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The Cumberland News Jun 4, 1902

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 '*,  NINTH   YEAR.  CUMBERLAND,', B; 0:   WEDNESDAY,  JUNE 4,  [902.  m  THE BIG STORE.  Gentlemen-  ;  BfPREPARmiQP;tlie:IARM:flATfll!.R  OUR'STOCK OF SUMMER UNDERWEAR.���������  /'.,���������* _" \        ��������� - \     '  .     *'���������  Belts, Bicycle.H6se,. Negligee Shirts,  and Fancy Ties is, complete.  COUNCIL   MEETING  i 1  /  Light  Weight   Summer    Underwear  from $1.00 per SuitYup.  *>0>  \'/5d&������t^ *~  w  w.  k'  $:  I  11  W  *N  IA  1 /*  ���������* '1  For Sale at ���������  SIM0N LEI SER'S BIG STO RE  :    . .v.   ��������� ��������� -, .. 1 *.   .    ; - ���������  &*'"'**Sg������*3S%'^^  Kicholles & Renouf, Ld.  "*     v     V   *       -    ���������-    ' - *���������-,��������� <*���������...*,      .    Y -'      *���������-.'**���������     :~,.     '.,  61 YATES STREET,: VICTORIA,-EJ1.C.   -Y7 ,  t   ,.    * -.     . - ���������.*���������*���������   - <** ���������*   * *     *       *   4 ��������� ��������� - *.j       - * .,   '*    ' * *    j -  x   -HARDVV'lR-E, MILL *iNp>i'CNING''M^C&INERY^  h. AND;FAR'MING., kNL)^ DAIRYING   IMPLEMENTS-^  '-". of all ktNbs. - ^;";:/ ��������� >'"'v.i Y( /��������� Y '  :-"-Ageu ts.f or- Mc'Ootrhick^HarTjBstingiMacHiriery'.-'. / _,."*;  (m " WHte for/prices and particulars. "'PYO'*-Drawer.563.  '*'$'*S3"3?������---fe-igg's������^  ,  YrfBABY  CARRIAGES���������  \V',th Parasol,.'Hood.or Canopy Tops,  and :  Rubber Tire.Wheels.! $14 to $35  Y    \   ���������GO-CARTS���������  That are adjustable to any position, complete with Parasol Top, Cushious and Rubber Tire Wheel* $11.40 to $25  I - .:    '  Our Assortment of Patterns was never as  large ao this seasons-  -Our Makes the Bebt.  / i r        :  .Write for Illustrations and give us an idea as to style wanted.  WEILER   BROS.,        Home   Furnishers,  VICTORIA,   Be.  'THE'  HICKS aOVICK PIAN8 CO.  .A.C-KE'S'T'TS   "'POR-  WRITE  FOR  PRICES  **  , I.  ''MASON %;RISCH'' ,PIANOS.  'OHIGKERING" PIANOS, \  '.-'���������'    ���������-'"  .    ... .-ANT)  THE. .-.���������.���������   .'*  v       VOCATION    ORGAN.  EASY  TERMS  GIVEN  123 HASTINGS ST.  "Vancouver, B.C.  88  GOVERNMENT  Victoria, B.C.  ST.  Reports���������Prom VT. EY Banks re  work and collections ;' from Board  "of Works that'moving of school  contract was finished'; from T.  Edwards asking Council to take,  'certain planks off his"hands, being  lumber used' for 'moving school;  . also,that he had placed several new  sills * under some of the walls and  asking compensation for ' same.  Laid over. '   0  New business���������Moved Aid. Reid,  seconded  Aid.  Calnan,   that con-  stable   be   instructed    to   proceed  against all .stores kept open  after  hours specified in"by-law,  ,   Aid.  Partridge���������The Magistrate  has already interpreted the by-law,  JHe has told thV Italian' merchants  that they need not close their doors,  but >that if  they .hung a' curtain ,  over prohibited goods after .hours  it would be sufficient;   The by-law -  should be* repealed-as it was con   .  stantly   being   violated,   and   the'  transgressors were hot fined for it as  my firm had beeni^ "  '1 Mayor Willard* read the section  relating to repeal,''which provides  that .no-repeal be enacted unless by  petition signed  by more than ^half  of .the etoiekeepers^affected. r  ..-Ald.v Partridge-1-This is a protection -for^ the'* Italian  storekeepers.  They  are' allowed  to., keep open,  while we of, British birth must close.  I move that the bv-law be repealed  Aid. Calnan'���������The motion is out  of order.   PJ arti <in favor of the fine'  being raised 'ffYm $25, to $150, and  ,the law rigidtye4iifor<ied. (Ap-jlau&e)  '?. Aid. Reid's^rn'oti'oti -carried.  ,.-v;Ald. Partridge .'here called attend  ;tion. to-the fact that theYSunflay,  l**   ' * i **��������� '   \        ���������**'  observance' by-law.was being-broken  nevery Sunday"-ip. the -year^   *"������"  j.  ' Mayor Willard���������Thin , by-law1 is  there, and a coristabl^jto.enforce it.  AldYBate mentioned tha'jb certain  * **[ "*    T - h  street.work passed by the Council  has been set'rsid'e -and later work  proceeded with/ Trie sidewalk on  Maryport Avenue was not yet begun, yet Dunsmuir Avenue was being mended-'and a sidewalk laid  though decided on later. .  . Aid. Reid thought that Maryport  Avenue had done without a sidewalk for years, the weather was  dry, and the residents were not put"  to any "hardships, while Dunsmuir  Avenue was too narrow where being repaired;' for the whole traffic of  the town.  Mayor Willard mentioned that  Fernie relief meeting had resolved  that the Council be asked to undertake the appointment of collectors.  Moved Aid. Mitchell, seconded  Aid. Reid, that the Mayor and Aid.  Bate be appointed.    Carried.  Mayor Willard then spoke of a  deputation having waited  on   him  with,regard to a recreation ground  for the cify, and that he had interviewed Mr Clinton on  this   matter  who had promised Lp bring it before  tbe  Company's  officers,   and   had  suggested   that  a  certain piece  of  land be examined.,  ���������    Moved Aid. Bate, seconded .Aid.  Calnan,   that Mayor  and  Council  examine the tract referred to.  Moved Aid. Reid, seconded Aid.  Bate,   that* tenders,   for   finishing  buildings be received on extended  time to the 16th inst.    Carried.      </  Accounts, presented���������T. Edwards  ��������� I LOCALS.    '     "   |  Mrs Wain presented Alex, with a*  toy baby last-Wednesday morning,  _ An excursion frorn^ Nanaimo to  this place is on' the tapis for 26th  inst. " ' '  Mrs Wm. Ashman became the  mothei of a handsome baby girl  last Wednesday. Y  A nice little bov came to Mr F.  'Dalby's' house last week. The  town is'rapidly filling up !  ��������� An addition to the family of Mr  J. ^Watson arrived on Saturday  last, in the person of a young son.*  -All  who-attend   the concert on  June.23, will have'the pleasure of  ��������� ' * > *        *  - listening .to another of-Professor  Schaffner,s  cornet. solos.       Mr J,  "Hutchinson  and   Mr   F.\ Ramsay  have also,"kindly consented to sing.  ' The lucky winner of Mr Harford's  sewing machine,;last Saturday, was  MrsFraser. t ��������� The number guessed  being 2666.. .Mr Geo. Clinton veri-  fied the count-of peas in the bottle,  which .number* was .2666,' -Mrs  ' Fraserf thus ' guessing the, exact  number. '-:-���������'The/ next nearest,'guess;  was -2668.'  /'   :v *\       s" . ' ���������-" '  Mrs J. Bennie and her child had  a miraculous escape while driving*  down the Roy road last week. " As  they cro&sed.the track -No .5 engine  and a train bf-coal cars came along  and caughtYthe rear of the' rig,  throwiijg the occupants out,' forriu-  nateJy they escaped with a few  scratches; -     > -       l  r Mr J.. B.   Bennett,: tHe   public'  ,-schdol principal, has "Secured "the  -train Jor next Saturday, ior,,an ,ex-  _> cursion .down .the'line. -    The cheap  ,rate", -35cr,' arid * 10c.  for' children/  will ho doubt be taken advantage  of'by many. -   The proceeds'will be  applied to purchasing books fo^r the  school library, .       ,  The footbalFmatclrlast Saturday  between a team from H'M.SJf Phaeton, and the Cumberland's, resulted  in.a score of 4 to 2 in favour of the  ���������home team. While some of the  visitors played a, good game, and  the team on the whole was fair, the  Bpeed of. the coal digger-boys was  too much for the jolly tars. As  usual, "oor wee Tammy" kept his  , end up, kicking 3 goals. He was  poorly supported-on the outside.  A concert and dance will be given  at Cumberland Hall on June 23rd,  in aid of  the widows   and orphans  of the Fernie disaster.   Some of our  best amateurs have kindly consented-to assist and we have no doubt  but that an enjoyable evening will  be \ spent.     Admission   to  concert  50c,    reeervid   seats    25c.   ext.ra.  Dance after the concert 50c.      We  understand that the Union Minstiel  Club  intend   giving an  exhibition  shortly for the same purpose.  Both  entertainments should  be liberally  patronized.  MEN'S  i t  Summer  Y * '  Suits....  FINEST LINE EVER  SHOWN   IN   TOWN.  f'it. .Y. \. .....  GUARANTEED  ., '*      ~   A .  t  '      "   ���������AT���������   . ',--  1 ' f  MODRE & CO  /v  LOST between-Vendome Hotel and Butcher  Shop; on 1st inst., ������ Lady'��������� BRACELET,"  made up of, 22 Spanish J real*.���������Finder  ,   on returning same'; to V.News "office wil  ���������a be rewarded.  /-  h  FOUND, ;bn   .Cbmox^:Nanii^ao .wagon '���������������������������  road/a Doubte-Barrelled Breech-load^'  ing Shot'Gun.*    Owner can have same*    -  bv  proving   property and paying  for  .thisadvertisernent���������Marshall Laird -#   ,.  "Union':lihy;'Ma,y.6tb, 1902.^    > i' *>.*   'v-  BIBTH.  Dalby���������In this city on Saturday,v  May 31st; the wife of MrF, Dalby  of a son.  Letter to the Editor.  *tt&-z"- 'tjs'pqb:  J G);B    PRINTING  Work of Every Description  at Moderate Rates.  I  ���������Contract,' $310 ; extra sill?; $6 ;  lumber' on hand, $5.0 70o. :  Mbvt'd Aid. Bute, seconded Aid.  Partridge, that Board of Works examine lumber and ,purchase if  found suitable.    Carried., .  Moved Aid. Bate, seconded Aid.  Reid, that building be taken off  contractor's hands.    Carried.  Account from A*. H. Peacey for  drugs and stationery,. &c."$'45. Referred to Finance Committee.  PERSONAL  l*i-?&������������ggg&������&Be&  Mr E. Barrett is indisposed from  an attack of sciatica.  School Inspector Netherby is pay-  Cumberland an official visit.       ,.  *Dr''Grice' returned'to Nanaimo  after a very successful business visit  to Cumberland.  Judge Harrison visited Cumber-  land on Wednesday, returning to  Victoria by Friday morning's  steamer.  Mr Commerford's child reported  by the "Herald" to* have died  from diphtheria, is almost well, and  outvof danger.  Mr Editor, Dear Sir,���������In a late issue  of your paper I find a letter re the social  given by the "Riverview", Lodge, L:T.B.  No.'166.    The writer of .which   did  fair  justice in the latter-part having given the  Association credit-where credit wasdue.  But, Sir, I am compelled  to remark  his  manner  of   judging   as   to   who   were  church-going people, and who were not,  he  seems  to have had  not the  faintest  idea.     Knowing,  as 1 do,  theie are few  rural districts that have come  under my  notice where people have more devotional habits than the one   in   question.      If  "Maple   Leaf"   had   the pleasure of acquaintance with the members of "River-  view Lodge.', he .would very soon be convinced it would be contrary to the nature  of his- early training to^nake assertions  that they were not a church-going society  Perhaps eur friend wrote the first part of  his letter that evening before retiring,   if  so, an   excuse might be in  order, otherwise  it  might  be imagined  he has  acquaintances   who ware, too mucn   enamoured by the contents of interesting reading matter, and who are always  in  their  places and pews on Sunday.    It would be  only proper to say the good people m the  country   surrounding   Courtenay  are  in  full  sympathy with  the motives  of the  L.T.B. Association.     Before closing this  I can assure "Maple Leaf I have made  no attempt to throw a shadow across his  path or  feel any way inclined  to tamper  .with his feelings, and hope at some  time  in the  near future to find he has  again  enjoyed the pleasures oi a social in connection with "Riverview" Lodge, L.T.B.  ���������I am, yours truly, D.D.G.M. ������   ���������  I**-" ,  A Tale of the Cattle Thieves of Agu������  Calientc.  '-Copyright,   1D0O  by "WY LcC.   Beard  As "we luul planned, the foreman sent  five   men   in   different  directions with  orders to search for" traces ot the missing herd, to let us know at once if  any  vwere found, and   to report by midnight  "in any case.    Delighted at the prospect  <o������  action, the   men trooped ont of   my  'tent     .Some of them spread their blan-  ' *-kets ont to dry.   Others offered needless  -help to the.men who were preparing to  -set out.    The rest, Spicier among them,  lounged   about   the   cook   wagon   ancl  "joshed" the Ballet  Girl, to use   their  own phrase, because he could not start  ���������his'fire.   For some minutes the {foreman  '    stood   in the dqpr of   my tent  nabbing  liis chin  thoughtfully.    Then be called  -to Spider.     ,  "Look ��������� here,   you' kid,"   said   he,  "You heard what we said 'bout eendin  ���������down the river ter get more men.  Well,  I want you ter saddle up u fresh pony an'  'be ready ter start in five minutes.   Bear 'I  The   boss,' here, he'll write   a note   fer  ,   -you ter take.    Get a wiggle on, now.''  / ,v*The  laugh   that /Spider  brought with  him   faded   from   his'fac*.    This   was  business, and without a word he nodded  ,;.and strode away, v  ,   .  "I reckon he's about-the bes' one ter  -sen'." continued  the foreman, turning  to me.'   "He'll  do, what he sets out ter  do "every time.*   Then   it  ain't   likely,  therms ,any danger down   that way, an  'lyou can't-tell what'll turn up here.   It'll  ���������-keep the kidouter mischief fer awhile.'  While.the   foreman was   speaking 1  -���������had torn a leaf out of* an account book -  'and had written  the note.    Suddenly 1  *became aware' .that   the  laughter' and  ���������-"talk of the men had hushed.    A second  dater  Spider,   his   face  workingr with  ���������irage,- dashed into the tent," caught up a  Tifle'and vanished.  "Stop 1" roared  the  foreman, lifting  the  flap   that   closed   the   tent   door  '"Through   the .opening I could  see that  'Spider  had  dropped   on . one knee and  'was taking  careful 'aim at something  Jihat was out of rny view"  ���������"What you,dpinV Come here I"-cbm-  >xnanded the foreman sternly.   Lowering  ���������-the rifle. Spider rose slowly to his feet,  "keeping his eyes   fixed  on-the point toward which he had been aiming    Run-,  taing to  the  door. I followed   his gaze  'with my eyes.'".*-- .    .    *  t,   On a ridge of sand, half a mile,away.  ������ three "men were galloping up and down,  waving ��������� their/ hat?  and  fifing pistols.  They were shouting,"too,- for0 the faint  ���������echoes of their shouts reached us.  "Look  there!" cried  Spider     "See  them   men V   Hollis   is one of   'em. an  that greaser what shot at me las' night.  "They'vegivin-us the laugh, that's what  ���������they're doin.  'cause we los'   our cattle  , un they got 'em."'Are you fellers"���������  "Come here! Hear me?" commanded  'the foreman again.   "Look here, young  man," he continued as Spider came re1  Juctantly forward.- "It ain.'t good buyi-  "ness lettin youi'"mad get up so bad you  lose  yer   head,   not   for   no   one what  'works roun   horses an cattle.    You had  -orders too.    Nobody jvhat won't  obey  orders works in my gang'.  Ther wasn't  no shootin called for.. Besides," he add-  -ed as an afterthought, "you'd; a-knowed  *^f  you'd had any sense that  you could  '    Spider  his  i'aco  ifelL  "That's right. I los' my head clean.  il know I did. "* I won't do it again an,  --say, I'm awful sorry. " he said penitently. Carefully lowering the hammer, he  placed the rifle, apparently as a sort of  token of surrender, in the foreman's  hands Then, without another look at  the men who were still capering about  fon the ridge, he w.ent away to saddle a  -���������horse.  "The boy's got the bea" ey'es of anybody in the  outfit, all   right  enough."  ������������������said   the   foreuiau.   setting   dowu   the  -.-rifle.    "1 alwus knowed that, but yet 1  ������������������don't believe he c'n tell who those men  ��������� are. not so far away aa that."  ���������  It   certainly seemed  impossible that  ���������Spider could  distinguish   any one at so  great a distance.. I ran into the tent to  ,  -get a pair  of  fieldgiasses. but when   I  /returned the men had disappeared.  "Jus' give one yell an then Walloped  off  behin'. tho  ridge thar as  you went  /..in," said tlie foreman.    "They was lef  behin' by the res' er ther gang  so's ter  ���������watch  us* I reckon, an  see what we're  ���������a-gonter do. "  "Well, they won't watch .nptfiin,'  '������������������ commented Lee. who had strolled up to  ���������ii* "They're' drank an they'll get  -'drunker; 'specially if Hollis is there.  Hfii'0 ' ben sober so long now that he  ���������������������������wcrVt stop soon once he gets started."  "Meekness an sobriety an the rest of  V2t 'K-Ha't   his   style   enough   ter hurt."  ���������:agre*;l tho foreman. - "But maybe Hollis wasn't there. .Look a here, you.kid.'  ibe called as Spider rode up on the biggest and, nest to his own, the   ugliest  horse I fead: brought from the ranch.    I  ���������forgot te? -&11  yen   before that   you're  'likely ter  c&sas  up   agains' a   heap  er  "trouble   oss   e?  these times if   you go  -shootin at saea *^bat   yon don't know,  'specially ^hora   they're so fur off  you  ���������can't hit 'eua.    It ain't perlite."  So earneat was Spider that he failed  for the moment to see that the foreman  ���������was joking.  "I did know 'em���������two of 'em���������Hol-  ���������������iot hit nothin at that  range.'  .glanced at   the foreman, and  lis  an   that   there  greaser." he cried.  "I saw 'em t   'Deed I did.  Honest."  "So?" replied the foreman, with assumed gravity. "Well, if that's the  case, jus" you climb down offen that  ther horse an go an get yer supper 'fore  you start." t  "Don't need ter. Got some grub here  in my cerones (saddlebags) The Bally-  Girl give- it to me, jus' now. Mayn't I  go'?". The foreman waved his hand and  smiled. With an answering grin Spider  galloped away.  In view of ths distance that must be  traveled we hardly expected to see  Spider again before daylight. Making  allowance for delays, we heped to get  away on the following evening. To me  the wait of 24 hours seemed a fatal  waste of time. ��������� The cattle would probably be well into Mexico before that.  "Prawb'ly they will." agreed tho  foreman. "Then all wo got ter do is ter  get 'em outer Mexico again, that's  all." This was delightfully simple in  theory. The practice, I Reared, would  be somewhat difficult. It was obviously  impossible for us to move, as we were  then situated. Until our re-enforcement  should come we could do nothing but  -wait-  Much sooner than'was expected, however, these re-enfercements came. The  , men were just finishing their supper. In  order to guard against apossible though  nnlikely-attempt at surprise, one_ of,  their number, posted in a position from  which he could watch both the mesa"  and the river flat,,was acting as senti-.  'nel.   Suddenly he hailed the camp.  "Ther's a gang er men an horses com-,  in up the river," he cried. In an'in-  stant, every man waa on his feet, had  caught up his rifle and was running to  the edge of the cliff, sheltering himself  behind the rocks that fringed it. Some  of the men were ordered to fall back in'  order to,guard us against surprise from*  the rear. They went, and then for a moment there was silence en the top of the  cliftY A buzz of .conversation from the  men below could be plainly heard.   ,  "Them fellers ain't greasers, anyhow," whispered the foreman.  "How do you know?"*I asked.     - .  "Why,,greasers talks high up in their  heads, like women, er kids.   These men  talks low in  ther  chests, like us.    Listen. "       ��������� ' '    ���������.  ..  * "Hello the  camp!" hailed   someone  ;,from below.     ,  "I-Iello below Who*are you?',' roared  the foreman in return.  "From the X bar X ranch. Ther'a  more of us comin How d'yer^get up  that, anyhow?"     "*  "Waiter minute." called th"e foreman While the conversation was going on Lee had laid down his rifle and  had been hurriedly gathering the resinous branches cf the greasewood, shrub  that grew about us thickly, and binding them together with a rawhide  thong Lighting the bundle at the fire,^  he ran back and threw it over the edge  of the cliff ** Fanned by the draft made  by its fall, the resinous wood blazed  like a firework of some kind. The horses  of the party below-shied and capered as  the glare struck their eyes, and there  was some swearing among their riders.  The light showed half a score of lean,  6unburned men, heavily armed and well  mounted Their leader, an elderly man  on a silver trimmed saddle, was at once  recognized as an old acquaintance by  the foreman ���������  "Glad t' see yer, Hay ward," called  he. "Turn t' yer left, thar, an you'll  find a trail what'll bring yer safe up.  Sorry ter sen that flare down, but we  had ter be sure you was friends. Come  up. " Filing over the rough path that  zigzagged up tbe "cliff, the ranchers  reached the tableland.  "Mighty glad you all's come���������didn't  expec' you so soon," said the foreman,  shaking hands with Hayward. "How'd  yer leave.the cattle down your way.?"  . "There aren't any cattle down our  way���������not so much as a calf left,'' was  the response. "This raid is the biggest  thing I ever knew. It has wiped ont  every brand on tbe river anywhere  ���������ilnns here The boys are all up We'rp  the first, br.t the reft are coming, all  that can Sevan of onr men will never  Htir again. "  "Gone out?" asked the foreman.  "Yes; shot by the thieves. I met that  boy you sent after us about half an  hour ago. He didn't know what to  make of us any'more than you did. and  on(3.of the boys' who rode out to see who  be was nearly got shot for his pains.  Wo made him understand after awhile  that we weren't rustler.-*, *md then he  gave, us your message. "  "Why didn't he come back with  yon "?" 1 asked.  "Don't know. 1 told, him he might  as well, for we were all up and coming,  but he asked us to tell you that he'd  return shortly, and then he struck over  the desert, going south. I don't know  where he was bound for."  Spider's absence troubled me a good  deal, but the foreman and the Ballet  Girl took it very calmly indeed. There  wasn't any one who could hurt him,  said they, except possibly the three men  that we had seen that morning, and it  was not at all likely that he  meet them.  < WALKED 223,840 MILES.0. ,  Edward' Pearce, of Woodchurch*  Eng-., has 'just retired from the postal service. During the 37 years he  held the office of rural postman he  walk'ed 223,S40 miles, or nine times  round the world. His daily walk for  over 20 years averaged' 17 miles,  and he.never missed a day's delivery  of letters for 37 years. ,  -with' the Strand, London, is to.- lie  commemorated by' placing a beautiful stained ' glass window " in St.  Clement Dane's chapel.  ���������\<  Mrs. Kendall was once playing in  Dublin, tlie role being Galatea. Pygmalion has that hot /unusual accessory, a jealous wife. During the temporary/ absence*of, the wife Galatea  was about to throw, .herself into the  in the audience called out,' warning-  ly: ''Don't do it darlint ! His'wife's  just- gone'out, an' it will be like her  to'be stoppin', at the key-hole'!!'  ���������suorsuad joj suoiq/nondd-e oxed  -a.rd Usui jo S3.01   Qovod jo euij^   uj  Di*.    Johnson's  -.long     association ', arms of Pygmalion iwhen an old lady   already knows. ��������� ���������  An'agreeable'man is one who- consents to,; being taught things that he  LIVER  DISORDERS  HeadacSzeSp Biliousness aassl ������oasstfljpaiiora Aire Thoroughly Cured by Dr. Cliase'-n  , ' *   \��������� ' <���������.    v ,���������  Thero is no single organ in. the human body -which exerts such a wide1 influence over "the' other organs    as  does the liver.   It has been well named the regulator of the system.    Once the liver grojvs sluggish and fails to '���������  filter the bile poisons from the system, there conies pain, disease and death.'    'The head aches, ' the tongue is  coated,   the bowels' become constipated, tho digestive system is thrown out of order, and foul impurities that  . should bo removed from the body, are thrown back into the blood stream..to   find their  way , to   the   weak '  . spots of the human frame. ' - , ���������'/,"��������� Y  , .  * , Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills have a direct action on the liver, ancl bringl-prompt relief and lasting benefit.' "Nearly everybody is familiar with the extraordinary virtues of this f amoxis/'trealment. Hero is\a'sample of the letters received from cured ones :��������� ,   Y ,    . ' / , .-.'    ' ''. J,' -. ,* ���������.  Mr. "John Skclton,  the well-known bridge builder" of .101 Sherwood street*,   Ottawa,  states:    '���������������'.'  "I have used Dr��������� Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills for kidney and  liver derangements,0 .brought on by, exposure.  ��������� ancl find them better than-any pill or medicine I have ever,used., '"    x-' Y   * .       "' ._     '*"        ' ,  "They cleaned rny system and an?vdo'nic feci health;* and vigorous and   better    in -every  vi'a-y',  commend them as the best liver and   kidney medicine that I know of."        ' ���������  Mr. James Baird, postmaster, Consccon, Ont., slates : ���������'   ��������� ,t '  "It giA-es mo and my wife much pleasure ,to recommend .Dr.   