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The Cumberland News Jun 18, 1902

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Array UAiAx'^j>������&**^������i~t*:  NINTH/YEAR.  CUMBERLAND,   B.C.   WEDNESDAY,  JUNE .18,  [90^  THE BIG STORE,  DLin'SMUIR aye.  <r*������  NEW-GOODS ft^  .  IKP BELTED   DIRECT   FROM   QBE AT   BRITAIN  ? >  Comprising::���������  V  FY  -i-<-  *".  Y       1 ' ***  LACE, and MUSLIN CURTAINS*  PRINTS .....   .............;. .<Y  SUMMER :-: DRESS,:-: GOODS  FLANNELETTES, ,&c,    &c.   &c  ' ���������>  Si  ���������x-,  I''".  I-.  ALSO A .SPECIALS LINE   OF.  I  GENT'S.   PARIS   DERBY "SCARFS.  SIMON' LEISER'S     BIG $f ORE:  fr ������&������&&&&='<  * Njcholles &! R^noiiftYLa;  Y    6HVAtES:STREET, ^VICTORIA', B.VC.  .     HARDV^aRE; MILL AND   MENING   MACHINERY,;  Y,:AND.'F.VRMIN<r ->A"Ni>YDAIRYING  -IMPLEMENTS  --J  :   OF-ALI  KINDS.;   -Y    ������   ,  ^  ��������� '   " >! '  i^i is������\,  is'':  Agents for McCormick-'Harvesting Machinery.,   Y  m     Write for prices ahd-rparticulars.>   P. .0. Drawer 563.     * "Sj  DOG POISONERS.   i , f-  \       j '     a .' ** ~ ������������������ *  At   intervals,    sbme.,  miscreant  scatters, poisoned ^baits', broadcast  about  tbe town   in seeming disre -  gard of the danger sof'^such a pro-  ceeding   to* valuable i dtock.   , Mr  South*-, the secretary^px;the S.P.C.A.  in the meeting' hejd'ioOhe purpose  of organizing   a' section   of   that  Society   he.e,"' spoke "in. pathetic  strain, and in strong condemnatory  language of this species of  muider.  He spoke of dogs" and,cats, the close  companions and pets oMittle child;  reri,   being  ppisoned.by some evil  minded dastard  who, "through mo-  tiveb' of jealousy, 'or "of bliud, unreasoning hatred of the poor dumb '  ������ animals,' -gave"'them ^a'small piece  .of meat containing th&de'adly drug.  Hev spoke of the sorrow of the child,  and the bitter heart-burnings of the  parentsat1 seeing "their iittle one's*"  grief.*   He sjt-oke also otthejaw in  regard to 'these monsters,, and ex-  - pressed, {he hope that,'"severe\though __  the penally now "wak*," there.would  "be,still more severe measures enact-  ed^ ,aria>the. penalty of .imprison  jfuient withoufoption of fine. V      \ <���������'  "Y'/fhis /minor^Vagedy,, has ; lately >  'been enacted here, in juutthe way,-  *and yvith ^herdetai'sas outlined by  Mr South.'and'in such a "way that-  should,-the Ymurderer   know^.the  effect<;of',his lwbrk,ibis; (or .her), con-  ,-scieuce will smile until death's day.  f    '"* ���������'������������������_������     ^      .  Cc**  t> T  One most pathetic, incident was  the discovery of .the dead body of a,  ^pei.catjncthelbqx' with^her young,  < kittens,'who  were 'vainly-seeking"  ���������*��������� "'i "* *- t, **   ' ** '"iT  f        ***   "j   ^   x**     J        '  Hthe sustenance,^topped forVever."  . ���������������������������<  Babies Look at this  ��������� BABY  CARRIAGES���������  W th Paraaol,  Hood or-Canopy Tops,  and  Rubber Tire Wheels... /. $14 to $35  ���������GO - CARTS���������  That are adjustable to any position,   com-  plete with Parasol Top, Cpshions and Rub  ber Tire Wheels  $11.40 to $25  c  Our Assortment of Patterns was never as  large aa this seasons���������Our Makes the Best  .  Write [for Illiistraiipns^nd^ive ua an idea as to style wanted.  ���������  WEILER   BROS.,        Home  Furnishers,  VICTORIA.,   Be.  THE'  HICKS <fe LOVSCK PIANO  WRITE  FOR  PRICES  i  'MASON &  RISCH"   PIANOS.  'CHICKERING" PIANOS,   AND  THE   VOCALION    ORGAN.  EASY  TERMS  GIVEN  123 HASTINGS ST.,  Vancouver, B.C.  88 GOvk-ft^MSENT ST.,  ^Victoria, B.C.  ijr&rsr ."xjs for"  JOB   PRINTING  Work ofEveVy Description  at Moderate Rates  FIRE AT FERNIE.  The Crows',.Nest Pass has been  v*-  the scene of another terriblec'almity  * in the form of a fire at Michel, B.C.  Coal   Co.   have been clearing la rid'  for building purposes on the south  side of Michel creek, and while the  ^men who were doing the .work were  at dinner the flames from the burning brush spread  to the surrounding  forfest.      A" heavy   wind   was  blowing and inside of 5 minutes the  whole  mouatain   side    was   in   a  flame.     Sparks were carried across  the valle}1* and soon ashes and cinders   were raining  on the  woodpn  town.    There is no system of water  vorks  in the  town and  no means  of fightipg'the  fire,  nothing  was  practically saved and a large number , of the  sufferers are destitute.  The C.P.R. lost 9 cars- which were  'burned on   the tracks   before  they  could be removed.     The total lobs  will be near $75,000.  The new railroad bridge which is  to be constructed over the Tyne at  Newcastle. England, will be the,  largest biidge-building undertaking  in the United Kingdom since the  completion of the famous Forth,  'Bridge. The work has been designed by Mr Clark D. Harrison, the  chief engineer of the North-Eastern  Railroad Company, and its cost  will.approxminate--$2,350.000. The  new bridge will carry three lines of  railroad, there being a length of  over half a mile of viaduct^There  will be'three large spans of steelwork, the abutments and masonry  supporting which will be of grey  granite. The foundations of the  piers will be constructed by the aid ������  of large cofferdams and steel cais  sons. The rail level above high  water will be 110ft. There will be  some 8,000 tons of steel used in the  structure. The.work,'it is computed, will occupy two years to  complete. -"'Scientific.American."  I    *   LOCALS'    Jl  ' ���������     v ���������   '*  k. '    ,Y  , A young son, arrived 'at Mrs W.  C. White's on Saturday.  Mi^s  Jessie Walker, the secorfc,  daughter of Mrs M; and-the late'Mr  Alfred   Walker,   was  married   on  Thursday, evening last'to Mr Joe  ,Stant"Of Cumberland.   '   '.  '   "  *"*    .'"  ��������� >".The-'Minister of Mines has1 given  flfBsurance that a- Royal Commission  ��������� '.������.'( i ** 't  will be appointed at' an earl}' date  < to / en "quire*? in to'  the cause of  the  . Per hie disaster. ..-���������    ���������  ' ' Bicycle Suits', at 'Moore' & Co's. -  \ Mr Frank Lovick of the firm of  Hicks;'& Lovick', was married in  Victoria recently/ to'Miss-.E! MC  Gladding of Vic oriaV Miss Glad-'  Iding'resided in Union -with/her  -parents some,;yearsl ago;-and_is &c  couwri "of Mrs'H. Smith of' Comox'.'  ' ^People are again'arid'again asking us if we know when theXJouncil  will-move' in' the matter of cows,  "        ~-- **. "\'  running at. large inv the streets of  the, town, ' We bonfecs we do'not  know, but have heard it reported  ihat  they   have  lately   had ��������� some  new sidewalks laid for the benefit.  ofthe c&ws.-     " ,   "-"'        ' Y   *������''  ��������� United in M^niiige.���������Yesterday  a;fterndori a very quiet" wedding occurred in this cfty', in which Mr W.  J,-McKay, ,of* Mount Sicker . and  ^MissYMcCarthur oft Cumberland  were'the nappy parties. The couple  are staying.at the 'Dominion'Hotel.  )and willVspend a part of; their;  honeymoon in- this. city:'���������Colonist *  Information lias been received in  "���������-Victo'Via to the effect that the wreclr'  of the "Idlander" has Leen accidentally discovered by a - Juneau  fisherman. He. was; trawling-for  naiibut in Stephen's Pas-age with  deep line, when it caught on some  obstruction which, after b'aing hauled up, proved to be a door of the  ill-fated Islander.  Ladies' Shirt Waists at reduced  prices at Moore & Co's.  The first number of the "British'  Pacific,"   an   illustrated   monthly  ��������� dited by Mr ,H. F. Pullen of this  place, reached us-last week, and is  a most creditable production, neat  in appearance, and generally well  gotten up as regards illustrations  and letter pre-s. The articles,  mostly by British Columbians- of  note, are of an entertaining and instructive character. A poem from  the pen of Mr,Erie Duncan ,of  Sand wick, who has written many,  choice bits, will be of special' interest to local folk. We compliment  Mr Pullen on his maiden number,  and advise all lovers of good reading to try the magazine., $1 per  3 ear. Mr T. D. McLean is the  agent.  A rattling as.cociation game was  played on the grounds last Saturday, between the Cumberland'and  a picked team from H.M. ships in  Comox harbour; Play was fast and  furious throughout, much brilliant  play-'being executed on both' sides,'  and so well contested was the game,  and so evenly matched were the  teams, that a draw was the result,  neither side scoring. : It was pleasurable to notice that there was a  total absence of petty bickering and  foolish threatening during the entire game, it being most gentle-'  manly throughout. One of the  Navy team, met with a slight mishap-during the last half, being accidentally struck a heavy blow over  the eye hy the knee of another of  the same team when the tvo met to  get possession of the ball. He soon  recovered sufficiently lo resume play  Coronation Day  will soon be here and you  will want a.  NEW, SUIT  Don't forget we can  fit"' you  out in anystyle or color and  At ANY PRICE.  .  'Youths & Boys Glntlilng  All of the Latest Coronation Y  '  Styles.    'All'go^at Reduced^  .^.Prices for Pay-Day...:.::.;;  *'  -. -iv    _1_at_    Y'   ^ '  MQtfRE,;&Tea  f i  *���������'  '.VI  s i -������������������I  'til  ���������it  *"'   t������~  ft't  ...   ������tt  .(���������Ml  ", I  #1  - t  '   i'k 'son ^; was*- born "* to. Mr?^nd- Mr������  .Alex, Grant,Jaite cH, Cumberland ,^afe>Yv  ��������� N'ariaimo on June. 11th itist;" -.-;'-'���������--  ;Mr J. Johnstone of. GpurtenayYis���������'  erecting' a   handsome ^two   storey  "residence on his ranch above Court-  nay.    Congratulations later.  ,-Jas. Brooking of Vancouver, a  brtther-in-law of Rev. Wm. Hicks,  di d last week at the residence "of  that gentleman. Deceased had  been an invalid for five months.  The remains of Robert Lamb, a  victim of the Fernie explosion, were  brought to Nanaimo for' interment.  At one time he resided in Cumberland. His widow and family are <,  living in Nanaimo.  .���������.--.���������������-**���������*-  "���������t  ':l  CONCERT'  For.Relief of Ferme Sufferers  A concert  for  the , relief of'the  sufferers by the lamentable disaster  at Fernie will be given in Cumberland Hall on the evening of June  23rd.    Besides those mentioned on  the posters, a number of other well  , known   y^ung   ladies  and  gentle-  men"will assist in making the pro  gramme a success.      The residents  'of   Union   and   Cumberland   who  have always been ready in the past  to respond to the call of the afliict-  ed, will,  vye are confident, be depended upon   to  give  evidence  of  their, sympathy  by aitending   on  that'evening.      Special   numbers  will be rendered  by the orchestra,  while Mr Thomson will contribute  some violin selections���������old Scotch  songs   dear   to the  heart .of every  one.     Quartettes will also be rendered    by   the   Corbett-Randoiph  Quartette Club.     Miss Willis Cor-  bett who.has already distinguished  herself  as a  contralto singer -will-  sing .a characteristic sprig, also recite'a"'dialogue.     Prof. Schaffner's  comet solo "The Raft," by Pinsuti,  will be eargerly looked forward  to  by loveis of good music.    The box  plan for reserved seats will be.opeu  at Peacey's drug store. 1  ft   *i<**������   ~H>i h*J>ii~**%\>  V* ������**������/?  -^V.       <������   '*.'' 4-,*l5-f*������flZf*=U.trf*A* A   %/   UlUi-   ,.'(������-.       iaW'l,*^lWi   ���������    l������4-lh-M   A   **<&���������������* y*J>3++,t**.M,Kl.1*,**CV~<tl*.^     X. ���������-A. J1.J-1/W, *,**���������- -Uv,-   .S(_.  ^^     -Strf^^v  ,L.     -     ,^,    J   M.|t      ������-   ������    *������������yj.^������ ,1    J!_4������JA.^.  "V    \  -.gj-^-yJty.g*������j^������.> .^in.ijww.^ja  <;.1.  ������ 1  ii '* 1  'Y>  lv*'  Si ".  j?:,  ���������f   '���������'  s/r -  *&/��������� *  ���������fl*' '���������' *"' *'  ?������ - ���������'.'  54i - - ;  (������������������'   *  ft-ft   ji  ������[������' -  ���������J-  ft    .  &;*  ������  4-  *$  ���������Si  St  X.-V  Si  ���������J'  Tale of the Cattle Thieves  < Caliente.  Agua  ���������-Copyright,   1900  by'W.   LcC.   Beard.  ���������"Tlie corp'ral's worse than the private,  The sergeant's worse than the corp'ral.  Tlie 'uir.s are worse than the sergeant  An tlie captain's the worst of all.  1 can't get 'em up.'  1 can't get 'em up,  (    1 can't get 'em ,up in the mornin.  In a moment the camp "was astir and  ���������humming with voices. The men wer  -���������all dressed when they lay down, so tha'  their toilets were completed when they  had rolled tip in their blankets and, if  they'felt inclined, washed their hands  and faces.  The bacon 'and coffee served ont by  tbe Ballet Girl soon vanished. The man  'devoured them standing or squatting on  the ground wherever' they happened to  be. .  The Ballet Girl, assisted, by two oth--  er cooks whb'came with our re-enforcements, 'marshaled the 'pack horse? that  formed our provision train.   LaDorionsiy  hoisting himself on to  the baek of  his'  horse, .the Ballet Girl stamped the spike  dn the end of  his wooden   leg well into  the stirrup and announced that all-was  r * - 'ready.   The horses of the men had been  sa'ddled for some time.' The men-swung  themselves  into  their saddles  arid we  ^started in a canter  over���������,the  desert.'a  troop that was 87 strong. "    . ., J ;    ;  ���������   ' The-men were in high spirits.^ Jokes  and rough chaff flew from one to aiibth- '  er. ,But it would never do to use up our  horses by keeping them at a canter., By  the order of  the  foreman the pace'was  brought  down' to a shuffling  jog trot.  'The spirits of  the   men seemed to keep  '���������pace with  the  speed of  their mounts.  -, 'The shouts and  laughter lowered until  -,   '-only a rumble of conversation could be  ,"heard.? '������  ,       ivine alter mile was passed.  The plain  >   over which we  rode was  unbroken  by  any tracks save those we left behind us.  The trailof the herd., the foreman said,  ���������lay farther  to   the^ south.    The   cattle  "were   heading  eastward.    So were we.  'The  point .toward which   they steered*  was probably the grand, sleeping profile  '���������of Montezuma, outlined against the blue  ,sky by a distant- mountain  range, and  ���������jvhich marked'a pass for which we, too,  "were headed.    On the other side of  the  - }pass lay Palomas.  " v"   At   noon we  ate   a" hasty, lunch and  1   .then jogged on again.    One part of the  desert was precisely, like another , There  was nothing to mark our progress until,'  - toward evening, we   came on thetrack  of the-herd.- The foreman and Hay ward  ���������-were mildly elated then.  .   "There can't be no doubt   but what  'we're gain'in on 'em. an   there ain'.t no  -doubt but what they'retall here, too,"  said the foreman ,  "We're liable for to  run agains' the outfit   mos'   any   time  now."    The  chase  was  a   little   more  -exciting after this.    To guard   against  -ambush or other surprise ten men were  detached and" ordered to ride 200 yards  **ahead of ns. and ten more were sent as  , far behind. . , **  The trail we followed was as plainly  marked   as   though a broad street   had  been laid out' across the desert     Sometimes we could  see it   for miles ahead,  -drawing to a  point   as   it   disappeared  on  the horizon;   sometimes   it   passed  -over one of the   many sand   dun'es-that  wrinkled the surface of tbe plain ; ,then  we could see it only when we mounted  rthe rise.  After sunset we  would camp   by the  'side of the trail.    In   the   morning, as  ���������soon as there was   light   enough   to see  'by. we would   pick   it up  again.    Day  .after day. this went   on.    Montezuma's  face grew more and more distinct.,, Cattle'that had'fallen behind   the herd began to  dot   the  trail   here   and there.  Stretching their chafed limbs, the men  would tell each other that the  thieves  -would havo to pay for all   this dis'com-  'I'ort once we had   overtaken   them     It  seemed to me   that it was   months, not  -days, since we had  been   following the  ���������cattle     I consulted   with the   foreman'  ���������as to tbe advisability of  greater speed.  "Can't see what   we'd   gain   by   it,  ���������only to kill up onr  horses." he replied.  "Them   thieves is  drivin   the herd ter  pretty   near   as good  a   place ter   ship  from as where wo   was  goin   when we  started   ont   from   the   ranch.     We're  ��������� gainin on 'em   too.   .'Don't   you    fret.  You'll see 'em  soon   enough. : an   then  -there'll be'all the fun  you  want."   ���������  To bo sure, the foreman's idea of fun  differed materially   from   the, views   I  held on the subject, but events redounded to the credit of the   foreman's   wis-  -dom; as events generally did.  It was about the middle of the afternoon when the foreman rode  up to me,  pointing to a  thin   cloud of  dust, that  '���������hung over the trial  at a   point directly  -ahead of   us, where a   rise hid it from  through. It formed up behind us, and  tbe rear < guard galloped forward and  joined them : ,then we all spurred forward.  -'"Haiti" shouted the foreman, lifting  one hand, while he reined in his horse  with the other. The men hesitated and  then stopped. Some of them,had passed  ahead and were obliged to return.  "What's wrong?" I asked. /  ' "There's another ridge behind this  here one," replied the foreman, raising  his voice sp that all the men might hear.  "Behind that other ridge them thieves  isa-waitin fer , us/ They'll .ins' waste  you   men   if   you try ter   rush-'em, an  '���������   , THE BUYED   GUY.   , .    \.  The guide was guiding a g'uy. As'  the guide guided the guy the guide  guyed the guy until the guy' would  no longer ,be guyed by a guide whom  he had hired not to guy, but to.  guide. ,So the guyed guy 'guyed the  guide.' "No wonder everyone guyed  the guyed guide guiding a 'guyed guy.  nursery of genius.���������Tuckerman.1  - If -you resolve to do right you will-  soon do wisely; but resolve only to  do wisely and you will never do  right.���������Ruskin'.  to  supply the' want of it.���������rBulwer.  The first duty of life is to be calm;  for the calm mind seeks the truth as  the river* seeks- the sea.���������Lawrence.  National    enthusiam   is   the    great  There is-no policy like politeness;  and a good manner is tho best thing  in the world to get a good naine or  When  a  man  poor excuse to  does   wrong' it  is   a  say there are ath'ers.  'It is wonderfdl how near  (to  insanity.���������7-J err old.,    .  conceit is  ', CHOSEN   FROM- ,A ., MULTITUDE:-" ���������.  i   .        -" ' ' ' -  m*^mmt^^m^mmmmmammmmammm^mmaa^mmtmmmmimmmamaummmamXMM  The Preference. Shown0 By Thinlting YPebpIe for I>r.0Chase's Syrup of "Linseed and liut1-  /' pentine-���������"Record Sales in October.  Considering the large number of  remedies for coughs and colds that are now toffered to the public,  and in '*  view of the fact that nearly'every druggist has a preparation ofrhis own -whicH - he makes  an effort to substitute for the medicine asked for, it seems  truly Remarkable that the 'demand for'  Dr. Chase's "Syrup of Linseed and Turpentine .'should increase by such* leaps and bounds! .,"'-. t "  During October the sale'of Dr. Chase's Syrup of Linseed and Turpentine exceeded'by several hundred bot--  ties the record of any previous-month in its history.1 When it is remembered  that this'' preparation'��������� received  very-little newspaper advertising the  evidence*seems .to'be conclusive that it makes its way by'sheer'force of  merit..  in  ; --.our sight.  "That's them, "he remarked tersely.  ���������"Now, then, I reckon"��������� He interrupted himself, for there was the crack of a  rifle from the invisible space, followed  ������ by the popping of six shooters.    Above  the rise   there  instantly appeared   the  -���������beads and. then the bodies and horses of  'the men who composed   the  vanguard  as  they raced   toward us.    One of  the  'horses was wounded, and the rider was  ��������� sitting   very straight, this  reins   in his  -right band, while his left arm, covered  by a reddened shirt sleeve, hung by his  -side.  Instinctively the main body form-  -sd a line, parting  to let the vanguard  "Haiti" shouted the foreman, lifting one  '  '       > huiid.  maybe we can get away with Pm with  out that.   Dismount    Now al*i yon joy/  what  has   got   rifles ccnu'e     .th   .aie  ���������The   men-  rolled   from  . tlu;ii     fciuf-oa  -Those who had   rifles drew them, from  i   c   .  , the leather ^beckets that hung to their  saddle's. ' .  "You haven't got no rifle,' so you  can't'db no good with us. Stay here,"  said the foreman as I started'for ward '  "You'll see some er the fight later on,  don't fear." -What he said was quite  true. I could do no good by going forward, arpied only with, my pistols.  Furthermore, though I did not'want"to  shirk my share in this fight,' in the result of., which I more than any one  there was interested. I had Lno't the  slightest desire to see more of it than-  was necessary.  The party led' by the foreman'toiled  half "way up' the incline and stopped  while the foreman went,forward alone.  Reaching the brow ofthe little* hill, .for  a'moment he peered cautiously? over,  then .beckoned to his men. They came  "and lay prone, resting- their* rifles on  "the sand in t front of .them. After the  pause of a second the foreman must  have given some"signal, for the rifles  spoke together.in a crash, and the white  smoke drifted lazily back, for a moment  concealing the men. Another volley,  and amuch heavier one answered ours.  The bullets knocked little spurts of sand*  from the ridge or flew, singing like  mosquitoes, over orir heads.  Then the shooting   became rapid and  irregular,    sounding   like    nothing  so  much as a number of packs of firecrackers set off together.    The men were firing at will.   Lying next to the foreman  Spider was wasting cartridges, to judge  from the rapidity of   his  fire.    He was  using one of the rifles he had captured  the night before   we   had   started  put.  aud each time he fired he would slip in a  fresh cartridge to a**oid exhausting the  magazine.    