of common larceny, like a vulgar rascal!  In the end the populace, while it  was not privy to the plot laid by a half  dozen arrant rogues, was nevertheless  not mistrustful. It rather inclined in  favor of the pitiable citizen* of Bailleu-  lo!s. This without taking into consideration the peasants on the outskirts  of tbe town, who were French, not having been expelled from their fireside  by the conquerors, as had been the  poor commoners of the city, and who  hated all the English within their borders.  So it may be said that the throng  which swarmed about the streets and  icrossways on tbe day when Dullart  was to be taken to the gibbet entertained more compassion for him than derision, above all. if you take into account the fact that he was young, good  in every respect and of a prepossessing  appearance.  From the jail to the gallows Josse  walked with bowed head by the side  of a priest, wbo enjoined him to rejoice that newts about to pass into a  better world. B* did not glance at a  single person, so great was the shame  be felt on account of the filthy mischief  of which be was accused.   It was only  When he bad ascended the first_rp"nJ2  of the fatal ladder,' having the cord  about his neck, that below the soldiers  grouped around the base of the gibbet,  he perceived the crowd and recognized  among them a fair young woman for  whom in happier days'he had conceived a tender and violent passion'.  At the sight of her he experienced a  yet more poignant sorrow at leaving so  soon and so painfully an existence  from which he had expected to' derive  such delicate felicities. And then, impelled by a 'sudden reminiscence ,and  by a natural instinct for preservation,  be began to cry out with all his might:  "Loyse, Lovse-, by God the' Fat'ier,  the Son and the Holy Ghost, I adjure -  you! Save my life,' claim me. In mar-,  riage." ' ,  The1 girl stood there trembling with  emotion among-her companions. Hearing herself thus addressed by name by  the prisoner, she became convulsed  with agitation; almost unconsciously,  half moved by pity, half incited by  her neighbors, she approached the gibbet without the police daring to prevent her.  "Oh, Loyse," repeated the prisoner  ardently, "I am innocent. 1. swear it  b3" my eternal salvation!   Demand me  In marriage, and you will have saved  my life!" , '    ,r,  She did not know one word to say,  she had, so lost her senses, but she extended her hand; which- the poor devil  seized  with  avidity.   Seeing this,   the.  people in all direction began to roar:  '���������A marriage;, a marriage! She' has  claimed him! Cut the cord, hangman;  cut it, cut it!'-'        '       , _  The executioner did not cut the rope,  but he-let it drop, undecided as to what  was most expedient for him to' do, and  as the crowd'^continued to bellow and  even-become threatening the officer of-  the provostship, judging it an opportune time for a delay, led the condemned man back into.his cell in order tc  submit bis peculiar case to the law.  And the people dispersed content, believing the man from that moment to  be saved. ��������� ���������  But the stealthy cats did not so easily let go one whom they held in their  claws. They had a man to be Hanged,  a pretty little man, a man over whoso  hanging they licked their lips, and  here' how people pretended that he  was-,taken" out of their grasp! And  why, I ask you? Under the most foolish, of pretexts, in the name of some ri  diculous custom, some illegal pretense'  which granted grace, full, free and immediate, to any condemned man whom  a woman declared, in public to desire  in lawful -wedlock! Who ever had  heard of an eqxial subterfuge?  But, ah,' traditional or written,; the  law is the law. and the.;case in question had to be elucidated! .Unwillingly  rather than willingly they opened an  inquest upon the matter in band .to  learn whether or not so. unreasonable  a usage had ever at any period had  power by law, which inquest finally established that no similar case had been  presented since the time of the conquest in Calais, but that previous to  that date there had been many such  cases, more particularly in Flanders  and in Artois than in Picardy.  In consideration of these indecisive  conclusions the enemies of Dullart urged the magistrates to override the law,  and the magistrates did not demur. It  was the governor who placed an .obstacle before them in view of public  opinion, which had become greatly agitated over a controversy which bad  at stake the life of a man made in the  image of God. Suddenly that dignitary  called to mind the example of prudence  offered of yore lo.tho world by that  worthy magistrate Pontius Pilate in  order that he might avoid thrusting  his own finger between the tree and  its bark. In place of announcing his  fears in public he appealed to his'master, King Edward, the fourth of that  name, to decide the matter according to  his own good pleasure.  The monarch judiciously estimated  that one man more or, less upon the gallows was of small value in 'enhancing  hisglory and bespoke clemency for the  case under consideration. He ordained  then that the old usages should be conformed with and that full pardon be  awarded the condemned man. *. under,  the condition, be it well understood,  that the solicitor of his love hold him  duly to his engagement.  So it came to pass that the good Josse  had the rare and marvelous fortune to  espouse a gentle and well favored maiden after the approved fashion instead  of the cold and grimacing death and  to be indebted to his wife for that  which ordinarily men owe. to their  mothers only���������that is to say. his life. \  A similar occurrence took place a  short time afterward unexpectedly at  the city of Rouen. As a certain thief,  a native of Hautvilliers, was conducted to his fate, a loud old woman stepped out of the crowd below and declared that she desired him in marriage.  The prisoner, astonished, considered a  moment; then, remarking that the  aforesaid person was a homely hag,  shook his head and pursued his way to  the gallows, observing to the executioner:  "The wench, I don't want her!"  