Chase's  Kidney-Liver Pills as a  cinc��������� of superior value. ' Wc use them  in preference to all'other pills in  on* family,  and ���������'! -might  that they cured ine whilo suffering from biliousness, ancl also curort my .wife  of    sick ��������� headache,  she suffered severely." ���������_ ���������"'-,'���������''.,  -Dr.  Chase's Kidney-Liver, Pills,  onc,.pill a dose, 2D* cents a,box, at all   dealers,    or    Edmanson,  Company, Toronto.    " , ,������ '  can    re-  family, medi-  here,   state,  from    which  Bate.1?,    &  NOT THAT KIND OF A RANCH.  A good story has come up from the  Pinchcr Crock district: Two travellers were driving through that section and met with an accident to  their buggy. "While one stayed -with  the rig, the other went to a nearby  farm ' house for tools cto ,make the  necessary repairs. Asking tlie farmer, who%chanced to be a Swede, if  he ,had a monkey wrench the astonished ' traveller received the following reply: "No: Ay got a cattle  ranch;     ma brother  lie who has not- forgiven an enemy  has not yet tasted one of the most  sublime enjoyments ��������� of life.���������Lava-  ter.'"    ���������    . Y   *  The**e never was, and never will. bev a  universal panacea, in one remedy, for all ills  to which flesh is heir���������the very nature of  many curatives ? being such that were tho  germs* of other and differently seated dis-  eaises rooted in the system of the patient���������  what would relieve one ill in turn would aggravate the other. We have, however, in  Quinine Wine, when obtainable in a sound,  unadulterated state, a remedy for many and  -    _ grievous iLa.   By its gradual end -judicious  Olo haf a horse I use the frailest systems are led into conva-  Mariy a girl's "distant manner may,  be  traced  tp  the*-fact  that  she 'had  onions for dinner'. " ,,        . *>    ���������  ranch;' Nels Nelson haf a hog ranch  ba de crick, ofer dere, and a Jankee  faller haf a sheep ranch bout five  mile down da, road; but. Ay bet 3rou  no faller d��������� fool 'enough "to start a  monkey ranch in  dese country."        ���������  Many a man break's his bill down  town then growls because his wife  wants-a little small change.-   -  Be more prompt **to go  to  a friend  in   adversity    than''in     prosperity.���������r  Chilo. ' ,    ��������� - ;Y  -  To be disinterested is to be strong,  and the world is at the feet of him  whom it cannot tempt.���������Ami el.  *��������� True happiness consists not in the  multitude of friends, "butYin the  worth and choice.���������Ben Johnson.   ���������  lescence and strength by the influence which  Quinine exerts on nature's'own restoratives.  It relieves the drooping spirits of those with  uwhoy3' a chronic state of morbid despondency and lack of interest in life ia a disease,  and, by tranquilizing vhe nerves, disposes to  sound, and refreshing sleep���������imparts Vigor;  to the action of tho blood,-which, being  stimulated j courses-throughout 'the veins,  strengthening the healthy animal functions  of the system, thereby making activity a  necessary result, strengthening the frame,  and giving life to the digestive organs, which  naturally demand increased eubstahce^re-  fiult, improved appetite. Northtop& Lyman,  of Toronto have������given to the public their  superior Quinine Wine at the usual rate, and,*  gauged by the opinion "of scientists, this  wine "approaches nearest perfection of any in  the market.   AU f*r*asrqi������ta pr>i) it.'  ���������MINAPoTS LINIMENT'Believes Neuralgia:,^'  ' ".    Y   ...   , '/    " , "-> . ' -    ������������������  , 'Unless you forget - that ^you Tare  trying to  go to-sleep -you will'  not  succeed. ���������  "' . I, -  , Y u need nob cough all night and disturb  youi* friends; there is no occasion for you running the rLk of contracting inflammatioirpl*  the lungs or consumption, whilo you can get  Bickle's Anti-Consumptive Svrup. This modi���������.,  cine cures coughs, colds, inflammation of, the  lungs and all throat, and-chest troubles.' lb  '-'���������'-'--   which  ������ .   *  pr.mofcosafrecancl easy'expectoration, -vv  immediately relieves the Ihroat and lung3 i  from  viscid phlegm.  ' The heart that is [soonest 'awake to  the flowers is" al ways J tne first to be  touched by* tlie -thorns.���������Moore.   .    ,  t r ^ f *   ������������������    ' "    , '  '      .-*��������� ' ���������        , ,      '     1 IS '  As Parmelee's Vegetable Pills contain mandrake and dandelion, they euro liver and kidncy  complainfcs with' unerring certaintyl O-They also  contain roots and herbs >vhich have'spocinc  virtues truly wonderful in theirL action on the  stomach and bowels. Mr. B. A." Cairncross,,  Shf.kospoaro, writes :���������" I' consider-Parmelee's  Pills an excellent remedy for biliousness and  derangement of the Ever, having used them myself for some time."    "'***"  * '" '"'.. '* -*.'- ".'". \  , A 'garden- is the ptirest of human  pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment of the spirit of man. without  which buildings and palaces are but  gross handiwork.���������Lord Bacon:  WHY WOOLENS WEAR THIN.  A  SCENE IX' A   GROCER'S* STORE.  would  [conti*nt;ed.3  Anthracite  Coal.  A Philadelphia firm has calculated  that there still remain unmined 5,073,-  775,000 tons of coal in the anthracite  Sir, 1 have just come round 'myself  to tell you that you have absolutely  spoiled a pair of blankets on me.-  I have ! '  : ������^  . ,  "Yes,  sir,   you have ! ='.."*  Surely you are mistaken,  madam !  I am not mistaken. I send round  my little girl a few 'days ago for a  good strong soap to mash out some  heavy things. Jn all " innocence I  used what you sent me, and the result is that my blankets are just the  skeleton of what thoy were. They  are ruined, sir, and it's your fault"!  *',Yes, but 1 sent, whut I usually  send in such cases.  What you  usually s'end !    No  -wonder' Mrs.   Moore,   my  neighbor,   complains of her clothes- wearing out; I  .that what I sold you   injured   your  soap.  But. madam, I always give my customers what they ask for. II������d you  named a particular brand of soap  you would  have had it.  Named a particular brand ! How  was I to know anything of brands ?  But I know belter now, and 1 know  what ruined my blankets���������and my  hands  are in a nice plight too- !  I can assure you, madam, that .it*is  not my desire to sell anything that'  will be injurious to cither the hands;  or clothing of my customers, and I.  shali-'bo glad to know how you prove  find you usually send her the same  blankets and your hands.  Well. I was telling Mrs, Neill my  trouble, and she lent me a little cutting, and here it is; you can road it:  "Dr. Stevenson Macadam, Lecturer  011 Chemistry, Surgeon's Hall,;. Edinburgh, describes the destructive pro-  ically. ..'.���������''  "After mentioning how strong alkali .such as potash and soda, disastrously affect cotton, linen and wool,  he, says   : ���������  "On one occasion I employed this  property' of soda in a- useful way.  There was a large quantity of new  .blankets sent to one of our hospitals, which when given; out, .were  said by the patients .to' be. not so  warm as the old blankets were, and  that led to an investigatian as to  whether the blankets were genuine  or not. They looked well, and  weighed properly, and I got a blanket sent to me for examination ancl  analysis. Wo found soon that there  was  cotton  mixed    with     the  wool,  and the,question was as to separating the two, because they'were thoroughly woven throughout, and it  was only by detaching the fine fibres  from each other that you. identified  the cotton fibre. I fell on the device  of using soda. I took a bit of blanket and put it in a vessel with soda,  and boiled it there, and f very3 quickly the wool got eaten away by the  soda, and there was -left behind the  cotton as a kind of skeleton���������a sort  of ghost���������of the original blanket out  of which it was taken. I mention  this merely to indicate to you" the  pernicious effects of using caustic  materials, which, when employed  strong by themselves, affect woollen  articles in this way, and which, even  when .not very strong,' will more  slowly, but with equal certainty,  tend to' destroy  the woollen fibre.*'  Now. I want to tell you that we  neighbors have had a talk over the  mattei\ and we, are not going to  have our ^clothes and hands ruined in  this way. Several of our neighbors  who have proved to us that Washing Sodas, Potash, Chloride of Lime,  and "soap substitutes" are most injurious to clothes and hands. "Free  alkali" in "soaps is practically the  caustic soda that burns the clothes.  Why, you dare not keep caustic soda  in a tin canister; it*'must be jn an  earthen, jar, or it. will even corrode  the tin ! : Now, it's for you to provide us with pure soap without free,  alkali,  or we must find it elsewhere.  Madam,     you   enlighten  1110 !       So  many  soaps  are  advertised .at pure,  that I really took little heed to any,  difference between them. ���������';  I have one, however, that has medical certificates of its freedom from  free alkali. It is guaranteed ���������pure;  and the makers offer .$5,000 reward  to any one -who can prove that it is  not pure, and further, I am authorized to return the purchase money  to any one .finding cause for complaint. '���������.'< '    ������������������  Let me see it,! Why, Sunlight  Soap ! It's a beautiful clean, fresh-  looking, soap, ancl this Octagon  shape   is  very handy.    Give me    five  bars.  Note by tin grocer. Thi3 whole neighborhood is using Sunlight Soap now. I have no  more complaints rhavo no room in my .storo  now for resinous concoctions of alkali poisons*  but it is not the grocer's fault if the public are  satisfied with common soaps.   If the public ask  for iSunlight Soap���������roct-gonha-r wo give 18  them.  Nothing,is so strong as'gentleness;  nothing so'gentle as real strength.���������  Francis do-Sales.    T '  If you use seeds, get good*ones./ We keep  tho best in the markot. . Catalogue on application.        .���������."*- . - -       ���������   " ���������  ."*   KEITH A'OO-,.*  P.'Q. Box l.*iC.       :    479 Main-Sbrect, Winir'pcg'  AlL=WO0l MICA R00FIN6  ���������   "Reputation for durability established. Eleven  years trial. Our severe frost has uo eiioet on it.  Beware of .American paper lelting which cracks 1  .in our cUmato. , - .*'  V^f. G������. -F-OBMSeCA...  "���������.TGHigginsavo., Winnipeg.   ,'   -    ' Sole Agent  R0.1l "Estate Agent.   Issuer of Marriage Licenses  Is assured if you  VIA1  Canad  Lowest Rates to all Toints  ��������� in the  EAST, WEST, AND SOUTH.  Daily Solid Veatibuled Train, with  Sleeping Cars, to St. Paul and Min-  ncapoiiri.    '        * "������������������ : ;   ' ,; - :   v : .   ���������  OCEAN STEAMSHIP TICKETS  Full  particulars  on  application to  T.ny agent Canadian "Northern Ry, or  GEO. EY SHAW,  'Traffic Manager,  Winnipeg.  Not one life can be pure in its purpose and strong in its strife and all  "life not be purer and stronger thereby.���������Owen Meredith. . .  Only ���������' the' brave know how to forgive; it is the, most refined and generous pitch of virtue human nature  ���������"Mi''arrive at.���������Sterne.  Those, who attain to any excellence  commonly spend life in. some one single pursuit, for excellence is not often gained upon easier terms.���������Johnson.  Tho poor author is doublv poor  when ho is compelled to borrow his  thoughts.  V  s-t tj  ���������>*, I  Y  I'"*  ������fJ&r*^2e&3-l������*Jt^������teste!MuXri^iMMvi.,,^ri.  1      .rrr     n    -i   .   ............^ -,���������  ^  OS GALLUP FAMILY.  JK  AI/ENING  OF, LAMENTATIONS  BY  THE AILING WlFE.      -  fr  Shnev* rfcr Time For,Departure  tl������e Other- World* Had 'Come,  She "Was Anxious to Become iin  al, but Tliere "(Vere Drawbacks.  iopyright, 1900,*by C. B. Lewis.]  , Gallup had' finished his supper,,  rcied his coat and shoes and- sat  dq in the' rocking chair to" read the  coif The Chemung County Gazette  ���������hed brought home from, the, post-  oi  01  n  win  k^-X.   *  fc   )'* ���������>-,  when Mrs. Gallup dropped down  ? lounge'witli a sigh and began:  muel.'if you could spare, a dyin  three'or four minits of your  tijl should like to talk, to you. I  kr 'you don't like^ to be bothered  wj you are readin, and I Avouldn't  sa word'if it was only a bile on my  lejr ono of my back aches, but- it's  in serious than that, Samuel���������fur  mf serious." '   , '    ,      \  j Gallup stretched his legs out to  tl)'fullest extent and made his toes  clc, but he never looked up fro.m his  pf. /' '- ,    , *  Idon t want to give,yon no sudden  sljk;" continued Mrs. Gallup as the  tili began to stream^ down her cheeks  u her nose >to twitch, ';but' It's, my  to tell you, so you kin prepare  self.* Samuel, you'll he a widow  ba'o Saturday ,night! Tonight, is  T;day night., Before sundown our  Smlay ��������� night Jihc funeral will 'beL  oj. I'll be an angel, ancl you'll be free  too out somewhere every even in and  pi checkers.'* Do you hear me! Sam-  ' ul;'  r.   Gallup   may   or   may   not   have  hrd her. but if he did he'paid'not the  slbtcsfattoiition.   \      <,   '  ..Ices; I've got my call to go," she re-  sued as she wiped her- eyes ou her  a  d  'SPA.ni<^A_ DYIST   WOMAN   TnRKK   OB   FOUR  -     '    MINITS." ,  be set back 30 or 40 years, or,will I be  an old woman angel?"  She looked directly at Mr. Gallup  and waited for a reply. but be was  reading how to make a hammock ou*  of a flour barrel, and he paid no heed  to the'quosticn.  "And are all angels purty. Samuel?"  she continued after awhile. "I've never been pnrty'since I was a baby and  fell out or the winder.'bur. if I've got  to-be* an ansel 1 want/ my face made  over as soon as'I get up tliere. I'm** not  sroiri ro be p* in ted our fur my homeliness as I tly around. If 1 was. I know  Vd make uo faces, at some of 'em.  Will, I be changed in tho twiuklki of  an eye and made as purty, as tin* rest  of 'em ?"  , Something  like  a< smile  flitted  ovei  /the face,of Mr. Gallup, but it was pro1*-'  ably caused by the article he was reu.������.l  ing. *      ' ,  \ "And about the' music. Samuel?, I  can't play oh no harp without lessons.  I' havo never even Rcen-a harp. When  ,we was first married,  I used  to play  lou the accordion  fur you, but it was  awful  poor playin, and  you  soon -got  sick of, it.  ' Is  it goin  to be expected  that I kin .fly right*up<-to'heaven and  begin playin on a harp the verv tirst  tiling? " l."*:   it  Is,   tl.e::   * ,ui.'^jju  n->  l  want to die. I never could a-bear havin  folks laugh at me. And the, singin.  Sa'muel'���������the singin! "My voice is cracked, and I sing through my nose, and is  that goin to do up there? I s'pose'I  could walk around with a robe'on and  talk and visit, but -I ciln't sing nor  play.' and they needn't: expect it. Samuel.'shall we'talk about whether you'd  better t take - a' second wife' or not?  Sometimes I think you had, and'some:  times- I think you'hadn't. '��������� What do  you think?"  Mr. Gallup turned from the harp-  moek article to one on natural gas In  Ohio, and he extended his legs' again  and (prepared to.digest it thoroughly.  It might have occurred to him- that  Mrs. Gallup was in the room and that  she or some one else 'was talking to  him. but he. ansAyered not. Ten minutes had .gone by'when ho finished the  article aud looked up and around'as if  he had suddenly" missed something.'  Mrs. Gallup lay curled up on the  lounge fast asleep, and in , the corps Y of each eye still glistened a big  tear. , m. Quad. "*  ask:  "Do you understand Maltese?"  "Xo."    .-.**'  "Do'you know Arabic?"  "No."  "Do you know Italian?"  "No."  "Do you know Greek?"  "No<'  "Then you four fools,   t only one!"���������  Youth's Companion.  '! !���������=*���������  .-j **���������  An   Inereilnlwiz.s  I.avrmaker.  It is recalled,that when the projector  of the railroad up Mount Washington  sought a charter from the New Ilamp  shire legislature one of the,lawmakers.  in his speech on the subject, said.  '.'Give the fool permission, but he might  as well ask for a railroad to the moon!"  But the railroad is still running *o the  Tip Tcp' House.     l ,    ,  THE HEAT OF THE SUN  THEORIES   OF  THE   ORIGIN   OF THE  BLAZING  ORB-OF  DAY.  A married man says that a wife  should be like a roast lamb���������tender and  sweet, nicely dressed. , but without  sauce.  Wher. a man approaches you and  begins t.'lling how honest he is. hold  your h'ptnl.s on your poeketbook.���������Atch-  L������j������n   flif-'ie.  ���������II������rd  HER "SUSPICION. CURE.'*  ^HDron.L'"I've   had   rheumatiz,   fever,  "eonsiuption   aud   heart  disease,   and  "uianyiiud many a time I've expected  to go'but I -have never felt like this  before    My   heart   goes   tunk.   tunk.  -tunk. my   lungs   seem   to   be   hitchin  nrou'nj, aud now an'd then my breath  shutsbff online the same as if I  had  got caight in a hole"in the fence.   "Mrs.  Watkbs was took this very way  before se died, and so was Mr. Comfort.  It* ma- come touight, or it may be'de-  , layedftill tomorrer.  but within a clay  or" tor I'll bo an  angel.     YoiY won't  blame me fur dyin, will you. Samuel?"  Mr.|Gallup   turned   his   paper  over,  pullet in his feet and'crossed his "legs.  but hade no. reply. c***  "Fq'ks can't help dyjn. Samuel���������.that  - is.  I ban't.    I  hate  to  go before I've  ' made'the soft "soap and'put up the fall  pickle,   but  I   can't'help- myself.     It  -  was jo with Mrs; * Watkins.    She had  the sap grease all ready and was ill  ready to dye rags fur a new carpet, but  "when1 Gabriel's horn sounded she 'had  to spread her wings. -  You'll miss the  soft soap.  Samuel,  fur* you're a great  hand Ito wash up. and you'll miss, the  *   pickhs, fur you love sour things, but  . will jou miss me?"  MrJGallup held the paper in his left  hand;and reached" down his right to  scratch his heel through his sock, but  he wis dumb'. Mrs. Gallup looked at  him through her tears for a time and  ther* shotted dowu a sob and said:  "W^ll, if you dou't miss me I can't  help It. I've alius had hot water ready  when you wonted to wash .your feet,  and rou've never found me without  stickin salve fur sore lingers. I've  nursed you through colic and sot up  with you through fever. You've never  had id tell me my bread-was,heavy or  the liiseuit tasted of salbratus. i Aud  when I'm laid away. Samuel, you'll remember that I wore the same bonnet  and shawl fur 21 years and that I  alius made a pair, of shoes last three  years. Haven't I done, purty .well all  things considered?"  Mr. Gallup might have agreed with  her.  but  if  be  did   he  didn't  say  so  aloud.    He crossed his legs the other  way and scratched the other heel, and  when  Mrs.  Gallup could restrain her  tears she observed:  "I  ain't leaviri this  house the way  ' some wives would.  Samuel.    When I  am  gone, you'll find your shirts and  "socks   and   everything   in   the   usual,  place, and you won't have to sew on a  button.    I'll even scald out the teapot  and  scour out the  djsbpan. if I  have  time.    If angels can  look down from  heaven, then I want to look down and  s������-r that I've lef/ everything in order.  1 want, to ask you about angels. Samuel.    Are they all old or young angels,  or are they sorter mixed ud?    Will 1  It Mmle 1,1 fo One Lingering: Honey-  (.**- moon For Slrs.Jones' Adviser.  * -"I would be quite happy; if my husband would not speud so much of his  time ar his club." said Mrs. Jones, with  a sigh! r -l...  ' "Why "don't  you  try   the  suspicion  'cure?" said her intimate friend.  "What in the name of Susan B. Anthony is the_suspicion cure?" asked  Mrs. Jones in amazement.  "Well, my husband got in the habit  of spending his evenings at his club,  and I worried over it for some time before I hit* upon a plan to keep him at  home.     At  first   I  pleaded  with  him,  telling him how lonely 1 was at home  when he was away, but he would only  laugh and promise to be home early,  which meant midnight or later.    Then  I changed my tactics.    Instead of asking him to remain at home I urged him  to go to his club.    The way he raised  his eyebrows the first time I suggested  it showed me I was on the right tack,  and I resolved to���������*kc.ep it up.  One night  when he came home for dinner he announced that he had a severe headache  and would remain home for the evening.    I  opposed  the idea and  pointed  out that an evening >tt his club would  cause him to forget bis headache and  do it good.'   He gave mo a hard look,  but.acted on the suggestion  and left  for his club.    Something told me-that  he would be back within an hour, so I  made  an  elaborate toilet and  waited  for him to return.   He came home, as I  ���������expected, with the plea that his head  was worse and that he couldn't stand  the noise at the club.    I condoled with  him and ignored his question concerning   my   elaborate   toilet.     He   hasn't  been away for an evening since.    It is  almost like the old honeymoon, only he  appears to have something on his mind  that be is not entirely satisliedabout."  ���������London Answers.  "What! Seven years  old and can't spell  your nameiyet! What  is your name?"  "It's'   Obereckeckel-  etopper,     sir." ��������� New\  York Journal.  YTise  Willie.  Caller���������Your  sister    expects  me to stay tor  supper, doesn't  she, Willie?  Willie���������Sure!  And she said if  you stayed as  long as you did  last night she  thought she  would ask you  tostay to breakfast.  , Tlie   Unusual.  Husband ��������� '  ' How   did   you  suspectJ that I  had been drinking?  Wife- By  your polite  manner.  *"   ���������'   ,  .The Small Boy>* Hongrer.  ' "If you- don't quit eating so much,  Willie, you will be sick." <  "Won't  It  be  time  enough  to  quit  then?"���������Indianapolis News.  A Luncheon Served-In Seven Coarse.**  For a seven course, luncheon then-  should be first*-either soup or fruit. A  half slfaddnc-k. duri-iK ihe sc\-wn., makes'  a good imgimiinsr or,a U*w stiawK'nie**..  served with, the hulls on1. Then a fish  dish, as creamed or deviled (ixh. servd  with rolls or bread:- creamed "sweetbreads, served in paper cases or pate  shells. Xe*\t either broiled chops, broiled  chicken, chicken a la Mat,viand or fricfis  see, with boiled lice av pejus. Then the  salad course. Better, of course, a green  salad with French dressing." and pass  with it cream cheese and wafers. Any  dainty dessert, as chailotte oi* ice cream,  cake and coffee.���������Ladie������'  fTnme Journal.  " X Survival of the Primitive.  A Philadelphia philosopher thus explains the general preference for a wall  table in a restaurant: "Primitive.man  ate in peril. The cave bear, the saber  tooth tiger, even some warrior of his  own kind, was apt at any moment to  leap upon him and to devour his food  and perhaps himself. Therefore he  took his meals with his back against a  cliff or in the corner of two adjoining  cliffs, if posaible, and with the open  country before him. That, you see,,  was .the safest way for him to eat. He  could not then be surprised.  "And we still have in us that memory  of tb% primitive man, and we still unconsciously, when we sit down to our-  repasts, choose places, that give us a  wall for our protection. That and not  a desire to see things is what causes U3  to pick out walls and corners. You can  see as well from the middle of a room  or from any other place, you know."  A  ThonphtfJil  tlnHbanfl.  Dnldncftti,  It has been found on study of 300  cases of loss of hair that baldness'prevails most with unmarried men. which  is contrary to the general belief. The  worries of the bachelor may be fewer,  but they are more trying to the scalp  than are the multitudinous cares of  the man of family. Most bald people  are found to lead Indoor lives, and almost all of them belong to the intellectual class. Usually the loss of hair-  begins before the thirtieth year. In  .woman it usually constitutes a general thinningViu men it affects the top  of the head. Diseases that affect the  general nutrition of the body are likely to thin the hair. Heredity is a  factor. If one has baldheaded ancestors, all the drugs of the pharmacopoeia will not bring out flowing locks.  <**>  Four to One.  An English officer in Malta stopped  in riding to ask a native the way. He  was answered by a. shrug of the shoulders and a "No speak English."  "You're a fool then," said the officer.  But the man knew enough English to  Mr. Eagle���������Here. Maggie: I've brought  vou a ready made nest.���������Sr-ribuer's.  Eott  Arbitration .Works.  Yeast���������Don't you think arbitration is  the safest way to settle disputes?  Crimsonbeak���������No, I must say that I  do not. 'We had some trouble with our  cook, and I went to the kitchen to arbitrate the matter with her. Oome up  to the house some time, and I'll show  you what remains of the suit of  clothes I wore that day. ��������� Yonkers  Statesman.  In Bad  Shape.  "I saw Jigley in the neighborhood of  Miss Goldman's house last night, and  he didn't look at all well."  "Nervous, I guess; probably going to  pop."  "He looked more as if he were just  coming from pop."���������Philadelphia Press.  ���������The Principle of Meteoric Formatlca  l������y Mutual Gravitation Hat Contradictory,' Scientist* Contend, to  Known Physical Laws.  