Or^ce a man   who lay   near  him screamed and then swore, clapping  his hand to his shoulder and withdraw1,  ing it covered with blood.    As he backed down the slope Spider offered him a  bandanna handkerchief   wherewith   to  bandage his wound, but he declined it,  and tore off his shirt sleeve/using that  instead.  ��������� After awhile tho, firing slackened,  until there was only an occasional report Eollowed by Spider the foreman  came down the slope and. walked, toward me. .  "It ain't no good. " ho called as he-  came within speaking distance. "Them  tellers kin hold us here jus' so long as  we don't do no more than we're doin.  All we c'u do is ter keep 'em under  cover, an we've done that now Ther  ain't one of 'em what dares ter show  his head. But while we're waitin here  they c'n take them cattle clean back  ter Portland, Me., if we only give 'em  time enough. We got ter get 'em outer  there somehow." ���������-.' ������������������   ;  "Rush 'em but!" exclaimed a voice  among- the men.   ���������  "Reckon, it. comes- ter sunthin like  that," responded the foreman. '.'We  can't touch their-flanks, 'cause their  ridge is longer'n ours."  A charge, then, clearly was necessary, and it was as clearly myvdnty to  lead that charge. I did not want to,  but if I hoped to retain'my self respect  or that of my men there was no other  course left open.  "All right," I called, trying to speak  unconcernedly.   "Mount, boys, and line  U"P*"  rcOJTTrWTTRD.'i  Thinkings pe'o-plG recognize "the harniuilncss and danger of .using strong drugs which are '������aid to cure a cold';  a few hours:-^They prefer to'.cling to Dr. 'Chase's Syrup of Linseed an d Turpentine, which they know beyond a doubt to be'^a,Jlhorough and effective treatment for coughs, colds, croup, ��������� bronchitis, whooping cough,  throat irritation, asthma*, and'even   consumption itself.   ,    " , :.-../,,,       ��������� '��������� "t  The combination of Linseed'and  Turpentine, -syith half a dozen, other ingredients  of( equal  value for treating colds,   in  such proportionV.,as they-are found in Dr. .Chase's Syrup of Linseed   and  Turpentine'has' proven  to, be a perfect protection agains.t such developments as pneum'onia/*consumption' and serious, lung trbubles. ,  -You can with certainty rely on this preparation to afford-prompt relief'and permanent cure.   t ''      r  '  Do you suppose "that the sale'of   T)r. Chase's Syrup of Linseed ;and 'Turpentine   would., be  more  than  three  times  that  of any similar preparation if -it was not the most effective remedy that money can buy ? ���������,It has'  stood the" test and proven itself worthy of the confidence that is placed in it.   People  recommend'it  one    to '  another,  and" so  the-good  news  spreads.    Be  sure  you  get   the genuine,   with Dr. Chase's portrait and "signature 'on the wrapper;  25, cents a'bottle.    Family size,  tHree^ times  as much, -60 cents.    At all dealers,  or Ed-  mnneoT"    T���������������������������*'������'���������   ���������<*-   r'n .   Toronto. ' '   ,  '     ���������       ���������   -r   ' > I   ' i -   '       ,   -     "        ' ���������  It    is sowe time ago now* since <it  was     decided   to    erect a��������� monument  - . *     , ���������  surmounted* by an  eagle on  me tielrl  of Waterloo in ������memory ofthe Old  Guard and-its gallant stand on that  fateful day. A "committee was formed-- some ,years back'to consider the  question, and M. 'G-erome executed  the work, but tlie eagle is at ^he pro-  sent time in the cellars 'of thc'Grand  Palais''Ymd cannot be 'erected for  want-'of* money. It is stated Uiat-'a  fete is to be organized, the proceeds  to go to the fund in question.  Wise is the mah who knows-vwbeti  to make a long-story short.  i  Some people avoid straightened circumstances by'being crooked."  l SLEEPLESSNESS is duo to nervous excitement., The delicately "constituted, the financier,  tho business man and those whoso occupation  necessitates ffrcat mental strain or worry, all.  sullor inoj-e or less from it., Sleep is the great  restorer of a worried brain, *and to set sleep  cleanse the btomach irom ail impurities with a  few doses of Parmo'ce's YoRoiable Fills, gelatine coated, containing no mercury/' and are  guaranteed to give satisfaction.or the money  will be refunded. - ,j       ; ,  VIA  mm DEPRESSION  -  0  kind-  Some men sow a few seeds of  ncss and expect to.-reap* their reward  with a mowing- machine.  PEOPLE    FEEL     WEAK,    .EASILY  TlKEi^AXDrOUT 'OF SO'RTS:  You, Must Assist Nature in Overcoming ' This Feeling* Before  the Hot  Weather  Months   Arrive.  Jiot  a   Steel  Engraving.  "Yes, mum," said the tramp, who had  devoured the second pie; "in tbe old  days I used to be an engraver and if  I only had the tools"���������  "' "Don't let that bother you," interrupted the old lady as she picked up  the ax and saw; "here are the tools for  a wood cut. Now get to work."���������Chicago News. ���������     _..        ....'._ _j  ���������   'J b is important*that you should-be'  healthy in'the sprang'.* The hot summer . is*   coming -on    and   you   need  strength,    vigor     and .vitality to  resist it.    The feeling of, weakness,   depression     and" feebleness  which  you  suffer   from  in  spring   is   debilitating*  and'dangerous.      You  have' bec'n <indoors  a good deal through  the winter months,  haven't taken  the usual  , amount     of    'exercise    perhaps,, your,  blood is sluggish and impure and you  need   a   thorough    renovation of the  entire system.      In  other words  > ou  need     o   thorough  course of  Dr.  Williams'    "Pink Pills.    If 'you   try them  you    will    be surprised to'note how  vigorous you  begin  to   feel,   how tho"  dull  lassitude   disappears,   your  step  becomes     elastic,'j the  eye  brightens  and   a feeling of new strength takes  the    place   of    all previous   feelings.  Thousands have prpved the  truth  of  these words and'fou'nd'rencwed health  through     tlie"usd    o'i'    ''these pills  in  spring time. ,,One"of the many'is Miss  Gassie - Way, . of    Picton, Ont., who  says:���������'"A few years 'ago  E was cured  of   a.   very severe and prolonged attack of dyspepsia through the use of  Dr.    Williams'     Pink   Pills,   after  all  other   medicines   I    had "tried failed.  Since that time L have used the pills  in    the    spring as  a tonic and blood  builder  and find them the best medicine 1 know of for this purpose. People   who  feel run  down  at this  Lime  of  the year will make  no mistake in  using  Pi.  Williams'  Pink  Fills."  Those Pills aro not a purgative-  medicini- and do not weaken as all  purgati\cs do. ' They are tonic in  their nature and strengthen from first  dose to lust. They are the'best medicine in the world for rheumatism,  sciatica, nervous troubles, neuralgia,  indigestion, anaemia, heart troubles,  scrofula, and humours in the blood,  etc. The genuine-are sold only in  boxes,'������������������ the wrapper around which  bears the full "name "Dr. Williams'  Pink Pills for Pale People." Sold by  all dealers in medicine or sent post  l^aid. at 50..cents sx box or six boxes  for S2.50 by addressing the Dr. Williams'  Medicjne..Co., Brockville,  Ont.  Beethoven's "Wit.  The composer-���������Beethoven'was possessed of a' grim satiric wit which  resembled nothing-" so much" as 'the  caustic humor of Carlyle./.. '.It.us. related of him that one day his brother, who was very proud of a little  piece of property he owned, called on  him, but found him out,, so he.left a  card inscribed :-J-" 'Johann'"Vbn Beethoven, land proprietor.;" ��������� Next- *day  he .had it returned, to him, .written  on ."the -back :���������" II. von Beethoven,  brain proprietor."   ________  Heard at. ii  Cliurch  Concert.  lie���������How I envy the man who just  sang the solo.  She���������Why, I thought he had an exceptionally  poor  voice ! *  Uo���������Oli, it isn't his voice I envy,  it's his nerve. <  Minard's Liniment Cures Burns, Etc.  ��������� The     relation     between   color  sound is merely hue and cry.'   '"*  and  In wishing1 woollens  and'-flannels, the so-t;  spar, made from Lover's Dry Soap t,a* ������owde.*).  will be found very satisfactory.       - t *" .  ^        iSffotium   of  GentiiA. ��������� l  A writer in the London Standard declares the idcfi_ that'genius is usually  modest *"to bo a popular delusion. On  'the contrary, ho alleges egotism to be  the. very essence of, true genius and  quotes many amusing examples.  '"When    Wordsworth,    Southey  Coleridge were walking together  Coleridge remarked that the day  and  and  was  so fine "it-might"have been ordered for  three poets,"  the gentle*'AVprdsworth,  promptly    exclaimed:    "Three,   poets!  Who a re the other two ?" '    : / *  Disraeli, then a mere youth, wrote to'  his sister that he had heard "Macaulay*  Shcil arid Grant speak,  "but between  ourselves I could floor them all."   And  again he said, "When I want to read a-  good book, I write one."       * ^    .  Our own Joaquin .Miller wrote to  Walt Whitman: "You and I are over  the head of tho rabble. We know we  are great, and if other people don't  know it it is their own fault."  It was President Grant who, being  tcld.that a certain senator, an admitted genius . w*ho was very hostile to  him,- did' not believe the Bible, expressed his estimate of the senator's  egotism by rejoining: "Why should he?  He didn't .write it, you know."  Sometimes a man's neighbors consider him ungrateful because he insists  on managing his own -.ffairs.  Belgium  Saloons.  Belgium has 175,000 taverns and saloons for the sale of liquors.  day,  CtirIo������H Old Cn.stom,  In one o\ the suburbs of Paris  wealthy merchant died the other  and on the evening of the funeral bis  neighbors witnessed a cuiious ceremony.      ; ���������"'������������������: s'  An hour before^ the body was- 'to ^be  .taken to the cemetet*y-,the relatives' of  the deacUman, 'flyef ox'* six in number,  :swent.out into the jspi'den adjoining the.  house and. walked'-*|olp.irinly;and silently arounal': it. Eacji carried a 'lantern'  and kept his. '.eyes''fixed.' on the ground,  as though, he were looking for something.' Finally they ali halted in front  cf, a --"large 'pile of/.stone's and, laying  aside their lantern's, proceeded to throw  down ther'pile. After every stone-had  been removed they, examined minutely  the spot o*?i-:v/..liich,th6 pile, had resved''  and then,sipwlfjand with bowed head's  returned -td'jtne'^iouse.y- -  This is air old'1 Norman custom, and it  is observed ,in this instance because the  dead man wh.s a native.of Gison. There  is a tradition in Normandy that before  buvyifigt.a body all the'ground around  his dwelling should.be searched in' order .to..make sure that the soul has not  hidden 'itself somewhere. At one time  every family in Normandy faithfully  observed this tradition, but how only a  few pay heed to it.  Canadian Northern Fy  ���������; ,     " Ys>    ; '   f ������������������    Y ��������� ���������*    - 4 ��������� *  Lowest Hates, to --all. joints-*  yi  "���������' in the   ' ��������� ���������   ���������  '.\  ' EAST,' WEST ,V_AND ''SOUTH.,''  Daily Solid Vestibuled .Train,'*-with.  Sleeping* Cai*s,' to St.  Paul and Uin- ���������  rneapoIl3^     "'   ' < ���������'      <~ '   '  , **. _* . r  '  v. ' _*     1 ,        *��������� ^ * t *        *  OCEAN ������������������STEAMSrife TICKETS  -,^Full  particulars "ont application  to-  ���������iny agent Canadian "Northern' -"Ry^or  .-l ". f        "'"' : GEO." .>E\' SHAW, '  .  .-  -Traffic  Manager, .Winnipeg.  CMdiin pAcmc  *���������>'-*-*    - ,  -   -* . J. * ���������  "THE'Y ROUTE.TO  Australasia  And: the Orient  CANADA'S SCENIC ROUTE  Travel\by,tne.'C.-F. R. and be assured b'f-SOLID COMFORT.  First=class C. P. R. Sleepers  on all through trains.  Through-Touristy Sleepers -- the best.  Tourist Rates' quoted tb all points  East, West, South",.,  The Old Country,  Thl Orient,  The'Antipodes, "  'Those desiring-information" in re-)  gard to any part of the world reach-*!  ed by the C. P. It. or its connections  are requested to apply to" ar.y _ C. FY.  1"{. representative or to  ���������*���������    -      ..^C'^AIcPHERSCM*:       t    .  *   '���������   -,--.Gen. Fas. Agfc., Winnipeg.  i   '  '   W  I  ���������   fe1  m  .-'"'���������ffl  i  r v L  'H  ^1  a  K tn. *t* mm viiwi^ cm  ���������  A' Corn moil'-  red Cow,  When toned up by  Dick's Blood Purifier   will, give* as  much and as rich  milk as a highly  bred aristocratic  'jiey"cow gives,  upon or-  d i n a r y  feed, and  a Jersey  cow when  given.  DICK'S-.''-'Y  BLOOD PURIFIER  will wonderfully increase her.yield  of milk. It saves feed too, because  a smaller amouiitof well digested  food satisfies the demands of the  system and every particle of nour-  sishnient sticks.  50 cents a package*.  Leernlng* Miles & Co., Agfc-fttS,  ,     MONTREAL.  Write for "Book on Cattle and Horses free.  1  ' 1  ~l  '���������''���������I  1  M  ' 1 ���������'���������*-  V  W.  N.   U.  N.o.373.  - WPE&HW
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o ,    By ELIAS LISLE ,        o
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A   Copyright, 1901, by A. S. Richardson.  A
3-F��*<>r��*��>'K&*09<^
Between wet and glistening fangs
Brindle,' the' ^performing lion of'the
Cosmopolitan circus, let out a. sound,
that was half groan and half roar. '
* .���'Whiit!/ You brute!" said Berthels.
the elephant man, gesturing at-him for
silence./ ,
, ' "Don t abuse him," said the woman,
scarcely more i:han n girl,' who stood
i beside Berthels;  "He isn't in good hu-
\ i ���
\ mor today." '   '      * ��� ,
i   "Should say be wasn't,"( replied Ber-
Whels.    "Ill 'tempered,   bad- mannered
, beast!  Wouldn't wonder if .he was go-'
\ng"iad."       '     "     ��     " �� ,      \
1 ">onsense!--My lions don't go bad.
Besiles, he's only, a two-year-old., Look,
^at^od Arehon.   He's ten if he's,a day,,
andp-oii don't see him going bad,'"'do
< you}' i     .      ���  , '   , *���
,1   '""here's something wrr6ng*with Brin-
dle, nyway,"- insisted the man.
Y   "G course there is. ' lie's had a rough
��� mocing of it.- He~'was cluinsy and1
stepe'd on Archon's toes at rehearsal,
kit-" , '      ���.    ���
andlrchon boxed.his ears.. The hyena
i In tfe next cage rlaughed, and that hurt
��� Briille's feelings.  You kno\v how sen-
sitrs-he is.-'He sulked*1 so that Lhad to
beat him" to make him perform at all.'
Hej awfully cut up about it, for you
kn<7 I really believe  he is fond of
,     ' '   r v . <        i
me - 4
*" ���  "Tish you'd believe that about some-
boc else, Sue,".said the man wistful-
-ly, ��oking down into the, clear, brown
,  eye that were "fixed on the lion.
',  'jei-haps I don't want to," said the
, gicsaucily.   "Besides,- Brindle is my
' ^bwd slave.  You can hear him swear-,
' inaiOAv." she added, laughing, ���as the
'   haflsome"   beast    muttered    liouwise
del downdn his great chest.
- file.   Zelka,   the' feline   empress,"
-wi right inhe'rjhalf jocular estimate"
jofjnndle.    'Brindle "was a lion with
"fengs/ -Some lions are savage, qth-
"crare sullen,, more' are treacherous,
at all   are , absolutely   cold , blooded.
', Tfre,' are a - very few ^exceptions" to'
th ,rule/ "however,, and "Brindle >was
'<oi of those very rare exceptions,
wi a capacity for affection ,and loyal Mile. Zelka liad,,only a faint in-
- klg of this.;Berthels-didn't believe in
it't all -because' he' was- the head of
-tielephant herd," and* elephant' men
ajvery wise-and'believe nothing but
tlworst about animals. That is the
or reason why all of them don't die
yog. Berthels was anxious about
M. Zelka, who *was plain Sue Range to him. 'That,she wasn't Sue
Bhels was not his fault. If she
ej did become so, he intended that
hi lion training career should end.
a! she suspected this. So it was
ply coquetry  that' made  her leave
h
now, walk over to the
, ..���._. w.v... .._ ,^._ cage and,
ping her piquant face close up to
tlion's, begin to talk to him.
t Brindle's sensibilities' had been
Ira ted. To be beaten by. his queen
���na humiliation of spirit beyond all
o*s. Not yet had the "smart" of it
psd away. Therefore, he now arose
lrhtily, stalked 'over to the farther
eur of his cage and affected a ma-
jc disdain of his charmer's converse. -' - .'-    ���
fell, you aren't' very polite * this
a'noon," she remarked as she turn-
away. ��� "Hope you'll feel better
,\a it comes time for the show."
ind I hope you'll cut that beast out
cie programme tonight, Sue. dear,"
6 Berthels as" he went to  his ele-
i, *���  ���
pts.
iter they had gone the hyena which
1 insulted    Brindle   that    morning
<e to make some jeering,- remarks.
ie   Brindle   then. in ' wrath   and
le in substance as follows through
letwork of bars at which ho claw-
ou snickering eater of better peo-
leavings,  if   I   could   break  into
cage for about two seconds and
one swipe at you  I'd  knock  that
through tho top of tho tent."
e, he, he, he! Ha-ah-h-h-hrr-ha-ha!"
ted the hyena.  "Ha-ha"���
e hateful voice died away as a ris-'
growl   from   Archon's   cage  gave
js that'the'king-of the circus had
,ened���������wakened with a strange lire
is-'eye,-before-which the other ani-
3 cowered.  For this was the fire of
pang of fear he noted the intense nervousness of the young lion, the most
promising performer of the lot, Brindle was stumbling through his part
like an amateur, and his mistress, too
wise to be harsh, was coaxing and
soothing him with hand and wand!
"Sue," the low voice came to her ears
from without the cage In a lull of the
music, "let me call the ringmaster and
have the,young one barred off."
"No; he's all right," said the girl
softly. "Don't worry, Phil. He isn't
going,bad. But I can't understand him.
Bee how he.watches Arehon." t    ''
Indeed the young lion's (eyes'1* wer��
hardly ever taken off ,the king of the
group. Twice he! missed his cue, and a
third time he half turned away".
"All   right,   boy,"   said   the   trainer
gently. '.'I'll give you a rest. Come our,
,Praetor! Jump!'So., Now, Consul! Up!
Good boy!   Up, Csesor!   Come, Senator.
over!   Hola!".     ,    " ' - -
Around the confines,of the cage, now
running, now leaping over, the set obstructions, glided the tawny, sinuous
bodies of the lion-troupe,,,while their
mistress, in the( center, waved-them on
with her Avand. But all the time she
was watching, not Brindle, / 'but Arehon, and Brindle was watching, too.
Soon it was ,the big, lion's ;turn. In
answer.to the, command he came forward', but, there was, something
strange1 in his motion. His eyes were
set, and he moved jerkily, and the
great tufted tail t that had been curving around his* flanks* grew straight
and rigid' as* an h;on club.,   0 /
". "Come, Arehon,'^said the" girl. "Up!*
Get up, sir! Arehon!" Then, without
raising her-voice] for the discipline of
the circus thinks*first of its' audience���
tho audience that must not be unpleasantly disturbed���she said rapidly: "Set
the poles and keep him back. ' I can't
get to the door. He's going bad."
��� Slowly the" great lion moved on���
stiffly, ,like aL cat stalking a sparrow.
The .others crouched at,the sides, silent
and tr.embling. Only Brindle growled
1slightIy't Then "theri1 was a rattle and
clank of the ��� iron door, and a man,
bearing a heavy club''in this hand,
leaped intdrthe cageY'V/'
"Phil!" cried the girl,\vith "a thrill
inkier voice'that'told him more than
ho had ever known before.' "Go,back!
They-don't1 know, you! You'll lie killed!   I can handle"���    Y
i. <i *-   '
Her    voice- was    drowned 'In , the
shriek of thousands of ^ voices as the
great lion * hurled himself straight at
her^throat, smiting at,her with those
terrible paws. At the same time a second tawny body darted "through * the
air, and 'the two met. Like *a flash
the-girl had slipped away, from the
mad lion's - onslaught,-;, but * a glancing/
impact had sent her to the* floor. Half,
stunned as she was, ^ she caughtat'the
bars td Vaise, herself, for once a trainer is down authority'is gone, and any
lion is likely to attack. A strong arm
lifted her and drew her toward the
door, but the way was blocked. Lock-
ed'-'in a furious embrace, the mad lion
and the two-year-old "were tearing
and clawing each other, while the rest
slunkv terrified, at the sides. Even in
her peril the girl thought of the faithful *beast.
"Arehon will kill him!" she cried,
clutching the, elephant -mail's arm.
"See, he is working,in at his throat!
Oh, can't they.get firebrands?"
What Berthels did then was partly
from gratitude', and partly from the
natural fighting courage of the man
who'trains wild bea'sts. He swung his
heavy .club up and as Brindle'in a final
effort for life tore half loose from his
foe brought the weapon down with a
smashing blow .across the mad liou's
maw. A lion's nose is his sensitive
point. * Half stunned, the giant relaxed
his grip, and Brindle tore away. Arch-
on gathered himself to leap. Again the
club fell, but this time too late. The
jnan was down:
"At him, Brindle!" cried the girl,
catching at Arehon with her slender
hands, and the faithful lion responded
with another attack.
But now the fighting madness was at
its height in Archon's brain.   One paw
or not. there seems to be no other whv
to explain the connection of this particular saint with Scotland, for he seems
to have passed the whole of his life up
to the moment of his martyrdom in the
east. .lames II. certainly associated
him with the country across the Tweed,
for it was he who founded' the Order
of St. Andrew in 1GS7. to be conferred
on the king and sixteen knights.���London Chronicle.
HOUSEHOLD  HiNTS.
'        How  the   Tea   Plant   Started.   '
As you drink a cup. of tea do you
ever think how tea came to grow?
Tell your next ** visitor i the story. A
Persian prince on his >vay to> meet
his betrothed vowed that he would not
sleep until he saw her. After traveling
seven days he stopped to rest under a
shade tree, and there,, being no longer
able to resist the temptation, he fell
into a sound.sleep. When ,he awakened, he was so sorry that he cut off his
eyelids and threw them on the ground.
From them grew the tea plant. It" is
rather unfortunate that'the story stops
here 1 cause it would'be interesting
to* know what thclady thought of a
sweetheart without eyelids and whether it would bef possible for 'then? to
crow again.        *	
C r
...    TO CANADA'SRESCUE.
Daily Journal ' of   Aberdeen    Slakes   Eloquent ���!),-fence  of, the Dominion.