And in a moment he was wedded to  the gallows.���������Chicago Tribune.  POOR OLD BOWSER!  HE TRIES TO PROVE A NEW THEORY  IN  THE.GUiSE.OF  A TRAMP.  But, aa ,17x11(1.], lit Experimenting  TVlth It He' MectM With. Complete  Failtzre���������-CoBies Bo-itji With a, Thud.  Leaving; Hi* Theory Unproved.  ' -[Copyright, 190i, by C. B. Lewis.]  S Mr. Bowser reached his gate  the other evening he was accosted by a tramp, and Mrs.  Bowser, who was looking out  of the window, saw that quite a conversation took place and that it ended  in Mr". Bowser handing over a' coin.  , "So, you gave that tramp money," she'  asked as he entered the house.  "I made a small gift to a man who  has been.unfortunate." lie replied.  , "But you  are  always  warning  me  against encouraging this tramp evil,"  she protested. '  "Yes; I have told you that the professional tramp should not be encouraged, but this Is an altogether different case. It yras not laziness or vice,  but pure misfortune, that forced the  man to ask for .assistance. I could only  spare a dollar, but I wish"��������� ^  "You gave him a dollar!" gasped Mrs.  Bowser. -' ,i ��������� \  "I did, and there is no occasion for  -you to lose your breath over it.   That's  one of your troubles, one of the troubles   with   most   women.    Tou   don't  seem to be able to .tell the difference  The   Gimlet   Scr-err.  The gimlet screw, the idea of a little  girl, brought many millions of dollars  to its inventor.  "WOMAN   DO YOU MKiLX TO INSULT ME?"  between a tramp who has-been on tho  road for twenty, years and a good man  who has been brought low by misfortune within six months:.- .After dinner  I wil' discuss the matter further with  you.'\ .       ,   _  Mrs. Bowser hoped he wouldn't, as  it was sure-to'end in a row, and she  brought up such a variety of subjects  at the dinner table' that she thought  she had driven tho tramp question out  of his head. In this she was mistaken,  however. No sooner had they passed  up stairs than he began:  "It is the easiest thing In the world  Mrs. Bowser, for one who understands  physiognomy or has studied the inflection of the human voice to defect the  false from the true."  > "I never knew that you had studied  physiognomy," she somewhat tartly  replied.  "Perhaps  not.    There  are  a  great  many things you don't know.   You are  probably not aware that I can tell by a  man's inflections when he is lying to  me."  "Then how do so many deceive you?"  "Who has deceived me?" lie shouted  as his self complacent smile suddenly  vanished.   ."That's your way exactly.  When you find you can't hold up an  argument, you begin to pitch into me  personally.    I have never been deceiv- j  ed. never.,and you know it.   This man  tcuight, for Instance, was telling me  the solemn truth, and I'll bet a dollar  to cents on it!"  "What did he say?" asked Mrs. Bowser as the cat came up from the dining  room and looked from one to the other  with a mild grin on her face.  "Never mind what he said. I am  glad I did not turn him away. You  would probably have ordered him off  in o hurry and thus added cruelty to  misfortune. You would have done it  because you can't tell the true ring  from the false. Why don't you pay  some attention to physiognomy?"  "I do. . I had been noticing the man,  and my idea was that he was a loafer  and a liar."  "Then you are an Idiot!" ' ,' .  "He had just asked the cook for a  bite to eat, and the inflection, of his  voice betrayed him as a deceiver."  "By thunder, woman, you would aggravate a saint!" growled Mr. Bowser  as he scared the cat under the lounge  and then began pacing to and fro. "It's  a mighty good thing for the unfortunate that alt peoplo are not like you.  You are as stony hearted as old Shy-  lock himself. I presume you would  turn me from your door if 1 came in  disguise  and  asked  for  a  crust  of  "I shouldn't like your looks,"' frankly  admitted Mrs. Bowser.  "Thank you."  "Nor your inflections of voice'. T^uly,  I should say that you were a liar!''  "You would! You would! Woman,  do you mean to insult rue?" .    .  "And I thiuk nicest other folks would;  Bay the same." ;-;:V  "Oh. you do, eh?   Well, now, let mlfc  tell you  something.    First,  I'll never*  forgive you for this'deadly .insult; second,  I'll prove to 'you within twenty  minutes that vou don't iknow* :as much  about human nature as that cat doe's  about playing the piano.- Woman, I'm  going to bring vou off that '��������� pedestal  with a thump!". '     - '    '  "Didn't yo"u ask me to tell you honestly what I thought?" she queried.  "Never you mind that.' L'll prove that  you are the only'human, being in this  town without a heart. I'm going to  put on a suit of old ,clothes and walk  around the block and ask three or four  people for charity. You'll see whether  my face aud voice rgive me'away as a'  Maraud deceiver."   ,     '   .  "I wouldn't do such a fooling thing,"'  she protested.   "Perhaps I spoke a little"���������  "Yes, you* spoke a little!" he Interrupted. "You spoke enough to say that  everybody would take me,for a liar:  and, we are going to see about it. Don't  trouble yourself to get up. ��������� Just sit  right where you are and believe that  everybodjr else In tho whole'world but  you is a, fraud. I have said that the  hearts of thousands are open to a tale  of real misfortune, and now for  .proofs!"     ,-  ���������   Mrs. Bowser didn't believe he would  put the matter to a'tesst, but ten minutes later ,he-eauie down stairs in an'  old outfit and  passed outdoors.    Tho  rear1'view,   she   caught   of   him .was  trampisli;enough  for.,any tramp.    -Ho  was pacing slowly around the block to'  get his nerve up when he met a benevolent looking old man witlra cane who  was on his way to prayer meeting and  stopped him' to pour out his.tale of woe.  He hadn't uttered a dozen words when  the cane was raised aloft and the old  benevolent shouted:  , "Yon ��������� go on, you rascal, or I'll call  the police!' I believe you aro the man  who stole our wheelbarrow yesterday."  v Mr.   Bowser  went on.  ' His theory  "about physiognomy and inflections had  received a shock, but he was not discouraged.' He stopped half way around  the block and rang the, basement bell  of a-house.   The cook answered it after  a minute, and bo took pains that she  should see  his  face'full  in the light  and that his inflections were all right  as he said he hadn't had anything to  eat for two days.- (  '"You old fraud! I'll yell for master  if you don't skip lively!" exclaimed the  cook as he hoped for.cold victuals.  '"But, my dear woman, can!t you see  that I ain no tramp?" he sweetly que;  ried. "Can't'you tell the difference"���������^  "No, nor I don't want to!" she shouted. "If you come hcre''and yank this  bell again, you'll want wings to get  away!" '  JTliat wras shock number two. but Mr.  Bowser went six doors up. the street  and called another cook to the door and,  said:  "I am an unfortunate man and not n  tramp, and may'I kindly ask"���������  " "Yoa can kindly take yourself off,"  she interrupted.'     .  "But I amjhuhgry and have no place  to lodge."     ������������������- .���������'."- \ ,  . "Then go to some charity. I don't  like your looks or your voice.- ' Be off  with you!"     '" '���������'.']  Mr. Bowser had found three cold and  cruel hearts, hearts like Mrs. Bowser's,  but he determined to try again. He  rang a front doorbell this time, and it  was the owner of the house who ap- ;  neared in answer and exclaimed:  "What! You cheeky old fraud, are  you back again?"  "I am an unfortunate man," replied  Mr. Bowser.  "I'll bet you are, but I'll get you' a  job in'jail if you don't dust out of this!  Away with you!"  "But, my dear sir, can't you tell the  dif"���������  He couldn't. He took Mr. Bowser  by the collar and ran him down the  steps and out of the gate, nnd he called  him a fraud, a liar and a jailbird. Five  minutes later Mrs. Bowser heard the  front door softly open, and 8he looked  up to see Mr. Bowser squeeze himself  Into the hall and sneak softly up stairs.  She waited a whole- hour for him to  come down, but he did not appear.  Then she turned out tbe lights and  went un to find him in bed and fast  asleep. .   * M. Quad.  CULINARY CONCEITS.  Hickory nut meats are nice for the-  top of sugar cookies.  A slice of bread boiled ,in pea soup  will prevent the peas froni sinking to  the bottom.  When making bread in cold'weather,  first warm the bread pan, the tlour and -  the kneading board.  When black spots appear on dorjgh-,  nuts, drop a slice of raw potato'into'  the fat and leave it while the next relay is frying and repeat. ������������������  The dry, every grain separate effect  so desirable in boiled rice is obtained  by pouring water over. it. through a  colander after boiiing and then drying  it'in theroven with the door open.  When boiling old potatoes, which  are apt to go a very dark,color., put it  tab'lespoonful of milk, into the water  in which they'are boiled, and you' will  find, they will be beautifully', white-  when cooked. ',;'  When cooking cabbage, use a large  pan,1 so as to have plenty oi' water,  and add a small piece of soda and' a  tablespoonI'ul of salt.' When the vegetable boils up. take the lid off the pan'  and keep the contents boiiing iit a gallop.'   ,,  .,,.'. ��������� ;; ,; ���������������������������;-���������'  -'I- li e-' Canal:  ..Thine.    '  ��������� ."Wasn't that ,  an    odd , thing  for  the   minister to say just  as   we. were  ^le'aving,?"   asked the Chicago  bridegroom,,to,  his* bride. ,' .- ,  '. "I don't think .  I noticed--what  he   said,"   implied the bride.  "Whatwas.it?"  ;'   "He   invited  us   to  come  again."  ���������  "Oh! that was  just ordinary  politeness.,: He  always does my  marrying." ���������  Detroit, Fre,������'  Press.  Paitiiiiijj;'<iie; Flatne;  He���������Do you think your love for me  will  last as long as this engagement  ring?  gue_I don't know, but if you notic(  it dying out you can present me witl  another.���������Life. :  "Well, well, -what Is  !t?"  ���������'Sorry to wake you-  up, ma'am, but .'I'm  stoppin' in your barn  tonight an' want to  leave a call fer 8  o'clock." ��������� New, York'  Journal.  , Sour   Slxteea.  t "Piggy - WU-;  liams-'says you  used to.be ea:  gaged to him."  , "But, Jim, it  was only��������� a silly boy and* girl '  affair."���������Life.'  Loolcinfir   Out  For   Psim.  A sweet little maid of four years was  distressed the other evening because  her father did not come home to dinner  on time. Her grownup sister said to  her: ������������������    -  "Papa is naughty, and when he  comes we won't give him any tea."  , When ho did come, the sister sent the  teapot out to the kitchen for fresh tea.  The baby looked on with a troubled  face and stole softly to her own room.  Shortly she returned with something  squeezed up in her tiny fist Going up  to her sister, she whispered: .���������  "Annie, I'll give you all my pennie*  If you'll give papa his tea."  And, opening her hand, she displayed  all   her  carefully   hoarded   pennies.  I3iiiv������-������'������al Al ant.  Barnes���������I wonder why it is that  everybody laughs at the cynical jokes  that are made on the stage about  love.  Howes���������I suspect it is because  everybody has been fooled by the  little god of love���������or wants to be.  Supermenaltlvc Children.  There are children bom into the  world in these days of nervous and industrial - strain and strife so highly  strung,'so intensely sensitive, that thoy  shrink from a sharp word as spine  natures would-not recoil from the sting  of a.whip. A curt reprimand will bring  the tears welling to the eyes of such'a  child and a sob to its throat' A sensitive 'plant will die under rough treatment,'that may be given a hardier  plant with perfect impunity. Children1  are very like flowers. Some of them  require more light, more warmth, more  care; more- consideration, more direct  manifestation of affection, than others  do. Denied these, they .never attain  their fullest possible development,, but  are often hopelessly dwarfed.���������Rochester Herald.   Baked  Bananas.  