The sun being assumed to be an incandescent liquid, now losing heat, the question * naturally occurs, how did this heat  originate? It is certain that it cannot  have existed in the sun through an infinity of past time, since as long as it has  so existed it must have been suffering  dissipation, and the finiteness of the sun  precludes the supposition of an infinite  store of heat in his hods*.,  The sun must therefore either havo  been ^created as an active source of heat  at some time of not immeasurable -antiquity by, an overruling decree, or0 the  heat which he has already radiated  away and that which he still possesses  must have been acquired by n natural  process following permanently established  laws. ' t  , -Without pronouncing the former'supposition to be essentially incredible, we may  safely* say thatcit isjn the"'highest degree  improbable if we can show the latter to  be not contradictory to known" physical  laws. '.���������',, '  And we do show this, and more by  merely pointing to certain "actions going  on before us at "present,* which, if sufficiently abundant at some past time, must  have given .the sun heat enough to count,  for all,Ave Icuoav, of his past radiation and  present temperature. " . <  It is not necessary at present to enter  at -length on the - details regarding, the  meteoric .theory, '-which appears to'have  been'first proposed m a definite form by  Mayer and afterward' independently0, by  Waterston,- 91* regarding the modified-'  hypothesis'of meteoric vortices, which the  writer of the present article'showed to be  necessary'in order that the'length of the'  year, as known for the last 2,000 years,  may not have bcen>sensibljr disturbed by  their sessions which the sun's mass must  have ,hatl during that period, if the heat  radiated .away has always been compensated by heat generated by .meteoric" influx.  We may,now believe that all the the-'1  ories of complete or nearly "complete contemporaneous meteoric compensation  must pbe rejected/but Ave'may still hold  that "meteoric * ������������������* * is * "* * not  only proved to exist as a cause of solar  heat, but it is the only one of all conceivable causes which avo_ know to exist from  independent evidence.!'. ( -  ,    *  , The,form of meteoric theory which now  seems most probable, and .which was first  discussed on true thermodj*namic principles by 'Helmholtz, 'consists in'supposing  the sun and its heat to have originated in  a coalition of smaller-bodies falling together by mutual graA'itation and generating," as they'must do, according to the  great*law demonstrated by Joule,, an ex:-  act equivalent of heat for the motion lost  in coalition.  ' That some form of meteoric theory is  certainly the true "and complete explanation of solar heat can scarcely be doubted  when the following reasons are considered :  First.���������No other natural explanation,  except by cheniical action, can be conceived. ,  Second.���������The chemical theory is quite  insuflicient, because the most energetic  chemical action Ave know, taking place  between substances amounting to tho  whole sun's mass, would onlj' generate  about 3,000 years' heat. *  Third.���������There is no difficulty in accounting for 20,000,000 years' heat by  the meteoric theory.  It Avould extend this article to too great  length and would require something of  mathematical calculation to explain fully  tho principles on Avhich this last estimate  is founded.  'It is enough to say that bodies, all much  smaller than the ,sun, falling together  from a state of relative rest, at mutual  distances all large in comparison Avith  their diameters, and forming a globe of  uniform density equal in mass and diameter to the sun, AA'ould generate an  nmount of heat which, accurately calculated according to Joule's principle and  experimental results, is" found to be just  20,000,000 times Pouillete's estimate of  tho annual amount of solar radiation.  The sun's density must, in all probability, increase very much toAvard his center,  and therefore a considerable greater  amount of heat than that must be supposed to have been generated if his whole  mass was formed by tlie coalition of comparatively small !iodies. Ou the other  hand, Ave do n<v ki|ow- how much heat  may have been diosipated bj- resistance  and minor impacts be/ore the fiual conglomeration, but there is reason to belieA'c  that even the most rapid conglomeration  that we conceive to have probably taken  place coukTonly leave the finished globe  with about half the entire heat due to the  amount of potential energy of mutual  gravitation: exhausted.  We may therefore accept as a lowest  estimate for the sun's initial-heat 10.000,-  000 times a year's supply a: the present  rate, but 50.000.000 or 100.000.000 as  possible in consequence of the sun's greater density in his central parts.  The considerations adduced above regarding the sun's possible specific heat,  rate of cooing and superficial temperature render ft probable that J) e must haA-o  been Alery sensibly Avarmer a million years  ago than now, and consequcntlj*, if he  has existed as a luminary for 10,000,000  or 20,000,000 years, he must have radiated a Avay.. considerably more than the corresponding number of times the present  year's amount of loss.  It seems, therefore, on the whole, most  probable that the sun has not illuminated  the earth for 100.000,000 years and almost certain that he has not done so for  500,000,000 years.  As for the future, we may say with  equal certainty that inhabitants of the  earth cannot, continue to enjoy the light  and heat essential to their life for many  million years longer unless' sources now  unknown to us are prepared in the great  storehouse of cr.eation.���������-"Essays In Astronomy," by Lord Kelvin (Appieton &  Co.).        (   Just   Li Ice  n Man. ,   ,  Mrs. Stocks���������If ,Ave move into . that  cheap house, Avc'll'lose cnste.���������  Mr. Stocks���������Oon't care if wo do.   It's *-  the best Ave c?-n afford without running  hopelessly into debt,  and,  besides, it's a'  comfortable place, anyhow.  Mrs. "Stocks���������Hub! Just like a man!  Only so you can be comfortable and pay  every little bill as quick as it cpmes in you-  don't care what 1 the ������world thinks!���������New  York Weekly- '  Buenos Ayres'is the largest city ssuth  of the equator. Rio de Janeiro comes  next,'and Sydney,' NewoSouth Wales.  Is' a good third. -��������� *  How  Sous:i  Got  His  Name.  ."When Sousa, famous tho world over  as king of march music, landed in tho  "home of'the free," he carried Avith  him a valise on Avliich was marked in  plain letters "John PhiliiDSo. U. S. A."-  Time passed, and this son of sunny It-,  aly commenced to gro\y musical, and  also to become Americanized. It waa  then, so the story goes,'that he ox-  pressed the desire for a name moro  nearly like 'those of tbe people of  which he was one by choice.        .       '  JMiilipso sounded out of place "doing  service  for a   man   who  had  imbibed  American ��������� beliefs   arid   customs   and  whose destiny'waa closely linked'with  "the , stars   and. stripes   forever." ,   -A  member of the band to which .he be*  longed  finally  mado a  suggestion.   I-*, '  turned out to be a happy 'one arid way,  adopted by the master of ^ the baton.  Tho suggestion Avas this: To the nam,)',  Philipso add U. S.   A.   Divide'.tlie on'e  'nariie into tvyo words, and' there* AA-aa  the smooth  sounding mid easily pre-*  nounced name of John Philip-Sousa.-  <Ct  When   Kissing AVas   Costly.  The case'of the People against Mur-'   \  line,   heard- by" the  governor  of  New'  Haven colony in council ou May dfiy, '  1GG0, indicates the attitude toward" unlicensed kissing, in those times.   It'ap-,,*  pearedthat Jacob Murlino'and Sarah* ���������  Tuttle 'had been 'caught  kissing each,. -  other.        , . j . '        ,\,',  Jacob tried to throw the, blame 6nY~Y  Sarah, saying he thought she had ."with i  -intent'let fall'her gloves."- Sarah'de-^  nicd the intent.   Jacob then, admitted v  that ho "tooke her by tbe'hand,'and -'  they both sat down upon a^ chest,, but; \  owhether- he 'kysscd her" or she kyssed;.";  him he knows not, for he never thought' '-  of it since until Mr. Raymond told him*  that he had not laydo it to heart as he  -  ought." / ^     * Y  -   The stern- governor, after duly, lee-   "  turiug the guilty'parties on the.enormi* *  ty of their offense,  decreed that "the. '  sentence therefore concerning them is,  that thoy shall  pay either: of therura ���������  fine of 20 shilling's to the colony."  -f*ei  O -  ;-: *���������* ���������*  :->.?f  Bereavement  and  Bnsincsa.  The following-curious advertisement,  is taken from a Spanish journal: "This  morning our Saviour summoned away  the jeweler, Siebald Illmaga, froria his  shop to another and better -world.   The'  undersigned, his AA"idow, will weep upon his tomb, as will also bis two daugh-'  ters, Hild and Emma, the former of  whom is married, and the latter is open *  to an offer. The funeral AA'ill tako place  tornorroAv.    His    disconsolate  -widow, '  Vcronique. .Illmaga.    P.    S.���������This   bo- ���������  reavement will  uot interrupt our employment, which will be carried on as  usual, only our place of business .will,  be removed from 3 Lessi.de Leiuturiers  to 4 Rue de. Missionaire, as our grasp^  ing landlord has raised the rent."- ���������  IIott  the  Pencil. *Wjts   Pr-odncctl.'  That the luscious peacb has boon derived from the bard shelled almond can  no longer be successfully denied. It is  said that tbe peach in its original soil  was a virulent poison and that the Persian warriors brought to Persia some  of the seeds and planted thom for tho  purpose of poisoning the points of their  arroAvs so as to render aa*ouuc1s caused  by them to be fatal, but a change of  climate ancl soil produced a fruit  which is not only luscious, but is esteemed exceedingly healthful.  The  Bull (liner  of   n  I^ife.  Life is a building. It rises slowly dr.y  by day through the years. Every new  lesson avo learn lays a block on the edifice Avhich is rising silently 'within us.  Every ��������� influence that impresses us. every book wo road, every conversation  Ave have, every act of our commonest  days, adds something to the invisible)  building.���������J. R. Miller.  Not   1'nt  Out.    , ���������  I was not successful in the attcn  to eject the cook from my house.  But Avhat nettled me was the unruffled demeanor of the woman.  "You might at least have the good  breeding to act 'put out,' "T cried and  left the kitchen, slamming the door behind me.���������Puck.  The  Fnr&parlnp  Bopr.  "'A good dog is the best friend a man  can have." remarked tho tobacconist to  the Avooden Indian. "When yon :.���������*!:  sick, lie doesn't tell yen what to tf:������������������."���������.  and when you got well he doesn't vjit  you how much worse he had the sa-no  i isoa.se.'"  '���������UV.W:.' V.  A Tale ofthe Cattle Thieves of Agua-  Caliente. ,    '  ���������a1  ';!'  ���������Copyright,   1900  by  W.- L-cC.   Beard.  As we had planned", the foreman sent  five   men   in  different  directions with  orders to search for  traces of the missing herd, to let us know at once if any  '    twere found, and  to report by midnight  :in any case     Delighted at the prospect  'of  action, the' men trooped out of  my  'tent      Some of them,spread their blankets out to dry    Others offered needless  -help to the men who were preparing to  '*-set out    The rest, Spider among them,  lounged   about' the  cook   wagon   and  -   "joshed" the Ballet  Girl, to use   their  -own phrase," because die could not start  -his fire.   For some minutes the foreman  stood   in the door of  iny tent  grabbing  'his chin  thoughtfully."   Then fee called  '���������to Spider.  "���������Look���������here,   you   kid,"   said   he  "������������������You heard what we said,'bout aendin  down the river ter get more men.  Well,  1 want you ter saddle up a fresh pony an  -be ready ter start in five minutes.  Bear 1  The   boss," here, he'll write   a note  t'erf  ,   you ter take.    Get a wiggle on, now.''  The  laugh   that   Spider   brought with  iiim"   faded   from   his' face.    "Tbis   was  business, and without a word he nodded  -and strode away. ���������-,  "I reckon he's about the bes' one ter  ���������senY" continued  the foreman, turning  to me.'"."He'll  do what he sets out ter  do .every'time *'  Then* it   ain't   likely  ;therls /any'danger down   that way, an  ���������you can't tell what'll turn up here.   It'll  ���������keep the kid outer mischief fer awhile.'  '   .While  the   foreman ,was   speaking 1  ' -bad torn a leaf out of' an account book  and had written' the note..' Suddenly 1  , 'became aware   that Jshe-Jaughter' and  '-talk of the men had hushed.    A second  '. dater ' Spider,   his . face  working   with  <rage, dashed,into the tent." caught up a  '���������rifle and vanished  ~      "StopI" roared* the foreman, lifting  the  flap  that   closed   the   tent ' door  "Through   the opening I could, see tbat  -'Spider   had  dropped- on s one knee and  was taking  careful   aim at something.  ���������������hat was out of my view.  "'What yondpin? Come here I" c'ouv  vmanded the foreman sternly.   Lowering  ,*the rifle. Spider rose slowly to his feet.  (keeping his eyes   fixed  on'the,point to-  -ward which he had been aiming.   Run-  .tiingto   the  door. I followed, his gaze  ���������_** with my'eyes. ' ������ '   . -,  * Ona ridge of;sand, half a mile away.  -  '-three men were galloping up and down,  ���������waving   their/hats and "fifing**pistols.  They- were shouting",'too.> for   the faint  ^echoes of theii- shouts reached, us.  "Look -there !V cried/Spider "See  *them. men?*-Hollis is cue* of Cera, an  ���������that greaser what rshot at me las' night  "They'regivin'ns the laugh, that's what  -they're doin, 'cause we los' our cattle  an they got 'em."Are you fellers"���������  "Come here I Hear me?" commanded  ���������"the foreman again.   "Look here, young  man," he continued as Spider came reluctantly forward.- "It ain.'t good buni-  ''ness lettin your,mad get up ao bad you  lose  yer   head,   net   for   no    one what  *works roun   horses an cattle.    You had  -orders too.    Nobody what won't  obey  ���������orders works in my gang*.  Ther wasn't  no shootin called for.. Besides, " he addled as an afterthought, "you'd, a-knowed  *^f  you'd had any sense that   vou could  ���������������.o% hit nothin at that range. "   'Spider  .glanced at  the foreman', and   his  faco,  ifelL  ''That's right. I los' my head clean  il know I did. "* I won't do it again an.  isay. .I'm awful sorry. " he said penitently. Carefully lowering the hammer, he  placed the rifle, apparently as a sort of  token of surrender, in the foreman's  hands Then, without another look at  the men who were still capering about  <on the ridge, he Av.ent away to saddle a  ���������horse. , ;  "The boy's got the bes' eyes of any-,  ������������������*body in the out lit. all right enough.'  ���������said tlie forcuuau. setting down the  .-rifle. "I alwns knowed that, but yet 1  'don't believe he c'n tell who those men  are. not so far away as that. "  It   certainly seemed  impossible that  "Spider could  distinguish  any one at so  great a distance.   I van into the tent to  .get a pair  of   fieldglasses, but  when   I  'returned the men had disappeared.  "Jus' give one yell an then walloped,  off behin' the ridge thar as yon went  ..in." said the foreman. "They was lef  -behin' by the res' er ther gang so's tor  watch, us, J reckon, an see what we're  ��������� a-gonterdo. ".'-���������'  "Well, they Avon't Avatch.-nothin,'  '��������� commented Lee, who had strolled up to  "HA "They're' drank an they'll, get  -drnnker. 'specially, if.. Hollis is there.  Hs-'a ben sober so long now that he  '������������������wor's't stop soon once he gets started."  "Meekness an sobriety an the rest of  ���������tit sil'A't his style enough ter hurt."  ���������-agre^S tho foreman. - "But maybe Hol-  ;lis wasn't there. , Look a here, you kid.'  ihe called as Spider rode up on the biggest and, nest to his own, the ugliest  horse I &ad brought from the ranch. I  .forgot tey -&11 ycu- before that you're  ���������likely ter  tf-Ssss  up   agains'a   heap  er  ���������trouble   o^  ev  ���������"shese  times if   you go  -shootin at saea what   you don't know,  'specially "������hora   they're so fur off  you  ��������� can't hit 'em.    It ain't perlite."  So earnest was Spider that he failed  for the moment, to see that the foreman  -was joking.  "I did know 'em���������two of 'em���������Hol  lis  an   that   there  greaser." he cried.  "I saw 'em./   'Deed I did.  Honest."  "So?" replied the foreman, with assumed gravity. "Well, if that's the  case, jus' you climb doAvn offen that  ther horse an go an get yer supper 'fore  you start." .  "Don't need ter. Got some grub here  in my cerones (saddlebags). The Bally  Girl givo it to hie' jus' now. Mayn't I  go?" The foreman waved his hand and  smiled: With an answering grin Spider  galloped away.  In view of the distance tbat must be  traveled, we ' hardly expected to see  Spider again before daylight. Making  allowance for delays, we hoped to get  awayconthe following evening. To me  the wait of 24 hours seemed a * fatal  waste of time. The cattle would probably be well into Mexico before that.  "Prawb'ly* they will,", agreed tho'  foreman. "Then all Ave got ter do is ter  get 'em "outer Mexico again, that's  all." This was delightfully simple in  theory. The practice, I feared, would  be somewhat difficult* It was obviously'1  impossible for'us to move, as we were  then situated. Until our re-enforcement  should come we could  do  nothing but  wait , <  Much sooner than was expected., however, these re-enforcements came. The  men were just finishing their supper. In  , order to guard against a possible though  unlikely attempt at surprise, one of  their number, posted in a position from  which he could watch both the "mesa  ���������and the river' flat, was ' acting as sentinel.   Suddenly be' hailed the camp.  "Tber's a gang er men an horses comin up the* river," he cried. In ,an instant, every man was on his feet, had  caught up his rifle and was running to  the edge of the cliff, "sheltering himself  behind the rocks that fringed it.> Some  of the men were ordered to fall back in  order to guard us against surprise from*  the rear. They went, and then for a moment there wassilehce on'the top of the  cliff. A buzz of conversation from the  men belowcould be plainly heard.  , "Them fellers ain't greasers, any^  how," whispered the foreman.  "Hoav do'you know?'/ I asked.     . . ���������  ��������� "Why, greasers talks high up in their  heads, like women, er kids.   These men  talks low in  ther  chests, like us.    Listen. " '  ,' WALKED 223,840 MILES.. ,  , Ikhvard * ( Pearce, . of, Woodchurch,  Eng., has "just retired from the postal service. During the 37 years he  held the office of rural postman he  walked 223,8-10 miles, or, nine times  round the'-world. His daily walk for  over 20 , years ayeraged 17'miles,  and he neA*er missed a day's delivery  of letters-for 37' years.'        '   -  with the Strand) ��������� London, is to be  commemorated by/rplacing a beautiful stained glass window', in St.  Clement Dane's chapel.  ' *"J    T ""  Mrs. Kendall was once playing in  Dub-lin, the role being Galatea. 'Pygmalion has /that not unusual accessory, a jealous wife. -During the temporary, absence of the wife Galatea  was about to throw .herself-into the  Dr.    Johnson's   -long    'association ( arms of Pygmalion-;wlieii-an old lady  in the audience called out,' warninV-  ly: "Don't' do it darlint ! His wife's  just gone out, an' it will be like her  to be stoppin', at the key-hole!"  -3.rd  ���������suotsuad jo j suotq/notiddT-" oand  uotit jo S3.01   oovod jo enxi%   uj  An agreeable man. is one ������who, con-,  sents to being taught things that he  already knows.- ���������* '       "',   '  -LIVER  DISORDERS  BBS  Headaches? Biliousness and Gomstipaftio'n Aire Thoroughly Cured foy Dp.YOhasef^  KideBey-Llvep-PiHsa'' \' . .  -  , *        , ' * * '' '        v-- 1 ,  There is no single organ 111 the human body which exerts such a wide influence over the other organs as  does the liA*e'r. It has been, av ell named the regulator of the system. Once.the liver grows sluggish arid fails to  filter tho bile poisons from the system, there conies pain, disease and'death. ' The head aches, the tongue is '  coated, the bowels become constipated" the digestive system, is thrown out of order, and foul'impurities that  * should bo removed from \hc body, are thrown back into tho blood stream, to find their' way to the weak  spots of 'die human frame. ;       ' '       ., -r       Y"Y ;t~ __*-.,        j ,  Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills ha ve a direct action��������� on" the liver, and   bring.-prompt relief and lasting ben-,  cut.    ."Nearly CA-erybody 'is  familiar   Avith the extraordinary virtues of this fambua/treaiinent.    Hero isSn, sample of the letters received from cured ones :���������       '    ��������� - '    ���������   '  y , 'o     * ,.,.- ' s.  0      Air; John Skelton,  tho well-known bridge builder" of 101 Sherwood street, ---Ottawa,  states :      .  '  Y  ��������� "I have used. Dr. Chase's Kidney-Lia-ci- Pills for kidney and liver derangements,  brought on by' exposure;',  ancl find them better than any pill or medicine I haA*o oa-gi* used., '���������''', > '   '      '*  * "They cleaned my'system and made me feel healthy and A-igprous and   better    in  every way,  ' commend  them as the best, liA-er and   kidney medicine that 1 know of." ' ( ' * ,      '���������*  ' "Mr. James Baird, .postmaster, Conscco'n, Ont., stater-; : . *' **"',  "It giArcs mo ancl my wife much   pleasure to, recommend Dr., Chase's  Kidney-Liver Pills as. a family medicine of superior value.   Wo  use them  in,preference to all other .pills-in  ovr family,   and T might    here,  state  ' that they cured me while suffering from biliousness, 'and also cured my wife,, of   sick    headache,    from    which  she .suffered  severely." ,    0 ,       ,    I ' *   "���������'      ���������      '  '��������� .    ' - ���������>   '   . <  ' "*   -Dr. Chase's'Kidney-LiA'er Pills, one.pill a dose, 25 cents ab'ox, at all ** dealers, *   or 1 Edmanson,.  Bates    &  Company, Toronto.     ."���������-������������������' -    " , '''*,*' .  I "can    re-  1 "Hello the  camp!" hailed,vsome one  < from below.   - - '"���������  ,*   ,  "Hello below' Who are you?" roar,ed  the foreman in return.  "From the X bar X ranch. Ther's  more of us comin How d'yer get up  that, anyhow?",  "Wait er minute, "f. called   the  foreman     While   the conversation was going on Lee had laid   down his rifle and  'had been hurriedly gathering the resinous branches cf  the greaseAvood shrub  that grew about iis^ thickly, and binding"  therm   together  with  a   rawhide,  thong    Lighting the bundle at the fire,  he ran back and threw it over the edge  of the cliff     Panned by the draft made  by*- its' fall, the  resinous wood   blazed  like a firework of some kind.  The horses  of the party below shied and capered as  the glare struck their  eyes, and   there  was some sAvearing among their riders.  The light showed  half a score of   lean,  sunburned men, heavily armed and well  mounted    Their leader, an elderly man,  on a silver trimmed saddle, was at once  recognized   as an  old acquaintance by  the foreman  "Glad t'~*"see "yer.*** Hay ward, " called  he. -"Turn t' yer left, thar, an you'll  find a trail what'll bring, yer safe up.  Sorry ter sen that flare doAvn, but we  had ter be sure you was friends. Come  up." Filing over the rough path that  zigzagged up the cliff, the ranchers  reached the tableland.  "Mighty glad you all's come���������didn't  expec' you so soon," said the foreman,  shaking hands with Hayward. "How'd  yer leave the cattle down your-, way,?"  "There aren't any cattle down our^  way���������not so much as a calf left," was  the response. "This raid is the biggest  thing I ever knew. It has wiped out  every brand on the river anywhere  ,'ilnng here Tbe boys are all up We're  tbe first, br.t the rp.������t are coming, all  that can Seven of onr men will never  tjtir again. " ,  "Gone out?" asked the foreman.  "Yes: shot by the thieves. I met that  boy you sent after us about half an  hour ago. He didn't know what to  make of us any "more than you did, and  ono of tho boys'Avho rode.out to see who  he Avas nearly got shot for his pains.  We made him understand after awhile  that Ave weren't rustlera, "und then he  gave us your message. "  "Why didn't he come back with  yon ?" I asked.  "Don't know. I told him he might  as Ave 11. for we were all up and coming,  but he asked <us to tell you that he'd  return shortly, and then he struck over  the desert, going south. I don't know  where he was bound for."  Spider's absence troubled me a good  deal, but the foreman and the Ballet  Girl took it very calmly indeed. There  wasn't any one who could hurt him,  said they, except possibly the three men  that we had seen that morning, and it.  was not ot all likely that he would  meet them.  NOT THAT KIND .OF A RANCH.  