Here is a Scottish ^newspaper. The
Daily Journal of Aberdeen, with a
really ,eloquent' , defence of Canada
"against Kipling's, implied suggestion
that,snow plans' a , part in our daily
lile. , }'-    o
"The title  of/Our Lady     of     the
Snows,' "  says  the "Scottish writer,
/'bestowed  on   Canada in a .haphazard sort of mariner  by^ Rudyard Kipling,   "is  not at all'.   '&, happy one",
as   it   applies^ to   a< season   only.   I
have  seen   the  grapes   hanging * t   in
luxuriant   bunches   to   the  vines     in
a   Quebec garden;   and  the fields, of
tomatoes    grow   crimson     in        the'
warm'sunshine:'    I have  .lingered in
the golden    wheatfields'   in tlie'evening     and     listened    to    the     myriad
sounds of the' cricket    and       grasshopper;   *-*I  have ^walked, araid.j   the
cedar    trees     in* an   Ontario' swamp
when   the   sunset glow     had   faded,
and  watched the fireflies darting   to
and  fro' like shooting stars;     and I
have  watched the tiny'humming-bird
with plumage that rivaled the gaily-
painted   butterflies,   contesting    with
^the bee for  the honey thati lay within     *the      sweet-smelling        flowers.
Scenes    like these are   not associated
with  a land   .of never-ending      winter.      Consequently     there      can be
no   greater  mistake"    than to     imagine,   as  too   many people do, , that
Canada     is' a  semi-Arctic      country
out of which little good   can   come.
And yet, what do   we find?   , According to  the returns  of the Board  of
Trade fully     65,000 to 75,000   Britishers    went  to  live""" in  the  United
States "during  the  past year,    while
only     12,000 or   13,000       went    to
Canada.      There' is  no   reason        to
doubt that if  the resources and natural <* wealth Lof the  Dominion^     of
Canada were more generally    known
in this country,  we would soon hear
the   last       of the  term* "American"
as applied to Canadian products,and
United States producers would      no
longer     receive credit    for Canadian
goods,     in many cases     superior to
their own.    Those who     guide      the
destinies      of   the  Dominion       think
that     the \  Stars   and  Stripes  have
overshadowed the Maple Leaf      long
enough. '   Every  true  Briton will  be
of the.same .opinion."       *
Sewer gas is counteracted by a handful of salt placed in toilet room basins.
A sponge is the best thing to wipe
down paint with, as it leaves no "fluif."
In  a  sickroom  never 'shake  pillows
and  bedclothes" over tho patient.    AI
ways shake them away from'the bed
It pays well to do your-mending &r
forc the articles go to the wasa,  as
.washing usually-results in making- the
holes larger.       '      _ ?
To renovate leather chairs wipe the
cushions   with  a  slightly   damp   cloth
and   then   rub   dry. .Next   apply 'the,
white of an egg beaten to a stiff froth
and rub with a soft cloth.
To" keep the dining room 'table in a
good, well polished corrlition rub it
once a week with a mixture of one
ounce of spirits of turpentine and one
ounce oi' olive oil. Apply it with a
piece of flannel cloth.
Milk that has been standing any little time in' a jug' should always be
carefully poured into another jug. leaving a little at the bottom, for this portion of the milk is'said to be injurious
to health.
Housework giov,es should be sufficiently loose to allow free play to the
fingers. In using rubber, gloves fji
dishwashing care should be taken to
wash '.them on the hands until every
trace of grease is removed.
Society Manner's.     '
The  young  girl, who" has  a   society
mask which she lets fall when she en
ters her own home need  not' hope tc
long deceive her friends.  Inadvertently
she will let it slip at an unexpected^mo;-
ment, and the glimpse once seen* qt'o'i
peevish, selfish nature is not "soon "for-"
gotten.   If theYvislies 'of the brother at
home are, not to^bo "considered, the'admiring man friend'feels ^ure her" lover
and future husband will not be either.
The   sweet, "musical   voice   which-  is
heard in sociqty often changes into a
snappy, disagreeable one when used to
address-a. patient'.devoted  mother at
home. But at some unexpected moment
the young girl is sure to be overheard,
says the Philadelphia Press.   A chance
visiter will ring the bell and be ushered
into the drawing room while,in a heat-,
ed  .argument   above   stairs   the (' fair
young  daughter  of   the   house   is  expressing' her opinion  in, no  measured
manner. ":
No rules for preserving the physical
beauty can obliterate traces in the face
of ill nature. Let the fair debutante
bear this well in mind.
in ess and murder which no man is
f enough to know, though all ani-
* recognize it with terror. Archpni
gone bad. At one glance'- Brindle
v it; knew, too, that the demon in
ession of the great-lion1'might lie
tily in wait for long, but that soon-
jr later it would glut itself in
ghter.
the attendants surrounding the
where the feline empress ruled
beasts that night one wore a grave
drawn face.  Berthels should have
b with the elephants, but anxiety
j brought him  into the ring when
e. Zelka's act was called.   With a
broke Berthels' arm. the foaailng jaws
were at his throat, when there came
the crackle of pistols, and the fierce
face rose, bespattered with blood, turned hither and thither and closed its
eyes. They dragged Berthels out of the
cage then aud there, but not so the
girl. "2ver her Brindle, torn and mangled, m&cnted guard until she came to
from her faint and drew herself to her
feet with her hands buried in his
mane.   ���;.-'.   ' ��� ��� ���';, '   ���    .
Berthels insisted' that he and the
feline empress ought to be married on
the day they buried Arehon, but his
broken arm wouldn't allow it. However, they had a professional wedding in
the lion cage, and Brindle, standing
proudly on his hind legs, with crossed
American flags in his mouth, was best
man.
St. Rule's  Tower.
St. Rule's tower, in the" town of St.
Andrew^, is ,an evidence of the link
which binds. St.-Andrew, whose feast
all good Scotchmen keep, to the country of whom he is the patron saint.
The legend runs that a monk called
Regulus, or Rule, brought the bones of
St. Andrew from Constantinople to
Scotland and buried them near the sea-
coast, on the spot round which .the
present town of St. Andrews afterward grew.   Whether the Story is true
Dr.   Crozier One of tbo Elect-.   .
Canadians generally will be interested, in learning- that Dr. J. Beat-
tie Crozier, author of the famous
work, "History of Intellectual Development," .has been ��� selected as
one of the>300 representatives of
the_- empire^ in the splendid ten-
guinea' volume of portraits and-biographies which the G-rosvenor Press
are bringing out.' The work consists of representative men of every
class outside 'of the military and
civil services, who will have a
volume to themselves. Dr. Crozier
will be one of the representatives
of the department of philosophy.
Also, of course, be will stand as one
of the representatives of Canada, a
distinction, he has well earned, and
on     which his      countrymen  will
warmly congratulate him.
Tlie I.ovincncsR of I)oc<.
I have heard the watchdog's honest baric bay deep-voiced welcome
to me as 1 headed for the pear tree
after dark. 1 believe the fellow that
owned the pear tree chose to think
that, the dog was giving him warning of my approach, but I knew
better. I had never given, that particular dog any reason to dislike vac
and the" fact that his noisy welcome
did bring the owner of the tree into'
his orchard with a gun was not
the dog's fault. It was merely, due
to the circumstance that the dog
in his canine ignorance welcomed me
too vociferouslv. .
She Keeps Bees.
Bee keeping'.is an occupation which
the few women who have taken it up
find both pleasurable and profitable
One of those who have made a signal
success at it is Mrs. N. L. Stow of
Evauston, 111. Mrs. Stow, who is the
wife of ex-Alderman Stow,'has.a fully
equipped apiary. She is a recognized
authority on the business and a frequent contributor to bee journals.
She started in 1SS4 with four hives
at her home in Ashland avenue. Soon
vthey had multiplied to twenty. The
nearby prairies were covered with
white clover and heart's ease, which
made the best sort of feeding ground,
and it wasn't long before the apiary
numbered eighty colonies, making it
the largest in the country.
All the^work of .attending, to the beea
Mrs. Stow performs herself, and during the' seventeen years never has a
swarm escaped. Every pound of honey
she'takes from the hives with her own
hands.
Japan'i Modern'Woman.
In reply to the query about the effect
of the new woman idea-in Japan a
bright .Japanese woman replied as follows, says the Detroit Tribune:
"Oh, 3-es, indeed, a very great effect
We are beginning to have old maids.
Such  a -thing  less than  a generation
ago was unheard of. but now we are
recruiting  more  and   more old   maids
each   year.    The   women's   clubs   are
making our girls much more particular,
as to their husbands.  The more education a  girl gets the  harder  she is  to
please in the w.ay of a husband.  When
she gets a knowledge of algebra and
geometry   and   chemistry  and   poetry
and drama, she begins to have ideals
and is not contented to marry the first
man or even the second or third that
she  has a  chance to  marry,  and  because  frequently the-fourth does  not
���turn "up at all or is no better than the
preceding three she prefers to remain
single."
HON.  DAVID WARK.
Oldest Jlember of Any Parliament in ttim
Britif.li  iCmpire, >*<;w JJrun-,wick senator  Has .Done Gtsoii   Work.
The oldest member  of any  Parliament     in   the  British  JEnipue,     and.
probably     the 'oldest-   represei    tlive.
in  any  of the national asscmYcs  of
earth,   is   the   Hon.   David   /\\ arj<   of
Fredericton,   New   Brunswick,       who/
has     just entered   upon  the     ninety-
ninth      year      of   his   useful     career,
writes     the Ottawa correspondent of
The Montreal     "Witness.     Fifty-seven,
years     ago '   he was chosen   member
lor  the  County of Kent in-the   New
Brunswick .Legislature.      After  playing   an  active,   -part m ( that   , body
at confederation/ he  was raisqd     to-
the   Canadian Senate,   which   he has- ,
attended   without   interruption   since-
1807.      Mr.  Wark's life �� has      iJeen,
one. of  value     to his country. In
one sense he, may be termed the   father of the Canadian    Confederation,,
since it  was .the  results   drawn from
legislation of his'framing that,, convinced  the colonies in favor    of   union.      On his initiative there        was
adopted     twenty     years before  'the'
union   a  free  interchange  of commodities    /   between     Britain's   several
colonics     on the northern , half      of'
this  continent.'    The'advantages    of
this     broad-minded step were   .made'
'plain     to   all., and  gradually     there,,
came      a     conviction      that   instead "
of rivalry  the position     of all would *""
be strengthened  before the world by '
a joining,   of  interests.
A marvellous    monument of the results     of regular     habits,   and temperate     living     is   the life ��� of : this.
<man.    At-   this   age    'he  is   , as   clear*,'
of  miiid   'and     as vigorous, of -frame-' .
as   most   men   twenty     j'cars his-*
junior^ . ""There     is   nothing - .   that. '
would    t offend   him - more  than **��� >san
oner   of    support.   . Sturdy *ii dependence  has    been *a    leading  characteristic    of ,his    -whole  lite.     -The" very '*
messenger   who  stepped  forward     to-
help       him on     with his.coat would
���be   waved^   ���bac'<:. ,    The  fire  of,'the--'
born< reformer  still shines     _'in   '   his    "'
eye.      His   last  address  in    the  Senate     was    a    complaint     that  there-
was not     given that1 branch     of 1he     <
Legislature     more    ito do. u   Three-*   '
ejuarters-o^   a century   on Canadian
soil, has  not" clouded  his  lover       forr
Ircland, the land of   his birth.       Mr. "  '
Wark's longevity     comes of no     facl ,<
practice.      He has taken regular exercise """and   refrained  from too -.vigorous    indulgence'   in table   delicacies.
For     years     he has eaten but     two
meals     a     day���breakfast.   and "tea���l
-but  in,this,     as   well-    as'all"- else,..   "
he has adhered to regularity;.      - _. ,   _
,   Senator      Wark     was  one Y of  the- ',.v
first      public , men "in   this* section""Y
of'      th'6 , ' e"mpiren      'to    Y identify ���''
himself   with     the   Imperial    feclera-J Y
tion  movement.       He  is.. in(> favor of
anyi "policy     that would . strpnerthen.,."
the    bond   between     the  motherland ' <--
and her colonies.  He would vote' -tomorrow  for   intercolonial   free  trade.,
He has long advocated the improve-  !
ment        of " Canada's   trade  relations
with      the,     United    States*: ''The .
breadth of view which     prompted his'
first  public     act  of     consequence ���*
the  adoption  of  fr'ee  trade    between
the  units* of  British   North- America.
���has  been  apparent  in almost every
speech he nutde*     He would like '  to
���ee confederation     rounded off       by     *
the inclusion ol  Newfoundland.       In
Parliament     this       wonderful old
man has consistently supported
every movement that was calculated to elevate the people's morals.
In a letter written by his 'own han'd
the other day Senator Wark - announces that he will* probably be up,
to Ottawa for a portion of the session. - : *
���<>i
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Facts About Londoner.
"Londoners drink less than seven
gallons of milk a head in a year.
Fifty-six different authorities exercise, control over the port of London.
In .1,000 deaths of Londoners 2S7
occur in winter and 226 in summer.
London's  cemetery  area  works  out
at one acre for each 1,700 people.
,   In London 900,000 persons arc living more than two in a room,     "and
26,000 six or more in a room.
Simplicity In Table Decorations.
Elaborate and expensive floral centerpieces are not necessarily'the most
beautiful. Simplicity often rules the
world of art and nature. Who would
consider as beautiful at first thought a
few sprays of the leafy growth of the
garden asparagus together in a small
vase with a like number of golden coreopsis? The effect is charming.if'the
vase also be simple. This should be remembered, that a vase of flowers is intended to display the beauty of the
flowers and not man's handiwork' in
molding or coloring the vase.
'The umbels of white flowers of the
wild carrot are very pretty in vase decorations, yet how few persons would
think of gathering them for that purpose!       *'. .     .
A .Harry Turnis* Stors-.   ,
I was at my hotel in Ottawa, the
morning after 1 appeared at tho
Opera ITou.se in the' "Humors of Parliament."' An eminent Canadian divine -was ushered into my quarters,
and addressing nie, said:
'"Allow inc to introduce myself,
and to say that I listened with the
greatest, pleasure and profit to your
most admirable ""discourse last evening!
I bowed my very best.
"I must say,-'' ..continued the rev.
gentleman, "that your efforts in the
cause of Christianity in Ihis ciiy
are marked by a fervor and earnestness that cannot Jail  to convert."
������Ilcally," 1 said, "yod flatter
me."
"Ah, no, sir, you arc one of tho
brave' soldiers of Christianity, who
march through tlie .world addressing
huge audiences and influencing the
masses, taking life seriously, and denouncing frivolity and worldlincss."
"Well,""" I said. "I"don't think I
do any harm, but I'must" disclaim
for my poor 'efforts'to amuse���'-'.
"Amuse, sir," repeated the astonished divine. "Surely-I am speaking-
to the gentleman whose striking discourse 'it, was my good fortune to
lis ten to last evening in Dominion
Church?"
"No, sir, I was in the Grand Opera House." ,
"Then you are not Dr. Munhalrrthe
revivalist?" <
"Bless you, no, sir. I am Furniss,
the caricaturist.'*'
i "Good gracious! whore's the door?
Let me out! They have brought me
to the wrong room!"���From "The
Confessions of a  Caricaturist."
Some   61 Tliem  "Out."
"Is the jury still out?" asked the attorney for the defendant of Judge Way-
back.
"I guess some of 'em is," replied tbe
judge   sagely.     "They've   bin   pi ay in'   J
poker fer the past three hours." ���������xi-iw������-jj(���������ij^, ^^.ifT.ra.'jjvj ^'^.^^^-.-g^jajj;^.  t  I?* ���������  *.'  Hi  s*   *  ti  /I  Y  1  w 1  4^.  A "Tale of tho Cattle Thieves of Ague*  Calientc. ������  ���������Copyright,   1,900  by  W.   LcC.   Beard.  ."The corp'ral's worse than the private,'  The sergeant's worse than the corp'ral,  The lulls are worse thun the sergeant  An the captain's the worst of all.  1 can't get 'em up.  I can't get 'em up,  i can't get 'em up m the mornin.  In a moment the camp was astir and  humming with voices The men wer  ���������all dressed when they lay down, so tha  . their toilets were completed when they  ���������had rolled up in their blankets and. if  they felt inclined, washed their hands  and faces.  The  bacon   and coffee served out by  the Ballet Girl soon vanished.  The man  '. 'devoured them standing or squatting on  nthe ground wherever   they happened to  be. '   ' ���������*  The Ballet Girl, assisted by two'oth-  ' er cooks who came with our re-enforce-'  meats, marshaled the   pack horses that  formed our provision train.   La Dor ion sly  hoisting himself on to   the back of   his.  horse, the Ballet Girl stamped the spike  jn the end of  his wooden  leg well into  .   the stirrup and announced that all was'  ���������ready.   The horses of the men had been j  ���������saddled for sozne time." The men swung  themselves  into 'their saddles  and we  ���������started in a canter  over the  desert.'a'  ' troop tha't-w'as 87 strong. ���������,    . ,  The men were in high spirit's." Jokes  and rough chaff flew from one to ahoth-  - er.  But it would never do to use up our"  horses by keeping them at a canter.;' By  the order, of  the  foreman the pace'wa's  '" brought  down   to a shuffling  jog-trot.  'The spirits of  the   men seemed to keep  ,'pace with   the  speed of  theirjmounts..  ���������mi-     "i     -i j    i i**.       ���������>      """I���������-:*r*"T '  through. It formed up behind us, "and  tbe rear . guard galloped forward -and  joined them; ,then we all spurred forward.  "Halt!" shouted the foreman, lifting  one hand, while  he reined in his horse  with the, other.  The men hesitated and  then stopped.  Some of them had passed  ahead and were obliged to return.  -'"What's wrong?" I asked.   '      '  "There's   another   ridge  behind this  here one. " replied the foreman, raising  histvoice spthat all the men might hear.  "Behind that other ridge them., thieves  is a-waitin fer us    They'll  .ins' waste  ', THE BUYED  GUY.*,,,  The  guide was  guiding -a guy.'- As  the guide  guided the guy  the guide  guyed  the  guy  until  the  guy would  no longer be guyed by a guide whom  he had ���������   hired     not    to  guy,   but  to.  guide.'   So   the^ guyed guy guyed  the  guide.     Xo ,wonder   everyone ' guyed'  the guyed guide guiding a guyed guy.  men  try ter  National,  enthusiam  is   the   ,great  nursery of genius.���������Tuckerman:  If you resolve to do .right you will'  soon do wisely; but resolve only to  do wisely and you will never do  right.���������Ruskin. .     '       '       '  to  supply the want of it.���������Bulwer.  The first duty'of life is to becalm;  for, the calm mind seeks the truth as  e  the river* seeks-; the sea.���������Lawrence.  When   a  man   does   wrong    it  is   a  poor >excuse to, say'there are ath'ers.  There  is  no   policy  like"politeness;   * - -     ,      ,~~~  and a good manner is ,tlie best thing      It is'wonderfdl how near conceit is  in the -world to get a- good name or ! to  insanity.���������Jerrold. ,  ^>,  .CHOSEN  .FROM   A ..'MULTITUDE-.    .  " *  The Preference Shown By Thinlting People for I>r- Chase's Syrup of Linseed and Turpentine-���������"Record Sales in October. -"'���������,,  *   Considering the large number of  remedies for coughs and colds'that are now ..offered to���������the ^public,  and in   ���������-  view of the fact that nearly every druggist has a preparation of his own which he makes -an effort to sub-  > stitute for the medicine asked for, it seems truly'remarkable that the' demand'for   Dr.  Chase's' Syrup of Lin- -  seed and Turpentine should increase by such-leaps^ and bounds. , ' ,  '���������>��������� *     v ���������> ���������  .   .    During October thensaleT of Dr. Chase's Syrup of Linseed and, Turpentine exceeded������by several hundred bot-   "  ������������������ties the record of any previous.month in its history.    'When it is remembered  that this    preparation received  /very'little newspaper advertising the  evidence seems to be conclusive that it makes its way *by' sheer "force" of  merit..      ������������    .._^ ' * ���������  Thinking, people recognize the harmfulncss .'ind danger" of using strong drugs which are said to cure'a'cold*  in a few  hours'."---.They prefer'to  cling to  Dr. Chase's Syrup of Linseed and Turpentine,  'which    they know   beyond a doubt to be'^a^thorough anel effective treatment for coughs, colds, croup,    bronchitis,  -whooping cough,  throat irritation,  asthma^ and' even  consumption itself.   '  , ���������" , /,    ,"   ,  "   *       ���������Y <  The combinat'ion of Linseed and' Turpentine, with half a dozen other ingredients  of equal rvaluefor treat-   ,  ing colds, in such proportionV.,as they are found in Dr. Chase's Syrup of Linseed and Turpentine  has' proven  to  be a perfect protection against", such developments as pneumonia,, consumption'and serious* lung troubles.  You can with certainty rely.on this preparation to afford prompt relief and permanent cure.   t  Do you suppose that the sale of Dr. Chase's Syrup of Linseed and. Turpentine would be more than three *  times' that of any similar preparation if -it ,was not the most efTective remedy'that money can buy? It has ';  stood'the tcstYmd proven itself-worthy of the* confidence that is placed in'it. People recommend it one to '.  another,  and so the good news spreads.    Be  sure, you get   the  genuine,   with Dr. Chase's portrait and signa-'  'Tlieshouts and  laughter lowered until  ���������only a.rumble of conversation could be  1    'heard.        ���������' <*   "  ! ������  lVLiie alter nnle was passed.' The plain  over which ,we  rode was  unbroken   by  -any tracks save those we left behind.us.'  The trailof the herd, the foremanrsa*id, >  ."lay farther  to   th<\ south.    The  cattle  "were   heading  eastward.    So were we.  'The  point'- toward which   they steered'  , was probably the'grand, sleeping profile  ���������of Montezuma, outlined against the blue  -sky by a distant   mountain, range, and  ��������� *which marked>a pass for which we, too.  ' Twere headed!    On the other side of  the  - 'pass lay Palomas. '.    .��������� ���������  At ��������� noon we  ate   a   hasty lunch and  ��������� then jogged on* again.    One part of the r  desert was precisely like another   There  *    was nothing to mark our progress until,''  toward evening, we   came on, the track  of the herd.  The foreman and Hay ward  'were"mildly elated then.  "There can't'be no doubt  but what  "we're gainin on 'em, an' there ain't no  -doubt but what-they're all here, too, "  -    said the foreman     "We're liable for to  run agains'" the outfit   mos'   any   time  now.'.'    The   chase  was   a   little   more  exciting after this.    To guard   against  -ambush or other surprise ten men were  detached and' ordered to ride 200 yards  ahead of us. and ten more were sent as  far behind  The trail we followed was as plainly  marked ,as though a broad street had  been laid out across the desert , Sometimes we could see it for miles ahead,'  drawing to a point as it disappeared  on the horizon; sometimes it passed  over one of the many sand dunes*that  wrinkled the surface of the plain ; .then  we could see it only when we mounted  rthe rise.  After sunset we  would camp   by the  -side of the trail.    In   the  morning, as  . soon as there was   light   enough   to see  *~*by. we would   pick   it up  again.    Day  .after day this went   on.    Montezuma's  face grew more and more distinct.^ Cattle that had fallen behind   the herd began to  dot   the   trail   here  and there.  Stretching their chafed limbs, the men  woulrl tell each other that the   thieves  ���������would have to pay for all  this discorn-"  .'-fort once we had   overtaken   them     It  seemed to inc   that it wan  months, not  -days, since we had  been   following the  ���������cattle     1 consulted   with the   foreman  ���������as to*the advisability of   greater speed.  "Can't see  what   we'd  gain   by   it,  ���������only to kill np our  horses." he replied.  "Them   thieves-is  driviu   the herd ter  pretty   near   as good a   place ter   ship  from as where we   was   goin   when we  ���������started   out- frorn   the   ranch.     We're  gainin on 'em   too.   .'Don't  you    fret.  You'll see 'em soon   enough,   an   then  ���������there'll be all the fun you want."   *  To be sure, the foreman's idea of fun  differed materially   from  the   views   I  held on the subject, but events redounded to the credit of the   foreman's   wis-  -dom, as events generally did.  It was about the middle of the afternoon when the foreman rode up to me,  pointing to a  thin   cloud of  dust  that  ���������hung over the trial  at a   point directly  -ahead of   us. where a  rise hid it from  ���������-our sight.  "That's them." he remarked tersely.  ���������"Now. then, I reckon"��������� Heinterrupt-  . ed himself, for there was the crack of a  rifle from the invisible space, followed  by the popping of six shooters.    Above  the rise  there   instantly appeared   the  -beads and then the bodies and horses of  'the men who composed   the  vanguard  as they raced   toward us.    One of  the  horses was wounded, and the rider was  ���������sitting, very straight, his  reins  in his  -right hand, while bis left arm, covered  by a'reddened shirt sleeve, hung by his  side.   Instinctively the main body form-  -ed a line, parting  to let the vanguard  "Haiti" shouted the joreman,-lifting one  hand.    '  maybe we can get away with 'hui with  out that.   Dismount   .Now ;\Y\ you joy?  what has   go,t   rifles come  _ith���������a.ie  The _nien   rolled < from    tluur   .Hur'-ea'  Those who had riflesr drew them from'  the leather beckets that hung to their  saddle's.  i _ -*  "You haven't got no rifle, so you  can't do no.good with us.-* Stay here,"  .said.the foreman as I, started i'oiward  "You'lLsee some er the 'fight later on.'  don't fear." What he said was quite  true." I could do no good by going forward, armed only with . my pistols.  Furthermore, though I did not want"to  shirk my share in this fight, in the result of, which I more than any one  there was interested. I had not the  slightest-desire to see more of it than  was necessary.  The party led by the.foreman toiled  half way up the incline and stopped  while the foreman went forward alone.  Reaching the-brow of-the little hill, for  a moment he peered cautiously over.^  then beckoned to his men. They came  and lay, prone, resting their rifles on  'the sand in front of them. After the  pause of a second the foreman must  have given; some "signal,,for the rifles  spoke together in a crash, and the white  smoke diifted lazily back, for a moment  concealing the men. Another volley,  and a'much heavier one,answered ours.  The bullets knocked little spurts of sandj  from the ridge or flew, singing like  mosquitoes, over our heads.  Then the shooting became rapid and'  irregular, sounding like nothing "so  much as a number of packs of firecrackers set off together. The men were firing at will. Lying next to the foreman  Spider was wasting cartridges, to judge  from the rapidity of his fire. He was  using one of the rifles he had captured  the night before we" had started"put,  and each time he fired he would slip in a  fresh cartridge to aA'oid exhausting the  magazine. Or;ce a man who lay near  him screamed and then swore, clapping  hie hand to his shoulder and withdrawing it covered with blood. As he backed down the slope Spider offered him a  bandanna handkerchief wherewith to  bandage bis wound, but he declined it,'  and tore off his shirt sleeve, using that  instead.  After awhile tho firing slackened,  until there was only an occasional report. Fallowed by Spider the foreman  came down the slope and walked. toward me.  "���������'It ain't no good." ho called as he  came within sneaking distance "Them  tellers kin hold us here jus' so long as  we don't do no more than we're doin.  All we c'n do is ter keep \en\ under  cover, an we've done that now Ther  ain't one of 'em what dares ter show  hi;* head. But while we're waitin here  they-c'n take' them'' cattle clean back  .ter Portland, Me., if we only give 'em  time enough. We got ter get 'em outer  there somehow." . :  "Rush 'em out!" exclaimed a voice  among the men.   ���������  "Reckon it comes-ter sunthin like  that," responded the foreman. "We  can't touch their-* flanks, 'cause their  ridge is longer'n ours. "  A charge, then, clearly was necessary, and it was as clearly mysduty to  lead that charge.1 I did not want to,  but if Iboped to retainmy self respect  or that of my men there was no other  course left open.  "All right, " I called, trying to speak  unconcernedly. "Mount, boys, and line  up."     '      .'  ture on  mrm^o-n  the wrapper; 25 cents a'bqttle.    Family size,  three times as much,   60 cents.    At all dealers, qr,Ed-  f-^n"   ���������-*-   <"'<-������..   Toronto.*-    , ''' ,  Tt     is-sowe time ago' now. since  it  ���������f,     <���������  was decided to erect a monument  surmounted by an eagle on' i.ne iielel  of ��������� "Waterloo in memory-of the Old  Guard and ,its gallant Stand ron that  fateful day. A committee was formed- some years back to consider the  question, and M. -Gerome execited  the work, but the eagle is at the pre-'  ysent time in the collars of the Grand  Palais* and cannot be . erected for  want of money. It is stated that a  fete, is to be organized, the proceeds  to go to' the fund "in cfucstion.'  Wise, is   the man 'who,-knows  when  to make a long story short.        ' , Y  - Some people avoid straightened circumstances *by ''being crooked.  SPRENO DEPRESSION  IJEOFLE     FEEL    WEAK,' ' EASILY  TLREI), AND  OUT OF SORTS.  You'Must Assist..Nature in Ovorcom-  ing-This  Feeling  Before- the  Hot"  Weather  Months  Arrive.  '��������� SLEEPLESSNESS is duo to nervous excitement. I'ho delicately'constituted, the financier,  tho business man find those whose occupation  necessitates <grout mental'strain or worry, nil  sutler moro or less from it. Sleep is tho great  restorer of a worried brain, *and to act sleep  cleanse the stomach from ail iinpui-ities with a  fow doses of Parme'ee's Vegetable Pills, gelatine coated, containing no mercury, and aro  guaranteed to give satisfaction,or the money  will be refunded. * v '   ',','' "  Comfort  Some men sow a few sce'ds of kindness and expect to-reap*their reward  with a mowing- machine.-  Mlnart's liniment .Cares, Burns, Etc.  5  r  The  , relation    between    color  sounel is merely,,luie and cry.'    Y  and.  ���������    l������is important that you should*, be  healthy in the spring.    The hot summer,   is    coming ' on    and"   you' "need  strengi.li.    vigor     anel vitality to  resist it.    Tlie feeling  of weakness,   depression     and   feebleness   which you  suffer   from  in   spring   is   debilitating  and  dangerous.       You  have  been   indoors  a good eleal through the winter months, haven't taken the usual  amount,    of    exercise    perhaps, your  blood is sluggish and impure ancl you  need    a   thorough   renovation, of the  entire system.      In other words  you  need     a  thorough course of Dr.   Williams'     Pink Pills.    If'you  try them  you    Avill     be surprised to note how-  vigorous you begin to feel,  how the  elull  lassitude   disappears,   your   step  becomes     clastic,", the  eye  brightens  and   a feeling of new strength takes  the    place    of     oil previous  feelings.  Thousands have prpyed the .truth of  these words' and fotrnd'renewed health  through     the   use    of    'tlicse pill's  in  spring time.   One'of the many'is Miss  Cassie   "Way, .  of    Picton,  Ont.,  who  sas's:���������"A few years 'ago I was cured  of    a    very  severe  and prolonged attack of dyspepsia through the use of  Dr.    Williams'     Pink   Pills,  after  all  other   medicines   I    had "tried failed.  Since that  time I'have used the pills  in   the   spring as a tonic anel blood  builder'and find  them the best nierli-  In washing 'woollens and* flannels, ,th,e soft,  soar made from Lover's.Dry Soap (.a ������owde.'.  will be found very satisfactory.       -  ���������.  know of for this purpose,  ���������ho   feel  run  clown  at this  i!.-  Pco-  Limc  cine I"  pie   v.  of  the year will  make  no  mistake in  using  Di.   Williams'  Pink Pills."  ���������Those Pills are not a purgative  medicine and do not weaken as all  purgoti\es   do. They  are   tonic  in  their nature and strengthen from first  close to lust. They arc the best medicine in the world for rheumatism,  .sciatica, nervous troubles, neuralgia,  indigestion, anaemia, heart troubles,  scrofula, and humours in the blood,  etc. The genuine are sold only in  boxes, the wrapper around which  bears the full name "Dr. Williams'  Pink Pills-for Pale People." Sold by  all dealers..in medicine or sent post  r4aid at 50 cents a' box or six boxes  for S2.50 by addressing the '.Dr. Williams'  Medicine. Co.,  Brockville,  Ont.  '  -Effqtlsm   of   Genlii*. '  '< A. writer in the London Standard declares the idea that, genius is usually;  modest' to be a popular .delusion. On  the contrary, he allegesiegotism to bo  the very essence of true genius and  quotes many amusing examples. .  When Wordsworth, -Southey and  Coleridge wore walking together and  Coleridge remarked that the day was  so line "it might havo been ordered for  three pools,'' the gentle/!Wordsworth  promptly exclaimed:. "Three, poets!  Who a re the other two ?"   ' "*'/' *  Disraeli, then a mere yputh, wrote to  his sister that he had heard "Macaulay,  Sheil and Grant speak, "but between  ourselves I could floor them all." And  again he said. "When Lwant to read a  good book, I write one."  Our own Joaquin Miller wrote to  Walt Whitman: "You and I are over  *he head of the rabble. We know, we  are great, and if other people don't  know it it is their own fault."  ,It was President Grant who, being  told .that a certain senator, an admitted genius wno was very hostile to  him,- did not believe the* * Bible, expressed bis estimate of the senator's  egotism by rejoining: "Why should he?  He didn't .write it, you know."  is assured if- you  ,     tp .- > ,  *7 \ Via"''  ,;       ",  Canadian Nortel! Ry  ��������� Lowest Tl?-tes to "oill joints *"*"  in the     ��������� ',���������-'���������< Y  '   EAST; WEST, "AND 'SOUTH.' >  , Daily Solid Vestibulecr Train; with  Sleeping Cars,j_tp StA Paul and Minneapolis. \ V '���������? ' '    * ,'   ''  *   *   T-rT���������   "-. ���������   ..      Y   ��������� -  '* OCEAN .-STEAMSHIP .TICKETS   .  j^Full. particulars" on#application  -uiy agent Canadian "Northern'"Ry,  * /Y    ' "   X' ' GEO. ,H." SHAW,   .  Traflic  Manager, .Winnipeg.  t-9,  or  Sometimes a man's neighbors consider him ungrateful because he insists  on mauagiucr his own -.ffap-s.  Belgium Saloons.  Belgium has 175,000 taverns and saloons for the sale of liquors.    ' -  The  sessed  Beethoven's .Wit..  composer *��������� Beethoven'  rCOWTrNTTBD.l  Hot  a   Steel  Eng-ravingf.  "Yes, mum," said the tramp, who had  devoured the second pie; "in the old  days I used to be an engraver and if  I only had the tools"���������  "Don't let that bother you," interrupted tbe old lady as she picked up  the ax and saw; "here are the tools for  a wood cut. Now get to work."���������Chicago News. ���������     _.. _ .  was pos-  of av grim ���������satiric'.wit'' which  resembled ���������nothlug' so much as 'the  caustic'humor of Carlylp.,-. "It.-'i.s* related of him that one day his brother, who was very ������������������proud" of a little  piece of property he owned, called on  him, but found him out, so he.left a  card inscribed :���������"Johanh' Von Beethoven, land proprietor.."- Next 'day  he had it returned to him, written  on "the back:���������"'���������H. von"Beethoven,  brain  proprietor."  i.Cliurc.il  Concert.  envy the man who just  Heard ar.  He���������How I  sang  the solo.  She���������Why, I thought he had an exceptionally  poor  voice ! J        ..  Ho���������Oh,   it  isn't  his  voice I  envy,  it's his nerve.  CwrlOTiH Oid  Custom.  ,In one of-- the suburbs of raids a  wealthy merchant died, the other day,  and on the evening of the funeral 'h'i'a  neighbors witnessed a; curious ceremony.       ''*������������������' ,' :  An hour before the body was- to "be  .taken to the cemetery-.the rela'tiYesof.  the deadYm'an, fivefbr "six in' number,  ���������went out* into the :j|arden adjoining the  honse and. walked'^olemnly and silently arountl'it. Each carried "a. lantern  and kept his e'yes.'iixetl. on the ground,  as though, he were looking for something.' Finally they all halted in front  cf a large pile of stones and, laying  aside their lanterns, 'proceeded to throw  "down the-pile. After every stone-had  been removed they, examined-minutely  the' spot oli^w.liich.the pile, liad resved'  and then, slowly Sand with bowed head's  returned 'toitn'e''-house.;- -  This is��������� ah bicl-' Norman custom, and it  is observed jn this Instance because the  dead man' was a native of Gison. There  is a tradition in Normandy that before  burying, a body all the'ground around  his dwelling should.be searched in or-  der^to.make sure that the soul has not  hidden 'itself somewhere. At one time  every family jn Normandy faithfully  observed this tradition, but now only a  few.pay. heed to it.  GANADtePiClkc  ..   c .        . - > *** - *  -, v      -���������   r- * o  "THE": ROUTE TO  J L '  Australasia  And[the Orient        ji.  . Y    CANADA'S SCENIC ROUTE  Travel-by the-C- P. 11. and be as-r  sui-ecYor SOLID COMFORT.  ' -     '-   r l *  First*=class'C.'P. R. Sleepers  on all through trains.  Through Tourist Sleepers ��������� the best.  To u r is t ��������� Rates": qu o ted toall points  "East, West, .Soiith';,  The Old Country,  The Orient,  The Antipodes.  ''V  if  .1  ���������\  "'I  ���������Those desiring- information in re-'  gard to any part of the world reach-'  ed by the C. P. II. or its connections'  are requested to apply to any C. I"]*-  11. representative or to   '^C'E. McPHERSCM  -   *     - .--.Gen.  Pas. Asr.t.. V  <\gt.  ' inuipea..  Common"  When ton eel up by'  Dick's Blood PtirY  tier   wi.ll   give.' as  much and as rich':  ^ iiiilkasahighly  ^^**^\*V^^ bred aristocratic  /"r* '^"wAi^x'' Jen;ey cow gives  """''' upon or  dinary  feed, and  a Jersey  cow when  given.  DICK'S Y   ���������  BLOOD PURIFIER  will wonderfully increase heryield  of milk. It saves feed too, because  a smaller amount of well digested  food satisfies the demands of the  system and every particle of nour-  sishment sticks.        .;���������.-   r .  50 cents a packages  Ltemlng, Miles & Co., Age-ftts,  ,     MONTREAL.  "Write for Book on Cattle and Hawses free*  i  ,  - ty  \x\  ski  I  m  m  is I  w  ill  i  ,'-**r  Ac'l  A-! I  .Hi  ii'l  ������������������'I  ' Jl  'Ai  hit  .������!���������  ���������1 :  f'Jl  f*f|  WjiL  m  'vi  "i'l  // ���������  W.  N.   U.   Ko. .373. "r^TT^f^T
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1 ALL FN TRE J
| DAY'S WORK j
By ELIAS LISLE 6
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A   Copyright, 1901, by'A. S. Richardson,   ft
Between wet and glistening'fangs
Brindle,  the  performing  lion   of /the
. Cosmopolitan circus, let'out a sound
that was half groan and half roar.
"Whut! You brute!" said Berthels.
the elephant man, gesturing at him for
i silence.,    *Y '        , '
"Don't abuse him'," said the, woman,
scarcely more than a girl,rwho,stood
beside Berthels. "lie isn't in good hu-
roor'today.','' ^'    '
\    "Should say he wasn't," replied Ber:
\thelk /'111 tempered, bad mannered
beast! Wouldn't vwonder if he was going tad."
\""Sonsense! My iious' don't go bad.
Besiles, he's only a two-year-old. Look
at o?,d Arehon. He's ten if he's,a" day;
and!you don't see him going "bad, 'do
youji *     * v 't
"lUere's something .wrong with Brin"4
die, |nyway,"- insisted the"man!
"0-* course there is.   He's liad a rough
moriing of -it.', He was "clurpsy  arid
stepjed.on -Archon's toes at rehearsal,
andkrehon boxed'his ears.. The hyena-
In tflanext cage laughed, and tliat-hurt
Brhille's feelings.' You know how sensitive-he is.- He sulked so that J had to.
beat him'to"" make .him perforin at all.,
He's awfully cut up about it,( for you
" know  I really  believe  he is  fond of
me." i \,    "    -   , ,       -    -
���"Wish 'you'd believe that about somebody else, Sue.V..said-'the man wistfully, looking down into the clear, brown
"eyes that were fixed on the lion.
- "Perhaps I don't want to,"-said the,
girl saucily.   "Besides; Brindle is my-
sworn slave.  You can Jb.ear-b.im swearing now." she .added, laughing, as the
handsome    beast    muttered    liouwise
deep down in liis great chest. ,
'-   "Mile.   Zelka,   the' feline   empress,"
Was right in.heivhal^ jocular estimate
of Brindle. * Brindle-Was a lion with
feelings." ' Some' lions, are savage, others .are sullen,' more are treacherous,
and Tall'are'"absolutely  cold 'blooded.^
./There are , a^very  few ^exceptions, to
. this  rule,   however,  and  Brindle  was
one   of "those   very- rare   exceptions,
with a, capacity'for affection', and * loy-
~alty.  -Mile. -Zelka had only a taint in-*
ikling of,this.. Berthels didn't believe in
it-at all because he was the head of
the elephant herd, and elephant men_
are very wise and_believe nothing'but"
the worst about animals.   That is the
only reason why all of them don't die
young.    Berthels  was  anxious  about
Mile." Zelka, who ,was plain Sue Ran-
some to'him.  ' That .she  wasn't. Sue^
Berthels  was   not  his   fault.     If  she
ever did become so, he intended that
her 'lion  training  career  should , end.
and  she' suspected   this.     So1  it   was
partly coquetry  that made her leave
"him now, walk over to the cage and,
putting her piquant face close up to,
the lion's, begin to talk to him.
But Brindle's sensibilities had been
lacerated. To bejbeaten by bis queen
was a humiliation of spirit beyond all
others. Not yet had the "smart "of it
passed away. Therefore he now arose
haughtily, stalked 'over to the farther
corner of ""his cage and affected a majestic disdain of his charmer's conversation.
"Well, you aren't very polite this
afternoon," she remarked as she turned away. "Hope you'll feel better
when it comes time for the show."
"And I bope you'll cut that beast out
of the programme tonight, Sue, dear,"
said Berthels as he went to his elephants.
After they had'gone tbe hyena which
had insulted Brindle that morning
chose to make some jeering remarks.
Arose Brindle then in wrath and
spoke in substance as follows through
the network of bars at which he clawed:
"You snickering eater of better people's leavings, if I could break into
that cage"'for-about; two seconds and
get one swipe at you I'd knock that
grin through the top'of the tent.'-'
"He, he, he, he! Ha-ab-b-h-hrr-ha-ha!"
taunted the hyena. 'TIa-ha"���
.The hateful voice died away as'a rising growl from Archon's cage gave.
news that the king of the circus had
wakened���wakened with a strange lire
in his eye. before' which the other animals cowered. For this was the fire of
madness and murder which no man is
.wise enough to know, though all animals recognize it with terror. Arehon
had gone bad. At one glance Brindle
knew it; knew, too, that .the demon in
possession of the great lion might lie
craftily in wait for long, but that sooner or later it would glut itself in
slaughter.
*    ' '*        *      . ��� *  ��� ,;.- *        *        * ,
Of the attendants surrounding the
cage where the feline empress ruled
her beasts that night one wore a grave
and drawn face; Berthels should have
been with the elephants, but anxiety
had brought him into the ring when
Mile. Zelka's act was called.   With a
pang of fear hernoted the intense nervousness of the young lion, the most
promising performer of the lot. Brindle was stumbling through - his part
like an amateur, and his mistress, too
wise to be harsh, was coaxing and
soothing,him with hand and wand.
"Sue," the low voice came to her ears
from without the cage In a lull of the
music/"let me call the ringmaster and
have the young one barred off."
"No; he's all right." said the girl
softly. "Don't worry,, "Phil. He isn't
going bad. But I can't understand him.
Bee how he .watches Arehon."
Indeed  the  young lion's eyes'wer��
hardly ever taken off the' king of tne -
group.  Twice he1 missed his cue, and a
third time' he half turned away.
"All   right,   boy,',*   said .the   trainer
gently. "I'll give you a rest. Come out,-
Praetor! Jump! So. -Now, Consul!"Up'���>
Good boy!* Up, Csesor!   Come, Senator,
over!' Hola!"    , '
Around the confines of the cage, now
running, now leaping over the set obstructions, glided the tawny, sinuous
bodies of the lion troupe, while their
mistress, in the center, waved them" on
with,her wand. But ail the time she
was watching, ,not Brindle, but Ar-
,chon, and Brindle was watching'too.
Soon it was the big lion's turn. In
answer to the command he came forward, ' but there was something
strange in his motion. His eyes were
set, arid die moved' jerkily, and the
great tufted tail;that had been curving -around his"' flanks ^grew straight
aiid',rigid as an, ii;on club.
' "Come,-Arehon," said the girk "Up!-
Get,up^ sir! Arehon!" Then, without
raising-her voice, for tho discipline of
the circus thinks first of its audience���
the audience that must'not be unpleasantly disturbed���she said rapidly:* "Set
the pole's arid keep him back., I can't
get to the_door.; He's going bad."1
Slowly the \ great lion moved on���
stiffly,* like a cat stalking a" sparrow.
Tbeptliers crouched at,the sides, silent
and "trembling. ; drily Brindle growled
slightly. Then therrj was a rattle and
clank of the, iron door, and a man,
bearing a heavy" club'' in liis hand,
leaped into,the cage.
-"Phil!"* cried the girl,, with'a,thrill
in her voice that told him more than
he had ever known before.' "Go.back!