Baked bananas are nutritious food  and can be eaten by those "with whom  "the raw fruit disagrees. They .are  specially nice for breakfast. ��������� To; prepare clip the ends, slit the skins from  end to end. but do not remove, and  bake fifteen or tweuty minutes. To  serve remove the skins and sprinkle  with a little sugar.-   How to Cnre For PearlH.  An: old fashioned receipt to; prevent  - pearls from losing their; brilliancy is to  put them away in a box- with a piece  of ash root Wise men���������in their own  estimation���������will probably laugh at this  advice, but it is just as well to let them  laugh and not have one's beautiful  jewel become dull and dead. \Vhythe  root of the ash tree should .have this  marvelous effect is hard to determine, ���������  but it is a fact and one which is worth  taking advantage of.���������New York Herald.   Broil Bacon Xn the Oven.  Try broiling bacon In tb.e_-ov.enr Kome  time and sigh that you have not done  it sooner. The oven must be very hot  and the bacon shut in a folding broiler  and over a roasting pan. Turn to brown  lightly on each side as you would in  turning over coals, and it will-Come out  perfectly cooked, without grease and  just the proper degree of crispness.  Little Conveniences.  Every housekeeper should provide  herself with little conveniences for doing her work. A short handled, broad  paint brush is handy tp wash tbe outside of window sills and an old toothbrush for washing around the glaisa.  To Stop n.  Gcin Leals.  If you find gas escaping, you can  stop it till a plumber can be sent for  by filling the hole with soap mixed  with whitening. This will also do in  case of water leakage in a pipe.        j  X. ii}  \t<  |y ���������  ^  THE CUMBERLAND NEWS.  CUMBERLAND, B. C.  In Texas and Louisiana there are  now moro'than 100 canals and pumping stations, each capable of flooding  1,000 acres of rice. These aro owned  by irrigation companies', which supply the water as 'needed to the rice  farmers. ' fi  I bought a horse with a supposedly incurable ' ringbone '. for $30.00,  cured him ' with SI.00 worth of  MINARD'S LINIMENT, and-, sold  him in four months ,for ������85.00. Profit'on Liniment,   554.00.   '  MOISE ' DEROSCE,  ..  Hotel Keeper.  St. Phillip's Que'., Nov. 1st,  1901.  MAKKET REVIEW. I A POSITIVE MAN.  After a girl reaches the age  Iier     birthday     anniversaries  years apart.,  of   25  occur  "Mother - Graves' Worm, Exterminator  has. Lhe liu-pest sale ot'any similar preparation sold in Canada. v It always g-ives  satisfaction' by restoring health to the  little folks.  A  pretty  admit   tlie  'one. '   , ,[���������   '  girl  is  always  'intelligence  of  willing  '���������a  to  homely  ' The  best- brand  shrink  a, little if  quires:  of resolutions  the     occasion  will  re  's STILL ANOTHER TRIUMPH ��������� "Mr.  ' Tlmn/.T: ,.S.   Bullen.   Sunderland,   wrP.es :  "For fourteen vears I was- afllicted with  ��������� Piles, and frequently was unable to walk  - or sit. but four years ajro I was, cured  ..by usinp Dr. Thomas'^ Eclectric Oil. I  .���������'have also been  subject to  Quincy for over  forty     years,   but  Eclectric ,Oil   cured   it,  and it was- a permanent cure in both  icases,   as   neither   Piles   nor   Quincy <have  troubled mc since."  GRAIN AND PRODUCE.  WHEAT���������The wheat markets during the past week have continued to  decline daily, with scarcely the least  sign of reaction. Crop'weather everywhere has been favorable, and the  volume of trade extremely light. The  consequence is that in, the American  speculative markets there has only  been one way to the course of prices  and  that has  been downward.  If anything should happen to depreciate the present fine prospect for  the spring wheat crop a sharp" advance i in prices would readily take  place. At the stage which the spring  wheat has arrived, it would scarcely  be possible under the most favorable  conditions to improve the prospects  further, so that any change in weather conditions would probably be for  the worse, and. much may happen between now and the' time when the  crop will all be safely ' gathered.  The demand from Europe for wheat  has been very quiet for- sonic time,  but in the last few .days a good deal  of export business is reported from  the seaboard. Broomhall reports bad  harvest weather this week in the United  Kingdom,   and  HE SEEMS ABLE TO PROVE THE  TRUTH OF WHAT HE SAYS.  Mr. Chalker Makes Some-Very  Statements���������Exulains     That  Strong  is  of  He  Prepared   to    Prove    the Truth  Every' Assertion He Makes.  ASK  FOR  vie s  Deaf and dumb  ably happy.  brides are unspcak-  ���������dog  Most  or  women  a  are  afraid  of  a'loose  tight' man.  A DINNER riLLr���������Many net-sons suffer  'excruciating- pains ^ifter partaking erf a  hearty din.ner. Tho food partaken of is  like *n . ball of lead upon the stomach,  and instead of being; a healthy, nutriment', it becomes a poison to the'system.  Dr.' Tarnielee's Vegetable Pills are wonderful correctives of such troubles. They  correct acidity, orjen .secretions and con-  -vert the food" partaken of into healthy  nutriment. They a ret iust the ' medicine  to take if troubled with Indigestion or  Dyspepsia. ' \  It is-easy for a,millionaire philosopher to' tell.a young man how to  live on- $6,a week and put money in  the savings  bank.  and  the  follows:  per sack  About one in every 28 earthquakes  recorded in the world is felt in the  British Isles.  ' linarf s Liniment Cures Burns, Etc.  The hig'pest casting ever ordered  made, at Chester, Fc'nn. It was for  the' propeller shaft of a steamship,  and weighed over (50 tons!  Free and ,easy expectoration immediately relieves and frees Lhe throat and luiurs  from'viscis nhleiriii, and a medicine,that  nromotes this is the best medicine to use  for coiifirhs. colds, inflammation of the  lunsrs and all affections of the throat audi  chest. This is precisely what, Rickle's  Anti-Consumptive Syrup is a specific for.  and wherever" used it has m'ven unbounded, satisfaction. Children like it because  it is pleasant, adults like it because it,  relieves  and cures the disease.  