j *��������� ��������� '  A goodi story has come up from the  Pincher Creek district. Twro 'travellers were driA'ing through that sec-  'tioii     and    met -with an accident to  r ' ***  their* buggy. While one stayed \vith  the 'rig the other .went to a nearby-  farm house for tools to ,raake the  necessary, repairs. Asking tbo. farmer"; , who chancedr to be a Swede, if  he had .a'monkeywrench the astonished traveller received the following repjy: "No. Ay, got a cattle  ranch; ma brother Ole haf a horse-  ranch; Nels Nelson haf a* hog ranch  ba de crick ofer 'deref-and a Jankce  faller haf a sheep ranch,bout five'  mile down da road; but.A^ bet you  no faller d��������� fool enough "to start "'  monkey ranch in  dese country."    '  ��������� He who lias not'forgiven an enemy  has ���������not yet tasted one of the most*-  sublime  enjoyments ���������,   of   life.���������Lava-  'ter ' . . -    ', .     '  . Many a girl's distant manner may  be traced to the-fact that she liad  "onions"' for dinner.   "    . '   ','  ������.  a  Many a man-breaks his bill down  town" then growls' because his wife  wants a little small.change.  '.j"      ,      '   Be'more prompt "to go to,, a friend  in. o-dArersity'' than in'* prosperity-���������  Chiio.      ' * v    Y .-*���������      -  To be'disinterested is to'be strong,  and the Avorld is at,the feet of him  whom it cannot tompt.���������Amiel.  True happiness  consists  not in  multitude   of    friends,    but" 'in  worth and choice.���������Ben Johnson.  the  rthe  The*-e never was, and never will., be, a  universal panacea, iu one remedy, for all ills  to which flesh is heir���������the very nature of  many curatives being such that were tho  sjerma of other and differently seated dis:  eases rooted*in the system of the patient���������  what would relieve one" ill in turn would aggravate the other. We have, however, in  Quinine Wine, when obtainable in a sound,  unadulterated state, a remedy for many and  grievous iLa. By its gradual and judicious  use the frailest systems are led into convalescence and strength by the influence which  Quinine exerts on nature's own restoratives.  It relieves the drooping spirits of those with  whom a chronic state of'morbid despond,  ency and lack of'intt,/-est in life is a disease;  and, by tranquilizing vhe nerves, disposesto  sound and refreshing, sleep���������imparts .vigor  to the action of , the blood, which* being  stimulated, courses throughout the, veins,  strengthening the healthy animal functions  of the system, thereby making activity, a  necessary result,.strengthening ,the frame,  and giving life to the digestive organs, which  naturally demand increased substance���������-result, improved appetite. Northrop & "Lyman,  of Toronto have-given' to^the public then-  superior Quinine Wine at the usual rate, and,  gaugea by the "opinion 'of scientists, tins  wine'approaches nearest perfection of any in  the market.   All c'r'AS-rnl'^ soil it.'  MAUD'S LINIMENT Relieves Neuralgia.  Unless you,forget that  trying, to' go to'sleep you  succeed. -   ;       '*'  you  will  are  not  A "garden* is' the purest of human  pleasures. It is' the greatest refreshment-of the spirit'of man, Avithout  which buildings and. palaces are but  gross handiwork.���������^ord Bacon.  Y, u need nob cough all night  and disturb  your friends; there is uo occasion for you running the ri-k of contracting inflammation pf  the lungs or consumption, while you' can get  Bicklo's Anti-Consumptive Svrup. . Thismedi    ,  cino cures coughs, colds, inilammation of the* '  lungs and all, throat and*chest ^troubles. . lbH  pr. motes a free and / easy1 expectoration. Avhich ,  immediate'y relieves the throat and lungs from  7iscid phlegm.    ' * ������     '       ' T        '   ,*Y > Y ;  'The heart-that is'soonest.iawake to  the flowers is~alAvays tlie first to be-  touched by' the thorns.���������Moore.  ���������-.'    - *- .-���������_.. *  As Parmelee's ���������Yegeta'ble Pills contain man;  drake and*dandelion, thoy euro,liver and kidney, **  complaints with unorring certainty.,. They also  contain roots,and herbs which,nave spocific  A-irtues truly wonderful in their, action on the"1 '  stomach and bowels.    Mr.-E. A.-Cairncross,    j  Shf.kespoare, writes :���������" I* consider-Parmelco s -,-  Pills an excellent,1 remedy.for biliousness and    <*  derangement of the liver, having used thommy- *',.  self for some time."*     - ���������  >���������  '    -"*_".*"'""." ',*,  Nothing is so strong as gentleness;'  nothing^so gentle as real strength.���������  Francis de.- Sales'. . *      ��������� <  WHY WOOLENS WEAR THIN.  A. SCENE IX"* A   GROCER'S STORE.  ICOXTIKL-ED.] ,  Anthracite, Coal.  A Philadelphia firm has calculated  that there still remain unmined 5,073,-  775,000 tons of coal in the anthracite  regions.  ' Sir, 1 haA-e just come round myself  to tell you that you haA*e absolutely  spoiled a pair of blankets on me.* -  T have ! *" '--:.',  "Yes,  sir,  you have !  - Surely you are mistaken,  madam !  I am. not mistaken. I send round  my little girl a fevv days ago for va  good strong soap to mash out some  hea\*y things. Jn all "innocence I  used what you sent me, and the result is that my blankets are just the  skeleton of what they AArcre. -They  are ruined, sir, and it's your fault !  '.Yes, bui, I sent. what I usually  send in such cases.  What you usually send ! Xo wonder- Mrs. Moore, my neighbor, corn-  plains of her*_clothes'wearing out; I  that Avhat 1 sold you injured your  soap.  But. madam, I always give my customers what they ask for. IL-d you  named a particular brand of soap  you  AA'ould haA-e bad it.  Named  a particular  brand !      Hoav  Avas  L to know  anything of brands ?  But 1 know bettor now,  and 1 knoAV  Avhat   ruined   my   blankets���������and    my'  bands  are in a nice plight too !  ���������, I can assure you,.madam, tha't it-'is  not my  desire"; to-sell  anything that'  will be injurious to either the hands"r  or  clothing of my  customers,  and II  shall be glad to know how you prove  find you   usually send  her    the same  blankets and your hands.  ''���������"Well,   I   Avas* telling- Mrs,   Neill  my  trouble,'and she lent, me a little cutting, and here it is; you can read it:  ���������'Dr. StCA-eiison Macadam, .Lecturer  oh* Chemistry, Surgeon's Hall, Edinburgh,   describes  the  destructive pro-  ically. ,'-..-       ..  "After mentioning ho\y' strong alkali .such as potash and soda, disastrously afTect cotton, linen ancl wool,  he saj-s    :        ''"..-������������������'���������'  *'On one occasion I employed this  property' of soda in a- useful way.  There was ,a large quantity of neAv  blankets sent to. ��������� one of* our hospitals, which Avhen given ��������� out, '.were  said by the patients to be. not so  warm as the old blankets were, and  that led to an investigate an as to  whether the blankets were genuine  or not. They looked well, and  weighed properly, and I got a blanket sent to me for examination and  analysis. We found soon that there  was  cotton  mixed    with    the wool,  and the question was as to separating tho two, because they were thoroughly woven throughout, and it  was only by detaching the fine fibres  from each other that you.identified  tho cotton fibre. 1 fell-on the*device  of, using soda. I took a bit of blanket and put it in a A'esscl Avith soda,  and boiled it there, and,very1 quickly the wool got eaten aAvay by the  soda, and there was left behind the  cotton as a kind of skeleton���������a sort  of ghost���������of the original blanket out  of which it was taken. I mention  this merely to indicate to you the  pernicious effects ' of using caustic  materials, which, when employed  strong by themselves, affect woollen  articles in this Avay, and which, OAren  wlven .not very strong, aa-HI moro  slowly, but with equal certainty,  tend to  destroy the woollen fibre."  "N"ovv\.I want to tell you tbat wc  neighbors Iuxa-o bad a talk over the  matter, and we are not going ' to  have our-clothes and hands ruined in  this 'Avay. Several of our neighbors  AA*ho have proved to us that Washing Sodas, Potash. Chloride of Lime,  ancl Vsoap substitutes" arc most injurious to clothes and hands. "Free  alkali" ;.in 'son.ps .is practically the  caustic soda that burns the clothes.  Why,'you' dare not keep caustic-soda  in* a ���������tin canister; it*, must be in. an  earthen jar, or it Avill CA-en corrode  the, tin ! Noa\', it's for you to ' provide'us- with pure soap Avith out free  alkali, or we must find it plscAVherc-.  Madam, you enlighten me ! So  many soaps arc adA'crtised at pure,  that I really took little heed to any  difference  between them...- ,  I haAre one, hoAvever, that has medical certificates of its freedom from  free alkali. It is guaranteed pure ;  and the makers offer 85,000 reward  to any one who can prove that it,is  not pure, and further, I am authorized to return the purchase money  to any one finding cause for complaint. ' '     '    ������������������  Let me see it'!. Why, Sunlight  Soap! It's a beautiful clean, fresh-  looking, soap, and this Octagon  shape is very .handy. G-ive me five  bars.  Nofcebythn grocer.���������-This whole neighborhood is usiug StLnligh*- Soap now. I. have no  more complaints I have no room in my .store  now for resinous concoctions of alkali masons*  but it is not the grocer's fault if the public are  satisfied with common soaps.  If thre public ask  for Sunlight Soap ocfc :gon ba-r wo give x������  them.  If you use seeds, get good ones. / We keep  tho best in the market.   Catalogue on application. -- " ,   .-- -    "       '  . vKElTH &CO.,  P. O. Box -156.   ( 479 Main Street, -Winnipeg,  ALkWOOt MICA ROOFING  Reputation for durability established. Eleven  years trial. Our sovere frost has uo ofi'oct on it. <  Beware of American paper lelting Avhich cracks'.  in our cllmato.        -,,.'-'-.* "1 ,, <  -"TGHiggimiavo.. Winnipeg.   .    *>   Sole Agent  HERBAGEUM.- *    '      *  Real Estate Agent. .Issuer of Marriago Licenses  Yoiir:  ���������������-> Is assured if you ,.  TRAVEL.  '  ^ "~VIA    .  ������.������'  Lowest "Rates to  in the  all Points  EAST, WEST, AND SOUTH.  Daily Solid Vestibulcd Train, with  Sleeping Cars, to St. Paul and Min-  neapoiicJ. ���������'���������������������������"-���������.>...'���������'' " 'v.'--'������������������������������������"    -" ���������:'���������.���������������������������-.'���������,:  OCEAN STEAMSHIP' TICKETS  Full  particulars' on. application ,to  -uiy agent Canadian Northern Ry, or  GEO. BY  Traffic Manager,  SHAW,  \Vinnipeg.  Not one life can be pure in its purpose and strong in its' strife and all  life not be purer and stronger thereby.���������'Owen..Meredith.', .  Only the'braye know how to forgive; it is.the, most."refined and'gen-.  ������rous pitch of virtue human nature  ������������������.n arrive at.���������-Sterne.       >  Those, who attain to any excellence  commonly spend life in some one single pursuit, for excellence is hot often gained upon easier terms .���������Johnson.  The poor author is doublv poor  when ho is compelled to borrow his  thoughts.. - ES-MS-fl-^  ���������"rTu''*'**r--'������"^  *<?0.  THE GALLUP FAMILY.  IP-  W  I  AN   EVENING  OF  LAMENTATIONS   BY  THE AILING  WIFE.     Y"  She  Knew   rfcr,Time  For ,10eparttire  ���������.       For1' the   Otliei- 'Worht Had 'Come,  xrnl She Was Anxious to Become an  V Angel, but Tltere \Vere Dra-irbncki.  [Copyright, 1900, by C. B. Lewis.]  ,Mr. Gallup had finished his supper,  removed , his' coat andt shoes, and * sat  doAvn in the rocking chair to read the  copy of The Chemung County Gazette  he had brought home' from the post-  ollice when Mrs. Gallup dropped down  , on the lounge Avith a sigh and began: -  "Samuel, if you could spare a dyin  Avoinan three ' or ,four minits of your  time 1 should like' to talk, to you. T  know you don't-like' to be bothered  when you are re*adin,r ancl,I wouldn't  say a Word if it Avas only a bile on my  leg or one of my-back aches,'but* it's,  more serious than that, Samuel���������fur'  more serious."      '  Mr. Gallup stretched his legs out to  their fullest extent and made his toes  crack, "but he never looked up from'his  , * v * ,  *    paper. * ' ��������� ���������'-        ��������� , t  "I don't want'to give-you no sudden  ���������, shock," continued 'Mrs/ Gallup as the  'tears began to stream"down her cheeks  -'and'her nose tp twitch.* '!'but it's/my  duty  to tell  you,, so you   kin .prepare  yourself.'  Samuel," you'll  be a widow  befqre   Saturday   ui'ght!  ' Tonight, 'is  Tuesday   night     Before   sundown   on  'Saturday ,night ,the* funeral   will   be  over, I'll be.an angel, and you'll be free.  to go outtsomewhere every'evenm'and  play checkers.-   Do you-hear-me, Sam-**  mV. Gallup may or .may not -have  heard her. but-if he-did he'paid not the  slightest attention.:! Y    - ,-  "Yes; I'vergot my call-to go," she resumed as she" wiped','her-eyes ,on her  K  - . "SPA1F , A _DYIAT   WOMAX ��������� TOREK   OB   FOUR-  ���������' ���������- V!MINITS."     ,  anron. "I've had vrbeumatiz, fever,  consumption and heart disease, and  many, and many a time I've'expected  to go', .but I, have never felt/like this  before.' My heart goes tunk; tunk.  tunk. 'my lungs-seem to be/hitchin  , around, and now an'd then my breath  shuts off on me the same as if I had  got caught in a hole in the fence. Mrs.  Watkms was took this very Avay before she died, and so was Mr. Comfort.  It may come tonight, or it may be'de-  layedjtill tomorrer, but within a day  ore-" twg-y I'll be an angel. You'won't  blame'trie fur dyin, will you, Samuel?"  Mr.|,Gallup, turned his paper over,  pulled in his feet and'crossed his lcfgs.  but made no^ reply. , *  "Fcks can't.help dyin. Samuel���������that  is. I ?an't. ' I -bate to go before I've  made the soft soap and "put up the fall  ��������� picklls, but I can't help myself. It  was.jo 'with Mrs'.' Watkins. She had  the. si ftp grease all'ready and-Avas all  ready to dye rags fur a neAV carpet, but  when Gabriel's horn "sounded she'bad  to spread her AA'ings.. You'll miss the  soft soap. Samuel, fur-you're a great  hand|to wash up, and you'll miss the  1 pickh's, fur. you love sour things,'but  will jou miss me?" *  Mr. Gallup held thp paper in his left  ' hand and reached down his right to  scratch his heel through his sock, but  he wis dumb. Mrs. Gallup looked at  him ihrough her tears for a time and  ��������� then bhoked down a sob and said:  "Wj-11, if you don't miss me I can't  help it. I've alius hadhot-water ready  when you wanted to wash-your feet,  and rou've never found me Avithout  stlckin salve fur sore '-lingers.' I've  .nursed you through colic and sot up  with you through fever. You've never  had in- toll me my bread was.heavy or  the biscuit .tasted of saleratus. * And  when I'm laid away. Samuel, you'll remember that I wore the same bonnet  and shaAvl fur 21 years and that I  alius made a pair of shoes last three  years. Haven't I done purty Well all  .  things considered?"  Mr. Gallup might have agreed with  her, but if he did he didn't say so  aloud. He crossed his legs the other  Avay and scratched the other heel, and  when Mrs. Gallup could restrain her  tears she observed:  "I ain't leavin this house the way  some wives would, Samuel. When I  am gone, you'll find your shirts and  "" socks and everything in the . usual,,  place, ancl you won't have to sew on a  button. I'll even scald out the teapot,  and scour out theYljshpan if I have  time. If angels can look down from  heaven, then I want .to look down and  sr.������ that I've lef*/everything in order.  I want to ask you about angels, Samuel. Are they all old or young angels,  or are they sorter mixed ud?    Will I  be. set back 30 or 40 year's, or will I be  an old woman angel?"  She looked directly at Mr. Gallup  and waited for a reply, but he was  reading ho/w to make a hammock, on*  *of a flour barrel, and he paid no heed  to the question. " ,  " /'And are all angels piii'ty. Samuel?"  she'continued after awhile. "I've never been purty, since J was a baby and  fell out of the Avinder. but if I've'got  to be an ansel I AA*am my face made  over as soon as I get up there.    I'nT not  ' sroin ro be p* in ted our fur my homeliness as I fly around. 11*_ 1 was. I know  J'd make no faees������-nt some of 'em.  Will I be changed In tbo tAviukliu of  an eye and made as purty as the* rest  of Jem?"     ��������� ,   ���������  Something ,like a smile flitted ovci  the face of Mr. Gallup, but,it was pro1"*,  ably caused by, the article he Avas read  ' "And about the' music Samuel? 1  can't play on no harp without lessons.,  I have .never even seen a harp. When  we Avas-first married, I used 40 play  on 'the accordion fur you, but it Avas  awful'poor playin,, and you soou'.got  sick of it'. Is- it goin to be expected  that I kin fly- right up tp heaven *atid  begin playin on a 'barn.the  verv  first  thiilg?      i.2   it   IS,    tLs**:-    i.    Uii^iio    n-.    i  Avant to die. fI never could a-bear bavin  folks'laugh at me. And the singiu.  Samuel���������the singin! My voice is cracked,,and I sing through my nose, ancl is  that goin; to-do up there? I s'pose" I  could Avalk0aroimd'Avith ii robe on and  talk and visit, but T* ain't sing nor  play, am-l^they needn't expect it. Samuel, shall'Ave talk about Avhcthc'r you'd  better take a second ,Avife or not?  Sometimes I'think you had, and sometimes I ,thiuI"Yyouvhadn't. What do  .you think?",        ",' "  "Mr. Gallupj turned from the haip-  mock article to one on natural gas in  Ohio, and he extended his legs again  and prepared- to digest it thoroughly.  It might tiay'e occurred to" him- that  Mrs. Gallup AA*as in the room, and that  she or some one else/was talking-to  him. but lie ansAA'ered not. Ten minutes had .gone by Avben he finished the  article and looked up and around as( if  he had suddenly" missed . something.  Mrs. Gallup Iajr^ curled up on ' the  lounge" fast asleep, and in tbe cor-  n������r of each eye still glistened a big  \em\      '  *���������"* .   '     -' *       M.Quad.  ti  HER'"SUSPICION  CURE."  It  Blmle   Life   One   Lingering*   Honey-  in������>on Kor'itlrs. Jones' Advisor.  ��������� -"I would- bo quite', happy if niy husband would not spend so ,much of his  time ar his club," said-Mrs. Jones, with  a sigh. * '���������  "Why .don't you try the ^suspicion  cure?" said her intimate friend. '*  "What iu the name of Susan B. Anthony is the_suspicion, cure?" asked  Mrs. Jones in amazement. ,  "Well,  my husband got in the habit  'of "spending his evenings at his club,  and I worried over it for some time before I hit'upon a plan to keep ,him at  homo.'   At first  I   pleaded   Avith   him,  telling hini hoAV lonely I AA*as at home  when he was away, but he Avould only  laugh ancl promise to be home.early,  which'meant midnight or later.   Then  I changed 1113- tactics.    Instead of asking him to remain at home I urged him  to go to his club.    The' way he-, raised  his eyebrows the first time'I suggested  it shoAved me I was on the right tack,  and I resolved to/keep it up.  One night*  whQii bo came home for dinner he announced that he had a severe headache  and would remain home for the evening.    I  opposed the idea and pointed  out that an evening at his club would  cause him to .forget bis headache and  do it good.    He gave me a hard look,  but acted on  the suggestion  and  left  for his club.    Something told me that  he Avould be back within an hour, so I  made an  elaborate toilet ancl   waited  for him to return.   He'came home, as I  expected, with the pica that his head  was worse and that he couldn't stand  the noise at the club.    I condoled with  him and  ignored his question concerning   my   elaborate   toilet.     He   hasn't  been away for an evening since.    It is  almost like tlie old honeymoon, only he  appears to have something on his mind  that he is not entirely satisfied about."  ���������London AnsAvers.  Dnldiit-nii,  It has been found on study of 300  cases of loss of hair that baldness prevails most with unmarried men. .which  is contrary to the general belief.. Tbe  worries of the bachelor may be feAver.  but they are more- trying to the scalp  than are the multitudinous* cares of  the* man of family. Most bald people  are found to lead Indoor lives, and almost alt of them belong to the intellectual class. Usually the loss of hair  begins before the thirtieth year. In  woman it usually constitutes a general thinning': in men it affects the top  of the head. Diseases that affect-the  general nutrition of the bgdy are likely to thin the hair. Heredity is a  factor. If one has baldheaded ancestors, all the drugs of the pharmacopoeia will not bring out flowing locks.  Fonr to One.  An English officer in Malta stopped  in riding to ask a native the way. He  was answered by a shrug of the shoulders and a "No speak English."  "You're a fool then." said the officer.  But the man knew enough English to  ask:  "Do you understand Maltese?" ���������-  "No."    .  "Do you know Arabic?" !*V*  -*NO* -     ,   ���������"���������it-  ."���������"Do you know Italian?"   <���������      '   '  ���������  "No." i\ ' .' *  "LjU  "Do you know Greek?"     -  , \^  "No^" - '    ,  ;-Then you four fools.    I only oner-  Youth's Companion.  , An Inereilnl*������ns Lawmaker,  It is(reealled that when the projector  of the" railroad up'Mount Washington  'sought a charter from the New [lamp  shire legislature one of the laAvmakers.  in his speech on the subject.r said.  "Give the fool permission, but he might  as well ask for a railroad to the moon!"  But the'railroad is still running *o the  Tip Tcp House. '  A married man says that a wife  should he like a roast lamb���������tender aud  sweet, .nicely dressed, -but without  sauce.       '        '  When a man approaches you and  begins t.-Uing how, horic-st he is. hold  your bnnds on'your pocketbook.���������Arch-  Gil m Cllr'ie.  II iirtl.  "What! Seven years  old and can't ' spell  your name yet!' .What  is your name?",,  "It's    Obereckeckel-  etopper,     sir." ��������� Ne"w\  York Journal.*-  Wise Willie.  Caller���������Your  sister expects  me to stay'to  supper, doesn't  she, Willie?  Willie���������Sure!  And she said if  you stayed as  long as you did  last ��������� night she  thought she  would ask you  to stay to breakfast. "���������  The   Unusual.  Husband-  now **did you-  suspect that ,1  had been drink-  Wif e��������� By  your polite  manner. -  '-The Small Boy's Hunger.   ,  "If you- don't' quit eating so much,  Willie, you will be sick."  "Won't it be time  enough to quit  then?"���������Indianapolis News.  .     "   .-      ���������   , ���������-       '      ���������  A Lnncheon Served  In Seven Coarse-*,  For a seven course luncheon, there  should .be'first either soup or fruit." A  half'shaddock, d 11 ring tlie season, makes'  a good begin 11 hm or a few stsawben ies.  served with the hulls on. ' Then a lish  dish", as creamed or deviled (i:-h. served,  with rolls or bread: creamed sweetbreads, served in paper eases or pate  shells. Next either broiled chops, broiled  chicken, chicken a la Maiylaud or frit-as  see, with boiled rice or peas. Then tlie  salad course. Better, of course, a green  salad with French dressing,* and pass  wiLh it-cream cheese ;\\u\ _ wafers. Any  daiutj7 dessert, as chnilotte or ice cream,  cake and'coffee.���������Ladies'  rinrtic Journal.  ��������� Survival ol the Primitive.  A Philadelphia philosopher thus explains the general preference for a wall  table in a'restaurant: "Primitive man  ate in peril. The cave bear, the saber  tooth tiger, even some warrior of his  OAyn kind, was apt at any moment to  leap upon him and to devour his food  and perhaps" himself. Therefore he  took his meals with his back against a-  cliff or in the corner of two adjoining  cliffs,* if possible, and with the open  country -before him. That, you see,,  was .the safest way for him to eat. He  could not,then be surprised.  "And we still have in us that memory,  of th% primitive man,'and we still unconsciously, when we sit down to our  repasts, choose places that give us a  wall for our protection. That and not  a desire to see things is what causes us  to pick out walls and corners. ' You can  see as Well from the middle of a room  or from any other place, you knowi"  A  Thonp-Mitfsil   HnKband.  THE HEAT OF THE SUN  THEORIES   OF  THE   ORIGIN   OF THE  BLAZING  ORB OF  DAY.  Mr. Eagle���������Here. Maggie: I've brought  vou a ready made- nest.���������Scribuer's.  Ho-rr  Arbitration  "Works.  Yeast���������Don't you think arbitration is  "the safest A\*ay to settle disputes?  Crimsonbeak���������No, I must say that I  do not.\ We had some trouble with our  cook, and I went to the kitchen to arbitrate the matter with her. Come up  to the house some time, and I'll show  you .what remains of the suit of  clothes; I wore that day. ��������� Yonkers  Statesman.  In   Bad   Shape.  "I saw Jigley in the,neighborhood of  Miss Goldman's house last night, and  he didn't look at all well."  "Nervous, I guess; probably going to  pop."  "He looked more as if he were just  coming from pop."���������Philadelphia Press.  *!������e Principle of Meteoric Formittica  by "Mutual Gravitation JVot Contradictory, Scientists Contend, to  Known Physical Laws.  