They don't know you!- ,Y6u'll be killed!   I^can handle"���*
Her -. voice was ' drowned in the
shriek of thousands of voices as the
great lion hurled himself straight,at
her throat, smiting at her with those,
terrible paws. At the same time a second tawny body darted 'through-the
air, and. the two " met., Like a flash
the girl, had slipped away ,-from . the
mad lion's onslaught.^ but a,-glancing
impact, had sent her to the floor. Half
stunned as she was, she caught^at the
bars toa*aise,herself, for once a trainer is down authority is gone, and any
lion is likely to attack. A stro'ng arm
lifted her and drew her toward the
door, but the way was blocked. Locked* in a furious embrace,* the mad lion
and the two-year-old were ,tearing
and clawing each other, while the rest
slunk, terrified, at the sides. Even in
her peril the girl thought of the faithful beast.
"Arehon will kill him!" she cried,
clutching the elephant man's arm.
"See, he'is'working in at his throat!
Oh, can't they.get firebrands?"
What Berthels did then was partly
from gratitude and partly from the
natural fighting courage of the man
who trains wild bea'sts. He swung his
heavy club up and as Brindle in a final
effort for life tore half loose from his
foe brought the weapon down with a
smashing blow across the mad lion's
maw. A lion's nose is his sensitive
point. Half ^stunned, the giant relaxed
his grip, and Brindle tore away. Arch-
on gathered himself to leap. Again the
club fell, but this time too late. The
..man was down.
"At him, Brindle!" cried the girl,
catching at Arehon with her slender
hands, and the faithful lion responded
with another attack.
But now the fighting madness was at
its height in Archon's brain. One paw
broke Berthels' arm. the roaming jaws
were at his throat, when there came
the crackle of pistols, and the fierce
face rose, bespattered with blood, turned hither and thither and closed its
eyes. They dragged 'Berthels out of the
cage then arid there, but not so the
girl., fver her Brindle, torn and mangled, rn&cnted.guard until she came to
from her faint and drew herself to her
feet, with her hands buried in his
mane.
Berthels insisted that he and the
feline empress ought to be married on
the day they buried Arehon, but bis
broken arm wouldn't allow it. However, they had a professional wedding in
the lion cage, and Brindle, standing
proudly on his hind legs, with crossed
American flags in his mouth, was best
man. .   ���
St.  Rule's  Tower.
St. Rule's tower, in the* town of St.
Andrews, Is an evidence of the link
which binds St. Andrew, whose feast
all good Scotchmen keep, to the country of whom he is the patron saint.
The legend runs that a monk called
Regulus, or Rule, brought the bones of
St. Andrew from Constantinople to
Scotland and buried them near the sea-
coast, on the spot round which .the
present town of St. Andrews afterward grew.   Whether the story is true
or not. there seems to be no other way
to explain the'connection of this particular saint with Scotland, for he seems
to have passed the whole of his life up
to the moment of his martyrdom in,the
east. '.Tames II. certainly associated
him with the country across the Tweed,
for it was he who founded the Order
of St. Andrew in 1GS7. to be conferred
on the king and sixteen knights.���London Chronicle.
**���     How  the  Tea   Plant  Slnrtca.
As you drink ,a cup. of tea do you
ever think how rtea came to grow?
Tell your next" visitor- the story. A
Persian' prince on his way to meet
his betrothed vowed that he would not
sleep until he saw her. After traveling
seven days he stopped to Vest under a
shade tree, and there.' being no longer
able to resist the temptation, he fell
into a sound sleep. When he awakened, he was so sorry that he cut off hiss
eyelids and threw tbem on the ground.
From them grew the tea plant. It is
rather unfortunate that ther story stops
here 1 cause it would be interesting
to know what the lady thought of a
sweetheart without eyelids and whether it would be possible for then? to
crow again.       	
���    TO CANADA'S RESCUE.   '    .
Daily  Journal   of   Aberdeen    Makes   Eloquent Defence   of, the  Dominion,
Here is- a Scottish' newspaper. The
Daily Journal of Aberdeen, with a'
really eloquent defence ' of Canada
against Kipling's implied suggestion
that^snow plays' a part in our daily,
lite.       ' ' '
"The title of 'Our Lady of- the.
Snows;' '\ says the Scottish writer,
"bestowed on Canada in a�� haphazard sort of manner ,by Rudy aid Kip7*
ling, is not at all" W happy one,
as it < applies '- to ��� a season only. I
have seen the* grape's hanging * in
luxuriant bunches to tlie vines" in
a Quebec garden,'' and the holds,, of
tomatoes-' grow crimson in the
warm sunshine:' iJ have lingered in
the golden' wheat'fields in the evening and* listened tp , the myriad
sounds of the* cricket and grasshopper; T have walked amid" the
cedar trees t in" an Ontario swamp,
when the , sunse't 'glow had fiided,
and watched the fireflies darting to
and fro like shooting stars; and I
have watched the tiny .humming-bird
with plumage that rivalled the gaily-
painted butterflies; ' contesting^ with
the bee for the honey that lay' within the sweet-smelling '.flowers. t
Scenes lilie these are not associated
with a land of never-ending . _ winter. Consequently "there can' be
no greater' mistake than to��� imagine, as too many people do,' that
Canada" is a semi-Arctic country
out of which little good .can come.
And yet, what do -we find?,. According' to the returns of the Board of
Trade fully 65,000 to 75,000 Britishers went to live in the United
States during the past year, while
only 12,000 or 13,000 went to
Canada. There'is no reason to
doubt that if the resources and na-,
tural wealth of the Dominion of
Canada were more generally known
in this country, we would soon hear
the last of the term "American"
as applied to Canadian products,and
United States producers would no
longer receive credit for Canadian
goods, in many cases .superior to
their own. Those who * guide the
destinies of the Dominion think
that the \ Stars and Stripes havo
overshadowed the Maple Leaf long
enough. Every true Briton will be
of the same opinion."
*��� i
Dr.   Crozier One of tho Elect.
Canadians generally will be interested in learning that Dr. J. Beat-
tie Crozier, author of the famous
work, "History of Intellectual Development," has been selected as
one of the^300 representatives of
the empire in the splendid ten-
guinea volume" of portraits and bio-
graDhies which the Grosvenor Press
are bringing out. The -work consists of representative men of every
class outside of the military and
civil services, who will have a
volume to themselves. Dr. Crosier
will be one ot the representatives
of the department of philosophy.
Also, of course, he will stand as one
of the representatives of Canada, a
distinction he has well earned, and
on which his countrymen will
warmly congratulate him.
Tlio'lioviiienoss of TJojrs. '
I have heard the watchdog's honest baric 'bay deep-voiced welcome
to me as I headed for the pear tree
after dark. I believe the fellow that
owned the pear tree chose to think
that the dog was giving him warning of my approach, but I knew
better: I had never given that particular dog any reason to dislike me
and the'-fact that his noisy welcome
did bring the owner of the tree into"
his orchard with a gun was not
the dog's fault. It was- merely due
to the circumsta-nce that the 'dog
in his canine ignorance welcomed me
too vociferouslv.
Facts AT>onr Londoners.
Londoners drink less than seven
gallons of milk a head in a year.
Fifty-six different authorities exercise control over the port of London.
In 1,000 deaths of Londoners 287
occur in winter and 226 in summer.
London's cemetery area works out
at one acre for each 1,700 people.
In London 900,000 persons are living more than two in a room, "and
26,000 six or more" in a room.
HOUSEHOLD   HINTS.,
Sewer eas is counteracted by a handful of salt placed in toilet room basins.
A sponge is the best thing to wipe
down paint with. As it leaves no "���fluff." ^
In  a  sickroom  never shake  pillows
and  bedclothes  over the patient.    AI
ways shake them away from tho bed
It pays well to do your-mending &r
fore the articles go' to,the  was-,  as
washing usually results iu making the
���holes larger.''
To renovate leather chairs wipe the
cushions  with  a  sliglitly  damp  cloth
and   then ��� rub   dry.    Next   apply' the,
white of an egg beaten to a stiff froth
and rub* with a soft cloth.
To keep the'dining room 'table in a
good, well polished corrlition rub it,
once a week with a mixture of one"
ounce of spirits of turpentine and one
ounce of olive oil. Apply', it with a
piece cf flannel cloth. t    ,      % <
* Milk that has been standing any' little time in a "jug should always be
carefully poured into another jug. leaving a little at.the bottom, for this-portion of the milk, is said to be injurious
to health. -' ,
Housework gloves should be^ sufficiently loose to allow free play to the
fingers, ,'ln, using rubber gloves for
dishwashing care should be taken to
wash them on the hands until every
trace of*grease is removed.
Society, Ma n iiers.,
The young girl who'ha's'a society
���riiask which she lets fall when she'en-
ters her own home need not-hope tc
long deceive her friends. Inadvertently
she will,let it slip at an unexpected'umo-
ment, and the glimpse once seen of a
peevish, selfish nature'is riot soon forgotten. If" the"'wishes of the brother-ai
home are not, to;be considered, the ad-'
'miring man friend feels sure., her lover
arid future_husband will riot be cither.
The sweet.Yinusical, , voice . which is
I-card in" society, often changes into a
snappy, disagreeable one when'used to
address-a patient: devoted mother'at
home. But at some unexpected moment
the young girl is sure to1 be overheard.
says the Philadelphia Press. A<chance
visitor will* ring the bell and be ushered
into the drawing room while in a heat-(
ed argument above stairs the ' fair
young daughter of. the house "is expressing her opinion in no measured
manner. ��    ���
No rules for preserving tbe physical
beauty can obliterate traces in the face
of ill nature. Let the fair .debutante
bear this well in mind.
Slie Keeps Eees.
Bee keeping is ah occupation which
tbe few women who have taken it up
find both' pleasurable and profitable
Onecof those who have made a signal
success a't it is Mrs. N. L. Stow of
EvanstonYHl. Mrs. Stow, who'is the
.wife of ex-Alderman Stow, 'hasYi fully
equipped apiary: She is a recognized
authority on the business and a frequent contributor to bee journals. *
She started cin 1SS4 with four hives
at her home in AVhland avenue. Soon
they had multiplied to twenty. The
nearby prairies were covered with
'white clover and heart's ease,- which
made the best sort of feeding ground,
and it wasn't long before the apiary
numbered eighty colonies, making it
the largest in the country.
All the work of attending to the beea
Mrs. Stow performs herself, and during tho seventeen years never has a
swarm escaped. Every pound of honey
she takes from the hives with her own
hands.
Japan'* Modern Wonian.
In reply to the query about the effect
of the new wonian idea in Japan a
bright Japanese woman replied as follows, says the Detroit Tribune:
"Oh, yes, indeed, a very great effect
We are beginning to have old maids.
Such a thing less'than a generation
ago was unheard of. but now we are
recruiting more and more old maids
each year. The women's clubs are
making our girls much more particular
as to their husbands. The more education a girl gets the harder she is to
please in the w.ay of a husband. When
she gets a knowledge of algebra and
geometry and chemistry and poetry
and drama, she begins to, have ideals
and is not contented to marry the .first
man or even tbe second or third that
she has a chance to marry, and because frequently the-fourth does riot
turn up at all or is no better than the
preceding three she prefers to remain
single."'    v
Simplicity   In   Table   Decorations.
Elaborate and expensive floral centerpieces are not necessarily the most
beautiful. Simplicity often rules the
world of art and nature. Who would
consider as beautiful at first thought a
few sprays of the leafy growth of the
garden asparagus together in a small
vase with a like number of golden coreopsis? The effect is charming if the
vase also be simple. This should be remembered, that a vase of flowers is intended to display the beauty of the
flowers arid not man's handiwork' in
molding or coloring the vase.
'The umbels of white flowers of the
wild carrot are very pretty in vase decorations, yet how few persons would
think of gathering them for that purpose!       * ���
HON. DAVID WARK.
Oldest 3Iember of Any Pai'li-inient in tlie
British iccipire. New Brunswick aens��-
i tor  Has Done Good   \\ oi k.
The oldest member of  any Parliament     in  the  British  l��mpire,      andL
probably     the "oldest    repre-sci    aive
in  any  of  the  national asseni.jLS   of
earth,   is   the   Hon.   David    *\*�� ark   of
Fredericton,   New* Brunswick,       who-i
has     311'st entered   upon the     ninety-'
ninth     year      of   his   useful    eareerp
writes   , the Ottawa correspondent of"
The* "Montreal    'Witness.'     Fifty-seven,
years'   ago     he was chosen   member
lor  the  County of Kent *in   the   New
Brunswick'Legislature.      After  play-
<ing   an active   -part in   that     body   .
at  confederation,   he  was  raised     to-
the   Canadian ,Senate,   which   he has-
attended   without   interruption   since-
.1867.      Mr.  Wark's  life  ' has      ijcen,
one of  value     to .his country.'        In. '
one sense ho may be termed the   father of tho Canadian   Confederation,,
since it' was   the'results   drawn from
legislation of his framing that ^   convinced  the colonies in favor    of    union.      On his initiative .there        was
adopted     twenty     years before     the ,
union  a free  interchange  of conimo- t
dities    /  between     Britain's   several
colonies    on the northern    half      of
this  continent.      The advantages    of
this     broad-minded step were    made
plain    *to   all, .and  gradually     there t-
camc      a    conviction      that   instead
of rivalry the position <. of all would
be" strengthened before * the world by
a joining     of  interests.
A marvellous    monument of the re- '*���
stilus     of-regular     habits     and temperate _   living     is ,the life     of     this
man.    At-  this   age'    he  is   ��� as  clear
of   mind     and   < as vigorous, of framo- \
as   most, men   twenty,   -years        _his-"
junior%   "There     is   nothing "��� Ythat^
would     offend   him "more 'than'     an
otter   of -support.     Sturdy  i;'depcnd- .
ence  has    been  ait leading  character- ���
istic    of his     whole  life.      The  very
messenger   who   stepped  forward     to-
help       him on     wit'h his" coat would
be   waved    'bao'.cY    The  fire-of,, the..
born'reformer  still shines      in      his
eye.   *v His  last address in    the Seriate     was    a    complaint     that  there-
was not     given that  branch^   of ihe'
Legislature   ' more      to" do.    ^Three^- ���
quarters of    a "century   on Canadian. '
soil has  not cloudod his  loye^ -'  for
Ireland, the land of  his birth.      Mi*.. ���
AV ark's  longevity     comes of no     fact
practice.'      Jlc has  taken regular > ex��� .
'ercise  and  retrained  from  too  vigorous     indulgence     in table,  delicacies.,.
For'    years     he has  eaten but     two    ,
meals    a    day���breakfast, rand.tea���f
but  in this,      as -well      as   all,  else,. f
he has adhered to-regularity.       p<   ' Y-
Senator   "Wark     was J one ^-.of ..the- *"���
first  '   public     men     in   this ..section -
*of       th6       empire   "*'   to    """ identify , *"
himself   with      the   Imperial'-,, federa-> _'
tion   movement,    r He  is   in  favor of* -
any' 'policy     that would   strengthen
the"   bond   between ,. the .motherland/,,
and her colonies.' He would vote 'tomorrow  for   intercolonial  free  trade.
lie has long advocated  the improve1- '
ment        of   Canada's   trade  relations ���
with*      the     United    States*. The
breadth of view which prompted his
first public* act of consequence' ���
the adoption of free trade between1
the units'* of British North America
���has been apparent in almost every
speech he made. He would like to l
gee confederation rounded qff v by
the inclusion ol Newfoundland. , In
Parliament this wonderful old
man has consistently supported
every movement that was calculated to elevate the people's morals.
In a letter written by his own hand
the other day Senator Wark announces that he will probably be up
to Ottawa for a Portion of the ses.r
sion.
A   Harry  FurnKs  Story. *     "
I was at my hotel in Ottawa, the;
morning after 1 appeared at tho
Opera House in the "Humors of Parliament." An eminent Canadian '"divine -was ushered into my quarters,
and addressing me, said:
'���Allow mc to introduce myself,
and 1o say that I listened with the
greatest pleasure and profit to your
most  admirable ""discourse  last  even- -
ing-
I bowed my very best. ^
"L must way," continued the rev.
gentleman, "that your efforts in tlie
cause of Christianity in this city
arc marked by a fervor and earncst-
nc-s that cannot fail  to convert."
"Ileally," I said, "you flatter
inc."
"Ah, no, sir, you arc one of tho
brave1 soldiers of Christianity, who
march through'* the world addressing
huge audiences and influencing the
masses, taking life seriously, and denouncing frivolity and worldlincss."
���"Well/' I said. "1 don't think I
do any harm, but I'must disclaim
for my poor efforts to'amuse���"
' "Aimi.se., sir," repeated the astonished divine. "Surely I am speaking
to. the gentleman whose striking discourse-"it was my good; fortune to
listen to last evening in Dominion
Church?"
"No, sir, I was in the Grand Opera House.".
"Then you are not Di*. Munhall, the
revivalist?" , i
"Bless you, no, sir'. I am Furniss,
the  caricaturist.;"
"Good gracious! wherc's the door?
Let ine out! They, have brought me
to the wrong room!"���From "The
Confessions of a  Caricaturist."
Some  of Them  "Out."
"Is the jury still out?" asked the attorney for the defendant of Judge Way-
back.
"I guess some of 'em is," replied the
judge   sagely.     "They've   bin   playin'   '
poker fer the past three hours."