Chicago's municipal debt has grown  from' 3{, to 5������ millions in the past  fire  years.  JINGLES AND JESTS.  The   "Auto"   Slie's   a   Lady.  Don't harass the nerves of your motor;  If you do. you are likely to learn  "Why it is a she. unexpected.  For. though only an -into, sh.3'11 burn  To'have ber rovsnjje. and her actions  "Will in.liiL-u juii tj earnestly yearn  (Wit;i oaths that are pure mediaeval)  To have died ere you caused hor to turn!  A'v'oldiiiMr Trouble.-  ; "YVhnt are yon doing?" ,asked the  justice :is the lawyer begun.       -  "Going to present our side of the  case."   '  "I-don't want'to hear both sides argued. It has a tendency to confuse the  court."  Mr.  bile:  .Mrs.  Mr.  Swift.  Fijjit���������Here  comes  an . automo-  Fijjit���������Horrors!  i-'ljj.'t���������Oh.   don't  It's live miles ahead oi'  Where?  be frightened.  us now.  Vacation.  The man who gats a week's vacation  Is feeling', blue  And thinking of their glad condition  Who rest through two.  He thinks who gets two weeks' va.cation,  "Kow g-lacl I'd be  If I could have some fir.e position  ;  Where I'd get"thr������e." '    -  Cinnamon ns an Antiseptic.  No living germ of disease can resist  the antiseptic power of essence of cinnamon for more than a few hours. In  destroying microbes it is not less effective than corrosive sublimate. Even  the scent kills them. A decoction of  cinnamon should be drunk in localities where typhoid fever or cholera  prevails.  this with small  stocks of old wheat everywhere, and  low prices,on this side for future delivery easily leads to demand, which  again may, lead to a reaction, in ,the  price  of futures. '  At Liverpool on, Friday the price  foe.No. 1 northern spring wheat was  6s'l������d;  J i  The market for , Manitoba wheat  continues firm, but the' amount of  business is small. Spot wheat is  scarce." There are only0,three'shippers  in the market,-but they readily'take  all the wheat-they can get for immediate delivery, in store, 0Fort William. Prices have eased off a little  under .the effect of .thco decline- in the  American markets, and at the-clofe  last week prices were :'' No. 1 hard,  75������c; 1 northern, 73/;c; 2 northern,  71hc "in store Fort William, spot ur  delivery first half August. ^  ,.  FLOUR���������Demand is light  market is unchanged' as  Ogilvie's Hungarian. $2.05  of 98 lbs. ; Glenora Patent, Si.90;  Alberta, - jSl.75;" Manitoba, - $1.60;  XXXX, $1.25.  -" MILLFEED ��������� Bran is firm and  worth $15 per ton- in bulk. Shorts  firm' at $17 ..per ton in bulk, delivered, subject to usual trade discounts.  GROUND FEED���������We quote : ��������� Oat  chop, per ton, $28: barley chop, $24;  mixed barley and oats,'- $20; chop  screenings, $15.50; oil cake, $30.,  OATS���������The market is weak and  lower, owing to near approach oi  harvest. No. 2 white oats are offering, at 40 and 40{,c, in store, Fort  William Feed grades are worth 37  to 38c, per bushel  at Winnipeg.  BARLEY���������All offerings are now being taken for feed at 40c per bushel.  The movement is very light.  SPELTZ���������Dealers are doing a little business in speltz for feeding purposes at 50c per bushel of'Soros.  HAY���������Demand is fair and the market steady at $7 to $8 per ton for  carlots" on track here for fresh baled.  ROLLED" OATS���������Milling companies report their prices unchanged as  follows : 80rb. sacks, $2.20 ; 401b.  sacks are worth $2.25; 20s, $2.30;  and 8s, $2.60 with cover. Twotb!  packages, $3.60 without case. Granulated and standard oatmeal is unchanged at $2.75 per $8th. sack.  POULTRY���������Spring chickens; -10 to  4 5c per pair, alive; fowl, 70 to 75c;  ducks and geese, 9c per pound; turkeys,  lie,  live weight.  BUTTER ��������� Creamery���������The demand  for creamery butter is not so strong  as to justify the advance in prices  which some creamery managers hoped  for in August. The make is now at  high water mark and shipments i eg-  ular at steady prices. We quote ltih  to 17c per pound i'.o.b. at factory  points.  i'LT-'R���������Dairy���������Receipts an- t .oci  large, and the mar<et  .s--.v.<:v Considerable qunn',";i)-s a;v  paying lMc .-per., pound for choicest  dairy in tubs or boxes, and from  that figure the market ranges down  to 10c per pound for low grades, all  commission   basis.  CHEESE���������The market is steady  and purchases have been made at  8������c per pound. The range of prices  is from 81c to 9c per pound delivered here.  EC;0S���������Fresh case eggs arc worth  12-ic per dozen delivered in Winnipeg.  DRESSED MEATS���������The market for  beef "is easy, and the price  from 7 to 72c; veal, 8 to 9c  ton is steady at Sic. Sprin  are selling at 12������c per pound  7-J- to 8c per pound.  HIDES���������No. 1 city hides, G$c; Xo.  2. 5f; No. 3, 4������c. Kips and calf  the same price as hides; deakfns, 25  to 40c; slunks, 10 to 15c; horsehidos,  50c to $1.  WOOL���������Prices range from 6 to 6������c  per pound. ���������  I-Iousey's' Rapids, Ont., Aug. 11.���������  (Special).���������Mr. George C.j Cha.lk.ev, a  .woil known resident of this place,  has authorized the publication of a  letter containing,some very startling  statements.  Those who know,3Jr. Chalkor will  not ask any proof of the truth of  any statement he makes, but to convince those who do not know him,  he has' announced that he is prepared to substantiate in every detail,  the truth ol his published 'statement,  which is as follows :���������  "It is with pleasure that I certify  to the merits of, Dodd's Kidney Pills.  "I was laid up with Kidney trouble  and was so bad that I could not do-  a day's work. My back was very  sore, 1 had- heavy, aching- arms, dull  bloated eyes. <T was very weak and  much reduced in weight.  ," "After I had used six boxes of  Dodd's Kidney Pills 1 wu^ ten pounds  heavier. 1 often wo'nc.. ed about the  powerful virtue of thio ''medicine. I  do not know anything'about what  Dodd's Kidney Piils are said to cure,  but 1 know a great deal about what  they will .actually do for lame back  and Kidney Trouble, and I can prove  it. -  "They arc-worth their weight in  gold to any one suffering as 1 suffered. The six boxes of Dodd's Kidney  Pills cured mef completely and there  has been no return of the old trouble.  