The sun being assumed to be an incandescent liquid, noAV losing heat, the question naturally occurs, Iioav did this heat  originate? It is certain that it cannot  ,have existed in the sun through an infinity of past time, since as long as it has  so existed it must have been r suffering  dissipation, and the finiteness of the sun  precludes the supposition of an hiGnito  'store of heat in his bodj-.  The sun- must therefore either have  been created'as au active source of heat  at some time of not immeasurable an-  tiquity by an overruling decree, ,or,. the  heat which he has already 'radiated'  mvay.and that Avhich he still possesses  .must have been- acquired by a natural  process folloAA'jug permanently established  laAvs. '       '  Without pronouncing the former supposition to be essentially incredible, we may  safely say that it is in the highest degree  improbable if we can, shoAv the latter to  be not contradictory to known physical  klAVS.' ''*,,���������-  And' we do shoAv this and more by  merely pointing* to certain actions going  oiYbefore ,us at present,; Avhich, if'sufficiently abundant at some past' lime, must,  have given^.the"sun heat enough to -count,  for all Ave know, of his past radiation and  ���������present* temperature.  It'is not necessary at present to enter  at  length  on "the-details .regarding   the  meteoric theory,  which  appears  to, have1*  been first* proposed in a definite forni by  .Mayer and 'aftci-Avard  independently ,,by  Waterston,. or   regarding  'the   modified  hypothesis of meteoric A-ortices, which the  writer of the present article showed'to be ,  necessary' in order that tho length of the '*  year, as knoAvn for the last 2,000 years, ,  may not have been-.sensibly disturbed bjv  their sessions which the sun's mass must  have had during that period,' if the heat  radiated a,way has alwaj's been compeu;  sated by heat generated by meteoric influx.   ���������  We may now ,believe that all the the-"  ories of-complete or nearly complete contemporaneous meteoric compensation  must be rejected, but we may still hold  that "meteoric -,* *- * is ,,*'������** *, not  only' proved to exist as a' cause of' solar j  heat, but it is the only one of all conceivable causes which Ave know to exist from  independent eA-idence."., .  The form of meteoric theory AA'hiclrhow'  seems most probable, 'and Avhich was first  discussed on true thermodynamic principles by .Helmholtz,'consists* in supposing  the' suh and its heat to have originated in'  ,a coalition of smaller .bodies falling together by mutual -graA*itation and generating,' as they must do, according to the  groat law demonstrated" by Joule, ah' exact equivalent of heat for the motion lost  in coalition.  That some form of meteoric, theory is  certainly the true and complete explanation of solar heat can scarcely be doubted  Avlien the following reasons are considered: ' '    *���������  First.���������No other natural explanation,  except by chemical action, can be conceived. * <  Second.���������The chemical theory is quite  insufficient, because the most energetic  chemical action Ave know, 'taking place  between substances amounting to the  whole sun's mass, would only generate  about 3,000 years' heat.  Third.���������There is no difficulty in accounting for 20,000,000 -years' heat by  the meteoric theory.  It/would'extend this article to too great  length and would require something of  mathematical calculation to explain fully  tho principles on Avhich this last estimate  is founded.  'It is enough to say that bodies, all much  smaller than the sun, falling together  from a state of relative rest, at mutual  distances all ' large un comparison ^Avith  their diameters, and forming a globe of  uniform density equal in mass and diameter to v the sun, Avould generate an  amount of heat Avhich, accurately calculated according to Joule's'principle and,  experimental results, is" found to be just  20,000,000 times Pouillete's estimate of  the annual amount of solar radiation.  The sun's density must, in all probability, increase very much toAvard his center,  and therefore a considerable greater  amount or heat than that must be supposed to have been generated if his Avhtjle  mass was formed by the coalition of comparatively small bodies. Ou the other  hand,, we do,*i*'v ki|OAV- how much heat  may have been .dissipated by resistance  and minor impacts before the fiunl conglomeration, but there is reason to believe  that even the most rapid conglomeration*  that we conceive to have probably taken  place could only leave the finished globe  with about half the entire heat due to the  amount of potential energy of mutual  gravitation .exhausted.  We may therefore accept as a lowest  estimate for the sun's initial heat .10.000,-  000 times a year's supply a: the present  rate, but 50.000,000 or 100.000,000 as  possible in consequence of the sun's greater density in his central parts.  The considerations adduced above regarding the sun's possible specific heat,  rate ot coo">'ag and superficial temperature render "ft probable that he must baA*o  been very sensibly warmer a million years  ago than now, and consequently, if he  has existed as a luminary for 10,000.000  or 20.000,000 years, he must have radiated away considerably more than, the corresponding number of times the present  year's amount of loss.  It seems, therefore, on the Avhole, most  probable that the sun has not illuminated  the earth for 100.000,000 years and almost certain that he has not doue so for  500,000,000 years.  As for the future, we may say with  equal certainty that inhabitants of the  earth cannot continue to enjoy the light  and heat essential to their life for many  million years  longer unless' sources now  unknown to us are prepared in the great  storehouse of creation.���������"Essays  In  As-  ,tro:*.omy," by  Dord  Kelvin (Appleton &   '  Co.,).    Jnst   Lifce  a  Man.  "Mrs. Stocks���������If we-mcWe into , that  cheap house, aat'11 lose caste.  Mr. Stocks���������"Don't care if we do.   It's  the'best avo can afford  Avithout running  hopelessly into debt, and. besides, it's a    ,  comfortable pis-ice, anyhoAV.  Mrs. Stocks���������lluh: Just like a man!  Only so you can be comfortable and pay  every little bill as quick as it comes in you  don't care Avhat the -world thinks!���������New  "York'Weekly-   Buenos Ayres Is the largest city ss'uth  of the equator. Rio de Janeiro cornea  next,' and Sydney, NeAV South Wales,  Is a good third.  '<- rilow   Son^a.  Got   IIi������   Xnni'J.   -  When Sousa, famcus tho Avorld over  ns king o,f inarch music, landed in tho  "home of" the free," he carried Avith  him a valise on Avbich av:is marked in  plain letters" "John Philipso, U. S. A."  Time passed, and<this son' of sunny Italy commenced to groAv,, musical and  alao to become Americanized. It Avaa  then, so the story goes,' that he ex-  'prossed the desire for a-name moro  nearly 'like those of the people of ���������  which he Avas one"by choice.  Philipso "sounded out of place, doing  .service  for, a   man'-Avh'o had  imbibed,,,"  American   beliefs ( and , customs   and  -whose destiny Ava=������ closely; linked Avith -  "the   stars   and ,'stripes   forever."     A   ,  member of the band >to w.hich he be'  ���������longed  finally  made ar.suggestion.   I-������j  turned out to be a happy 'one and "way *  adopted' by  tho'master of, the'"baton.  The suggestion Avas this: To.the.nam.j  Philipso'add U. S. A.   Divide the ona ;,  name into two words,-and. there .aa-'os  the  smooth' sounding and,,easily 'prc-  aounced name of John Philip * Sousa.-  ,   ���������<' ���������.    *.' <  r  1 "/'  cy  ' \  '&  When   KJHBtinsr Was  Costly.  The case'of the. People against Mur*,  line;   heard  by  the  governor  of  New '  Haven colony in council on May day,.*  1060. indicates the attitude/toward un-^  licensed, kissing in those times.   It'ap- H  peared that Jacob Murline and Sarah -  Tultle'* had been  caught  kissing each   ���������  other.       ' '. , ' '  * Jacob tried to throw the blame on  Sarah, saying he thought she liad "Avitb  intent ,lct fall- her 'gloA-es." " Sarah "de-  "nicd the intent. Jacob" then admitted *  that'ho "tooke her by the hand, and^'  they both sat .down upon a, chest, but  whether he kysscd her-'or sho kyssed* :  him be',knows'*not: for he never thought '  of it since until Mr. Raymond told hiin; '.  that he had not layde it to heart as he'  ought."      ' -     '  , \ " -,      ������\l,  YqThe stern governor, after duly loc-;  "turing,the" guilty parties on thetenormi-^  ty of, their offense,'.'decreed that "the;  sentence therefore concerning ���������them is  that 'they shall pay either of theni a  fine of 20 shillings to the colony."   .  H  ,1  Y'   **!  t.l  1 ���������**-  '-'-Y-n  Bereavement  and   Unsiness.  The following-curious advertisement  is taken 'from a Spanish journal: "This  morning our Saviour summoned away  the jeweler, Siebald Illmaga, from his  shop to another and better world." The*  undersigned, his widow, avIII Ayecp up-  on his tomlvas will also his tAVO daughters,  Hild and Emma,  the  former of^  whom is married, and the latter is open.,,  to'an offer. The funeral Avill take place'  tomorroAV.    His ** disconsolate ' Avidow,  Veronique* Illmaga.    P.    S���������This, be-  r-eaA-ement will not interrupt our em-  ploy ment, which Avill be* carried* on aa  usual, only our place of business' will  be removed from 3 Lessi do Lciuturiers  to 4 Rue do, Missiouairc, as our grasping landlord has raised the rent."-  IIow the  Pencil   Was  Produced.  That the luscious peach has-been derived from tho bard shelled almond can  no longer be successfully denied. It is  said that tho peach in Its original soil  was a virulent poison and that the Persian warriors brought to Persia some  of tbe seeds and planted them for tho  purpose of poisouingthe points of their  arroAvs so as to render wounds caused  by them to bo fatal, but a change of  climate . and soil produced a fruit  which is not only luscious, but is. esteemed exceedingly healthful.  The  Biiiiainsr  of 11 Iilfe.  Life is a building. It rises slowly.day  by clay through the years; Every new  lesson we learn la.-.Is a block on the edifice Avhich is rising silently Avithin us.  Every IriJluance that impresses us. every book avo read, every conversation,  AA*e have, every act of' our commonest  days, adds something-to'-the invisible  building.���������J. R. Miller.  Not   Vut   Out.,   -  I was not successful in the atten  to eject the cook from my.house.  But Aviiat nettled me was the 'unrai-  fled demeanor of the woman.  "You might at least have tho good  breeding to act 'put out/" I cried and  left the kitchen, slamming the door behind me.���������Puck.  The Forhoarinp: r������opr.  "A good dog is the best friend a man  can have." remarked the tobacconist to  the Avooden Indian. "When you :������������������:j'c  sick, be doesn't tell you what to tr kv\  and when you get avcII lie doesn't ' ott  you how much worse be had the sirrs  nisease."  '.;^\*\;i-^.^"j>i.''-:-. <-. ,-1 p  HERLOCK   HULMtb.  JK.  ,< i  Aiintfic* 0::e of HJb H'einar3cn^?Ie F?**--  ii-.i^!.:v������:i.-*  Come**  to   Lt^:!it.  Sherlock Holmes. Jr.. clutched hia com-  ���������   piiin.!:'-i ������t:-ni aud said:  "I'i   you .-if that man?"  "I'c-s     Vou mean "che one with the uiuf-  tac-ho ciiifl goatee, don't you:  "The   bame.    He   was   aAvake   all   la^t  . nicht    with    tbe    toothache.    His    wife  :  ������.iiHi'U   to   put  che   hot   water  bottle   <>:���������  \ ins cheek   but-/he  wouldn't have'it.'and  i'hhe in.ide him proinibe cq have the tli'm,:  1 pulied to.day.  His tooth isn't aching now,  :; though." ,  i ' "*Tl>cn  he-is a  friend of yours, is he?  ; \Yhy -don't you   ntrodaJe aae?"  ':    '"A  frieud'of   uiaeV   -\'o.  .1 never saw  ' aim until I called your jx-eution to him  : a moment -Ago."  The great :iu-.i"eur   " -(.-.-<-'.<ve's compan-  ! ion   shied   away   -.i^.*   -i   .iuutilcI   woiiuiu  who sees   \Yu Ting r'aag    0:ning to ask  i.!ie: lions and   -aid:  "Khorloek, ilu-iv's ao use calking:   I'ac  uot   to  quit   iissueialing   with  y.m.    iYis  "r.uea'tuiy way \ou ha\e 5C ,i:i lii.g out all  ::i'.out people avIu are siraiigor-^ to y./.i is  jiiakni,-; aie'nervous.    I'm  afraid  .if y-.ni.  How 'do   you   know   this   man   had   tho  U.otJ.a^heaU last night.���������*'''  "Look  at  hih eyes.    They  are  ail  red.  '  I'ltey  are   the  ey.-s  of  a   man   who  has  jecn robbed of i-deep."  "Yes.    1 cav see tliat hrs eyes are red,  lull  p.-rh-ip* he is a ���������victim of hay  tVver  or soaiething of that kind."  "No.,  If   you   could, make   derim-i ions  * you    would    know    better.    Look    ag.iiu.  Vou will tee a 'dentist's sign iu a'window  aer.*-*h*. a sticet there."  ' ,   "Yes. I s.".- ii."   , *  "1 'noticed! that,lie gave a sudden start  when he'happened to see iliat hi.-ai. a-.id  hall stopped as ir be thought ul ��������� man.,'  over. TIk'ii lie put a .hand up. to bio  '-cheek, assumed a cheerful look and hur-  lied on. So���������yon sis? his tooth has quit  jichuig. (  - '*Bi:t how do^you know ho didn't have  a. hot water oottle against his cheek last  night?" ' ,  ' "Because he has.jnsr had n shave.   A  ��������� inari neviu jn-t- sha\e������l the in xt tn'iiiiiiu  . iiRi-i Jetting  his  e'hi-K-k   rest  v.nmi   a-bet  wuier bottle.    Ot' course his wile wanl**1..'  him u������.let"hor add to l-i*- ulKo-.-y by boil  ing hib face, because that's always n woman's ,wuy iu siich'ia CP,;:-.- of hein^'k".--'."-  "Perhaps'.' But,  1   think  you  haw  iel't  one    point    unexpliunetl.     Hoav   do . you  know the man has u wife?"  "C'"i. b'*:t you're dull. You're a bruit the  poorest deductor I ever s:iav. Didn't y^u  iialkYthut he was wtvirmg a hail, v, ;���������'< h  , chain? Who but a ��������� uuin' with, a un>*\\  :;t'i-on<r v/u'e viui.-c h'-ur cfunpo������!'d U  'would wear one of iho^o things 'a.l-'*:-  euli ;htVned age?"���������Chicago 'Record-lJer '  aid. .        ; "*    '   "      "   ,  A      n^  iT*t  I      "s     h   A       f%  Y(ri    yinxlk  1  &       J     ft'       (3  ���������LJ  ft?    *  1-4  >-  t-������t-������AfM  %_  s >  x \  nvr> 5  --<\  /  r>.  is  AsthnirLlerie L'rings instant Rel'-ei and Permanent  Cure in All Cases.  .sknt.ahsolutely' free on receipt,of postal.  Write Your Nam.0, and Address Plainly.���������  There is nothing like A.-thmalene. It  brings instant rel.ef, even in the wor=t  ca>es.     Il cures when all elbt fai.s  ���������TheR.n*-. C P. Wells, of Villi Kinge,  III., d&ye: ''Your trial bottle of Asthma-  I- ue received iu good coodita .a. I oa.inot  toll youv llow'thankful ������ teel tor the good  derived from ifc. I wis i si v<������, chained  wivh yacnd f>-n- thro.x? ,uut A"!,iru f.-r ten  'y'ftars. I ih spared v>t" iv*-r heutrj; cored. I  8a>v your ufivertisenii1"!. f >r th������ cure ^>i" this  drca.ifu'l ihm! tornu'ii%uij{ dis-< a-"--, -Asthma,  ..u-.d thought you had ovetspoken yoUf������clvoa  but re>olvod to ^ivu it, ,i ,ir.,d.' To -my  aslou.o'ii'-eu', t'tw b')r.l .lY.r-ri 11lio a0charm.'  St-od aie a fiill-.-ii/.-jd bii-.'l-,"  *-fo-.'j  V yy {? ������xh   I  KpES-h Lapep beer  BTEANI  eer,  .A  1 ���������-'J  V  ������������i      ' I?    ������  THE BEST .'.".-  IN  THE'PROVINLE  and-  Porter.  A rev,aid of $5.00 will he p'aid for information' leading  to  conviction or  persrons >vitholding or ciestroyiiiti any   kegs  belonging *to',this. company  Slr MRTFSiL,   -Manager.  '��������� E N.  '���������n  mm**-   -uwj������ iamn.  'jrimnrr ti>-8> ir r- m-ussr"-*  ,,- Rev. Dr, Morris Wechsler,  Ral������bi of the'C������'������ii|. Biji*.i Israel. ���������;  " '',     ��������� Now York, Jan. 3. 1901.   .  i  Drs Tai-m* EROf''. "Mr.'Jicn'K Co ,  -, G-HiHleim-u:    Your A  :i*. idiiLie is   o*nrc*c  j    oelicui ri uio'ly tor AbTlium aud Ha..    Fover,  !    ami ics oornuobiciou, alio-. ia.%..i   ail    'roablta  j    *A-nich oi.iiuiilia ���������          as-jOiiuhui^ jij-.l  .Dilmia Jfi*ih A>.���������.!-,,'.a.  WOQtlol-fuI.  JLtSb'.lCCeSS'ld  After havinii i^ cirelutly analyzed, -.��������� e can state that Aafchmi.it m;   confc* ina no   opiu-r,  riiorn!*,hie, chlorof J1; .:i or elhor.    Voiy tiul> {yoord,  '**      ' .REV, DR.'"MORE 16 WECiI-^ER.  ".Are  JiiL::-?"  Her Go3it!o Il;^5t.  you    very    loud    oi'' your  iiklwA.  '���������V.'hy,  yos.''  ho sniil.  cluii  '1  like it  ui-otiv  /ol  "1 .should think you'd be m-)i-o cin-iul  :Yif \\"- n-./U'.-itloii. thou.'"-slip*.-u-J,--*.'v,oii  ��������� L, Tliori-m'tft-:   \\bi-.i   he   c-iuk-   hum"   Ifty  ��������� :uu ii.iU diili-uliV" liniims tho l:-.'. to u-, li"  ��������� told  hor  ho  hud   boou  to  Uu- tlit-i*t������������������!-.  n  '. '.ii-in-j uunnUoriul to h:in  v,-hat  km-' of .*  ��������� i.-pr.t'at'iou     the     theater     got.���������Cuk-a,,.'  1 .1'ost. '    ! '  fiIecl3nJiio:ili*'5- Co-JjnltSorc.l.    **  ;     As the ou-i s.;- uuin di-miS'-.Ml  the nt-v\-'.,v  Jiiairiod :uiir In* ttu-kod tbo loo m hih v-'  l������ofkot   with <a   ui.-Ulfi- ot oou.so  air.   oii-  :.*!vi:ni  -���������* hieh. a  fiiopd roniy: kod:  ,       -'I   iiiiii���������;nt������ ih:iT  l'onn  of n-vnut* rau-i  bo   an   ov^ryiiaj    na.-iu-   with   you.      Yoo  poi-Ui-t ii h) nu-cbanioaUy."  ,   "Why  shouldn't   t  acr-i-pt  it  mocbii'Mc-  ally, j;nod '-ir?" ropiiod tho divine.    "11  i������  .���������ompfu-iition for joiner work, isn't it?"���������  iCichmond Dispatch.  c        No Occ:>i������ioiJ Fos* K.ci--iiioi-se.  "Yes." the t'aruu-r s-aitl.- "I've raised a  big crop of bops this year, but I ai i't  Tuite ea-^y in my conscience whe.u 1 think  bow  it'll   all   be   worked   up   into   lujror  u-er.  "Yon   may   quiet   your   scruples,"   replied bis friend- from the city.    "Science  has  discovered   several   wonderful   wajs  *r.f    mnkim**    beer    by    u-.in</    ���������-ioi-'othlnp:  :boapor than hops."���������Chicago Tribunu.    _  Z^wttisift- <lso Otljer Foot lis St.  "Mother���������Uthel is* the vc-iy intake of  *.vliat 1 was at her acjo.  He���������Really! I shouldn't have thought  il possible.  Mother (coldly)���������May I ask why7  ITo (seeit-p bis error and striving to rectify il)���������Ob���������ei���������I was iorceUii'tf wtiat a  long time njjo that must have been.  At A noil'i*i*'"* Aflersioori Ten.  He���������I'm thinking seriously of resuming  business.  She���������I thought you liad retired permanently.  "1 thought.so. too. but 1 ,need some excuse for not .attending- my wife's after-  ,noon teas."���������Uro.nklyn Life. ,  Axi.A3*������J>iti������>H.i Lady.  ' Tlnsbnnil���������The doctor 'snys if I keep up  this race for money I'll breakdown when  1 am  forty.  Wife���������Never mind. dear.   By that time  we shall be able to afford ,it.��������� Life.  HOUSEHOLD  HINTS.  Piddos of vlm-f-'ifT will not keep is a  jar that has evor bad aay -kiiul oi' greaso  kept in it.  Lauip cliiinne~-������ may be quickly cleaned   by   rubbini:  the:p   with   a   clean   sof'i  ;  cloth and polishing-with a piece of news-  ;  paper. .  ; ��������� Clnm shells are more convenient for  ; scraping ��������� pots and kettles than a knife,  ' requiring less tinio to remove tbe burned  i surfaces.'  ':      Half-a lemon dipped in salt and rubbed  on your ivory kni'.'e handles will restore  ; them to their original v/bitcnuss.    After  '��������� cloi'.is- this  wash  the   knivus  at  once  is  warm water.  To renew tho pristine lightness of old  feather pillows lot them out in a sumiiK.-i-  rain until thoy are thoroughly wet. Then  drv them by pinning them to a line and  iiuiriii by beating them.  .   u< -, ,    ���������   ���������' '   A vox Sprinos. N. Y., Feb. 1, 190J.  Dii. Tai't P>nos   "Mjsmcine Co. -        ' , '  - (>ry Ibii. >.: 1 '������������������������> '������ '-nt** t*e-<timonia! from a sense of diity, having te&fced, the wonderful ufl'tot of your Abchur-ileise, for uih euro oi" A.fthoi-j,. My wif-o has been i*>h\ujed ��������� ith  bya^'iiortic cjairhaid for '.ho piisu 12(ve.irs.    Havnu/   <.xb:<us.td  mv'onn   ekil' *"aa'   well' aa  Hay in../   cxh-������us.tri  my" oun   ekil' "'aa'   well  niduy oinrtirt. L chanue i co'aee v-11 ���������-ignaipoi- your nHirl./wa on'KlO'h street Rtw   Y-irk, I  ato  c-i oiican-ed i b >cfclo'ot Aathisialeu^-.     My ^vifo ooiii.nifcfict'd I   Muui. about Oia   r-rst   ot  Nowjiubtr     Tver*, ^o-ai noMceri a tadicil   inipruv<. ment.       Ast-r   us.ii g   ono   bottle ��������� tier  con-  Asihmi itus (ii-a"ppearfcii and she u eutir'cly fi*e= fi-i.iu all symptomis.      1   eel that I cat-.  ais.ouc'y':<.ci)imooua ;he o't-dicii.t- to all-who are aiuict>:d.\\it'i thj^dij'iPs^'nsr-diaiaa'".  ' ' Youn, rusyecstully, ,    - U. D. i'HELLJ*5, ^l.D.  Db. Taut Vnos  "MediotneCo. . t, . ���������    feb." 5.^1901.  G-jiiw' imu:    1 wdo iioubiod with Asthma for 22 years.    I have 'tried   iiamurous   reme  diea, out tho; hdvs all failed.    I ran ac:-oa= your j.rlv-rt,i&em'eui ,-..\ !   -ua-U-d   with   a  boitle.     1 lou.ii* it-!:��������� t .tt'ouce.o I have l-oioo yurob.ihtfl > our ful -.az^   bobtl'-,  -and  ever-fi iti-t'a .    I hav������- rmmlv of f< '*���������   ohib;;eu, and i< r *-iix ytjcire was, .nidbk- to work,  ji-iw in bin; best, of health and doing ousnioss. every day.    'i'hbi lo&cin onj- yi-u c-an mal.-e use *  >" 'in van  -.en. lb , "-'"'' -���������'  ���������S   lt\PftAlSL,  67 H3.1S'. I2i)v-   S'..,^-v/T  r": Cicy  of asi you ->en, m  Home a-uiioja, 2^5 Rivirgton Street,.  TRIAL BOTTLE SENT AHSOLUTEtY 'FREE ON RECEIPT  r OF POal'AL.    ,  '���������     "Do nob d'.^lay.    Wrjte at oiioo/oJilinssi. fe, DR. TAPL'   "BROS.   M13DICINE   CO,   79  E-st isOoh S:.,'Ncw Y.-r,- City.%" " ��������� -  ���������    '      SOLD! BY* A-LL DRUG'GIS.i"S. *  KOTICK IS HERI'YY GLVES Ui������,b ������*],-  plioa,ii')u v.ill bo marie to the Legislativ  AbaCiubiy ot the P. o^mce of Bri-is'i C>lam  biu at lib pre>eui: ^s;ii;n lor he Aoo io \u-  coriiorate a ijotnpmy with >jj*<.\er v,o cm.-  htrae , ��������� ij-iip, i-i-m <iio ai.ri'c-ycsiato a .-iu-sjU  or doabla hue of r-iiwos, to be-o-'orati-o by  .i-roan^ ileotirmitv or t. y other mode o  power, at acd fri.m tbe Oitj of V"ii_i.>zid, in  t.-ie [>ro*.ineeY-i Bnt' h Columbii1. t'beooc  Nortti viosc b) tie moiit fea-*ib'0 rou;s to :i  point at or oca'r Seynioar Hairows iu th-  said PiOv-iuce of Bnliah Columbia; an-  v.ith power to construct, eatabhah, main-  Lain and. coiuiuu-lly < porate a railwaj  firry ateom&hip berviee for the purpo.-e o'  iranaferriug forrewar I pass ngers a. d pa -  s -nger and fre ght cars* from tt-e aid poin  r������L or utar Seymour "Narrows in Vai.eouver'b  Isl-md to a piuuc ou the Mainlaad of the  Province of ������i'ibh Columbu' ; and v/ith  further powers to build, < quiy, maintiii-  and opf-race "i*-ranches of tho said -a'lwi.y  from at^v pnmt on t.be ina-n hue thereof i.o  any point in Vancouver Inland ; and with.  pO'-ir to huild and operate ti*an.way& in  ooimec.il,n viuli tbe said nilwav ; and v.ith  povver to build, com-imci, iqaip, niaiubabi  anil operaiu tehgraph a:.d tebpliooe lineb iu  ���������.���������ormeoiio-j wit-i the f-aid railways ami  branched; ancl with power to geueiaie tleo-  biioity for die huoply of light, liuat and  power, and for all, any and i\ory otlu-r  pu.pose uicntioticcl in ijoottons 80, Ul, 82  mil 8i*i ot t'.>e " v\'att-r (Jlaiirfet- Ooubolioa-  uinii A-*,, 1S97," aii-^ to oo cvi-ryii.n-j;  -jf-.-eay *ryOr :nci<*U-n'.al to ' tho,cinline; out  of -iiI or any of th'v "bjfOt.-i refi-Vrud '.om  the said .seuliocs; and' -.v>lh po-.i������r to ux-  -I-si.' all 'hij poworn.j^iveij to the Company  b Parts-i IV* and V ->r"ihe '��������� Vvater v'lausu.i,  \./ ���������oKoluiaUtin Aet, JS97 ;' and with pown-  t.o build, ov.-n and o.niotaui .sawiniilfc ; a:,d  to carry ou a general expveys business, and.  to'lniuu, '. inuii.ta ii 'anil opura-e DJ'idgei,  raiid.., way.--, fi rrio.-, wli^rve.*, docks,  ate������,uiboans,'��������� rtteanihiVipsi. ccai haiikeiH,. and  other .'works; and to make, tiatlie or ��������� other  arvjnaeineiit.- %virh railway,- rt.-.eanishi[<. or'.  ������s-.:a!!ib<.'i,r. aud.-oth.-r C'-impanieo ; and wii>h  power to exp'.opriaie lauiis 'or the purposes,  .if i.):e Conipai-.y and'to-acquire laini noLsutea,  pi"?vi.ieg("ii or .titbe'r aid w.om any Giivern-  ent or Mumciuaiir.v, or other', uersong or  .bodies coi-pm-ate, aud with pqwtv io build  wa^on roa-la to bo ui-ed n. the ooustiuoc on.  ot.feU.ch railway and >r, advancB of yarne, aud  to li.'������*y ffind ioih-..", 'oilrt from alt perHun.s  using, and on all fright pa������sii-g over ar.yo'f'  ^iich roads built by the Company, whether  before or after tbe i-on^Cruer-ion ol ciie rail-  w.y, and wibn power i-< s-A'l out its uudei'-  ...,������vi:.->.' ;  u'l-i   ������������������; h all 'ofcher-1'.'.-.ual,   m;u^Ks;uy  (������*.. i,- oft? ;a/S*>.  ASSESSMENT ACT AND PROVINCIAL  REVBN'DE TAX  iV i .  e:  ���������till r  i.  ivih-tu-a ������s iphv Ij-j  ��������������������������� c-'3H������ry or cjiidae^ve Lo ihe above obji.o������������-,  or any of them.  i>Ye.' at Victoria,'���������Pv.C..   thia 24r.h day of  Mareh: A.P., 1902.  K08KRTS0K & ROl'iT.RT^ON.  SLU/lcri-OKf.* >'0.(: ti'ik ii.!-j*Lii.;.\;,-r.s  '.'OAIOX DlHTRIOT.  Tv^ i OTICE is hi-iet������v given, in  accordance  ���������-^     ,w;th tho   Sca^u-Sa,    IhAi  Prr\mual  vuiuc Tax, and    \\\    taxes   levied    under  .'.��������� A--V- -3������)'ii,cr.i Act,, are   nov.-   cue   for the  year 1901.    A*i tl-i above named Uxes col-  Ic-ilile v������ ithin ihe Con ox "D^uio*: die   payable at my office, al the Court 11 >u&e Cum-  beil^nd.    A%seab'.-d bsxes are cr>lieotible   at  the following rates,. v\x:���������  ]f pv.cl on o:  i>eforo Juue 30th, 1901:���������  Tlii-er������liftha ol one   per   cent,   on   real  property.  Two- and one-half per cent, on assessed  value of wild laud,-_  One-half of one per ceut. on personal property. ,  Upon -ucb excess of income���������  CLASS A.���������On one thousand .dollars and not  exceeding ten thousaud dollars, one per  cent up to fi.*o thousand dollar*,, -ind  two per -.Cit. on the i emaK.der:        jf  Class B J���������On ten thousand dollar . and nob  exo'ecliog *fc ��������� eiity thousand dollais. ono  Mill oiic-haif ������cv cent, u-j to ten thousand  dollars, a;.d tf-a auu one-halt per cuit. on  r,b*<**v4om;i.,.t\der :  Class 0 ���������Oo tweury thousand dollars, aud  not exceeding inr'y thousand dollars, t.ao  ut.sl one half p< r cent, un to twen;y thousand dcilaiy, and tiuee per eenfc. on the  rem lindi^i :  Class D. ��������� On all others in excess of forty  i,oou*wnii dolla,.-, thiee per cent, up to  fot iv tl-ou.-ai'd do hirs, ar>d throe and  oue-baM ].er cenL. ou tbe remamdi r.  IF paid on -or'.-af^er 1st July, 1001:���������  Pour iil'th-. of one ni'V,C\'U. on real p.ropi-r'ty.  Tlwei! per cent, oa'-t'ie aasesdtd value "of  'Ailu lan<l. ,���������������     , '   ''  Tbt-e.-quaneiB ol one per ceut. on porconal,  pvoytrty. ��������� Y  On i-o niuoh of tho income of any pernon as  eyeiid's- ono.th.uu'-iuri dollars, iu aec.ord-  anee with the folio*..ing classiiicationw;  up-m anoli excess the rates shall be,  i.iiiisf l.y :,��������� '  Class A���������0u ono thousand dollars*, and not  . excWriing ten thousa^id dollars,   one   and  oufr-balf per   cent,   up   to   live   thousand'  'do"l:-.i:',, a tl :,wo and   one-half  per  cent.  ou ��������� !w ri-o-aiuder : -  Class B ���������Ou tetj thousand do'larp, and not  exceeding tw: nfcy thonsau'd dollars, two  per oent. np to ten thousand dollars, and  three par cent, on the reaiainder :       v !<  Class C.��������� On twenty thousand dollars, and  not exceeding forty thousand dollars,  three, per cent, up to twenty thousand  dollars, and three and one-half per cent,  oo tho remainder :  Class I).���������Ou all others in excess of forty  thousand dollars, thr e and one-half }>e'r  cent, up to forty thousand dollars, and  four per ooni; on tha  remaiuder.  Troviiici-ji'Pvsvo-me T'iX  ifiS per oapita.  JOHN   HAIRiji,   .  AssiRssor and Collector.  -  Cnmberk::d, B, C., I i th January, 11)0 i.    ���������  Aiy2"2  kit  .11  Kaquimalt ft'TianRimo.-Ev.  c *  ^rrrn_i-rr*,TTTT~,-irirT*"*/,rrTTri"i���������rr*"iTrr*i'i ���������** **~**'t-h���������"���������w-rr-i'-WT'r  Stearuphip Poheclule Effective Tuesday, Januaiy 21, 1902  S. S. "City of Nanaimo.'.  Leaves Victoiia Tuesday. 6 a.m., for Nanaimo, calling at Noitb Sa-*nich,  Cowichan, "Musi1 raves, Dur^oyne,  Maple. Hnv, Vesuvius. Chemainus,  Kuper, Thetis and Gabrioi'i.  Leaves  N;.n,i.mo  Tuesday, .3, p.m.,   for  Union Wharf and Comox direct:  Leaves'Comox' and Union Wharf Wednesday,  12 noon, for Nanaimo and  way pons-.  Leaves Nanaimo Thursday, 7 a.m ,  for  Coinox and way ports.  Leaves Comox Friday,  7 a.m., for  Na- ���������  naimo direct.      ,'  Leaves Nanaimo Friday, 2 p.m., for-Vic-  tori������,-calling at Gabnola, P'ernwood,  Ganges, Fuiford and North.S.aanich.  Leaves Victoria Saturday, 7 a.m., for  I si ancl Ports, calling-, at North Saan-  ich, Cowichan, Musgraves, Bur^oyne  ' Maple Bay, Vesuvius, ���������Chemainus',  Kuper, Thetis, Fern wood, 'C'SnY-es,  Fulford and Victoria, when freight or  passengers offer.  Special arrangements can be made for-  steamer to call at other ports than those  above mentioned when sufficient business  is offered.    ' '  Tne   Company   reserves   the   right   to  cbaivjc sailing dales and hours of sail;n*-**.  without previous notice.  ���������   GEO. 1.. COUS-THST,  .,  Traffic Ma"Q3g*or  Black Diamond Su  *Q  sery  QUAKTER WAYjWellingUnRoad  HUTOBIESOH- &  PIRRT  20.0OO Fruit Trees to   ch.ooa>   from.  I.,arg������ Asso.- truent of Orntmental  -Trees,   Shrubs- and   Eves*aeens  Small Fruits   in   Groat   7ariety.  Orders   by   mail   promptly   attended to. '    - 1  sl2tc  P. O. BOX, 190.  KURTZ?S OWN ���������!'���������"���������������������������':  KURTZ'S PIONEER, or  KURTZ'S SPANISH BLOSSOM  ,      G1G---ASS  .'^STThe.Best in B. C.  and made  by Union Labor in Y  6'S;  ���������poneer ������3faav JTactoi  ������TlrTP,n^..T������lH-W.rJ-������r.lfWW1MW^JlU  ncouyer,  B.o.  TO THE "DEAF.  A'ricb-lad)"-'cured of ber Beaf-  ness and Noises in tbe Head by  Dr. Nicholson's ArtiFcial Ear  Drurns, gave $10,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people unable to  procure Lbe*Ji7ar Drums may have  them free Address No. 14517  Tho' Nieho'Yori Institute, 780  Eighth Avenue, New York, U.S.A.  &<��������� fflSlBBBSSr*  >*"  S^T���������-Vn^*.iijfr tj-jt* ;.. jtw^jt^w,  ���������"���������"-"If-'* TT ftirtfjnri������.jn t  IP  ' .THE   CUMBERLAND   NEWS  ' " -   ' * .      n ' ^  t  Issued Every "Wednesday.   -  ' *"     * i  W. B. ANDERSON,       -     - EDITOK  Tlie coluumd ot Tile News are open to nil  who wish to axpreso clieieiu viewt. ou matt-  rs of public   interest. . . ��������� <.        ^  While,we do not hold our3elve3 .responsible for the utterauces of correspondents, we  reserve   the r ght oof   declining   to  iuser  omm-anicaik'na unneceasaiily pe'iraonal.  WEDNESDAY,'JUNE 4;i.902  11 hi ������������������������> ���������nfifi"  SOLD BY ALL NEWSDKALSi'.S: ,10c  ���������  Furnishes Monthly to all LovertYot' Music a  ' v^st .volume  of   Now,   Utioioe,   Copyrigh*  Compositions by the most popular 'authora'.*'  32   * Pages ,. of     Piano     Music  "���������     t     5  SONOS/*     -.5 lSfSTRUj-MKNa'AL,  , 10   Complete -Pieces- for*5 Pianoi ,  with interesting Mubieal Literature.  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Our fee returned if we fail: "Any-one sending sketch, and description oi  any Invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerning-the patentability of" same. "How to! obtain a patent" sent upon request. Patents  secured through us advertised.for, sale at.our expense.   ' "        . </  - Patents taken out through us receive special notice, .without charge, in  Thb'Patent Recobd, an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted  , by Manufacturers and Investors. .  Send for sample copy FREE.'    Address, _    ������ -     ��������� ,  '���������������"''/, VE&Y&& ?l-' E^fM^S - & * 'GO; ���������  ,    .   */,     '" - (Patent Attorneys,)   '   ,'."''. ' ','  ' Evans BuSMen������,   -/, -���������,    . W&SS-EEMGTbN, Dm ������������  -5    i  rliitiii*^  Wks>  ���������a  *aJ^  -r*"*  ,  OF EVERY-CLASS AND DESCRIPTION  .-** - i *       " "*���������"  At    LOWEST    RATES.  ���������LU*illl     ���������!   I       II II   llil<   IWIU * I I m\ IIIIH* ri'llT **ie*WUmntoLttll&mxtoJm'*tt^M'.mtnmm*i'l\ "  Espimait Staalmpii,  TIME TABLE  EFFECTIVE  '  NOV. 19th, 1898  VICTORIA TO WELLINGTON*.  No. ?a     -  No. 2 Daily.  A.M  De   9:00' .'..Victoria...  ', 9:28  Goldstrc-flm  "r   10:9   L"   10:48   P.M.  12:14        Nanaimo.'  ���������Koen.gs...  Duucans.,:.  V.M.  .. De. 4:25  .... '���������   4:53   0:1  P.M.  7:11  A . 32:3 .Wellington.......... Ar. 7-55  WELLINGTON rTO  VICTORIA.  No. 1 Daily, ���������   No.'3 S.-iUn-dav.  A.M.       . , s.M.  De. S-.05 "Wellington...'. Dc. 1:25  ���������'   b:2,'j :  Nanaimo :.   " 1:39  *   9:,">2 .....I 'Duncans '. '*   G-,05  ��������� '"10:37  Koenig's '. "-   6:16  H:1S Coldstream  "   7.3?"  Ar.ll:45    .        v.. Victoria, Ar. S:00 p.m.  Reduced*  rates  lo and from  all points  Saturdays and Sundays good to return Mon  day. ,,   ��������� -  For'rates  and   al    information    apply i\b -  Company's Oilic-es. - ���������  A. *OU,NSMUlR Gko. L/COUl"!TNEY.Y  Puksidknt.        .- 'I'raflic Manager  wciwrrMwiwiBu m*iMK9%mT**mwn  '���������  JAS. A. CARTHEW'S '  livery..' Stabl"e'i  Teamster   and Draymbn ,'*  ������  Single and  Double rigs    '.  for Hire.     All Orders  Promptly   Attended   to.    :  '.R.'SHAW,'Manager. :  ; Third St;? Cumberland, B.C;  m  i "&  ':''<-'t   /.SUBSCRIPTION    -   ,-;  ..     For   tVve J.   W.   Pepper   Piano*  Mnsiq.Mago'zine, price One Dollar,  sper year  (po8Uvge;',paicl),, can" 1j(  " place J. by applying to the office  oi  "News, . Cum berland,  B. C.,'. -\vherr  .pa mp1p-po.r*ies can. be^ seen:;,  ,11  .���������/  ���������/".' ,\'^1HING|,J|  The Best and Most Influential ,j  Mining Paper in   the   World.  PUBLISHED WEEKLY, $5.00 PER YEAR.  SPECIMEN   OOPY   FREE. ;  ' ���������'  '253 BrboLdwa.y.'/- " New York.'  ft  I  fef  HlIRl.'B" "IUMIM18!  VANCOUVER.   B.C. \  J  Fruit & .Ornamental Trees,  Thirteen Acres, all produced by  intelligent Wl.it'e Labor. Less  than Eastern Prices        ���������   -     <������  Clean Certificate from Inspector.  No  San  Jose Scale  or Borers.'  emeu LARS.  KOTlCE'-i -        ':     .*  -.'  -    bill-heads  ''' letterheads      '    -  '/-   - -imeHior'andums ..'  ,    -\ ;, envelopes    '   '  '.'. >   business cards  labels & bags1.       -  - -'*\  bills of/fare  '," , Etc., Etc.,- ���������**       Etc.   - ,*  CONCERT PROGRAMMES  * BALL. PROGRAMMES '  DISPLAY BILLS    *    ,   ' \a  POSTERS"'     -  *   ._      CONCERT TICKETS   ,  BiLL TICKETS*  /V      MENUS'" \  RECEIPT FORMS  ,  ��������� ABSTRACT'bF ACCOUNTS  '   Etc... Etc., Etc.  ORDERS  EXECUTED' WITHOUT' DELAY!  *       < .,  Notice.  Riding on locomotives and rail  way cars, of the Union Colliery  Company by any person or per -  sons���������except train crew���������is-strictly  prohibited. EmpJo5*;ees are subject to .dismissal for allowing same  . ���������     ;     By order   . - '   %  "���������' '       "     " Francis ;D. Little  "-    ���������*   \ '      Manager. -������������������   '  , I Have   Taken    Ofrsce  in the,. Mai,n    , Building,  Dujis'inuir. Avenue,    Oumberla ' d..|'  and am-agent  for the following  reliable    insurance     companies:  ,* The '" Royal   London   and' Lan.  cashir'e-and Norwich  Union.-  am  prepared to .accept ,risks' a  current, rates.   <T am   also agent  for the Standerd.Life Insurance  Company pi  Edinburgii and the  ' Ocean .Accident-Company oiEng-'  'land.    Please   call*  and   investigate before insuring in'any othet.-  Company. ������������������    ' -'   *Y  ' /'-    JAMES ABRAMS." '*  Cumberland ; - '"  .--���������  'HoteHr���������~     ,     ;,  i  '    C'OR. DUNSMUIR AVENUE'',  .AND-   SECOND"   STREET.  ���������;    CUMBERLAND, B. 0. * '  Mrs. J. IT. Piket, Proprietress.^ / ,    /  When in Cumberland be  sure ^  ' and stay at' the  Cumberland  Hotel, -first-Class   Accombda-  ,' tion for transient and perraan-V ���������  * ent boarders.       ,       "        (:   :,    (, ,  Sample Rooms and' Public H������li '  ������ ������      ���������* .  Run in Connection  with   Hotel  Rates from $1.00 to* $2:00' per. day  ���������^g^^gg^e-aas^'-^e^  '1  Death Intimations .  Funeral   Invitations  r ,    '  '     Mempriam  Cards  t  i iwifii ii   ���������TTuwwutfi I"  'Tinmi  ttt���������iT-nrminr-rmTT ii i ii>mY������-r Miin * mitihipn  On Shortest Notice.  GARDEN & FIELD   -  Seeds and    Bulbs  for Fall & Spring Planting.  Fertilizers, Agricultural Implements, &c.  Catalogue   Free.  It will Pay yon     '*&&  * |   Do" yor.5 fcntei:d.kuy3ng a riSIo or |  3    -plsto-!?   If so,  get .ths .-bast ,!  I***1     .which is a  ���������.^TF'^-ir-,^ ��������� ������  '   "Rifles ranges in pirico from Sd'.OQ'to  |  S75.00%   For Large and small game,  m   also for targeb practice.    Pistols from  Fi   "53.50 to $-20.00. ' .  tj Send einrnp for larp;o ctitaloane illas- ,1.1:  H .tnitii-.ir complete lino, bvimful of vnluable I- y  ji}   information to sporU-mcn. ^W'S-if'c  '������' 5 STF.VEB5 ARMS &KQ TOOL C0.silli|l|f  TO   ADVERTISE   IN   THE  lip.-  M. J. HENRY  ^  3009 Westminster Road  VANCOUVER, B.C  GREAT  WEST  "N e w s;  TRAOK MARKS*  ' DESIGNS,    .  ������OPYHICHTS  A<v  ' *,-A?Jione senaitvr a aSotch and description atg'  ?������S������^Ly*iP?te/?,t?bl0- Communications. atrloK*  conftdontlal. Oldest afjency ?or securlnt petcSS  In America,    we have  a WasUingtoa ofiioi  ':':-'8oiaTiFid.'-amerioKn; u  ^v?P,f���������n!y.^1Justratfsd- H^KOBt "ctreaiatlo* '������f-  ��������� -p-\ni- ������51(o'tbB- ' SPccircon coplas and Ham*  ___ Book on Patents sontfree.  Addrceat*^   ���������  v-,';<.   f   *Mvuw?<i;.fiYGQ,V -'F"     ��������� ���������  -���������*-��������� .   <-;>  SSI ,KiO������i*wo',;���������"V'..,.-"-- :-��������� '������.*";i;       *-' -  ���������*",."���������     ! ".������ ���������. - .-^-,'N " *'",'- j;s'i"i     '',  -^SElZtttS&'SZtiS'S&ltixiJZ*  I am  prepared * to O  furnish Stylish Rigs ������  and do .Teaming at C  reasonable rates: ' .q'  g D.  KILPATRICK.     ������  o Cumberland ������  '*$$ \ ooooooooooooooooooo  The most Northerly Paper published on-the Island.  Subscription,  $1.50   per an  Crryj.irairtTnrt rwi** -ww  LIFE.  THE reason why the Great Wjsst  . Like"'-Asf.uuance Co. has. more  business in form than any other Company ever had at the same age, is their  promptness in Paying Claims, and the  Liberal Contract given, free from all  annoying restrictions.       ,  ������������������ Any information   asked   for   will   be  promptly and cheerfully given.  A." ANDERSON,  General Agent-;  Drvwer, 5:. Nanaimo, B.C.  G������  -4C  -w-  "������������������X���������-w-  -*v���������  (?  flies of any Pattern Tied to Order.  ro  WE  WANT YOUR  f  li 8ATI8?ACTORY Hi  i  f  "NEWS  OFFtGE  Dunsmuir Ave.,  Cumberland, B.C  Office Hours :-��������� 8 a.m. till 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 8 to 1.  Fancy Inlaying wood in and metal.  French Polishing.  Apply  ,..    NEWS OFFICE.  ���������*   "ii  ���������^'���������"V'jl  ,-Y.  !  . J   ���������**>.' II  - '"- <l  -.- ���������-,- Ml  V  ',������-,*.  "-4YM  ���������. '.-I'J  -���������4.*  \6oboooooo6 060006000'  yY-S-;  *-   ��������� 1, ������, . -     - < ^- ���������     ���������>,"'.,   .   .    t *' - ���������.?* ���������-*'���������>,-1  Y-'OY*,.-   -W.���������*.���������/.     '3,-r'-**-*    .������o /���������?   ; Y-Y^  "-*r^     Rs^Ka-.^a ...������ ���������   ':   "..'���������: "'     ;" *^'s.-<-|  -i  ������������������>���������> OHIO VOODOO  "BITES  1-.  )n  ,'������*���������*  ' ft'  i.,  Vs*  .6'  -������������������"J  '���������������-  f*  *Y-.y-  ,*>     l ^  -I-.,-"   "  *  .1  4,  WEIRD AND   BRUTAL  NEGRO   ORGIES  REVIVED IN THAT STATE.  OneWoman Killed ��������� Robert Louis Stove:i-  son's "Vivid  Description    of   Hoodoo or  ,Voodoo Kites as   Found  lit  tlie    "Fair  Cubacs,"    One   of   ibe   Stories   in    ftiisi  ' '��������� Dynamiter." ' '*  Voodoo or hoodoo, thoso woird,  and bestial orgies sometimes practiced by, negroes and which had their  origin in the dark past" in Africa,  have recently been resumed in the  levee district of fcJpring/icld, O. For  many years this section was rendered notorious by the heathen practices, but for some timo they have  been extinct. Now comes the news  that thoy have Leon revived in all  their  old  time horror.  Charles Hon ton, chief of tlie negro  dancers, has been arrested lor slashing Annie Powell with a, ' razor,  lie, says he committed the crime-  to remove the hoodoo spell,the woman had cast on him.       t    ,  The best description ever written  of the hoodoo or voodoo - rites t is  found in' the "Fair Cuban," one of,  the stories' in Hobert Louis Stevenson's - "Dynamiter.','' Stevenson  says: '     _  "I scarce know upon what grounds  I acted, but 1 shaped my- steps in.  the direction of the sound and inra  quarter , of an hour came unpreceiv-  ed to (the margin of an open glade'.  It was lighted by the strong moon  and,, by the flames of a fire. In 'the  midst there stood a little low" and  rude building surmounted, by a cross  ���������a chapel,' as 1 then remembered to  ���������have .'heard,1 long since desecrated  'and given over jto the rites of the  hoodoo. - ,   "���������  - "f-Tard- by the steps of the en-  ' trance was a'black', 'mass-continual-  fly, agitated and stirring to and fro,,  'as if with inarticulate life, and. this  I presently perceived to be. a heap  ,of cocks,   hares, dogs  and  other  ani-  voked���������the* death or disease of enemies or rivals���������some calling , down  these plagues upon the rest of their  own blood and one, to whom I  swear I had never been less than  kind,   invoking  them  upon  myself.  "At each petition the tall negro,  still smiling, picked up some bird  'or animal from the heaping mass up-  ,on his left, .slew it with the kinfe,  and .tossed the body upon .the  ground.      At length-.it seemed it  reached the turn of the high priest-  :-ss. She'sat down the basket on  the stops, moved in.to the centre  of the ring, groveled in the ' dust  before the reptiles and, still groveling, ' lifted un her "voice. between  speech and singing-, and with , so '  great, .so insane fervor of excitement  as struck a sort of horror through  my blood.  *, " 'Power,'.      she    .began,      'whose  name  we  do  not,' utter;   power    that'  is neither good  nor'evil,  but    below  them     both;      stronger   ;*lhan good,  greater  than evil,  all  my'life long I  have adored  and served  thee,!      "Who*  has shed blood'upon thine*       altars!  Whoso voice is broken  with  the singing  of  thy  praises? Whose linibs  tire faintjbefore  their age with leap-'  ing  in   thy ..revels?   -   Who  has ' slain  the child of her  body?       ��������� '   '  " T,''she cried. T. Me Gainnboeru !  liy my own name J name myscir.  I tear away the veil. J" would be  served or perish. Hear me, slime  of the fat swamp/blackness of 'the  thunder, venom of a serpent's "������������������ udder���������hear or slay me. ��������� 1 ' would  have two things,"O shapeless one,  O horror of emptiness, two ' things  or die, the blood 'of'my while faced-  husband. , On give me. that! lie is  the enemy of' hoodoo: Give mo his  blood. " And yet another. O .racer  of the blind winds, O- germina.".sr" in  the'ruins cof the dead, ,0 root of  life; root ,','of corruption! h grow  old. I grow.,'hideous, T am known,  1- am' hunted of0*1* any life. Let the  servant  than   lay   by  this *' outworn  must learn. It will pay you to"    re"-  member this, young'man.  You may often have to reverse  yourself, you may have to change  your proposed course absolutely,  you may, against your will, have to  disappoint your friends. .-But when  such a proceeding, is necessary, carry,  it out in an open'and manly way.  Summon those most interested and  explain the situation. 'You will find  that they will, appreciate your position. You'll find further, that > after  your explanation they will ^.remain  your firm' friends.  Depend upon it���������success- in leadership is built upon reciprocal personal  confidence.      - ',  . THE ANTIQUE BUG.  IT IS RARE AND* COSTLY AND IS FREQUENTLY COUNTERFEITED.   '  Switzerland's Schools.  The schools of Switzerland are famous, but so much ,time is demanded  in them for mental efforts that ' a  feeling has become prevalent ��������� that  the physique of the scholars suffers.  A native of'Basel, Switzerland, has  donated to the local university 300,-  000 francs for the founding of chairs  of critical theology, philosophy ,and  biology, which arc to be free from  all interference by church or state.  ' Indies in :i IUislu-l.  Tn a bushel  mcasur.e there  548  cubic inches.   ' *  are  Rnni.KrlaiiH.  reassuring.  .body; , Jet the chief priestess turn  again to the blossom, of her days  and be 'a girl once more-and be the  desired  of  all ,mcn,  even,as  in      the  .past! And then, O lord and, master, as 1 here ask a' marvel not yet  wrought since 'we were torn ,from  the old -Jand, have 1 not .prepared  the  sacrifice in  which thy soul      de-  ���������lighteth, the kid without the horns?'  "Even as she uttered  the        words  there was a great rumon of  through all the circle of the  shipers. .. It rose and fell and  again ancl swelled at'last-into  ture when .the tall-negro, who  stepped an instant. into the -chapel,  reappeared before the door, carrying  in his arms-.the 'body*, of the  girl Cora. I know not if " 1* ,  what followed. When next, my  awoke "to a clear knowledge, -  was laid upon the" steps before  .serpents, the negro 'with the  stood   over  her,   the  knife-rose,  Joy  wor-  rose  rap-  had  slave  sa.v/  mind  Cora  *   the  knife  and  ra       ,' Born   s  *" It' is somewhat reassuring, nfter the  i oft repeated asseveration of the family  physician, that women are-altogether too  "prone to rush in with their advice and  remedies where the skillful practitioner  almost fears to tread, to be told 'that  after all'"women are horn sanitarians.'"  This from-no less a source than a prominent'member of the Pennsylvania hoard  pf health. This tribute is still'further enhanced by the statement 'that whereas,  womeiij.'are born sanitarians, men must  be taught. "This fact," the speaker de-,  clares. - "is based upon the evolution* of  the race, 'as the role that ��������� cleanliness  plays in civilization is' undoubtedly due  to women.   Advantage of-.El'i's {iii't should'  ,be taken-in our nalioifVE'lajgou.sc'Ucn'piiig.  Women   by  office  and 'evoliition  are  the  .housekeepers and health ofiicers of the  family. -Let them become publicly aiid  officially our health officers and sanitary  managers.' The marvelous'ability' aud  success' already shown'by them i.i this  field warrant every confidence.   There arc  r millions of unoccupied women who can  thus find a work that will bring gladness  to 'giver- and receiver and ahat wiil lift  us a-long way iu the progress of* civilization'���������Washington  Star.  at this  horror,  to   end.  I  screamed'out in my great  bidding them in God's name  BE HONORABLE,-"'  "WEIRD HOODOO  RITES.  * mais still struggling, but helplessly  te-nered and cruelly tossed one upon  another. Both the fire and the chapel wore surrounded by a ring ��������� of  kneeling Africans, both men and women. Now they would raise their  palms half ^closed to Pleaven, with a  passionate gesture of supplication ;  now they would bow their heads  and spread their hands before them  on   the     ground. As     the  double  movement passed and repassed along  the line the heads kept rising and  falling like waves upon the sea, and  still, as if in time to* these gesticulations, tho hurried chant continued.  I stood spell-bound, knowing that  my life depended by a hair, knowing  that I had stumbled on a celebration of the rites of hoodoo.     ,  "Presently the door of the chapel  opened, and there came forth a tall  negro, entirely nude and bearing in  his hand the sacrificial knife. He  was followed by an apparation still  more' strange and shocking���������Mine..  Mendizabal, naked also and carrying  in both hands and raised to the le-  * vel of her , face an open basket of  wicker. It was filled with coiling  snakes, and these, as she stood there  with the uplifted basket, shot  through the ozier, grating and coiled  around her arms.  "At the sight of this the ferver,  of the crowd seemed to swell sudT  , denly higher, and the chant rose  in pitch and grew more irregular in  time and!accent. Then, at a sign  from the tall negro.-where he stood  motionless and smiling in the moon  and firelight, the singing died away,  and there began the second stage of  this   barbarous   celebration.  "From different parts of the ring,  one after another, man or woman  ran forth into the midst, ducked,  with that same gesture of the thrown  up hand before tho priestess and  her snakes, and, with various adjurations, uttered aloud the blackest  wishes of the heart. Death and diseases   were "the  favors  usually        in-  Sa3-s Richard   Crpk������*r, JCx-t-eader of Tam-  *    many Hall, >"������iv Voi-lc, If You Would  Succeed in Politics.  In an interview succeeding his resignation of the Tammany chief-  ship, Richard Croker said:  You ask me for'advice on how to  succeed in politics.  The first thoughts that occur to  mo after long experience in active'  and practical, politics are these: Be  honorable, be manly, live up to*  your promises, be loyal to your  friends, be trustworthy���������not only in  big affairs, but in the smallest matters.  These qualities deserve to win confidence, and they always do win it.  I know this, because I have put it  to the test.  The men who helped me to win  victories were those in whom I had  implicit confidence.  I could feel that  Via S**voei Sixteen  In  Chinn.  In China there is nothing of the sweet  girlhood which is enjoyed in this country���������iu fact, 'one rarely sees girls in'China, says a- writer in the Loudon Mail:  They marry so young that they appear to  ,spring from childhood to maturity without any intermediate stage of girlhood.  There is no "blushing Iii" or "sweet. Hi,"  no flirtations.* "no balls, no picnics, no  'billets,doux. The child has uot ceased  to play with her doll before she* has a  baby to dandle.  The only joy of a woman's life is in  dressing her hair. This is done with an  elaborate, artistic science curious to see.  