That is over tnree years ago, and I  still''enjoy good Health."  This is, indeed, a' very strong testimonial for Dodd's Kidney Pills and  one which will have very great weight  with all -who have the pleasure of  Mr. iChalker's acquaintance or friendship. , -  Dodd's Kidney Pills have made  many friends and are to-day, without doubt, the most popular'family-  medicine.  Delicious  flavor.    Free from hulls.      Warranted Pure.  Put  up   in   all  sized packages.  Ilvie's Hungarian  As  now manufactured.  Insist  on getting "OGILVIE'S,"  HAVE    NO  The great FAMILY FLOUR,  as they are 'better than the Best.  t^/  SfLwJcit, Arts &ru *tnx>rxL  o/imu  4#������.  4uM7^y 4STU*t6  "TRY   oure  E  Parlor  The E.B. Eddy Co. ^=$A-  ,,-    -Limited;   '      ^f\  Hull,      ~ Canada.    ���������  Matches  The latest and Finest  Brand yet made.  , <<  The United'' States received from  Germany during the nineteenth century 5,079,362 immigrants. -  The     newest    schooner, is  long-  and   has   ' seven< masts,  being'built in Boston.  480   feet  She jis  Mrs. Celeste Coon, Syracuse, N. Y .  writes : "For years T " could not eat  many kinds of food without producing* a  burning-, excruciating pain in my stomach. I took Parmelee's Pills according  to directions on the box under the-head  of 'Dyspepsia or Indigestion.' One box  entirely cui-erl me. I can now eat anything I choose, without distressing nie  in the least." These Tills do not cause  pain oi- griping, and should be used  when a cathartic is required.  A new railway is to be built from  Southern to Western Australia. It  will   cost   ������4,400.000.  The number of  ies from 12.293  iigures  are from  five nests.  ants in a nest var-  to 93,694. These  a recent    count    of  >*".'. ,;. ���������������������������"������������������ '"       -   ���������     ���������  "mm is riot mom in this  ^iffll. space to say much  MtwiII speakfmitself.  HALCYON HOT SPRINGS  SANITARIUM  Lake,    B. O.  The British Plouses of Parliament  were the most expensive of modern  buildings They cost 3* millions to  construct.  j i.  era'c'y  i'.-  Tn washing woollens and  Lever's dry Soap (a nowder)  found   very   satisfactory-!  Tt   is   estimated   that   only  six  of     the     population     of  leave   thr;   city  for more  than  at a time in the summer.  flannels,  will    be  IS  one' in  London  a  day  In 1898 an Australian stockman,  kangaroo-hunting, picked up an opal.  Since then Australia has exports-]  $420,000   worth  of opals.  Situated midst scenery unrivalled  for grandeur.  The most complete health resort on  the continent  of, North America.  Its- baths ' cure all Nervous and  Muscular  diseases.  Its Waters heal all Kidney, Liver  and   Stomach   Ailments.  They are a never-failing remedy for  ali  Rheumatic  Troubles.  IMPERIAL R3APLE SYRUP  The quality standard from   Ocean   to  Ocean.   Your money back If not   sat-  .   isfaotory. -  ROSE & LAFIAMME. Ag*8., JIONTEEAt.  Indianapolis now holds the iccoid  in rapid hog-killing; 3,298 hogs were  recently turned into pork sausages,  etc.,   within five hours. '    ���������'���������  'Wages  raiige  very   low  "Kami    laborers     get     SI  Women  who   work in vineyards  15 cents for ten hours'  work.   '  in    Spain.  >0   a  week.  get  vcr.  O&LY $5.00  The McCrosasn  Rocker.  Ifc Fares tli������ w!(e. It saves  the time. Ic saves the  clothes. Writ- for par i'.-u-  lars. 3). Ii. Easmbrook,  313 Princess St., "Winnipeg;, IHan.  E  overseers  only get 55 cents  a day  ranpros  IVTut-  lambs  Hogs,  MAED'S LIMENT Cures MM  Out oi 156,000 houses or flats in  Glasgow. 36,000 have one room only,  and 70,000   onlv two  rooms.  Horses, giraffes, and ostriches have  the largest eyes of land animals;  cuttle-fish of sea creatures.  Books, flowers and fruit are nearly  always welcomed by an invalid as  much for the sake of the kindly  thought as for the gifts themselves.  "Ah There, Girls!"  Do you  know    why you  are    like  LUC3NA   Cigars ?    Tell   us  quick.  Because you are always  the  same,  .sweet aud good.  MANUKACTDRKO   BT  GEO. F. BRYAN & CO WINNIPEG  W. N. U. No. 390.  Milk of human kindness is  of a poor quality and little  can.  usually  in     the  MAED'S LINIMENT lor Sale EverfwHsre.  Sir Wolfe Barry estimates the loss  caused by. the'congestion of the London streets at ������2,154,000 a year.  The  a boil  best place for a  man  to  have  is in the tea kettle.  Tt is only necessary to read the testimonials to 5>e convinced that Holloway's  Corn Cure is unequalled for the removal  of (.'orns. warts, etc. It is a complete  extinguisher.  LIVE STOCK.  CATTLE���������The export movement-'is  becoming larger and quite a few cattle have been handled this week.  Their condition is good. Choice export steers from ehe western ranges  are worth 4-ic per pound off cars at  Winnipeg; butchers' cattle, 3J to 4c.  Stockers are not moving to any extent.  Common soaps destroy the  clothes and render the  hands   liable   to   eczema.  REDUCES  ESPKW5S  Ajfit. tor the Octagon Bar an  If you start out in the  with a smile on your face  be surpi ised at the number  ant people you meet.  morning  you will  of pleas-  Many a man makes a fool of himself because he hasn't the moral courage to  do  otherwise.  The voters' lists for Paris as revised show the total number of electors in the capital to be 605,270, as  compared with 550,691 last year, an  increase  of  54,438.  Tho father of M. Santos Burn ont  has an estate on which 9.000 laborers cultivate forty million cottce  plants.  A reduction of 41,000 of the total  number of cattle in Great Britain is  not. on the total herd of nearly 7,-  000.000, of much statistical import-  rmce, but. it gives the first check to  the progress year by year since 1394. ->.**^*. v*..,. ,-u,*. tJAs ^, ^ t^tr��������� *HM.^A] ,^ . j,  ���������  ISSUED    EVERY    WEDNESDAY.  ^-abscriptio-n $1 50 a year, in advance  1221. 36. Bnoerson, iSoitor.  ~ tSS" Advertisers who want their ad  ehanfrert, should' get copy in by  9 a.m.