Their hair is invariably black and very  long. It is drawn tightly from the face  and stiffened with gum. It is then piled  up in coils and wings and loops that  stand alone without the .aid of pads,  roulets, pugs or-hairpins.  There ure no spinsters in' China except the nuns who dedicate their virginity to Buddha. These ladies shave their  heads like priests and thus deprive themselves of the only Chinese sign of gender  ���������the hair dressed a la teapot.  Those of Highest Value Come Fi-orai  Persia and India���������Tlie Colors'Never  Fnde~TIie Banlc President's Per-  wiaii Ming.    ,, ,  To be the possessor'.of an antique rug  is the ambition of-many and the achievement of few. Of'those who congratulate  themselves upon their ownership of such  a valued article many would have the  bubble pricked in au instant if they weie  to submit their rug to an expert.  "There are not 200 genuine antique  rugs /for sale in this country," is the  statement of one of the most experienced  men in the business. "Those who own  them hold on to them,,i'or their value increases every,, day. , To be an antique  a rug must be at,least 100 years old., so  what do people iheiin by coming to me  and saying that they have an antique rug  which they bought When it was new'2u  years, before? '��������� , ���������  ���������'One man thinks because' a rug looks  a little dingy and because he pays a'good  price for' it that it is a genuine antique,  but uew rugs are doctored .to give them  the appearance of age. See this one. , It  has been sent here to be repaired, and  the owner believes that it is a real antique, but it has the dry rot. lean tear  it, and I could not do that if it were, real.'  ���������Doctored rugs are put in a boiling solution with an infusion that gives the yellowish cast,' such ' as this one has. Always beware of a rug with that vtohe.  It is likely to have been treated, and that  will ruin it for wear.'*-       ' ''  "A bank "president bought n handsome'  '.rug for his office, paying i\A~,0 for it. 1  ��������� knew that it was a modern rug the'minute I laid my'eyes on it,'hut he thought  , I was mistaken. One night there was a  fire in the rooms rauove the bank, and  three' inches of water' stood on the rug  for several, hours. If it had-been what ii  was said to be it would h'ave come> out  of its bath as good as ever, but. being  a coiiHiCi-feit, tlie water ,'ruined it. The  insurance company found it out-and refused to pay tlie ,*f4i)0. The firm that' sold  the rug,was threatened with' exposure  and suit for selling the rug as an antique  and decided to take it back and refund  the' money.  "The best-rugs come, from Persia ami-  are named after the provinces, in which  they are made: Once in awhile a rug  .that is made in a certain province has  the'fappearance of one mado in another,  and', the.^only way one can tell to which  class it-really belongs is to dissect it and  -find- how the knots are tied.    The, man-  operation. It worked without fail, but  metal of. any kind in the room had to be  taken out or it would have turned black.  Nursery Measures.  One teaspoonful of liquid ' is1' one  dram, , one tablespoonful four- drams,  or- half 'an ounce, two tablespoonfuls  ight drams, one pint 20 ounces. These  measures are--used when a baby i-3  brought up by (hand, so that, the barley  w-ater and milk���������which form the chief  food of the hand fed baby; may be mix-  ed in the proper proportions. The proportions vary with the a-^e. If sugar is  added to the food, the ordinary kind'  should not .be used, but milk and sugar,  'which can be procured from auy drug-  rist.   (,. 0 ,  -   ;    , A Broo&lya   Bud.  He���������Yes, I won' $-10 last night at  poker, but yon know the saying. "Lucky  al 'cards, unlucky at lc-ve.'"  She���������B-but surely you aren't superstitious, are you?  How Best t������ Eat.  , At a recent meeting of medical men  Dr. P. A. BurralJ spoke of the amount  'of mischief done by the very common  habit of eating the meals rapidly. Thorough mastication was of the utmost importance, and of course this presupposed  a proper condition of the teeth. Gastric  digestion was often weakened and much  distress was caused by taking in too much  fluid with the food, particularly at the  beginning of a meal. Another factor in  causing dyspepsia was the habit of eating food in silence or without that mirth  and good fellowship so necessary to insure the normal action of the digestive  organs. These little details might seem  trite and unimportant, but it was the  duty of the careful physician to instruct  his patients in regard to them. The long  continued and tree use of digestive agents  sewed to make the digestive organs lazy  and  inactive.���������Medical  Record.  RICHARD   CROKER.  they were loyal always. And they  on their part knew that I was loyal  to them. > . ,  There you have a firm partnership  established���������a partnership that no  amount of ill report can dissolve. '  Men like manliness. They know  that a manly man can be counted  upon to fight in the open, that he  has the courage to be outspoken,  that if he differs, he differs honestly.  Hence men as a class follow the  leadership of a man they can rely  upon.  There never was a sneak who was  a successful leader. To retain his  following, a leader must be above  board with his associates. That is  the first principle that anyone who  wishes  to  achieve success  in politics  To Remove Splinters.  A  splinter, is a  little  thing, but capable of creating a great deal of mischief,  discomfort  and   pain.-     Every  mother of  small children, says a writer in Harper's  Bazar,   should    provide   herself   with   a  pair   of  sharp   pointed   forceps   for  this  emergency.     When: the   splinter   is   imbedded  in the flesh of hand or foot,  the  point of a small pair of scissors���������a manicure   pair   will   answer   well���������should   be  inserted  directly over and   following the  path of the splinter and a small incision  made.    If there he any. bleeding, stanch  it   by   a   little   pressure,   then   open   the  wound  by stretching it''a little and with  your  forceps pick  out the offending object.      When   the   splinter   is   under   the  nail,  cut a  little  V shaped  piece out of  the nail, and with the forceps the splinter  is  easily  removed.     Protect  the cut  made  with a little collodion or a finger  cot.   Order of Colored   Nuns.  In New Orleans is an order of colored  nuns, founded many years ago. It was  instituted for the special purpose of giving education and moral training to  young colored girls and to care for orphans and aged, infirm persons of their  race. In its orphan asylum are children  of all ages up to 14 years.  The convent is a stately building more  than a century old in the old French  quarter of- New Orleans and once was  ������,������ opera house and ballroom.  ner of making these rugs has come down  from generation to generation and from  century to century! The same patterns  persist and are done in the same colors.  The peoplo are not inventive; neither are  they imitative. They know how to do  ono thing well"*'and they keep on doing it  as long as they live, and their'children  take .it up- when .they lay it down. A  few years ago aniline dyes were introduced into Persia, aud a wail of, despair*  went up from artistic people everywhere.  The exports from Persia fell , off. ancl  the shah, on learning' the cause, forbade  the importation of these dyes, and so the  native rug ancl carpet makers have gone  ba'ck to their beautiful "vegetable dyes  that will endure forever.  .  "The colors of the best oriental rugs  nevoid fade. The dust aud other foreign  particles that they accumulate in the  course of time soften the original colors, but nothing of their primal quality  is really lost. Moreover, they can he  cleaned, thoroughly over and over, and  neither the texture nor the coloring will  be the worse for it.  "The Persians v-.-ill do nothinsr aside  from their own* methods, but the people  of India are excellent at copying and  will reproduce a rug from a colored do-  sign, if they do not have the original, so  perfectly that one cannot be told from  the other. They are able even to get the  time softened effects in copying from the  old rug. Two rugs are being made in India to match a large sixteenth century  rug for one of the Vanderbilts, the design having been sent from here.  "Another rich family is having rugs for  their entire house made- in India from  designs prepared by an artist to match  the furniture and decorations, almost all  being in the French renaissance style,  although this is against 'the advice of  architect and decorator.  "Good antiques cost hundreds and manv'  SS.000 and  rugs  of  good size and quality.  "For $15,000 j-ou may buy a lovely  silken rng whoso authentic history is lost  in antiquity, but it is supposed to have  been made by a princess, as no one else  would have had time enough to weave it.  There are about 1.200 knots to the inch.  "Almost all the old patterns have been  repeated and are still being used, the exceptions being those of a few rugs'.in the  mosques, of which no copies are permitted. ���������...���������'...  "The Armenians have brought ov-pr a  great many spurious rugs within the last  few years and have demoralized taste  and trade. Thcf wool in these rugs is  colored' with the mineral dyes, and the  weaving is less skillful."���������New York.  Press. .'.'���������-. ���������'  ' WHitninii'8' Little   JTolces.  One Suuday, inorniiig'WliiLuniii .carno  out to see me on Prospect bill, in Som-  ervillo, where 1 was then living, says  J. T. Trowbridge in The, Atlantic. - Of  much of that'day's talk I' have a vivid  recollection, even of its trivialities. He  was not a floud laugher, and -rarely  made a joke,'but he greatly,-enjoyed  the pleasantries of others. He enjoyed' especially.' any allusion, serious or'  jocular, to his poems.  When at* dinner; preparing my dish  of salad,  I remarked that'I was em:  ployed as  his critics would  be,.'"when  .-bis no\y, edition���������wasrt,out.' he queried,  '''Devouring 'Leaves of Grass?' " "No," '  I said; "c'u'tting<'up 'Leaves of Grass,''''  which amused him more, I,fancy; than  the cutting up did. which '.came 'later. ' ,  As the afternoou waned and bespoke  of leaving us somebody placed a book '  before the face,,of the .clock.    I'said,  "Put 'Leaves'of Grass' there; nobody  can see through that."-   "Not even the  author?"   he ,said, /with   a   whimsical  lifting of tho brows. ��������� ���������  Tbe  Roaians  IMd  Not  Usec Soap.  The' Romans  were   not   acquainted"  with .the use of regular soap, but they"  employed   an  alkali, -with   which   the.,  greasy dirt was dissolved out of their  clothes.   This alkali, called nitrum, ia,,  referred,to by Pliny, but the,cheapest'  solvent was urine,  which was mostl.y^  used." .The clothes were put. in, this,  miked with  water and  then stamped *.  upon with "the feet. ' This process was''  performedr'.by old  people,*1,while boys,  lifted the clothes out of tho tubs.   The*.  white garments,  after  being  washed,������'  were subjected to the vapor of,sulphur, *  beingstretched on a frame-'and the sulphur burned beneath.    Poor people in  Rome cleansed their bodies with meal  of lupins, called lomentum, which, with  common   meal, is "still   used "'in  some ,  places for'that purpose. . >.  Looking  For  Tliem.  Major d'Arlandes.,like many another  French soldier," was tired of] Availing  for promotion and opportunities to distinguish himself. lie seized an opportunity to enjoy .a little excitement and  at the same time to remind Louis XVI.  of his baflled ambitions. o  He made a balloon ascension, which  at that time was thought to bo a very  risky affair. The king promptly reproved him for his rashness.  "Your   majesty   will,  pardon   me, .1.  hope," said the officer, "but the fact is  the minister of war has made me so  many promises in the air that I went  up to look for some of them."   ,  >of them thousands of dollars  $10,000  are  not   exorbitant   for  UiidisrnUied.  The teaching of cookery in the English board schools is sometimes not  appreciated by those who would be  most benefited.by it. The teacher of  one of these schools recently received  the following letter of protest: "My _  Mary Ann is not going to be a servant.  I wants ber to be a lady, and the less  she knows of howvto cook victuals the  better. When I sent my gal to the  board school, I did fiot expect she was  going to be  like that."  taught undignified things  To Hid a Room ot Insects.  A family moving into an old house a  year or so ago was unpleasantly surprised to find that the former occupants had  been lacking in ..housewifely qualities,  and after sleeping in the house a night  or so it was discovered that there was  more insect life than was agreeable. To  follow old fashioned methods was too  slow, and instead three sulphur candles  were purchased, the house was shut up  after the candles had been lighted and  left to itself for three hours. At the  end of that time everything living inside  had been killed, and' there was no trouble afterward.' The family moved to another floor in the same house, repeated  the same operation,1'with the same success, and, removing again to their original  floor, for a third time repeated  the  Whistling.  As a method of prolonging life and  strengthening the human frame against  sickness whistling is said to be beyond  compare. Development of chest and  neck muscles is one of the special advantages claimed for the exercise.  Long, deep breathing is ani essential  for a good whistletv as it is not permissible to draw iu the breath except  during the intervals of the sound production.  Petnlant Tennyson.  Tennyson was one of the most fortunate of poets, in that he was rarely,  criticised adversely, yet Mr. Bram Sto-  ker, who saw him often while his plays  were in course of__j>roduction at the  Lyceum, said that he used constantly  to complain of "the attacks made on  him." He actually* wound up one day  by declaring that he often wished he  had never written a line.  His Limit.  Wife���������How did you get along while  I was away?  Husband���������I kept, house for about ten  days, aiid then I went boarding.  Wife���������Boarding! Why didn't you go  on keeping house?  Husband���������Couldu't. All the dishes  were dirty.  <-  y-:  (\  ii <������������������***$ j^-^i*������tir.titf^iS.  1  v  i'l  TEE CUMBERLAND NEWS  CUMBERLAND. B.C.  if  i  Hi  I.  ,A  Good  Gaesser, i    *       < -. >  An; elderly woman with an impedi-  . ment' in her" speech' had troubles of  her own at the corner of Twelfth 'and'  Walnut streets the other day. As each  car came out Walnut street she would  stop it and say to the conductor. "Dud-  dud-dud-does th-this kuk-kuk-car gug-  ������Ug~go"��������� At this juncture, and some'  times before, the conductor would im--  . patiently exclaim,* "No; take the next  car." /Then he would pull the strap,  and the car'would go ahead,  leaving  the woman at the crossing. , -  There are five different lines, passing  , out-Walnut street at this* point, and if  the woman  could read .the signs.she  'disregarded them.   Finally a conductor  more considerate, than the 'others help-  ; ed her aboard aud allowed her to ex-*  plain-afterward.' After three -blocks  had-been traversed'he found'that she  wanted -to go to Darby, and his was a  ���������Darby car. When she learned this, she  beamed her joy.'"Yuh-yuh-young man,"  'she  said,   "yuh-yuh-you're, a guggug-  . rood  . f M '  Your  &  will be as strong as our~ if you try  ���������*" i  Stilibh'-s  *��������� / '  Consumption  Cure  ours is so strong we guar-  and  antee a cure or refund money,  and we send you free trial bottle  if you write for it. SHILOH'S  costs 25 cents, and will cure Consumption, Pneumonia.Bronchitis  , aud all Lung' Troubles.     Will  cure a Coui  rli or  Cold in a day,  I':  Messrs. C. C. Richards  & .Co'.y  -..Gentlemen,���������After  suffering    for     7  ', years-with inflammatory'rheumatism  -'so -bad that I was elen months coii-  \ fined to'my'room, ,and for two years  ;could not dress "myself without help.  - Your-  agent g*aye   me    a bottle , of  MIN.ARD'S-UNIMBNT  in   May,   '97,'  and,asked me to try it, "wnich" I did,  ' and was so ���������well- pleased -with the results that I procured more'. Five bottles .completely cured me and I have  ' had no return of the pain' for 'eighteen months.  ,* The above facts are well- known to  everybody in-������this village and neighr  borhood. ��������� ,  " "    '      Yours gratefully,  A. DAIRT.  St. Timothee,  Que., May 16,  1S99.  and thus prevent serious results.  It has been doing' these things  ,    for 50 years. \ '  S. C. /Wev������S & Co., Toronto, Can.  Karl's Clover Root Tea cures Indigestion I  WHEN   DOGS  ARE  SICtf.  General Smith, of Chicago, states  that many of, the steel structures of  that city are corroding and will ultimately fall.,    "r   ,  the spring mum  VARIABLE SPRING   WEATHER DISASTROUS'TO WEAK PEOPLE.  .,   Thos.  A.'   Dick,   a Hamilton bookkeeper,  committed suicide.  ' Chronic derangements of the stomach, liver,  and blood aro speedily removed by the actire  principle of the ingredients entering.into the  composition, of Parmelee's Vegetable Pills.  These pills act specifically on the deranged  organs, stimulating to action tho dormant ener-  Even  Usually    Robust    People   Feel  ���������Run Down and Out of, Sorts    at  This    Time���������Dr.    Williams'   Pink  Pills are the ���������Very* Best    Spring  ��������� Tonic.  Parmelee's Vegetable Pills  '-���������*��������� The 'greatest depth' of-the ocean is  said to-be 45.236 feet, *or"eig lit and  three-fourtlis miles. - -1  MNABD'S LINIMENT Cures Dandruff. -,,  '*   ^ * ,c  - Electricity . moves'. 2SS,000 .per  se-'  cond;    light    moves    192,000 .per.  second;    a \rifle   ball moves  1,4C0 feet  per second.< -    v  ' '       ">      ���������   '  K.       V-  Thoro is more Catarrh in this section of the  country than all other diseases put .together,  and until the last few years was supposed to be  incurable. For a great many years doctors'pro-  nouncod it a local disease, and.prgscribed local  remedies, and by constantly ������ Ailing to cure with  local 'treatment, pronounced it incurable.  Science has proven c&t^irrh to be a constitutional disease, and therefore*- roqniros constitutional treatmeuto    Hull's Catarrh Cuie, manufac  The spring months are a trying-  time to most people. At.no other  time, of .the year do'^ealtli and  strength seem so hard.to gain and to  hold. You do not feel that you-are  really sick, but you feelabout as bad  could if you were seriously"  That' feeling- ought to be got rid  j of���������and'it .can be. What you need'is  la tonic, to'enrich the -. blood and'-free  it( from the impurities which^liave  lod-ged in your " system during" the  winter, and which are responsible  for your present condition. Dr. Williams'. Pink Pills is the only reliable,  never-failing- 'tonic medicine. , These  pills make.hew, iJicii-blood,strengthf  en tlie"- nerves, and 'bring- health 'and  vitality to every organ in the body.  They are,, a,n ideal spring medicine  and the best'thing in. the world for  all .diseases- 'having'* their origin'in  impoverished or impure blood.* The  case of .Miss Belle-.��������� Cohoon, \White  Rock Mills;' '-N. &., is strong- corroboration of these '-,statements. She  Says':- "-Th'i?ee years ago this, spring  I  was * very ' much   run   clown.      The  Tlxo Way to Give Medicine to   The.se  I:ij;*u2y Sensitive Patients.  an all treatment of a sick dog remember you 'are dealing with a high'ty  sonsitivo and nervous patient. "Do \ ery  gentle, avoid roughness or auy thing  likely to alarm him. In giving hi in'any  liquid medicine do not open his mouth,  but. placing him between your knees,  with his face looking iu the fame direction as your own, gently raise his 'jaw  and. pulling his lips' away from his  teeth on one side of his mouth, to form  a cup or funnel, very slowly pour from  bottle or spoou the quantity he. is to  have into it.  Keep his head raised for a minute or  two and if he does not swallow the  dose insert a spoou between his front  teeth. This will Lave ihe* effect of  drawing off his attention from the  medicine and he will usually swallow  at once. If the dose is a pill/ bolus or  anything solid, hold his head the Fame  way as before mentioned, but with the  left hand under lower jaw. press firmly  on each side with thumb and linger a*r  the junction of uppei\and lower jaws.  This will usually cause him lo open'  his mouth, when the' dose should'be  put into* the mouth' -as , fa������������������ back as  possible" over the tongue (or be *.vill'spit  it out) and cio.se the jaws somewhat  sharply, and in most cases the deed-is  done. If any trouble* arises with the  aetio'n of his'front p-iws this may be  got over by wrappir-r him round with  a shawl or coarse ivn'on.  \Vheu once you ha \e got into the way  of it. you will be surprised tliow simple  it is. u I am quite sure.a practiced own-  er������or kennolsmai* would dose a dozen  dogs while, a novice was making a-  bundle over one.���������''All About,-Dogs."  by Charles Henry Lane.  ������  (ktrU Ca,^ 4TZCV, *V������^/ 4/P  -/iAu^^tl^n/,  'eas  Page  Woven  Wire  Fence  Owine lo the variations of the Canrinian climate,  considerable allowance must be made in all fences  -fi~Lj���������cp-j: for contraction and expansion, which makes an or-  =���������3=^1==''': chnary wire fence un.serviceable, as when it expands  *   it becomes .������o loose as to prove of little value.   Note  hecontinMOUSCoil;rS*sF:52!ssS5::^S2C?this makes it elastic and .solf-repulating.   The Page  Wire Fence is made of "Pnse" wire, which is twice as strong as ordinary wire.  Prices are  particularly low this'sca&on.   50,000 miles of Page fences now in u<-e.   We also make Gates,  Ornamental Fences and Poultry Netting.  "Inc fuye Wire Fence Co.. Limited. Walkorvill**. Ont.'2  ROSS & ROSS,  General Agents,  Box 633,  Winnipeg,  Man..  The nineth parliament of Ontario  has prorogued; the elections are expected in May.   ' '  A TORONTO MAN  THE MR.  .LIVES  JARDINE REFERRED TO  IN THE QUEEN* CITY."  "Are    you'"willing   to  arbitrate?",  asked the employer.      '   ,    '  "Certainly,"' replied the walking  delegate, "provided I ,am given 'a  reasonable assurance .thai 1 he 'decision- will bo in( accordance wiyh o*urri  "viay of thinking."  /  Minard's liniment Cores Burns, Etc;  THE  COLLAR   BUTTON.  tured by F. J-Cheney & Co., Toledo, Ohio, is ; least exertion exhausted me. yl-seem-  tho only constitutional care on tiio market. It  is taken internally in doses f **om 10 drops to a  toaE-ooonful. It acts diroccly on the blood and  mucous surfaces of tha system.. They offer one  hundred dollars for any case J t fails to cui-o.  Send for circulars and testimonials    ' .  i    Address     F J. CHEN*EiT-& CO., Toledo, O.  Sold by Druggists, 7*jc.        "       *   -.  Hall'sPami-y "Pills ai e the best.  k  fn   the   Streets  of  Cairo.  One of the most picturesque places in  the world is undouhtodlj.the;Egyptian  city of' Cniro.-'.nhd not the least of its  attractions are the varied and often  musical street-cries which,*" assail .tin-  ears on ail sides. Not onlv the street  musicians who' tap their tambourines  to the admiring "Allans" of tho cro-vyd,  but the merchants and peddlers, contribute' to the, chorus.  A fruit seller, basket on head, with  grapes and tigs, will saunter by-singing  in a quaint- minor: "Oh. grapes, - oh.  sweet grapes, "hat aro larger than  cloves' eggs and sweeter than now  cream! Oh, angels' food, delicious tigs,  bursting with honey, restorers " of  health!"  Another street cry which may be  heard in the main street of Abbassieh,  a suburb, contains the following enticing announcement: "Tomorrow. O people. 1 am going to kill a camel. The  doctor says it is young and healthj-.  .Oh. its flesh will be tender as the quail  rwl juicy as lamb. Its price is but 1%  piasters (TVi cents) the pound. Do you  love the sweet flesh of a camel? Then  comb 'early'.and be satisfied!" ..,  Kot the least picturesque figures 'iu  the- streets are the city police in their  neat white arid red uniforms in.summer and blue serge in winter.    ������  ed'to lose ambition and a feeling of  languor and sluggishness took its  place. Sly, appetite failed ���������me^ and  my sleep at nights was disturbed  and restless. In .fact 1 was.in a pit-;  iable condition. ���������"*' After /trying-' .two  or three medicines' without benefit, I  began the use of-Dr. -Williams'- Pink  Pills an-d they speedily worked"-a  change for the, better and by the  time I had used 'a'half dozen -boxes..  1' felt stronger than I'ha'd 'done . for  years. I have since used the ..pills  in the spring, and I-find. them'an excellent "tonic." .   *   l"     -''  Because- of. their thorough -and'  prompt 'action on ' the blood , and.  nerves these pills speedily cure  anaemia, rheumatism, scia.tica, partial paralysis, St. Vitus' '.Dance,  scrofula*'and eruptions of the skin,  and the' functional ailments which  make the lives' of so mf-.ny women a  ���������source of constant misery. Other so-  calied tonic pills are mere imitations  of this sl'erlin'g remedy. Get the genuine with the full name ,"Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People"  on the wrapper around every box.  Sold by all medicine dealers or sent  post paid at 50 cents a box or six  boxes for $2.50 by addressing The  Dr.. Williams' Medicine Co., Brock-  ville,  Ont.  Its'ClessJnr.M Realized Only by Those  YVIjo   Have   Lived   Without   It.  "In looking over a trunk full of old  truck the other day." said the elderly  man. "I c-aine across a lot of old shirt*  with the buttons sowed on. and as I  looked at them I realized anew what  the collar, button means to huiuanity'  There have been greater iu vent ion's,  surely, but not many that, have' conferred ''a more unmixed blessing - on  ..mankind.  , '     *  - ,  ""-"The younger person of today, accustomed r to thecoljar^buttbn always,  .cahuot'realize what it "was to be with-  out it.H He can never know what it  was to have shirts with the buttons  sewed on���������or uot.' as the case might  be. Not so very many years ago. when  the collar button was'yet comparatively . new, before persons 'had come,to-  keep./as "everybody" cominouly does  now. a lot of buttons on hand, the man  who had lost his collar button ���������houghf  himself entitled to the sympathy .of his  fellows, but wruug as be inight.be by  that loss be' could not even guess at  the anguish that in the sewed 'on button' days filled the heart of the uian*  who. wheu he came to put on his last  clean shirt, found that key button, the  one on the collar band, most important  one of all, gone entirely or only, just  hanging by a thread!  f'l  knew a man once who had this  happen to him and didn't swear. * That,  "was The only great thing he ever-did...  I)lit .1   have always thought that that  alone was enough to stamp him as a*  most extraordinary man."-  Well-known- Throughout  Canada    As  -    -One  of Canada's     Commissioners  to     the    Paris     Exposition���������His  Statement    is     a  Very    .Valuable,  '  One'  and   Has    Beca* "Read   With  Much Interest.  Toronto, April 5.���������(Special).���������Mr.  J." G. Jardine, whose statement as  to the wonderful  curative "and tonic  An inch of rainfall is equal to  500,000 gallons per square mile.  14,  DR. A. W. CHASE'S 0K~  CATARRH CURE... aJC  IS sent direct to the "diseased  parts by tho Improved Blower.  Heals tbe ulcers, clears the air  passages, stops droppings in tha  throat .and permanantly cures  Catarrh and Hay"Fev������r. Blower  free. AH dealers, or Dr. /\ W. Chasa  Medicine Co., Toronto aoi Buffalo.  ��������� Kidney Pills  many of-'the  of' this - city.  305  Crawford  Glacier Ice...  Glacier ice is not like the solid blue  ice on the surface of the water, but  consists of granules joined together by  an intricate .network of capillary water filled Assures. In exposed sections  and upon the surface of the ice can  be . observed "veined" or "banded"  structure veins of a denser blue color  alternating with those of a lighter  shade containing air bubbles. The  cause of this peculiar structure has  been the subject of much theorizing  among investigators, but hitherto the  greatest authorities consider that the  explanation of the phenomenon is yet  ���������wanting.  S Why  a.  Limpet  Stick*.'  The limpet has gained notoriety by  the strength with which it adheres to  the rock on which it decides to rest.  The force required to detach the limpet  froirfthe rock has lately been tested by  a -well-known naturalist, who found  that, more than sixty pounds must be  exerted for the purpose. So this little:  thing, weighing about half an ounce,  sticks so tightly that a force equal to  two thousand times ita own weight is  necessary to drag it away....  It was at one time supposed that atmospheric pressure had something to  do,with the adhesive power of the limpet,'but it is now generally agreed that  the creature exudes a kind of glue for  this purpose. If you place your finger  on the rock immediately after a limpet  has been detached, you will feel that  the surface is sticky, ahd'if you allow  your finger to remain there for a short  time you will"notice that it is beginning to stick quite tightly.  Ditched the Bishop.  ���������    ''T remember once driving across the  country with Bishop ." writes Rev.  Cyrus Towns'eud Brady of "A Missionary Iu the Great West" in the Ladies'  Home' Journal, ".while discussing the  nature of the soul. That is. the bishop  was discussing. I was only prompting  by a question now and then..- We were  on. the rear seat of a wagon, "with the  driver on the front seat. It was a  very dark night/ In the middle of the  bishop's exposition the wagon took a  wild plunge, there was a "crash, aud  over we went iuto the muddy ditch.  "��������� 'I befj your pardon, goiifs!" said Ihe  d.'ivor. vho had retained control o.f tbe  horses as we scrambled to our feet. 'I  was s-j interested in heariu the man  dtscu.^.sin my immortal soul, which 1  hardly ever knowed that 1 had one before, that I clean forgot wbeiv we was  add drove you plump Into the ditch.' "  Better to  Hnve  Waited.  ��������� The other moruing Jones turned* up  at ihe office even later than usual  I.tis employer, tired of waiting for him.  had himself set about registering, the1  dav's transaction's, usually JoneV first  dutj\ The enraged merchant laid his  pen aside very deliberately and said to  Jones, very sternly Indeed,. "Jones, this  Will not do!"  "No. sir,'-' replied Jones gently, drawing off bis coat as he glanced over his  employer's shoulder, "it will not. You  have entered "McKurken's order in the  wrong book. Far better to have waited till I came!"-  properties     of  Dodd's  has1 been' published in  papers,   is    a resident  city.'   His  home is   at  street.  i  Mr. Jardine was   chosen as one of  the Canadian Commissioners  to    the  Paris Exposition two years ago; and'  performed the onerous duties of that  office  with    honor *   to     himself  and  credit to his country.  It is to his experience in tlie Frenc,  capital  at -this   time  that 'Mr. * Jardine  makes , particular   reference    in  published    staeement    in    which he  'says : <������������������ r  "During* my stay-in Paris I felt  many times quite run- - down' owing-  to the complete change and to xhe  worries and work of our business  there. I suffered not a little with  backache, with a general feeling of  depression and I found Dodd's Kidney Pills invaluable.  <sl had learned the value of this  medicine before going to Europe as-  I had it very successfully for backache, which I found it relieved almost instantly. So when I went to  Paris I was careful to take with me  some of this my. favorite remedy.  * "Every time I was threatened with  a return of the trouble, I used a,few  Dodd's Kidney Pills, and can I say  they did not disappoint .me. They  tone up the system generally, and  they do certainly relieve backache  instantly." " v  What Mr. Jardine has said is amply borne out by many others in this  city whose .experiences have been  and are .being published from day to  day. Dodd's Kidney Pills arc certainly Avithout an equal as a medicine for those who are "tired out."  "run down"  or  "used up."  Dodd's Kidney Pills have been endorsed most heartily by all classes.  All men are good���������.good for something or good for nothing. -   -  When ���������washing- greasy di=hes or pots and pansi*  "Lever's Dry Soap (a powder), will remove ilio  grease with the greatest; oasa ,    *  <*. '  . All kinds of useful employment are  equally honorable. ��������� ,,  ,  Messrs. Nortbron & "Lyman  Co.  are" the  proprietors of Dr. Themas' Eclectric Oil.which  is   now, being*   sold, in   immense  quantities  throughout the Dominion.   It is welcomed by  tho suffering invalid everywhere with emotions ^  of delight, because it banisligs paiti and gives  instant relief. This valuable specific for almost -  '���������every ill that flesh is heir to,   is valued bv the*,  sufferer as more precious than gold.   It is the  elixir of life to many a wasted frame.    To the  farmer it is indispensable^ and it should bein  -  every house'. ,   '  ' The t Bible contains 3,566,480 letters, 773,4-74 words 31,173 verses,  1,1S9 chapters, and 63 verses.  ANOTHER HAPPY MOTHER.  Tells   * How    Her    Baby  Months Profited by  Treatment.  of    Eight  Wise '  '  A  that  Winnipeg     by-law -will, demand  all bread loaves be stamped.  MIMRD'S LINIMENT for Sale Everywhere.  Uncalled  for  confessions..���������C.  excuses  are  Simmons.  practical  The How of Milk   ,  will be increased.  A  A Thieves' Trick.  mastiff    was   trained    to  assist  thieves in Paris. It was In the habit  of bounding against old gentlemen and  knocking them over in the street. A  "lady" and ''gentleman"���������owners of  the dog���������would then step forward to  assist tbe unfortunate pedestrian to  rise, and while doing so would ease him  of bis watch and purse.  Why go to all the  trouble of keeping  cows and get only  about half the milk  they should produce.  Purifier  strengthens the digestion and invigorates the whole system so that  the nutriment is all drawn from the  food. It takes just the same trouble to care for a cow when she  gives three quarts as when she  gives a pail. Dick's Blood Purifier  will pay back its cost -with good  interest in a few weeks.  50 cents a package.  Leemlag, Miles & Co., Agents,  nONTREAL.  Write for Book on Korsos and Cattle free.1  Teething' time is the critical age in  a child's  life.  Any slight  disorder  in  the stomach or bowels at>that tixne  greatly increases the peevishness of  the little one, and may have serious-  and even fatal results. It is impossible to take too great care of your  baby's health during this period, and  no better remedy than Baby's Own  Tablets is known for the minor ailments of .childhood. Among* the  mothers who have proved tho worth  of this medicine is Mrs. R. Sic-Master, Cookstown' Ont. Her little-  baby . girl was . suffering from the  combined trials if indigestion, constipation and teething, and tho  mother's strength was severely taxed  by the ' continuous care the child  needed. A box of Baby's Own Tablets, however, made such an improvement that Airs! McMastcr is  now enthusiastic in their praise,  "it gives me great pleasure to testify to the value of Baby's Own Tablets," she writes : " My baby of  eight months was much troubled  with constipation ancl indigestion,  aud was very restless at night. I  procured a box of Baby's Own Tablets, and the results were so satisfactory that I have not used any  other medicine since. My baby girl  is now regular and healthy, and getting her teeth seems much easier  and sho rests a great deal better..  These Tablets are a great help to  little  ones when  teething."  ��������� Baby's Own Tablets are guaranteed to contain no opiate or other  harmful drug. They produce natural  sleep, because they regulate the  stbmarh and bowels and comfort the  nerves. They promptly cure such  troubles as colic, sodr stomach,ron-  troublcs as colic, sour stomach, constipation, diarrhoea, worms, indigestion and simple fever. They break  up colds, prevent croup ancl allay the  irritation accompanying the cutting  of teeth. Dissolved in water. they  can be given with absolute safety to  the youngest infant. Sold by druggists, oi" sent postpaid at 25 cents a  box. by addressing the Dr. Williams'  Medicine Co.,' Brockvillo, Ont. Free  sample sent on application. Mention  this paper.  What some men say should not be  charged up against them, but credited to some one else.  W. N. U. Kc. 371.  Ml  M'l  i  , *' $  ;J  -1'  : ���������:  , *  .     N     1,  <: ~.;YY���������  * 1 / **���������!*���������-��������� j'K'ffc'* ji\.������'������-* ������-<ouA*   -n i  i-J/ li*Hij���������-������J v������~ '!<���������*'  l  &'������.!������������������< JtTV^tl'- *^-*axn*tJaOituz-M-**������*i������iU.w  IK  Isfc  lis.  ISSUED    EVERY    WEDNESDAY.  Subscription, $2 a year, in advance.  TO. '38. Hn&erson. JEoitor.  *2T Advertisers who want their ad  chang-ed, should ?et copy in by  9 a.m.   day before issue  Subscribers tailing to leceive Tiik  Nkws regularly will confer a favcr by notify ut;   ih<s   otbce.  Job Work Strictly C. O. D.  Transient Ads Cash in Advance.  The Ollallites.  Mr B. Ii. Hurst the well known  real estate agent and broker of Victoria, has furnished the Colonist  with what that' paper calls '"the  final exposure" of the " Olhilla  Alining Co." The exposure is contained in the following clipping  taken from the San Francisco Call:  "The members of ihe Salvation  Army and the public in general  have been warned by Commander  Fredeiick Booth-Tucker n.itto have ���������  r i  anything to do with the .''oil and  miiuna enterprises"- conducted by  former- officers of thcarm}-*^ under  the name of  the   " Albert ,E. Hall  ***  ,    Company,",  with   offices   in   New'  'York oily. .     '   *  '   The men who were formerly affi-  c-"Hated with tbe Salvation Army and  who now have'sc'hgmes "id-get rich-  1 .  quick" for'the pubioVare'William  J. Bre\vei,.'Carl-'Hillstedt,  William  'Hatpin,   and,   Wi   Winch'ell. \: The  companies they have promoted,,are* t  '"���������The International Zinc Company,"  '���������"The Great  Republic Gold .Mining  Company," rand "The Consolidated  '   -Oil Lands."*    .'--,,.  < -Brewer began-bis stock operations  .about eighteen months ago. when  ' he was.editor in charge of. the various newspapers, published by the  Salvation Army in Nftw York .city.  He secured the assi.-tance of the  " "other- officers named ,.arid .worked'  assiduously .to-;dispose of stock  among the rank and file of the Salvationists.  When the" business operations of  Brewer were discovered. Command-  er Booth-Tucker insisted that his  subordinate should give up his  stock dealings or leave the Army.  Brewer was not, prepared to do as  he was asked and his resignation  was demanded.  When Brewer resigned the officers  associated with him in his promotion schemes followed him, and  -. wich the aid of Albert E. Hall, a  printer, a ���������-company was formed  under the title of the *' Albert, E.  Hail Company." Sui-es of expensively furnished offices were taken  in New York City and literature  was sent out broadcast.  In some of the magazines for the  "present month, " The' Albert E.  Plall Company" has glowing advertisements and tells of the wealth  that awaits investors in its mining,  (Smelting and oil companion.  In a recent statement issued by  'Commander Booth-Tucker ast; the  mining and oil operations of Brewer  and-his associates, the head ofthe  Salvation Army says:���������"I desire to  slate that these transactions have  our utmost disapproval and that as  nearly as we can learn they are an  absolute imposition upon the purchasers."��������� San Francisco Call,  March 15, 1902  -". The -"Ollalla Mining Company"  is one of many similar companies  promoted by the Albert E, Hall  Company of New York City, and is  re\iresented in B.C. by Mr Oliver,  M.P.P., director ; Mr C. Lugrin,  Attorney. The director in B C.  appears to be bent in making a  great reputation for himself, and if  he succeeds will no doubt be written  down in history as rivalling in the  magnitude of his schemes the late  South African magnate, Cecil  Rhodes. Why d->es not the Premier take Juhn Oliver into his confidence and put him at the head of  MAGNET cash STORE  Mrs  . . ,      .   ���������' m .reP'y to y������ur inquiry as to which is the best tea-to use, I  would say that in my opinion it rests between the Blue Ribbon and Monsoon  1 acket Teas. If you hke rich, strong tea, then Blue Ribbon is undoubtedly the  best but should your taste be for a delicate and very flavory tea 1 would' advise  you to call on C. J. Moore for a packet of Monsoon. ��������� Personally, I drink Blue  Ribbon in the morning and Monsoon at.5 o'clock, but then, you know, I am a  perfect crank about tea.- . ' J       ��������� '.  Yours truly, '  SARAH GRUNDY.  a railway building department ?  The Province would* then be able to  get its railroads built for nothing,  and the'Government no longer be  wcrried in finding-the means to  carry out great projects.  FERNIE  DISASTER.  Meeting in aid of the widows and  ' orphans fund of the Ferniedisaster  "was.held Wednesday evening, May  28th.    Chairman, Mayor Willard.  The chairman stated,the object  ioxu which the /meeting was calleJ,  calling attention to the generous  response made' by the people of  Fernie, a little more than ayear  ago, in aid of f the suffers through  No. 6 explosion. The amount sent  being $704.  The next in order being election  of secretary- and   treasurer.      Mr  Geo: Clinton was elected treasurer,  'and Mr Hall secretary.    In .matter -  *of appointing canvassers  for subscriptions   the chairman  requested  the, colliery managi-r; Mr M at thews,-  ,to  appoint  them  for   the   several  mines.     He' named   the following-  gentlemen:--For No.4sloi c") Messrs-  R^Short, F. Crawford, H.'Va'sV'J.  Kesley, and C. H., Ash man ;   No. 5*  shaft, Messrs D. Walker, J.Strang,  D.'Daniels/J.' Gillespie,'-C. Vat fer,  and J. Martin;   No. 6 shaft, Messrs '  W, Johnson, "Harry King, and  C.,-  Webber.     For outside employees���������'  Mr McKnight.      Wharf,  Den man  Island and Hornby���������Mr Manson. ,  r    A motion was carried to the effect  that the Council be responsible for  the canvassing.of the city for subscriptions.  It was moved and seconded that  the chairman confer with the lead'  ing men of Comox, Courtenay and  the surrounding di.-trict regrding  the appointment of canvassers for  subscriptions.    Carried.  Moved and seconded that "the  secretary be instructed to write"the  .Secretary of Board of Trade of  Fernie -informing the people of  Fernie of the steps taken by t he  meeting re relief fund.    Carried.  Mrs Anderson and some other-  ladies informed tho meeting that  they .would arrange to give a concert in aid of the sufferers.  No further business  the meeting '  adjourned.  THE HANDY^MAK'3 ROADWAY  Lieutenant   A.   JE." Ruxton,, of  H.M.S.  Arethusa,   China  Station,',  writes:���������"I  enclose - the  following  photograph,, taken   by me  at  Comox," Vancouver  Island,   B.C.;   it  ' shows a handyman's roadway when  no other  material   was ' available,  and is a goodexample of the handy  man's   ingenuity.      The   spit   on  which this rifle range.is' built consists of deep, loose sand, except for  the, two plots of grass in the photo,  and,   no   stones   or ,timber' being  available, a  large-number of condemned boiler-tubes were brought  fronVEsq'uima'lt dockyard aiid laid  - *Vi-       ,������ ���������'    r \  down.     The whole, range, houses,,  .butts, and firing points, etc.*, were  built by'Jack^     A rough estimate,  in round   numbers  of, the  boiler-  tubes  is about   150,000." -Strand  Magazine.  SEASONABLE    GOODS.  '<" -'w ������������������:���������- .v..   - "   r     Ready-Mixep Paints,  AlXbastine,    -Whiting,    '��������� '  - Glue,   . Wall -  Paper  .  a  1'/  r 1  A  Garden] Tools, '> Flower Pots,.. Etc.'  i ***  Dunsmuir AventieV  Cumberland,, B.C.  *������  A. ft. PEACEY, MMsU JStatioriar.  w FOR  THAT COUGH.   TRY '-'  "WINTER'S v ���������'. ������������������"'������������������:"������������������  ���������    Y    *'  INSTANT  "'��������� Y .'��������� ������������������-,  . Y ������������������'���������    COUGH,CURE,  A. QUICK CURE FOB,' BEE STINGS  **- i  First full the s|ting from the flesh  then bruise the fresh' leaves of the  c"'mmori   weed   known  as   vervain,,  a* d'rub the wound well with them,  *- ***��������� *  after which bind to it a plaster,-"of,.  ��������� the crushed-leaves well: "moistened,.  This,will" prevent swelling and ease  the pain.    Vervain may be used in  , its dried state by steeping the leaves,  in   hot ���������*"'water. !   It1-*'is-gathered' in  September* by .negro-nurses..an the  ' i -    ���������* **v *  south ana hung up to'dry forwinr  tfter use.���������Ladies'Home Journal. ,( -;  ' RETURNED.���������To-day and ,until  Tuesday; June 10th, another opportunity is'.bei'ng, offered to the people  of Cumberland and vicinity to have  first-class photographic work done  ri'j-ht- at homeland at reasonable'  prices. -Call "and examine photos  of your own'" people." " Paulu's  Studio.  it's a good one, and reliable,  for   children  . 'ani)    adults.'  We -are  selling   our. TOILET SOAPS  at Ccost to   make  room.'       Finest   GLYCERINE   and   CASTILE, SOAPS  '^Avvay jjown. -* , ; Y    *.     -      ',  -STORE OPEN Sundays from 9 a.m. jo,.io a.m.,  Jgf , and'from 5 "p.m.-to 6 p.m.   *-YY''  *;   '  I   Dunsmuir A^ ',"    Cumberland; B.C. "  , NOTICE.  ' I have been requested by. Mrs M.  Gibson to thank- the L,T.B., arid  the general public for the generous-  assistance given'on her behalf during' her late'trouble. :*.���������  '    *         " Sgd,"      J. N. McLeod,"Y  violin  D. THOMSON.  Teacher  , ' Music for Dances, &c, supplied  at short notice. Orders left with  Mr' E. Barrett, at the Big Store,  will be promptly attended to.  . IF'qiR;.  S-AlILIE  MAPLEHUR$T   FARM,  ~'\ HO R N B Yc    IS L L NY>, "\  (comox district),.   Y"    _  Containing���������   ������  230   Acres.   ��������� : 200 Acraa Fenced.  About 400 healthy Bearing Fruit Trees.  70 Acres cleared Up good, and' in crops  and hay land. -���������  Y  62 Acres cleared up  rough,   but good,  pasture. .... . ���������  85  Acres bush���������easy cleared.' "*"*  .'13,; Acres chopped and -burned ,oy,er.-.  * The whole of;the 23o^aci;es. is excellent  -land and will grow any kind of grain and  'root crops. 0 la suitable -for "beef, dairy or  sheep. .      t"  15,000 Cedar.' Rails in boundary and  .field fences..   J .....  Large 7-roomed house���������water in house  2 Story Bank Barn, 32 by 75 feet. Sheep  Barn, Hen Houses, etc.* ,-       , '  Buildings 5_years-.old. .Abundance of  good water. Nearly 1 mile*frontage on  Lambert Channel: 'f^ miles from Government Wharf.  Good Markets���������Cumberland (Union  Mines), Nanaimo and Victoria.       ,    *  Good shooting ��������� Deer, grouse, and  ducks plentiful.   -  Price $6000  1-3 cash,  balance,   6 per cent.  ALL ACCOUNTS due to the late Edward  \ Rolilngs, shoemaker, of Comnx, mlist ber'  paid to Mks Jane Rollings, -Executrix,  on or before the fir.st day of July,  1902; *'"���������  and all Accounts owing must be preaeuted  for payment by that date.     /    ,     *  MRS JANE ROLLINGS.  '"������    *  ',    . ,  '      Y     "       Executrix," Comox;  21-5-02-'    -Y.Y ���������:������������������   ..   . . t.   . ,. .  '    ���������*'  :i:  Baltoess SBDjaessfaliy Curefi  To Have something Swell.  Take *a  Dry  Sponge  and  pour .on  it  a  bucket-of water  It  will  swell  every time sure.     ....      ..-..         BUT we are not selling spoages, our line' is   SWELL     BUGGIES  Also, 246 Acres'adjoining���������good land, at  $8 per acre.  Also, several   Good Grade Jersey Cows,  Heifers   to   calve, and Yearlins   and  Heifer Calves..,  Apply GEO. HEATHERBELL,  "Hornby Island.  i4tS-c2 ���������-   . ..;...-..;  By PROFy SCHAFFNER  The Old   "NEWS ������ BUILDIKa.  rs  of all kinds.        We have ju3fc received a Gar Load of Open and Top Buggies  with Steel and Rubber Tires.        Expresses of all kinds with Platform   Half-  .flatform, Duplex and Elliptic or Hog-nose Springs.        Buckboards;   Ca'rts  Sulkies, etc., all of the most Up-to-Date Patterns and Finish.       Guaranteed  for one year by the Makers and ourselves,      ......  Mill  3-12-'02  0AEM1G1  STANLEY   CRAIG,    Prop.  F0EI8,  OTIi'E IS HEREBr GIVEN that sixty  days after dato I intend to apply to the  Hphourable" the.;'Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for, permission to pur-  ������cha8e:-'the---fol'U>'%ii^.u.1Crpwn lands :. .commencing at a post-on the north shore cf.  Otter Bay,, . Chatham Point, Vancouver  Island, thence west forty chains,- thence  south forty chains,... thence east forty  chains, thence along the' shore to the  point of ,-commencement, - containing 160  acres more or less. ���������",-'���������������������������"' '  ALBERT FRANCIS YATES  *    Nanaimo. B.C.,  Dated the 4th day, of April, 1902.  16-4-02    8t  1 IdYerttse in the lews,  . A remarkable cure effected. Cares bald-  nesB of long standing by the use of PEER-  LESS HAIR RESTORER and ELECTRIC  MASSAGE TREATMENT, both of which  combined destroy all germs and invigorate  the roots which stimulates circulation of tbe  active forces that feed the hair follicles.  From one to two, months treatment  will Restore Baldness of long standing-  Daily Treatment $15 per month.  Parasites cause all hair trouble. Dandruff  is caused by a jjerm which saps the hair*  vitality. Vaseline and oils are of no benefit  to the hair, as dandruff germs thrive in  them, as well as in all grease. To cure dandruff, which is preceded by, and' a sure indication of, falling hair, 'it is necessary that  the dandruff germ be .eradicated. From one  to. three bottles of the Peerless Hair'Re-  storer will cure the^Vb'rst chronic case.  ^:..,-Profe8spr_'vSchiaffner, graduate of  the Cincinnati ...'Conservatory' of  Music, and Member of the Musicians Union of Seattle,-will give,instruction to a limited number of  pupils during his stay here, on  viplin, or brass and reed^ instruments. Satisfactory musical engagements entered into for all entertainments. Apply at office,  upstairs in Whitney block.  '    1  *���������  )  ^

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