- day before issue.  The Editor will not be responsible for the  views, Hontiments, or any errors of composition of letter correspondents.  Job "Work Strictly 0. 0. D.  Transient Ads Gash in Advance.  It ie said thai the .recent letter on  "Modern Ministers and their duties"  . has     given ��������� umbrage'   to    people.  < If we read the contribution, we will  eee that there is no'special reference,  to any one, so that 'if the cap fits, it  must go to show that some.are cog- ���������  nizant, of the fact that things are  not as they quite should be in their  church.  i.In  regard to, cprreppon-.  . dence, if people are to,be denied the  .right   of   expressing, their   views  ;  through "its columns, of what value  is it?     . _       '  The news letter in ��������� the "Herald"  of the 4th'inst., rates our City  ���������Council for, letting one of' their  buildings for public entertainments  ' While we'personally think it would  be better to _ let private en'terprize  have- the benefit of -all dances, and-  * entertainments,- &c., a ball such  as thaVthe. Council have completed,  is necessary for:meetings' of Various"  , kinds,* andis really a benefit 'to the  public.1:" We'trust that- there will  not be a-clashing of interests as .is.  insinuated.   ..  Now-that Hon Jus Dunsmuir, has  , purchased the coa'l' interests of this,  place ouuight," it'is assumed that  there may be certain changes made  in due time, in working plans. That,  these changes will be always for the  better, it is certain' to all who know  M-r Dunsmuir, his executive' abilities, and his dominant desire to im-  " prove Vancouver Island generally.  THE CROFTERS.  In a letter to the Colonist dated  Tiree, Scotland, Sept. 15th, Mr  Oosnell, the Premier's private secretary, says that ho has been officially accredited for the purpose of  inquiring into the crofter question,  and hopes soon to tell a good deal  about it. He says the inhabitants  of Tiree "are of a most exemplary  character���������honest, industrious, intelligent, hospital, polite, quiet and  .deeply religious." The chief industry is a distillery, which produces  the celebrated ''Tober-mory whisky"  which must he set down'as a divine  elixir, as no doubt it is rcsponisble  for all the good qualities of the inhabitants. But with all their good  qualities, it is questionable whether  the crofters of Tiree would better  their condition by emigrating to  B.C. The Japs and Chinese aro  here, and will look after the fishing  industry, in the working departments of which they have now almost a complete monopoly, and  which they well know how to hold.  So long asthe Yellow men are allowed to come into the Province in  unlimited numbers, it would be  cruel to invite white meu to come  here to enter into competition with  t]ym. There is no doubt but that  Proojier Dunsmuir, with his cueto-  ' Dear Mrs B~���������, in reply to your inquiry as to which is the best tea to use, I  would say that in my opinion it rests between lhe Blue Ribbon 'nnd Monsoon  Packet Teas. If you like rich, strong tea, then Blue Ribbon is undoubtedly the  best, but should"your taste be for a delicate and very flavory tea I would advise  'you'to call on C. J. Moorb for a packet of Monsoon. Personally, I drink Blue  Ribbon in lhe morning and Monsoon at 5 o'clock, but then, you know, I am a  perfect crank about'tea.  Yours truly, , ,  SARAH GRUNDY.     '  mary perspicacity, will follow in  the foot&tept* of the Australian Pre.-'  mier, and force the Dominion Government to si and by any legislation  1 which - lhe . Provincial Legislature  may enact to prevent British Columbia from being over-run by  hordes of the lowest chss of Asiatics  THE NAlvTAII&O AIiBSTjeUffX  RAILWAY. '; .   / <   j *  It is reported that the survey  party have located a route from Nanaimo to the West Coast which is  devoid of engineering difficulties?.  Don't fail to attend' the free  dance in the Cumber hind Hall tomorrow" night. ' A first-class evening's'enjoyment.       ,. '  ...Harvest Thanksgiving service in  Presbyterian Church Surid'ay-'evening.* ���������      /   .      / *.\: ' -   * ,   ������������������':  ...    NOTICE.  ,      ^Cumberland City, .   - .    ���������  -      '- "   "~'\ ,October 8th,  1902.  TT AVING- SOLD OUT my Butcher Bust-  ,       f ness to Mr Donald McKay, ,Mr Jas.  McOee will pay and collect all acoounta.  JAS, WOODLAND.  15^10-02 46 "   .'  ZSTOTIOIE.     .  -Cumberland, B.C.,  Oct. 6th, 1902.  'TCVall whom it may concern this  is to certify that the partnership formerly existing between  Donald McKay and Wesley Hodgson, in the butcher business carried  on in thw City of Cumberland, B C.  has this day been dissolved by mutual consent.  The business will still be carried  on under the name of Donald Mc-'  Kay,.who will assume all liabilities  against the late firm of McKay &  HodgKon.  All c accounts due the-late firm  must be paid to Donald McKay.  Signed,   W. Hodgson.  D. McKay.  Witness���������F. A. Anley.  15-10-02 3t .;  MUNICIPALITY  OF  THE  CITY OF CUMBSKIiAND.  b  V\ rBERBAS, it ia deemed necessary   to  amend and consolidate tho By-Law  relating vo Scavenger ltattw.  Be it- therofi-.ro ouar.r.od hy the Municipal  Council or the Coi portion ot the City of  Cumberland, that SoctionlQ bo ameudud to  read as, follow:-.: ���������  ''Licensed Night Scavenger ahall receive  -from each  Private House tho sum of -  ���������    "  50o. (titty cent*) per mouth.  <     From   each Boarding   House  with  accommodation    from o three   to    five  boarders ������1 ,(one dollar) per month ;  from five to ten boarders  ������1.50 (one  dollar and nfty"cen*u) per month.  From each Boarding Rjusc, Hotel, etc.,  with accommodation for more  thau  10,   ������2 (two dollars) yer month.  Bead the lirsc time 8th September. 1902.  Head tho second time :^3rd September, 1902  Read the third time 7th October., 1902.  Re-considered and finally passed 7th  October, ,1902. ,        *   .  WM. WES'LEY \V1LLARD,  Mayor.  Lawrence W. Inun-ss,.,,  '^Ciiy Olei-k.  STORE  New' Lines of-��������� '*  Rubber Garden Hose, Rakes,  Hoes, Axes, Hose Reels,  Spades, Shovels, Tarred and  Building, Paper,    ,&c,     &c.  'ffiivib 1 - -M ������^ ������'WWG&  " i  Besmuir Avenue,  atsucnntJ&jaar+vsm^wagmaacatoir*  Cumberland, B.C.  ��������� i>  . ii  "Advertise in tlie lews.  EXAMINATIONS* FOR -CERTIFICATES  .'    OF COMPETENCY.  Re "Coal Mines Regulation Act."  "VTOTICE is hereby given thntan Exam-  inatiou or Certificates'of Competency  as Managers of Mines will be hold on the  15fch day of October, -1902, at the Court  House, Nanaimo, B.C., and also at Fernie,  B.C., ou the eame date.  Candidates, not under 23 years of age.  desirous of presenting themselves for examination must deliver to Mr Thos. Morgan,  Chairman ef Board of Examiners,'Nanaimo,  on or before the 5fch day of October, 1902,  notice of such intention, in writing, to-  pethcr with a certificate of service from  their former or present employers, testifying to afc least two years' experience underground.  Tho examination will be in writing, and  will include tho following subjects, viz:���������  1,. Mining Acts and Rules.  .    2. Mine ga'-os.  3. General Work.  4. Ventilation. -   .  5. Mining machinery.   ���������  (5. Surveying and levelling.  Any further partioulara required may be  obtainod on application to Mr Morgan,  Chairman of Board of Examiners, Nanaimo,  EDWD. G-AWLER PRIOR,  Minister of Mines.  Department of Minen, ���������  Victoria, B.C., 4th Sept., 1902.  17 9-02 4t  me some  H\   ������  Ow������  Take a  Dry  Sponge  and  pour  on   if a  bucket   of water  It will  swell  every time  sure.   JUT we are not selling spoages, our line ia   SWELL     BUGGSES   :  ������ A, H. PEACEY, Druggist & Stationer.  tin K ' - -   C*  A  NEW, LOT OF   W^   ' -    ������������������       ' I' ', .i  ROC FTESTER& CANADIAN CAM ERAS '  ,, PPIOTOGRAPHERS'  SUPPLIES, '    ' '  PLATES;    'PAPER,     MOUNTS,    Etc'      '  ^  I.  .���������5.  A  ���������   NEW" FANCY liEATHKR, GOODS.   ���������  ,  PURSES,   CARD CASES,   TOILET SETS.  ' <1  I  Try a Bottle of   itST  '���������PltAGllANT-OLS) STCGLXBK y      "  LAVEITOES,   WATER.  STORE OPEN Sundays Irom g a.m. to 10 a.m  c    and li*oin(5 p.m. to 6 p.m. ' ,  =-^^^1^^  In tho matter  of JosKi'U Butciihr  and  Giovanni 'Ciiiaka,   deceis<;d intestate,  and in thu matter of the " OQicial Ad-  minijtrator's Act,"  1SJOT1CE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an  ordor 'was   inado   by   his   Honor   E.  Harrison, County Court Judge,  on September  25f.h,   authorizing the 'undersignsd to  administer   tho    personal    estates    of    the  lato Joseph Butcher, and Giovanni Chiara.  Therefore,- all persons having claims against  the  said  estates   are iequeatied to   aoiid in  particulars of the same within 30 days from  date hereof, and all parties indebted thereto  are requested to  pay euch  indebtedness to  the undersigned forthwith.  ���������    HENRY P. OOLUS,  Official Administrator.  October 8, 1002. 2t.'  UBBM -  STAIFS.  Seals, Stencila, Price Markers,  Printing    Wheels, Numbering  Machines, Band Dating, and  Numbering Stamps, Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Print-  in    Presses,       &c ,      &c,      &o.  FranMia   Stamp   forks,  VANCOUVER,   B.C.  13-8-02 .  RAMS.  SHROPSHIRE  RAMS.  of all kinds. We havo jugt received a Car Load of Open f.nd Top Buggies  with Steel and Rubber Tirea. Expresses of all kinds with Platform, Half-  Plafcform, Duplex uad Elliptic or Hog-no?o Springs. , Buckboards, Carts,  Sulkies, etc., ail of the most Up-to-Date Patterns and Finish. Guaranteed  for one ye;u* by the Makers and ourselves.  .  ..     ..     ..     ,....'   A Good Earn is half th.0 Flock,  so Improve your Sheep   -IT    -:-,   PA'TS-  I have Pure Bred, and 7-8 bred  RAMS FOR SALE, and1 prices  right. _     '  Place your orders now as possibly  I will be. out of the business next  season.  I have also Pure Bred Black  Minorca Cockerels for Sale at  $2.oo  each.  . GEO. HEATHERBELL,  Hornby Island.  13-8-02  umiiuij rtiijiaj.g*  TiT A IV  y y%- rj  J1.8A1IU  'i 19 'no  O   L-������    Oil  ki J. & A Si     U ii Mi hi 1A U ^     n d in 11J  STANLEY   CRAIG,    Prop,  FOR SALE, Cheap, a Good Bicycle  ���������in first-class condition.���������Apply,  "News" Office,  i  FOB .S^HilECr   .  MAPLEHURST   FARM,  HORNBY     ISLAND,  (comox district;,  Con taming���������  230   Acres.  f���������    200 Acres, Fenced.  Abbui 400 healthy Bearing Fruit Trees.  70 Acres cleared"up good, and in crops  -and hay land.  62  Acres cleared  up  rough,   but  good  pasture.  85   Acres bush���������easy cleared.  13  Acres chopped and burned over.  The whole of the 230 acres is excellent  land and will grow any kind of grain and  root crops. I������ suitable for beef, dairy or  sheep.  15,000 Cedar Rails in boundary and  field fences'.  Large 7-roomed house���������water in.house^f*  2 Story Bank Bain, 32 by 75 feet.   Sheep  Barn, Hen Houses,,etc.       -.\\  Buildings 5 years old. Abundance of  good water. Nearly 1 mile frontage on  Lambert Channel. \% miles from Government Wharf.  Good Markets���������Cumberland (Union  Mines), Nanaimo and Victoria.  Good  shooting ��������� Deer,   grouse   and  ducks plentiful.  .Price,;............ $6000  1-3 cash,  balance,   6 per cent.  Also, 246 Acres adjoining���������good land, at  $8 per acre. '   ...  Also, several  Good Grade Jersey Cows,  Heifers   to   calve, and Yearling   and  Heifer Calves.  Apply GEO. HEATHERBELL,  Hornby Island.  14-5-02  VIOLIN   TUITION.  PROF C.H.   SCHAFPNER. con|  SERVATORY   GRADUATE,       has   de  cided to  locate permanently irj  Cumberland is prepared  to giv-  lessons to  a  limited  number o.'j  pupils on the Piano, Violin ami  voice  culture. WHITNE-il  BLOCK.  flXKuoortssaczzaREaawv  ���������aamesna  "ENGINEERS, Firemen, Machinists an  jil Electricians send f^r 40-page Pamphl'  containing Questions asked by Examina  Board of Engineers' to obtain 'Engines |  License.���������Address, Geo. A. Zklmr, "Pti  lisher, 18 S. 4th St., St. Louis, Mo., U.S.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xcumberland.1-0176690/manifest

Comment

Related Items