&'}���
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* t! ��������� -*?"������������������"'������������������.'-'"��������� -  VriJfcsw-^v' f .-.-.' t^^^i^A^t^SjjSzSSi'SS^  .'.'.P^-^JXSa^AA*^-^ > ^%^r -C-a,- "-^-^ i  rf"T^^-^'  ,j=*CFLr* ^-r.-^fTJXr������K^%^m^^~^l  ^"f^"' '** ���������t^-V^"1'*''  *������  WHEN   SKULE   LETS OUT!"  FY  I? ,  '"4  |Yi  I? '  h  1'.  jr1'  i*v  I-,;  I*'*,5  jfe*-  |#  w  1st''  I.Vft  If  ��������� 9  *t  J.*\  i?        **���������  "t  " s     *  k  11  I'ri '.appy ez si clam; oh, you kin bet I'm  feelin  G'-ruz the time fer closin skule gits nearer ev'iy  ���������   ������'".>���������    ''' >  f'm sick uv tills here study work an monkcyin' ia  skule, , '  ���������Uv   lcarmn   that   ole   gofjrafy   an   math'iiietioian  rule.   , , i  1   list  can't  git  it  through   my  head���������Hit. sppJhn  book. I mean���������  Ft blaine near ov'ry word T spell I  mi=s it **iick  an 1 clean.  Ob, won't I be a happy kid an won't ) wh������op aa  shout  '       An have the slickest kind u; Um������  When  .    . Skule  I 0Ut*-    7  : / ' *   . -  ��������� It aintt a bit uv fun fer me to go to skule an  1 j learn  j 'Bout who discovered 'lleriky. cuz 1 don't kcer a  : dura! '  '. I' ten times druthcr be the man what has a line an  ��������� hook  : An 'scovered that the fish are bitin down'in Col-  ton's brook'.  ���������I aon't see why they fill me up or' 'ritlHimtic nn  '  : say '   '  ' I'm goin to be a banker,  like mj   papi. is, some  - ' day, n  :. Becuz I'll be a pirut er a'cowboy, jist \bout -    ,'  ��������� Ez quick, by ginger, ez 1 kin  : When  | ,    Skule        ' ���������  ���������i 1 ets  .  I ' - , outt  I .wonder If they think it's fui to  multiply an  add.     ,, /.  ' .    I   never, ylt  could  figger  right,   an   that's   what  niakrs me mad.  The only  lime in  all  my  life when   I  kin  figger  u -straight '  .Ip when I figger slidin in about ton minutes late.  , '" llt druthcr read uv  BuiT'lo  bill an  what the cowboys do (J  "Than hear 'em tell 'b'out Dewey an  his brave an  tru.-ty crew.                           .  .  '     Td like to kill ta Injun chief ar> be the Buckskin  Scout,                       '   '  -'*     An mob by 1 will stanrf a sbow <,  *     When   , ������������������   ,  V Skule  Let's  '   Y '.       0ut}   '  Jist think uv'what I'm missin in the way uv win'  nin fame!.  ,"(    If  l.k'eep   goin   on   to  skule,   I'll   ru'ver   carve  a  ( - name.  r-don't see how ril.stan' a show to 'no,a ble.������ed  ,    thing- ���������       - '  If I must stay cooped up in sl'iile ������-studyin[  by  iiiigl1'* ��������������������������� ..  r i But,'bully gee. I'm glad it's .line, aa soon 1 will  *be free: "-. ' ,.  They won't be no more schoolin  fee awhile, you  bet. fer me! ' -  t \ ' _       ���������  '   -rj'll make  things  hum  around  our  b<*>ise  when I  bf"?in to spo'ut.i '        '    '   .  Gee whiz!    I.wish't'rhis'wu.zthp'day  ", .   V When . !  .     ',< ., ' Skule    ���������  '     "   ,        .      ,    *      I-ets  ! ��������� " Out!  ' '   '     .; *      ,  '  \ ���������E. A. nrinin'-tool ir I ..is An ;?���������������*>'"������������������ Tiroes  *f?  : Taciicnl    BlnjitTtT.  :     M*ii*i<l���������Has Mr. (Jrxxlkctch'ociiH' tn cnU  : on you,yet? -r ,  -j     Mabel���������No.     He    aski-d ** ni(>   '.sfvora!  I \v,oeks if, he might call .ton.  \     Maud���������AVhnt did you "say in PM>tyV    *  '    'Mabel���������I   told   him   in-.itnr.iu   y-iiild   tt������  glad to see him.    ' ' *��������� '  'Maud���������Well,   that's   where   yon   swallowed yoiir gum.���������'Chicasn 'I'ribui'.e.  , ,M������?an ori'Tli������������iii.  "Well. Dorothy." said An**.*- Jane,  !'������hev've decided to name ih������ baby il.ir-  oi.l.,:  "Oh, p������ha\v!" exclaimed Utile 1'orotliy.  *'I think that's too iiie.in W'sy ciii:i i i'1  they name it El*=i" or soiai'lhia-r'V Tln-y  l\iu'nv I want a little sister."���������1'hiladel-  jihia Press.  A-Test of ProTTiinc-'ne!.'.  "He aKsumes a jaeat deal of impor-  lance as a public otlirial." said one On-  n a man. '   >  "lip," aufrwered the other, "but any  o'ie can see he doesn't really amount to  iimc-h. He has .been beheaded on!/ twb-e  ���������in the past six mouths."���������Wusuingtoa  Stur.  _..  A  Very  Pnlnfil .VoEce.  '!,.'! I  l"i   '(.j  Bertie Soppiful���������I s'pose, my boy���������aw  ! ���������that nil the ncres heah beloiig to the���������  i nTv���������squire���������aw!  ; Kid (with toothache)���������Some on !em.  ������������������But I've got ar! a dozen acliers of rae  : own. and well I knows it!  Emergency  Ability.     .    .     ,  "Women have no originality���������no inventive genius."  "Nonsense. I've seen my stenographer  make a,memorandum with a hatpin on a  eake of soap when she had no paper  handv."���������Chicago Record-IIerald.  I? PRP.P.  CTS  Asthmrilene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent  t      ,   , Cure in All Cases.  SKNT AliSC)LUTF.LY,FREE OX  RECEIPT- OF  POSTAL.  Write Your Name'and Address Plainly.  | ^E si?4=i Uv  /���������fe'.** ,^1*'%i>  yip   **? *������������������,  mm  'J lii  VJ Bai!  ������Ei  I&-  There is nothing like Aithm.ilene. It  brings instant relief, even in the worst  ca>es.   'It cures when all elbe fai s  The R^v. C b\ Wells, of Villa. Kidge,  III., aa\b: ''Your trial bottle of A=thma-  1-ue received iu good condition. I oatmot  (tell you liow thaukful I toel for the good  derived, from it. l( w.js a si vi', ohaiucd  with [juf.nd sun throat, ;md Asthma f.>r "ten  years. I di sp ������ire.d of ������ver being cored., I  anf your advertisement i.t tbr cine of this  dreadful and tormentinij disc a;f, Abtbiija,  .mil thouiiht, you had overspokisu yon'-'*' Ives  but resolved to'liive it ;s. ir.nl. Tw> (ny,  aatoniahnitin'-, r.ho trn.l acted like a' charm.  Seud'iijts a, full-sized biKile.".   <       r  -   lj^MMMtbMl*t_&l^i''iiww ������SDa ������������  ,   Y Y '- '   , <&  .'     Presii Lagep Beep ���������thesm<oC-;nce  STEAM:. Beer.** Ale,   and    Porter.    ,  ~������r  A reward of $5.00 will be'pa id for infoi;mration   ]oarl*3*ng  to  conviction o  persons withfjlding or destroy in tr any^-kejrs   belonging   to  this  company'  " "  ���������   ' HENRY'Kfi-IFK?,;   'Mavaner-  r *" *j , ' - - n  i   ���������*��������� mi Tin ii li na 11 rrTTTTr'TWTrrTTri^nfi*^ *  ESTABLISHED   1877, \ . iWCOP^ORATED    1S98fl  ��������� t������ * *** i-  j*     * ,- ��������� - >.'..-  '  -     ���������   ,  -   ,     * AUTHORIZED   CAPITAL,  $100,000.  BEALEK.S ' A'ND    EXPO.RTEB2S  *>*>B5a^<r5JWf'  ���������"-'���������V, v.  ���������* -*  EVSBY  ������ulSSCS^  0  . 5 & if.  Alter .having it cirehdly ana  moryniue, chiorofuiiui'or ether  - Rev, DrY Morris Wechsler,.  ilau'bi of the Coiig. Buai Israel.  New York,'Jan. 3. 1901.  D'rs Taj-i* Bros'-'M-edicinu Co ,  G-euclenieii:^   Your A-'i/buialuue is   an   e*c-  cellcii' remedy for Asthma and Has  'Fever,.  :and ir.s c-oeip.'&iiioo  alleviates   all,    roubles  'which ciiiubiwc with A.sitinia.    Itssuccesstid  asKOuishui ' and woudcrml.  , \^e can state that Asthmaicne   cont'in.������ no   opiu-'n,  tiulj yours, '  11KV. DR. & OUR 13 WKCIIt-'LEll.  Fair Minded. Anjliow.  Briggs���������Who   was   the   homeliest mnn  yon ever sow?  G'-i.'-v.-c-s���������Vgglhavga.   by  all odds.     He  'wus ku homely that he took offense it you  told him that his children  resembled him  in the least.���������Boston Transcript.  ". - *, .Avon.Springs, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1901.   ' '  Dk'Tai-tBros   jSIKwerMK Co. ' Y ,     ",' ������������������ - <  ,- GouLleiucii: '1 a ri;e thia testimonial from a sense-of duty, having iested Mie wonder-'  ful effect ot your Asthmalene, for the cure' of^A-'thma.. My wife has been 'aflhcted ' ��������������� ith  syddiiiodic^sthina tor tne'past 12 \ears. " Havin" exhuus'ed my ' own bkil as. well as  mauy others, I chanced to aee your sign upon your windows on 130th st're< c "New Ynrk, 1  at o-ice oluai'ied a bo tie ot Asthnidleiie. * M'y wire commenced tniuiig ir, about -he hrst ot  Novenibi.r I very boon noticed a radical l'mprove'rient. Asti'r utiug one bottle' her  Asthma has ai.-apyi-aren'and she >.-, butirely fre.- from all aynipconis. 1 eel that' I can consistently recommend the medicine to all who are aillicted vv,it-i.tlYdistrc;s-'njz dibeaae.  .     ..  Yours respectfully, ,,- O.1 D. PHELPo', M.D.     ���������'  _ _ : : !     '/._._ . '  j c      t  -  Dit. Taft Diios  Medicine Co.' ~^ .   f?cb 5,21901.  Guiitieuit-b: I waa tiotioleil with Asthma for 22 years, I have tried numerous ie:ne-  dies, but ti.e> have ���������>! 1 .failed I-ran aci n^s *, on** aclvn-uiseineni- a!..i ytni-u-d with- a trial  bottle. I touun lehirt at once. 1 have since pnrch.u.ed'your tulu-iz- bottle, .and I km  ever gratefu . I have family of f.mi child, en, and f r s-ix j"car.s'wa--, %utiHble to Work.' I am  how ii, t.hc lies'- of, health and doing business eveiy day.    'J"his testimony y'm can mAUe ute  of as you see Ji r *   ,  Home a'.idreU,������ 235 Rivu.gton Street.  s Raphael;  67 15..SI. 129th St., Nrt\v Y r\ City,  TRIAL BOTTLE SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE-ON RECEIPT  OF POSTAL.  "Do not delay. ,  Write at oi ce, ad.nxssi ,g DR. TAFT   BROS.    MEDICINE   CO ,   79  E st 130th Si., New Y..*.k City Y , , ,'      '     -c   _   ' ,     .l  *      *   '       -SOLD    BY    ALT,    DRUGGISTS. "'"    ''      -'  Hot His War-  .l>.73cf~-Yoti iiro chnrged with . stealing  ���������sis turkeys from Colonel Smilax. Have  you any witnesses? _'  Rnstns��������� No.'sah: you bet I am t. I  doan' steal turkeys befo' witnesses, sah.'  V-Cincinuatl Enquirer.  NOHOW IS HERIfl ,Y GIVEN .thai ap  olio i ion  will   b������   made   to   the Le'ri'-la'iv.  y A Yen. My of the Piovn ce of Briush Oolum  l<ia at lf.t. urer-ent nsriif.n for an Act to incorporate a CuiiipA iy wi.h power to coe-  otruo.t-, cqviip. tn.nutaiu ai>d opei.ite a sinyh  or double line of railway, co be operated hj  stearn^ electricity or any other mi>de oi  p'oweij at aud from tbe City of Victoria in  the province of British Columbia, thencr  Ni rth "vvest by tie most fe-i-ible route to m  point at or near Seyn our "Nairows iu th  said Province of "B-iU-ah Columbia; aim  vv ith power to construct, establish, main  '.am and continu-lly operate a -.lilwav  ferry steamship service tor the purpose ��������� o'  transferiiug fur reward p isa.-Dgers a .d pa -  singer a-id fre ght cars from the ^aid poin.  at or near Seymour Nunows iu Vancouver'^  Islind to a point oo the Maml.md of the  Pcyvioce of Brr.i&h Columbia; aud with  further powers to build, < quip, maintain  and operate branches of tho said railway  from any poiut ou the mam line thereof to  auy point in Vancouver Island ; and wirh  power to build and opeiate tra-mways iu  k-funection with the said mlway ; and v. ith  power to build, construct, ������quip, maintain  and operate telvgraph and 'elephouc lines in  eonnecr.ion witn the said railways aud  ���������jraaohes ; aud with poz/er to generate (lee-  tiicity tor the supply of light, heat and  power, and for a'l, any and every other  purp(^.^c mentioned m Sections SO, SI, S2  and S3 of the " Water Claused Consolidation Act, 1S97," dii't to do everything  nfcess ii-y or incidental <������������������' the cirrjing out  <>f all or any of tbe. objuets reterred lo in  the said sections; and wth power to ex-  '-rcse all the powers given lo tbe Company  b- Parts IV aud V of ihe '* \v ater Clauses  Consolidation Act, 1.S97 ;" and with power  to build, own and maintain saw-mills ; and  to carry on a general express.business, and  to build, maiutan .and operate bridges,  ro>id.-, ways, ferric.--, wharves,- docus,  steamboats, steamships, coal bunkers, and  other works; and to make traffic or other  arrangement.-    with   riiilway,   steamship   or  * ateamboat aud othttr companies ; and with  power to expropriate lands for the.purposes  of. the Compa-iy and to acquire land bonuses,  privileges or other aid trom any G-ovem-  itieut or Municipality, or other persons or  bodies corporate, and with power to build  wagon reads to be used in the construction  of such railway and iu advance of same, aud  to ltvy and collect tolls from all persons  using, and on all freight passing over auy of  -uel; roads b"vilt by the Conuv-iiy, wbt-ther  !i'.;fi>i-4i uv a'*ter thu e.'.>nr.,.truvi-i:,������n of the railway, aa<l wir.n power t<-. .--eli out its ui'.der-  i-akirig ; und v-pb y.ll other usual, i>.eccts:i.ry  ..r ii cidcutal ii^.h.������, or privileges aa m������y be  in cviwaiy or cuiducr/e to tneabovii objiccs,  or any of  them. .'  Da ed at Victoria, B.C.,   this 24th day of  March,'A.i) ,  1902.  liOi'-KKTSON & PcOBERTSON,  ���������SOLICITOUS FOli THE Al'I'LICANTS  .������ C.%  ASSESSMENT APT AND PHOVINCIA1.  "REVEJJUJS TAX.  Oomox District,  ���������\TOriCK is hereby given, in   aecordanc  ** ^ wuh the Soamtea, that Provincial  viniieTax, and all taxes levied undei  e Assessment Act. are now due for the  \ ear 1901. Ah the above named taxes col  leuiihle v\ ithiu the Comox Dim not are payable at my oliice. at, the Court House Cum-  berlind. Assessed taxes are collectible at  the tollowi"g r.-.tes. viz:���������  If paid on or before June 30th, 1901:���������  Tnret-tifths ot one   per   cent,   on   real  property.  Two   and  one-half   per   cent,  on  assessed  value o"f wild land.  One-half of one per cent,   on   personal property.  Upon ^uch excess of income���������  Class A.���������Ou one thousand dollars and not  exceeding ten thousand dol-kirs,   one   per  cent    up   to h*.-e  thousand   dollars.,   and  two per cent, on the remaiLdei:  Class 13 ���������On ten thousand dollar . and not  txoefcding t lenty   thousand   dollass,   one  ai.d one-half per cent, up to ten tih.msdiid  doliais, and tvvo and one-half per cont, on'  the remainder :  Class O ���������On twenty thousand dollars, and  not exceeding lorty thousand dollars, tv\ o  and one half per cent, up to owency thousand dollai a, and three   per   cent,   on   the  remainder :  Class*!) ���������On all others iu excess   of  forty  tnousdiKi dollar.-*, three per   cent,    up   to  foi ty tiiousai.u   do lars,    and   three   and  one-half per cent, ou the iemaindi-r.  If paid ou or after ist.Tnly, 1901:���������  Four,fifths of one per cent, oh real property.  Three per cent,   on  the   assessed   value   of  wild tand. '  ' ,'  Three-quarters of one per cent, on; pereonal  property.  Onto much of the income of any person as  exceeds one thousaud dollars, in accordance with tlie following, classifications-;  up >u, such excess the rates shall he,  namely :-t-  Class A���������On one thousand dollars, and not  exceeding ten thousand dollars, one and  one-halt per cent, up to five thousand  dOih'rs,. a: d two and one-half per cent,  on'.'he remainder'.:'���������' ���������  Class B���������On ten thousaud dollars, and not  exceeding twuity thousand dollars, two  per cent, up to ten thousaud dollars, and  three per cent, on the remainder :  Class 0. ��������� On twenty thousand dollars, and  not   exceeding   forty   thousand   dollars,  throe per   cent,   up   to . tweuty  thousand,  dollar.-.-, 'and three and one-half per   cent,  on i ho remainder :  Class D.���������On-all others in excess of forty  thousand dollars, thr e and one-half per  cent, up to forty thousand dollars, and  four per cent on the   re.maind. r.  Provincial Revenue Tax  gS per capita. '  *        v JOHN BAIR'D,  Assessor and Collector.  Cumberland, 13. C, 11th January, 1901.  My 22  For .Downright Satisfaction,?  Shipment after Shlpm e nttr  Ship Your Goods ^to. Us/  Full    Prices < and, 'Imme-  diate'.Payment    tvery'^ Time.  'Been    Established -24    Years.  Write  for Prices.    Make Trial  Shipment.    Convince Yourself.  ���������i i  i i  SSE  " frTS ("-tH0 FS������ WV) (?3!P WW R !^S ^S^  ������3  o-o-atiz w.m&t ave. n.  [pr  WRITE'   FTOR.   PRICE.    CIRCULARS.  '������'t  sua.' ffl&ffiS&  *'-*.-_' 4*?R  Mspini8.it^ & ItaiEo, Ry.  SKSicenKi  ��������������������������� wm in ��������� i ���������mm  i   in ��������� i  ii ii in ii    i l in    *~A^-52Zzn.-hjLS.-vJfttf&nvzxscxarju  Steamship Schedule Effective Tuesday, January 21, 1902  S. S. "City of Nanaimo.'  Leaves Victoria Tuesday. 6 a.m., fm Nanaimo,   calling   at   North   Sa?nich,  *V*  Cowichan, Muss-raves, Cuigoyne,  Maple Bay, Vesuvius, Chemainus,  Kuper, Thetis and Gabriol'i.  Leaves Nr.na.mo Tupsclay, 3 p.m ,r for  Union Wharf and Como\ direct.  Leaves Comox and Union Wharf-Wed-;  nesday,   12 noon, for Nanaimo and  way ports.  Leaves Nanaimo Thursday, 7. a.m , for  Comox and way ports.  Leaves Coniox Friday,'. 7 a.m.', for Nanaimo direct.      /     .  Leaves Nanaimo Friday, .2 p.m.,. for Victoria, calling at Gabnola, Fernwood,  .      Ganges, Fulford and'North Saanich.  Leaves Victoria Saturday,- 7 avm., for  Island Ports, calling- at North Sa.in__  ich, Gowjchan, Muss-raves, BiM-������oyne  ���������M;iple li^iy, Vesuvius, Chemainus,  Kuper, Thetis, Fernwood, Ganges,  ��������� Fulford and Victoria, when freight or .  passengers offer.      ��������� ���������. ,  ���������Special arrangements can be made for  ���������steamer to call ai other ports than those  above mentioned when sufficient business  'is offered.  The Company reserves the right <o  change sailing- dates and hours of sailing  without previous notice.  '   ���������>���������   GEO. Ii. COUBTHfBY.  Traffic Manager  "Hi  Hi  uiamina Mrserj  QUARTER WAY.Wellington Road  y  HUTOHBRSON' & - PESEI  20,000 Fruit Trees to   claooss   from.  I^arg-fi Asso.tment of Ornamental  Tr-=es,   Shrubs  and   Evorgaeoas  Small Fruits   in   Great   Variety.  Orders   by   mail   promptly   attended to.  a!2tc  P.  O   BOX,  190.  *'; ...KURT-2,S"-'G\VN   ,..'  ' K U RTZ'S PIO N E ������ R, or  KURTZ'S SPANISH BLOSSOM  giW^The Best in B. C.  and made  by Union Labor in .  I^toneer,. (Btcjar factoi  : Vancouver,   B.G.  rz������MSCjns.ti-������:vt  kKiv������wjmsv3-/ ^nrt,t) vrze ^ ��������� *r-=n> -r. .J..J ^ r������"*rm *  TO THB:jrEAF.  A rich lady cured of her T>e.-'.f-  ���������ness and Noises in the Head hy  ;Dr. Nicholson's Arufcial Ear  Drum:-?,.gave $10,000 vo liis Institute, so. that deai people nnablf* to  procure tlie Ear Drams may have  ihem free Address No, 14517  The NiehoVm 'hiflituie,. 7H0  .Eighth'Avenue, New York, U.b.A.  ~^*<lm m  j, in.'-'  ���������:t-*af  " ���������*$**>  haw  )  ^^^f^^gFT^pMl^'  WSBm.  V  1  THE ;CUMBERLAND   NEWS  ���������* Issued -Every ^ 'Wednesday.  '/' ***  W. B. ANDEJtSON,*      -     -���������.--'   EDTTOK  Tne columns ol The News are upou to nil  'i *  who wish to oxprusd therein vi^ws oil ir.att-  rd of public   interest. _ < .  While we do rioC hold ourselves  ies>pqnsi-  ble for the utterances of correaoondeuts, wf  reserve   the r ytit    of oechiuug   to  mser  ouimuuiCcUicns unnecessiiily personal.  WEDNESDAY,  J,UNE  18/1902   '  'bOI.BBY ALL NKWMiKALfil'.S: 10c  O^^ST^STT^^ sending stetch -d -^"  any invention will-promptly receive our'opinion free <������������*n>^g������*a  allity of same. "������HoW to obtain a patent" sent npon request. Patents  secured through us advertised.!or sale at our expense.       -  Patents'taten out.throhgh us-recfive special notice,^xtnout cha,g,m  THEPA-rEi-T l:=pbED> an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consumed  fov, Mamifacturei's and Investors, r ��������� ���������'  "fiend for sample copy FREE-   -Address, ' *'  ���������' '   ,      '.VSGTGR Ja.EVAM������ &.  GGV .  *   '  - (Patent Attorneys,)      '. ,  Espitaalt&HaaaiiiioRy  TIME TABLE .EFFECTIVE  1   .J^TOV. 19th, 1898  VICTORIA TO WE"LLIiNTGTON".   -,  No.'2 Daily. '' , No. ^a.  De   9:00 Viclorja,..*. Dc. 4:25'  '���������  <fc2<* Goldscreain..' '*   4:53  "    10:9  ....- Koengs...: ''��������� 5 34  'J*   10:48 Duncans 6:1-  *,i-.M. . *r,*u-    -  "  '"   12:11       ....... Nanaimo    ' 7:41  ,.V. 12:3    WVUiiigton  Ar. T-oo  '  WELLINGTOiV uTO  VICTOKIA.  ..J,  %  Hr^\.  ���������%���������  Furnishes Monthly to all.L������vers of Jvlubic a  v.Mit  volume  ot  "New,   Choice,-  Ooyyngn.  Con.poaitions by the most popular authorn.  ,32 '   Pages     of     Piano     Music  ,    ,     5   SONUrf,   '     5   lSSTRH MENTAL.  10   Complete   Pieces   for* Piano,  ,   with intf-resting Musical Literature.     -  Once a monthvioi\10c.  ,-������������������   Yearly.Subscription, $l.flb  In   one year you  get neatly 400 pages U  Music, comprising   120 complete .piece.-,t..r  " ifce" Piano.     It bought in wy music stoie at  2n<Aalf off, would enrt S30.    * If you   will  .Bandustheuameuud   ad^i**   of  live   pel ,  ���������  for.neV*.  on   the'  {--������-���������*<*  <* Organ,   we ml.  send you a sample c-py free.  '       J. W. PEPPES, Publish, r,    /  OaUl. q K .i������U'& 0. c   Music & Imi .���������Free  "TEigiitii & Lociwr 8ts',  ���������    Philadelphia, ��������� rA.  l^^ll^l  SwjEffi  ;���������"  ������  ../ r  ' &>s  No. 1 Daily,  A.M.  De. 8:0J   "   8:SCi...  9:52  No. 3 SfiUn-dayv  ������-*���������     'a. ai.  .Wellington  De., 4:2=5   ..Ndiiaiino..., *��������� ���������" 4:39   .'Duncans..-.  " S'-Oo  \   JAS. A. CARTHEW'S     -  i LiverV: Stable  ���������      ��������� * ������  ��������� Teamster and Draymen  : Single and Double rigs  ": for Hire. All Orders  : Promptly Attend^p to,"  ; R.SHAWj. Manager.  ���������": Third-St.7 Cumberland, B.C  <tf  '5  ^���������m  j^tji.i������������m.������uiii1i������>������������������������w* I"IHIIII1H  J* '6:16  ���������   7.32  'subscription   %   *  For the J: W.^'Peppor Piano  Music Magazine, price'One DoIIhi  i.er vear (postage paid),' aw.; w  placed r������v applying lo the ofiice oi  News, Cu-> bcrlsind,' B. C.,- whert  pamplf- co-nipo can be seen.      ,<���������>,<  * W*������ Wfi "^"-S *S^ ^?*"  OF .EVERY CLASS AND  DESCRIPTIOx^'  At  . LO W EST '  R A TE'S.  tk.Btt^*>������  Fining-r!?1      - ���������  The,Best and Mcsi Influential,  Mining Paper  in jhe   World.  PUBLISHED WEEKLY, $5.OO PER YEAR  "     * SPECIMEN   oOPY   FREE.       v  253 DfoaLdw������.ye   -   Ney .York.  circulars.; "   ���������: *.  notices' x   \';,  ' '   '     ,  ^  -   BILLHEADS      ���������',;   .  ,  V/  '  '- LETTER.HEADS"  AIEMOUANDUMS  '��������� /   .V   ENV.Ef,OPEs' *  -   ������������������  .   '    '��������� /    ''-BUSTNESS CARDS  'labels &;bags '. ^ - \   '���������".'���������  ' '  "       BILLS OF'-EARE  /'. ;Etc,     ( '-Etc.,  ' '���������   Etc.;*   *-  . i..   j        .  v.        lt-   - ���������'    i    _ ������������������   5>  CONCERT PROGRAMMES  ���������,  .     BALL PROGRAMMES      ��������� ^  ������."��������� DISPLAY BIELS-  POSTERS*  ~-.   ���������'        CONCERT TICKETS'  "' V- BALL TICKETS   -  t- >  r     ' Y     [MENUS  l  receipt forms;;  A BSTRACT.of ACCOUNTS  Etc.  Etc.*,  Etc.  " 10-67    ...,...- Koo������iK's..-._..-..'.'.  "11-13     .Goldstream   Ar. 11:45    .       ��������� ��������� Victoria: Ar. S:00 km.  Hofluccd iatcs to and from*,  all points  Saturdays ^and Sundays good to return Mon'  duy.     , ,< .i  For  rates   and   nl    information    apply  at  Company's Oi*nYes. \ /  A. DUNSMUIR. .       Gko. L. COURTNEY:  -  - President.       i -        Truffle MaimKor  Notice.  Riding oriTocomotives and "rail  way cars' of the Union ' Colliery  Company by any person or * per  sons���������except train crew���������is strictly  prohibited.' Employees are subject tJ dismissal for all owing, same  *' ���������    -   ��������� By'* order     --     -     , ;   *  *   u    ;      '       Francis D. LiTTi.Ev-  -, ,    ., "Manager. '  '  I Have,Taken    Office,  jn jh;e   Nath   ;  Buijcling,'  Dunsmuir Avenue,    Cuinberla 0..' . >>  "and anivagent  for^ the  follo.wing  ���������   "reliable    insurance - companies:'  _The- Royal  'London   and - Lan  '     cashire and Norwich   Union/   ,,  r-   am- prepared" to  "accept frisks a-  current  rates. , I am   also agent  ...for Hie Standerd Life-Insurance  -Company of.* Edinburgh and,the  Ocean Accident Companvof England1.    Please   call   and . investi-/-.  -  gate before1 insuring in.nny otherJ  'Company.  "Y,  Jy -     -JAMES ABRAMS.    -  _2 _1_12- 1 ���������-!��������� ������������������ ������������������  ���������Cumberland      - ^ /���������;  COR. DUNSMUIR AVENUE  AND .," SECOND     STREET.  ,    .    CUMBERLAND, B.' C-  Mjis. J. JI. Piket,' Proprietress.  . -  ' When in Cumberland be" sure'  f i'  .  .arid sta}**  at ,the  Cumberland  ^    .'  Hotolp������������������First-Class, Accompda-  ,   *  tion for-transient and perman-,  ent boarders. ' ' .' \   ��������� -  <  Sam-pie Roomsand   Public Hall-  Run .in Connection   with': Hotel  i.  , '.t  <   ri  it ���������  Ai  i    .  i  i  ,      'I  yV  HURT'S, BURSIH18.  ' v'   VANCOTjyifiil.'  B.C.   ^  Fruit & Ornamental Trees,  Thirteen Acres., all produced b_  itUeiligent'Wi'ite Labor. Lest  than Eastern P.ices.  'Clean Ceitificatc from Inspector.-  No  San   Jose Scale   or Borers.  GARDEN & FIELD  Seecls  ancl    Bulbs  for Fall & Spring Planting.  ���������������    Fertilizers, Agricultural Implements, &c.  Catalogue   Free.  I. J.  HENRY  3009 Westminster Road  VANCOUVER, B.C  irxjtccfci n ������������ *-"��������� * '  GREAT  EST  LIFE.  THE reason why the Great. West  * Life .Assurance Co. has more  business in ftnLe- than any other .C.oin-  \ pany ever had at the same age-, is; then-  promptness in Paying Claims, and-the  Liberal Contract given, free ' from all  annoying restrictions. ,- ���������    .:  Any   information   asked   for   will   be  promptly and cheerfully given.       '���������  .    - A.  ANDERSON,  General Agent,  Drawer, 5- ?"Nanaimo,"��������� B.C-  ORDERS   EXECUTED WITHOUT. DELAY.  .<:>>  \ 1  i1   "^n  ,W^  n  Death Intimations  Funerai   invitations  Memoriam  Cards I  , ,, . j       ��������� i-  j n-T.-rT * ">^^- -w^g������i*mi������ni mmmTw*\  On Shortest Notice.  i  n  '#���������-������  t  u  TO   ADVERTISE   IN   THE   _6e  99  !N?b. 4-4..  JC2H  J1 ..^-.���������.' ^j*-A 'n-^j^U^iT^f^Vy.'r'fi^C  ^CltiLAi ISEiU. 1.54-t *^~���������"J"*HK?1  i  I  -y  Rates'from $1.00 to, ?2.00, per ; di  ay  c^/S^^jt^e^S^^^^^Sjc^^SSSS^SM  -, '* *'  ' ;* ^ -  , .1.  "51  'L  ''i  SiEva^    ' DESIGNS,.',      t  ^ CSOPYRiCHTSj. AC  ���������   Anyone nendinp? a alirctch and description may '  {ruielj'.yasooitain, free, -whetber an inventioale  P-atcnt8 taken tbroujjb Munn & Co. roceivo  special notice la tbo    -      ������' ^ *   - *���������  .    SCIEMTiFlO  AMERICAN,  "beautifully illustrated.  Inmost clTCUlatl<������ of  _anv scientific .IournaJ, weekly, terms5S.C0 a yeqrt  S1.60S1X months ,  Specimen copies and UAMfr-  Booii ON Patent"-" sent free.   -Vddresa --  "'     '   fVSUNM/'A   CC,     /-      -",-  *,3������l\Wi0.utw:.    ",'';*'- -J-,?   ^     >  'Iff;  * ti  t      W  C  ���������-���������V,  .1.  * '.-��������� '-YYI  ��������� ('    i*      /"i    <fi  >.-���������-    iJf-,!S  obOOOOOO.OO,OOOOOOUO^Y,  Pijics (6ni_/ S'10-OO.  j Made in all the standard .all- j  bers both Rim and Center /ire.-j  "Weight about 7 pounds. Stand- jj  arcl barrel for rim Tiro cartridges, j!  2t inch*t?s. For center-fire cart- J.  ridges, .26 inches. |  U these .rider, are not carried in stock t  by your dealer, send price and we vail |  send it to you express prejriid.^ |  , Send stamp forc.-vialo������ dc-nribinpcop- f. (  plete linevr.nd containing   valuabls* m-j?  iormacion to shooieis. ,     -f-  The J. Steveiis kzm m Tool Go,   \  , 0. Box 2670        CHICOPEE '-'ALLS, MASS. j  o  o  o  o  o  o  o*  o  o  o'  1 very e  o,  o^  a.  o  o  'k'-oIR''  --  i{'  V!-:  y- k  O  o  o  o  o  c  I am   prepared    to  furnish Stylish Rigs  "and do'Teaming at  reasonable rates.  O  C  O  C  o  o  o  g D. KILPATRICK,  o Cumberland o  0000000000000000000  **l  1 - w  ^"2  . P  r-^sr^j^ra- ���������*���������=.! "��������� ���������i'-jr-t- - jr^rir.K'i*^  The most Northerly  Paper published,on the Island.  *��������� >  Subscription;  $1.50   per an  "V*- .w ^  -3  Flies of any Pattern Tied to Order.  |8ATI8FA0T0ET^Si  1 '���������      '     '  Dunsmuir Ave.,  Cumberland, B.  r"  -  Office  Hours :,-8 a.m. till 5 p.m.; Saturdays,* 8 to r.  Fancy Inlaying wood in;and metal.  French PolishingY^- ���������  NEWS. OFFICE.  "-;    ..'���������u-r'i.i.Jtvir.^,  ���������'.;c.C ,,*  ,',,  t:   Y  ooq������o������CK>������c**3������OGe^  " BY THE GRACE, jj  OF A RED HAT *  By-Madge  Bronson  ge*r  Copyright, 1901, i  By A. S.  Richardson.  iOOOOOQQQQOQQOOQOQQOQOCQOO  It -was such a startling bit of millinery���������all crimson velvet, peacock,  breasts and glittering buckles!  Edith   Harlowe,   stepping  from ,the  elevated train, paused for a farewell  glance in its direction.   The next' instant there came a, fierce tug on her  belt.   Then something strong and convincing clasped her waist. Vaguely'ske  '    felt  that  her  feet  were  dangling   iu  space.   Then she beard horrified cries,  and finally she realized that she had  , been   dropped   unceremoniously ' upon  '   , the seat nearest the door, with a crowd  of curious people pressing upon her.  0 "Oh, the poor thing,  she's going to  faint!"  Edith drew herself up defiantly, only  to drop back instantly into a more limp  and comfortable position, and . the*  downtown terminus was reached before she felt equal'to walking. A,faint  peach blow tint crept into her face as  she approached- the young guard who  had so pluckily come between herself  and death. * '  "This is one.-of the times,' don't you  know, when'one can't think of pretty  .speeches.   It was all my fault���������and���������  and-if you had, not"���������   She shuddered  .suggestively.'    "Flense   give'me   your  v name��������� and  my' unce  will, thank you  better than I can.   Ferhaps he"���������'  .r One  glance  at  the  guard,   arid  the  ���������words died on her "lips.  The young fellow was looking into her eyes with an  air which would stamp'asy suggestion  of reciprocal favorsjas an insult.  "My  name is, Larry Creston. ancl  I  '    would 'be. pleased  to  meet your���������or���������  - uncle.-Harlem?  Yes, ma'am."  '*  And as he assisted a  heavily laden  Italian   into   th***' train    Edith   turned  ��������� away /with  a  bewildered  feeling that  she had been dismissed,   but not dis-  ���������>_ courteously. ��������� ���������   .     , _ " - *  In-'the great commercial world where  ���������' "she was but <-a clerical  atom   the kaleidoscopic    life    tumbled    madly    on  without  reference'' to   hairbreadth  es-  - capes.' and it was quite late ia the aft-  ' ernoon- before   Eel ith -found" time   to  scratch off the'following note:     . " ,<-*.-  Dean Uncle John���������Yon have'always said  that when you could be of assistance to  'tme'' I should iod. free to call upon you.  Now,   I  have "a  real   favor   to  ask.  .This  . morning ,your heedless niece was saved  fronTa shockinar, if not fatal, accident by  the quick wit and ready arm of a,guard  on the Ninth Avenue 'L. E2' impressed  me as being somewhat above the ordinary. I know that from your point of  view I am'rather a useless member of society,  but still if you agree with me that  1 was worth saving, will you try to placa  this young fellow in a line more suited to  liis abilities? Your "pull," dear uncle, is  unquestioned. Will you kindly attach  yourself to one of the numerous strings  and oblige vour appreciative if somewhat  obstinate niece, EDITH HARLOWB.  P. S.���������His name is Larry Creston.  For   a   week   Edith   heard   nothing  from her note.   Then one noon she met  '   her  uncle  rushing  from   his   favorite  ��������� cafe, and. she walked at his side to the  elevator door.  "Well, Edith, I've seen your hero.  First rate fellow, and, strangely  enough, I've had some business dealings with his father. They live out in  Ohio, and the boy, fresh from college,  came here imagining that New York  would be at his feet. Instead he soon  found himself on his uppers, glad to  take the first thing that opened up and,  too proud to write home for help."    .  "Urn-urn.!'' murmured Edith.' "And,  what is more to the point, do you intend to help him?"  John Harlowe smiled into the piquant face of his niece.  "In good time, Miss Independence.  I've several things in line, but he's at  least safe where he is. Long hours  and exposure won't hurt him. He's  tough as a pine knot���������was a member  of his college eleven"���������  "I guessed as much," acquiesced  Edith; with a smile.  "Eh? "Why?" inquired Mr. Harlowe.  "Ilaveyou.'seen him since?"'  "No, but I guess he did not tell you���������  just'how lie saved my life. I've���������well.  I've felt that tackle."  She disappeared in the elevator, leaving her uncle chuckling by the cigar  stand.  *        *        *  ,     *   .    *        *-������        *  At rare intervals Edith made her appearance at her uncle's' dinner table.  Pier acceptance of such an invitation  . was usually the occasion for christening a new gown. But on this particular evening she could extract no comfort from the fact that the chiffon applique on her bodice had been purchased at a bargain. Neither did she care  about meeting the rising young novelist who was to occupy the seat on her  aunt's right The first breath of spring  was brooding over jthe great city. The  office had been musty and close. The  columns of figures had danced like  mad, gaunt dervishes before her eyes.  Her aunt had just confided to her  that she was having new linens made  for the furniture when one of the several black and white automatons scattered about the rooms presented itself  before her_and resolved itself Into���������  ^,-a������sciii������������-������'i**^  Larry Creston.!  He took her out to dinner, and she  tried to cast a scornful glance at her  uncle, who nodded to her across a plateau of lilies and violets. But how  could one look scornful when one's  head'ached? 'Everything seemed to recall the drudgery of her daily work.  The breadsticks were long, narrow col-=  uniHS of figures. Instinctively she began to estimate the number of-almonds  in the cut glass dish on her left.  Larry Crcston's friendly'eyes studied  her face, and hp secretly wondered if  this were .the same independent, busi  nesslike jJrl whi for 'njinv ino-njngp  had ridden on his "train and whether  the change had been wrought by the  trailing gown, the bared shoulders or���������  A faint sigh "escaped her lips, and Larry pulled himself together. ���������  "Has your uncle told you how good  he's been to me? No; of course not.  lie's not that sort of man. But I've a  berth in the C, ,R. and N. office. I've  been there two, weeks, and the fellows  'are a jolly, clever lot."  ��������� .Edith smiled, and the tired'look fad-"  ed from her eyes. During the remainder of the dinner she chatted brightly  with Larry and .those nearest them,  but young Creston .was not deceived.  ���������When th'ey returned to'the parlor, he  secured for her a dim. corner near a  window overlooking,the garden. The  moist odor of spring ,rose' from- the  ground, the sky was placid and starlit. He did not bore her with idle talk,  and tho girl was grateful.  'Mr. Harlowe was very,, kind to ,this  niece whose independence tried his  soul, and his carriage was ordered to  take her home. N '    ���������  Mr. Creston was* closing the carriage  door when   Edith,  with  sudden  compunction for her"languor, exclaimed:  ' "Can't I drop you at your rooms, Mr.  Creston?"  The young man laughed lightly.  "I'm afraid it would be rather out of  your way, but if I may I'll ride as far  as your flat.".  So he knew she had a flat. When  they, turned into the .dim, quiet side  street, an odd whim seized the girl. ;'  "You've never seen our little den,  Mr. Creston?' I kno\y it's rather late  and utterly' unconventional, but won't  you stop u bit? Somehow I 'dread rny  own company this evening." >    .  The invitation v*as accepted with  alacrity. A few minutes "later they  were seated in the glow of the lamp,  Edith leaning restfully against the  soft folds of her cloak. While Creston's  quick glance took in thevdainty room,  whose every appointment had come  from the home Edith , had loved and  lost, tlie girl was whimsically wondering what would, happen if her companion, Mrs. Cornelius, in dun colored  wrapper and crimpers, should suddenly appear in the doorway and ask  about the dinner, as was her custom.  But Mrs. Cornelius slept, and Creston  turned from'his polite scrutiny of������the  room to study Edith's face.  -  "You are nearly worn out, Miss Harlowe," he remarked abruptly. "Do you  have your vacation early?"  "In August, I believe, though the  schedule's not made out yet."    ���������-  "Humph!   August is a long way off.  Why don't you cut it all and go with  your aunt to"���������  Edith was aroused on the instant.  "So undo has boon^taIking to you,  and you've gone over to the' enemy."  "Not so bad as that," replied Creston  cheerily. "I shall always be on your  side, of course, but then I think you  are a bit unjust to your uncle and aunt  when they really want you for their  sake as well as yours."  "Oh, but you don't understand," protested the girl. "Why,* if I were to  make my home with them ray salary  would not pay for my dinner gowns  alone."  "And you must work?"  "I must work. I would be utterly unhappy if I were dependent on any one.  I love work, indeed I do."  Creston rose and drew his fine figure  to its full height before the tiny fireplace and mantel. From this vantage  point he gazed wistfully upon the  graceful figure reclining in the wicker  chair. But when she looked up at him  the wistful expression had disappeared, and in its stead shone a light almost masterful.  "I  think   that even   the  most  independent of you business women need  some one to look after you occasionally."  Edith flushed.  "Thank you for the suggestion, and  may I add that I think you have done  your full share in���������er���������looking after  me?"        ,  In a flash he read her meaning. She  thought he was reminding her of the  incident at the "L" station*���������of her own'  carelessness and his so called bravery.  . "Believe me, I did not mean that. I  was only thinking how wan and tired  and disheartened you look."  She held out her hand, with a smile  that veiled tears.  "I am tired and horrid tonight and  you were very kind to come in and  save me from myself. Will you come  back some evening when I am more���������  amiable?"  * * *        *        *      * *        *  John Harlowe met his niece on lower Broadway.  "Hello, Edith! Back from- your vacation? Come in and have lunch with  me."  After they had taken possesion of a  table among the palms and ordered  the, most cooling combination on the  menu Mr. Harlowe glanced keenly at  the sunburned face of his niece. '  ''Look as if you'd been living on the  beach. Been having beastly weather  in town. By the way, young Creston's  had luck. Rowland went over to the  N. 'Y. and H.,* and Creston gets his  place."  "Yes?"    '  "It's quite an advance for a man so  young in the service, and Edith"���������  there was positive anxiety in the  man's voice as he,studied his niece's  impassive face���������"I hope you'll treat  the boy���������well, a little better after this."  "I really don't see how 'I can, my  dear uncle. ' Ten days ago I promised  to marry him, and'I rather think that's  the limit, don't you?" '     '_  "He actually asked you to marry him  on that salary? Edith, that fellow will  be president of the system some day.  Lord, what nerve! And on a hundred  a month!   Think of it!"  "Yes. and just, ���������'think- if I hadn't  , turned to look at that red hat, and he'd  .never saved me. nor you'd,never"���������'���������  "There, there.'" Edith!"-.-This' is no  jyaine of consenuences."  The lt.us-.ell   Housm   Kotund-i.  ��������� " This rotunda of ' the, Russell'  , House ' is one of ' "Mie best-kno,vrn  places in Cainada," said aii M.P. at  Ottawa to, his visitor there the  other day. "You can see men here  from all over the -world, and some-  howY.they don't seem to get away  into ' private parts, of this hotel-  ther wa'y.'r they do in other houses,  but'', are drawn to* this 'rotunda,  where they loiter about, smoke, and  talk. One reason is that this place'  is as. busy, as " ;a thoroughfare.  There's ra constant coming and  going. .More than, that, you can  always find out * who anybody is.  There's people' here who knock  around all the time, and delight in  telling you who's-.who. ' As you  don't know anybody- here, you'd .be  a picnic for one . of th'ese cele-  brity-sccnters. When' I  first  came  down here, I was greatly impressed  by the way some,of those chaps float  around and chat with some of" the  great men of the land. I thought  they <must ' be great men, or they  couldn't talk to the great, but now  I know that the political big-guns  willrtallY to anybody, and that lots  of men-who are famous ain't very  great .when you1 get close to  them."  ' Four G������������nii   H:il>its.  There are four good habits���������punctuality, accuracy, steadiness and dispatch.* Without the first of these  time is wasted. Without-the ��������� second mistakes the most hurtful 'to  our own credit and.interest and that-  of others may be committed. Without'the third, 'nothing can he well  .done, and without the fourth opportunities of great advantage are lost,  which it     is  impo^ible  to recoU.  In Iliini It"  f������������������cierj.  - A Hamilton, clergyman married a  co tuple in his church the other day.  The caretaker spread the bridal car-  pot for the'wedding-' party and did.  the other necessary things to make  the affair distinguished. After it  was all over and the young couple  were leaving the groom handed out  envelopes to both the clergyman and  caretaker. Later the clergyman said  to the caretaker: "What did you  get in your envelope?" And the  caretaker opened the envelope and  disclosed a sheet of paper on which  was written, "Thanks." And to  the clergyman the ca.retak*er sai'd :  "What did you get?" "Whereupon  the man of God drew forth a similar document and nothing more.  When the young couple return from  their wedding trip they will hear  from -both caretaker and clergyman ���������Hamilton Spectator.  eTliu   Artist :iii<l  tilt"  Duke.  When Gustavo Dore was at the  height of his fame he visited England, and Blanc:hard Jerrold 'took  him to a -public dinner for one of  tho literary charities. The Duke of  CamTjiidge was in the" chair. Jerrold suggested to the secretary that  he should arrange fpr his Grace .to  speak of the famous French artist  when proposing the toast of [he visitors.  "Just write the gontlom.in's name  on a slip of paper, and I'll put'it  under the Duke's eye." Whereupon  Jerrold wrote "Distinguished visitor���������Gustave' Dore," but unfortunately marked the accent over* the  surname's last, letter so faintly,  that it was .invisible 'to His Royal'  Highness. Presently, hot and anxious, the secretary came hack to Jerrold, "By all means, says the Duke,  but  who the devil is Dorc?" '  Jerrold had to make this .clear,  and did-so" on. another slip of paper,  with the words, "Gustavo Dore is  the celebrated French painter wht.se  pictures are the admiration of the  whole civilized  world."  The Duke is too much a man of  the world not to have accep tcd thc  snub with gracious savoir faire, and  he did full honor to Dore in a kindly  and appreciative reference to the  guest ��������� and did not forget the  accept.   More   Slander.  Every kind father should drop money  into the children's bank in order that  their mother can be supplied with  "chansre."���������Atehison G!ohp>    . -  THE SUNDAY- SCHOOL:  LESSON IV, SECOND QUARTER, INTERNATIONAL SERIES, APRIL 27.  ills   Lnclc  She���������Have you never been tempted  to give up literature?  Author���������No such luck. I've always  been compelled to stick to it���������Puck.  now doing this -with Peter.  17. Forasmuch then as God gave them  the like gift as He did unto us, who believed on the Lord Jesus Christ, what was  I that I could withstand God?  Peter was in the hands of the Lord,  the Lord's messenger, the Lord's servant, and it was the Lord who Wrought  all tbifr, as they might have expected  He would had they believed what He  commanded concerning giving tbe gospel to every creature and the prophecy  of Joel concerning pouring out His  Spirit upon all flesh. Before Peter and  the other six Jewish brethren God did  for the uncircumcised gentiles just  what He had done at Pentecost for  circumcised Jews. ,  18. When they heard these things, they,  held their peace and glorified God, sayiris-.  , Text of tlie Lesson, Acts xi, 3-18.  Memory Verses/' 7-9-^Golden Text.  Acts x, ������3���������Commentary Prepa-rerl  toy-Rev. D. M. Stearns.       <  '[Copyright, 1902, by American Press Asso-  ' ciation.]       ,   '  1, 1. The  gentiles 'also  received  the word  of God. V * .  * The apostles and brethren that were  in< Judzca heard tliis, and it is plain  from the context that it did not fill  them with joy. How unlike our Lord-  Jesus the most of His disciples are! At  one time some of the apostles felt like  burning a town because the people  would not receive Christ,- and now  they seem to feel some\yhat like burning Peter"* because through h'irn some  uncircumcised.' people had received  Christ. We receive Christ when we re-  ccive'the word of God concerning'Him.  It������is a simple and most reasonable  thing to receive with meekness the  word of God, yet' comparatively few  do it. Those who do give joy to-_.our<  Lord (Jas.'i, 21; John xvii, S). * * "^  2. 3. When,Peter was come up to Jerusalem,, they that were of. the circumcision  contended with him.  / ~     ; *:  ti Though they had been for.years with  Jesus and had been ' fiiled ,with the  Spirit., they ,had not learned the significance cf ''whosoever" 'nor that Yin  Christ'Jesus neither circumcision arail-  eth anything nor uncircumcision, but  a,ii'e>v creature" (John iii, 10; Gal.'vi,  15). The feeling still exists Mn some  quarters that it would be wrong to officiate or take the communion outside  of one's own denomination. ',   ��������� --  4-10. Peter rehearsed the matter from tl*6������  beginning. ''  ' About the sixth, hour Peter felt led  to go on the housetop to.pray and, being hungry, would have eaten,' but  while they made ready he fell into a  trance and saw this vision (x, 9,-10).  At that very time the messengers-from  Cornelius' were near to Joppa, and it  . w,as necessary that Peter should be  ready to receive them _and go*- with'  them, which he certainly . would not  have done but for this special; vision.  It is beautiful to see God preparing  -THis-ser-vants for the good works which  He has prepared for them.  ' 11, 12. The Spirit'bade me go with them.  While'Peter was considering the significance of the .vision tne messeugers  from" Cornelius .were at the gate inquiring for him,'and, instructed by the  ���������Spirit, be called the men in and lodged  them, and the next day he and six others started with * the messengers for  Crcsarea and the' home of Cornelius.  This, book might well be called the,  acts-of the Holy Spirit in the name of  the Lord Jesus. In it we see God and  angels and men all'working-together  that men may know the riches of God's  grace and His wonderful love.  13. 14. Who shall tell thee words whereby  thou and all thy house shall be saved.  As Cornelius told Peter why he had  sent for him, this is what he said that  the angel said Peter would ,do; therefore at the time of* that vision neither  Cornelius nor his house, however devout, was saved, and Peter had to  come from Joppa to tell them the good  news concerning Jesus Christ that they  might be saved. How few seem to  feel as Paul did when he said, "I arn  debtor both to Greeks and to barbarians, so. as much as in me is, I am  ready to preach the gospel" (Rom. i, 14,  15).  .     ���������  15.'And as I began to speak the Holy  Ghost fell on them as on us at the beginning.  Chapter x, 44, says' "While Pctor yet  spake these words the Holy Ghost fell  on all them which heard the^word." So  it was while Peter was still speaking  and 'just at the beginning of bis discourse that God wrought so marvelous-  ly. There was nothing in all this got  up by man, neither the discourse "nor  the results. All was from God. It is  my increasing conviction that if we  preach the preaching which God bids  us (Jonah iii. 2) the results will be all  that God pleases (Isa. lv, 11).  . .        ��������� -. ��������� <  16. Then remembered I the word of the  Lord, .. how . that Pie said, John\ indeed  baptized with water, but ye shall be baptized with tho Holy Ghost.  These ascension words (Acts i, 5) bad  therefore only a fulfillment at Pentecost. Here is another fulfillment, and  so it goes on and will until tbe "great  fulfillment, or filfullment, of Joel ii, 28-  32,, in the near future. Jesus had told  them that the Spirit would bring to  their remembrance what He had said  unto-them  (John  xiv,  2G), and  He is  Then hath God also to the'gentiles grant-  ed repentance unto life.  The promise to ABram was that all  families of the earth should be blessed  in him (Gen.' xii, 3), and it was written  by the Spirit through Isaiah that Israel  should blossom and bud and fill the  face of the earth with fruit (Isa. xxvii,  6). One would think that in the blessing to this gentile household through  Peter the Jew the brethren might have  seen some - fulfillment of these things  and not have, been surprised at them.  Yet it is tr(ue that many prophecies'still  awaiting fulfillment when* fulfilled shall  ereatly surprise a host of believers.  THE LATE LORD DUFFERIN.  Caught   *h.v  si' r'iiil .ili.m   .'it.    Julian's  .-������tu<l������������>  hi   I'ari������.      ' '  Art  1  , Ella lie: worth  Dixon   writes       to  M.A.P.  ������s  follows  about the       late_  Lord  Du'lTerin-'- ��������� ,' "   ��������� .,  "!��������� do not think Lord Duflerin  ever' got over the cruel loss of Lord  Aya in Ladysmitli". He' was devoted to his eldest son, and when he  was offered a parting gift on leaving  Paris, he chose that Lord Ava  should be  painted     by* Benjamin  Constant.      The  handsome        young  man     who feel ,at Ladysmith     went,  to     the  war somewhat     against his  parents'   wishes;      indeed,   he     never  ^told " them he   was going^'   till     the  .night'before.     The future 'Jilarchion-  ess.. of Dufferin is an American���������once'  lU.iss' -Flora . Davies;'   ,;that     she  has  a fortune".*is  in    .every way'  a      desirable   thing.      Lord   'Basil  *t   met,  ,her in Paris 'when , he was     with his  father atHhe Embassy.j  "Lord Dufferin's 'passion was   - for ���������  painting,   and more (than _  once';, he,  escaped from"'a" vice-regal ��������� throne to,  go     and paint -incognito, at Julian's -  studio* in Paris. ������������������ * A ^Canadian- friend  of  mine -tells  me    that   -'.the"*.'great ,  viceroy'  was'once" fairly     caught. It*  -vyas when     thevDufferins were representing * Q-ue'en .Victoria'    in' Canada- '  One day-, my friend saw a man whom  she knew well going the _, round  ������of'v  the different,    ateliers in the Passage  des     Panoramas.      'That is'  an   -eccentric     Englishman,-     a."SI.  Smith-  son, who comes to*, paint���������a    nii'ddle-1-  aged    man,' as you see,' explained   a  Swedish .      student next'to her.  ,_ 'I  don't know - (wliat 3rou mean.,'      ex-,  claimed    ^niy  bewildered  ,    Canadian  friend,   'Pat man     is  the,    Marquis  of   Dufferin, : Viceroy    "of Canada." ��������� I  kriow    him as we'll* as   .1, know you.' ���������  When His  Excellency passed' her she  'was  much  too     patriotic" not "t . to -,'  make her-most     demure   Court curt-  '  sey.      Lord ,DufToi *n     recognized;-his !  blonde   (Canadian   'subject'    at",,once,-\  laughed   ., heartily.     at" the ;��������� whole ���������  thing,  and. acknowledged*    that .-he*,  had been " fairly   found- out.   , T may- '  mention", (concludes Miss,Ella --��������� Hep-. ���������'  worth    Dixon)    "that the   unfortunate vice-regal -  art-student    had had  to   undergo   all   the", usual, torments; *'l  indignities,  and  'standing of   drinks'  which      are    inflicted ���������'���������'.on  new-com-  crs in the men's studios in ���������     P,aris.-  The .consternation      when   the'truth*  became.known was,  I believe*,    .con-*'  siderable." , '  DELAYED BY A WEDDING.  Co re mon 3-  IT as  Periformecl on tho  Train���������  JlridesToom   IVaitrcl, for Girl to  Grow.  Pressed for time and impatient to  wed the bride for* whom "he had looked in vain for ten long,,years, Charles  M. Woodworth. a mining law specialist of Dawson, was married yesterday at Calgary, .Alberta, to Miss  Beatrice Start'of that city. An exceedingly romantic history surrounded the wedding in addition to the  unique fact of its having been performed on board of a Pullman coach  while the--train waited for the ' hurried ceremony to be concluded.  More than a decade ago, when  Woodworth was a youth in Nova  Scotia, he started on a cross-country  tramp. One exceedingly hot clay, he  applied at a farm house for refreshments and his wants were supplied by  an exceedingly pretty little girl of  ten years. The young man lingered  with her as long as possible'and in  after years never forgot the incident.  T;>vo years ago he tried to find the  girl, but the family had moved, no  one knew whither. Coming from  Dawson two months ago Woodworth  met the young woman on the train  and they speedily became uigag*ed,  ..but she refused to.;-accompany .him  north, and the wedding ho desired  was. postponed ���������indefinitely. Thence".  Woodworth went to ^Edmonton to"  transact some business and- thence  traveled in Eastern. Canada. He was  just starting west again when he received a telegram from the young  woman, indicating that fche would go  with him to Dawson City or anywhere else, tho only limit being to  the ends of the earth.  So the young lawyer hurried westward. He had no stop-over privilege  and so he wired to a Calgary'-clergyman, who, with the bride, awaited  the overland on the station platform.  The ceremony was speedily performed on. the train to- the enthusiastic  delight of the other Pullman .passengers, and Woodworth's lonely trip  was transferred into the happiest of  wedding journeys.���������Vancouver corres-i  pondent San Francisco Chronicle.  A   Pninfnl   Similarity.  "I am surprised that Gayboy didn't'  pay you. I thought, the fellow had  good points."  "So have pins, yet they'll stick you!"*  ���������Judge.  .;  Railway Rails.  Railway rails deteriorate sooner In*  tunnels than elsewhere because of the  effect of injurious gases. i  9*-  ^  (  -I.  fa  'I  h  a  t .  ��������� i$  ��������� |;,f  "-t-ll  f'  . i  ��������� o* ,r.  m  '&:���������  ������:%  if-"*'  1  mr  m  m  ft  1 ��������� ���������*'^W������***'���������'"  ��������� 77;  ^  '���������������*  THE CUMBERLAND NEWS  CUMBERLAND. B.C.  '    a   SScinning  Process.  ���������'This," said'the fond father to the  dermatological expert, "seems to be a  .pretty big bill for the treatment you  have given my daughter."  ___ "It was,' a. difficult treatment," ex:  plained the skin.doctor.' "You see, we  had to remove all the cuticle from her  , cheeks and graft a new epidermis upon  them.,"  "Well,'V said the father, reaching foi  'his checkbook/"I dou't know* which  one of us you, skinned' the most."  **"     " ��������� ������������������*��������� ������������������       ' ' i  Santa Pe.  The   oldest ���������capital   in   the   United*  States is('Santa Fe, which was the scat  of government in Kcw .Mexico as .far  back as'lG-10.  introducing a happy man to a pes-,  -sin-iist is like shaking a red rag at a  bull.  I)  Blessed is the woman whose hus-  bandi can always 'find in the bureau  drawer the thing he is looking for.   -,  a O    * <������ r'  Ha'w 'Winds  -AND-  Wet Weather  catsse the Colds that cattse  Pneumonia and Cons-amp-    ,  tioa* .    ���������'���������'���������-..   ...'���������>'  9^/  Cure'  IMKETS.  ctstcs the cold, heals 'the  lungs and makes you -well*  S H1L 0 H cures Consumption  and' all Luna*-, and Thtoat  Troubles; and Coughs and*  Colds in a day* Positively  guaranteed;   25 cents.   ��������� ' ���������  Write to S. C. "VtteXM & Co., -Toronto,*  ��������� Can., for a. free trial bottle.  ���������Karl's Clover Root Tea Cures Headache  ��������� Politeness'   is' the  Jove's, thermometer.  ��������� zero ' mark, oi  Messrs    C. C.  Richards  & Co.. *.  .Gentlemen,���������'After*  "* suffering     for  ���������������������������seven years  with-inflammatory rheumatism, .sosbad  thatYi  was  eleven  , months confined to my room, and for  'two    years ( could* not  dress    myself,  * without  help.' Your, agent* gave  rne  'afbottle, of MTiNARD'S,LINIMENT in  , May, ''97,< and /asked  me'to   try  it,  'which I did,   and was' so "well pleas-  ,-cd with' the  results  that I procured  more.*' Five bottles' completely cured  rme and "T have   had no return of* the  pain for eighteen months.       ', ' .  ! ./The above facts are well known to  -���������everybody, in  this village and  neighborhood. .,' _ '" '.  '    Yours-gratefully,  A'. DATRT.  ' St.^Timothee,   Que.,  May 16; 1899.  AMrfGGL MICA. ROOMS  xleputation for durability'established Elovcn  years' trial. Our severe frost has no cilcct ou it.  Kowaro of Americaa^japerleltins which, cracks  in our-climate,' ' '  ,'���������   v*^. us. roNsecA.   *  li6 IKgginsave., Wiuuipogr. , . Sole "Agh:vt  HEBJ3AGEUM. J  Real *Estato Agent.. Issuer of Marriago,Licc*r,t:afl  W������'  <W������l|  The * minds ' of _ men resemble' the  soils of old mother, earth; some are  deep and rich and some are. shallow  and poor. ",     .       ?   ~  < ,A) Bl-T- OF' CORRESPONDENCE.  '"   "' "   The following correspondence,  end-  -,     ing   ,in   'triie Irish fashion;   actually  *  'v - passed ��������� between, two men in England  some.years ,ago :   ���������  . -  Y '--������������������Mr.' Thompson  presents  his ,com1  / plimenis ,. to Mr.  Simpson',  and 'begrs-  h 'to request that he will keep his doggs  '    fr,om trespassing^ on,, his _grounds:"\  !," y  'i "Mr^/Simpson^ presents liis"*c6mpli-  " *"/ments to Mr.'>|Tlhonipson-ifand- begs to  ���������  - ��������� suggest-that in-future'ho'should not  *-    ..spoil 'dogs! with two "gees.'*, .-^  *-* ':"iMr. -' Thompson's respects  to'Mi*.  "*-  ; Simpson ,,and-* will feel  obliged if.he  ,   will*; ^at)d  "trie.'- "'letter 'e' to the last  ������.** -jwWqrd.-Jir^thcViipteYiustrreceived^.'so as  ' &*���������,' i-cprescni" Mr. Simpson ancb lady.'',  .''_'Mi'.' Sinipson"returns  Mr'.  Thompson's   note-   unopened^ the impertinence -it .contains being  only equalled  by- its ,vulgarity. '\      .    -  Fishermen, .-like'doctors, never attempt to 'cure a sucker until after he  is dead  ' ,        ' <*'   r ;  A RAILWAYMAN  EXTR.A ORD JN AR Y TJ NPL.EAS ANT  SYMPTOMS ' OF KIDNEY .rROU- -  "    '     . t BLE IN THIS CASE.  Tortured*- by all Kinds of Pains and  Aches    fie* ..Tries-' Everything, but  .Fails   to Find Relief Till a Friend  ���������..Advises"  Him "to Use"Dodd's Kid-.  ' *:iey 'Pills���������They Have made a Well!  ���������* -Man* of 'Him'and He is  Grateful.-.  There is moro Catarrh,in this sectlon-of the  country, than all other'diseases pub together,  and until tho last few years was supposed to be  iucurabiov.iror a great'ijaany years doctors pro.  nouncod it**^ local disaase, and proscribed local  remedies, and bv cciistr-.ntly failing to-cure with  local trea'onncric, pronounced if; incurable.  Science has proven catarrh to bo a constitutional disease, rmd therefore requites constitutional troatmeuto Hall's Catarrh Cnie, mamiiac-  tared, by F. J Chene'} & Co.-, Tola jo, Ohio, "is  the only ;onsrifcutiona* cti/o on tho Tnaj'l-.et. It  is taken internally in doses from "0 drops to a  toa&pooniul. iz acts cliif^tiy on tho blood and  mucous surfaces of the system. Thpy offer one  hundred dollars for v.ny~ ca&o it laiis to euro.  Send ioi- circulars and te^ttrnoni-'* Is *  / ddrcF.s     F J. CHENEY & CO., m  Sold by ���������Drawis's, '/.>.-.  - liaii's Saini y pills are the bo.-;'  L'oiseio, O.  Some parents use their children  to  hang old clothes' on.  MAUD'S LlrllMLNT Relieves Neuralgia.  Strange   that  the  vulnerable   point  of a pugilist should be in the jaw.  Ottawa', ,Ont., April 21-(Special.)  Frank Charrand,"t a railway man,'"  whose "home .is "at 130 Little Chau-  dicre ��������� Street, has acknowledged^that  Dodd's Kidney Pills have done'more  for him than ."anything else in the  world has ever done. ' ITe says:t ''X  suffered with backache and 'was always drowsy and'had a * very' heavy  ���������feeling in my limbs.      ���������   ' '  "1     had *frequent severe  headaches (  and    more times very sharp pains in  the top of my hoad,ri\\hich gave me  niuch'nnnoyance in my' Work'.,  . "My    fingers    would   cramp* and I  would have an uneasiness'in'my legs'  and occasional-pains in the loins'.  in spells and short of  ate   a hearty.meal I  pain in my left side.  wouldk   sometimes be  "WHEAT.  'Manitoba wheat has been dull all.  week'until Saturday, when the opening of navigation af Forf William  and the strength in the American  markets'., * developed more interest  and some - demand for spot wheat  sprung up. Prices have'gradually  come up from 09%. for,l northern  and 66;"i for 2 northern,. (a.t the end  of last week, to 71V&e and GS^c at  the end of this week ior wheat in  store, Fort William, immediate delivery. For May delivery the price  is the same as for spot and in fact  the 'spot wheat is in better demand  than the future'delivery. Ino. 1 ,hard  is worth 74V->c spoc. Values are  practically the .same; in store at  any of the lake ports, djut at the  moment, in store; Fort' William, is  most wanted. , .  Country    Wheat���������Market. ^ nominal,  owing to bad roads._    -.  ,Liverpool*   Prices���������"no.    1  northern  spring    wheat sold at Liverpool* ou  Saturday at Gs Id.  * '<  FLOUR-Ogilvies Hungarian Patent  $1.9:5 ' per sack of yS 'lbs.; G-lenora  Patent, SI.SO; Alberta, SI.00; Man-  itob'a,' -SI .40;. Imperial XXXX, $1.20  MILL-FEED���������Br&n,Jn bulk, per ton  Sl-i.50; shorts, $10.oO. Delivered in  bags, the prices are $1.50 higher.  ' GRQtj'ND FEED-Oat chop is quoted at S27'per ton delivered lo the  trade;, barley'* cb.-p, S22 per ton;  mixed _ barley and oats', $25 \per ton;  oil cake, $27 per ton. ,     (  'OATS���������While there , is no surplus  of oats- to be seen in this market it  may also be said with equal truthfulness that there is no shortage. As  'one. 'dealer puts'it,r "Whenever oats  are wanted' a car ,pops up." ' Most-  of the feed requirements are being  met with 'Manitoba/ oats although  two cars 'of Alberta oats were taken  this weak forYthe'purpose. Most of-  the" "Alberta " bats are,going to Montreal lor, export.'. We learn of one'  transaction in '. Fort, '^William oats  this week. The price was 36"^, for  No. ,2 white. As 'soon -as' navigation  is declared open the Fort 'William  basis will be/aclbptedv SelWs are  asking 45 to 50c per bushel for seed  oats "here From 35 to 36c per bushel is being paid'for. feed grades in  car lots on track here. Prices to  farmers-at country points for ���������No. 2  white, oats range from 2SJ to 30c.  Street oats, are worth 32 to'34c per'  ���������bushel.- '"-   "������ * :   , ' yf  ;.; BARLEY���������Receipts ja'rc light* and*  the" market isa advancing . for -feed  grades.,' Dealers are/now quoting 43  to 45c for choice J,eed grades.  '-HAY���������The Hoods In the coimtry  districts have destroyed large quantities of hay,-and the price has advanced accordingly'.^ Baled^ hay is  worth S6 to $6.50 per .ton.  DRESSED MEATS-Beef,  city dress-  tfj&Lirts MPtts fiur&ttAs M&������ fines  <$U/ JUS ^p(^tt -h   & -p4nvfLd> 4a4s  Page Metal Ornamental Fs*nce. ftXus  ; ornamental, very showy and surprisingly cheap." It is jus"! what  is wanted for dooif yards, diviidon fences in town lets, 'crave  yards, orchards, etc. K .'is on r*c PFft R\]ti*ilNR FOOT  painted and retails at onlr ^^ CIS- l k"K hUK,,l,n,J rUU������-  Just think of it. Let. ua send yoa full particuL-nrs. We also  J make iiirm fence, poultry natting, nails and staples.  Vhp PagelVlrsFsnsoCo., IJmtteiJ, Walkervflfa, 0n������.    3  ROSS & HOSS, General Agents, Box 633, .Winnipeg,  Man:  ������KM������K>������fMI  Some men 'find that Friday  as unlucky as/any other day.  is just  A bird in,the hand is permissabl  if you hayc no knife and fork.  THEY NEVEH TAIL���������'Mr. Sf Id. Si'jtAner,  LauRfcon, writes: "For about two years I was  troubled with Inward Piles. butbj-u?inff Par-  rne.ioo's Pills, I was" completely ciired, and although four years havo elapsed since tlien the '  havo not returned." Parmelee's Pills are anti-  bilious and a specific for tho cure of Liver and  Kidney Complaints,, Dyspepsia,, Costiveaess,  Headache, Piles, etc., and will regulate tho secretions and roruovo all bilious matter..  Dr. Temple, thcr archbishop'of Canterbury, declares that it is not a bad  thing for' boys to ,figlit occasionally/  provided there is no feeling of malice  TEETHING   TIME.  a .hundred  it/  before   retiring  Where   there's a wilLthere's  to break it.  a way���������  For  Ttsplr   Own   Cfilvcq.  .-v couple of you:i������ nipn were out fishing o:;e day -md o:i retnniing were going past a farmhouse- and felt Jiungry.  They yelled to the former's daughters,  "Girls, havo you any buttermilk?"  The reply was gently wafted back  to their ears. "Yes, but we keep it for  our own calves."  The  boys  calculated  that they  business away, and they went.  had  Theory   n������d   Practice. '  - "Dlnglebat has original ideas about  family government. He says every  home should be a little republic, where  universal toleration prevails and every  'one has a voice in the government."  ' "Yes. his family is managed on that  plan; but;he.'and Mrs. Dinglebat have  the same.'old wrangle every day as to  who shall be president."'  Rot Painful.  . "Here," cried Oldham to his fellow  --lodger, who was starting for his holiday, "that's my brush and comb you're  putting in your portmanteau."  "Well, let me have 'em. You won't  need 'em; you've grown so bald lately."  "That's just it. I can't paft with  them." - '��������� ���������'-    - ���������   *     ���������-        ,  Never  Pleasingr.  Mrs. Mitford���������What do you think of  this vivisection question? It must be  I awful to be cut up alive.  Mrs. Graham���������Yes, and it is awful to  be cut dead, as 1 was by one of my  dearest  friends  last  evening.-  "I v.-as dizzy  breath.      li    I  ^rould    have a  My    appetite _  very good  ancl sometimes I couldn't  eat anything. <  ' "I had, a constant soreness and  tenderness over the spine ancl tired  feeling in the region of my kidneys.  *'t suffered quite a little with, a  dragging heavy feeling across the  loins.  ''Dodd's-sKidney Pills were recommended to me by a friend of mine  who had been cured, and I began to  use them.  "Almost from the start I began to  feel tli j wonder) ui improvement,  -which continued as' the treatment  proceeded, till the unpleasant symptoms had one by one entirely disap  pearod.  "Dodd's Kidney Pills have worked  a wonderful . cure in my case and I  cannot speak too highly of this  great and' good -remedy."  What    Dodd's     Kidney     Pills  done     for     Mr.     Gharrand  they  clone    for     thousands  of others,  they'll  do   the   same   for .you if  give theni a chance.  There -.are many railway liien in  Canada to-day who''find; Dodd's Kidney Pills indispensable. They are the  railway man's surest and best'friend.  .The constant vibration on trains  and engines is, very.hard on the kidneys and Dodd's Kidney Pills make  these organs well and, able to resist  disease. .'������������������-��������� ��������� ;'  ed,' _ 7 to Sc* per pound; country, V2C  under these "prices; veal. 8 to 9c;  mutton, Sc; lambs, 8c; hogs, 7y2c.  POD'LTKY-Fresh "killed chickens 11  to* 12V2C per pound, delivered here;  ducks and geese"1, 10 to lie; and turkeys,  12V2 to 14c. ���������   .   .  BUTTER���������Creamery���������There- is very  little creamery to be liad as milk is  scarce and local factories are' only-  making a very, small quaatity of  butter, not enough .for their regular  customers. Winnipeg buyers are paying 24c' per lb. net for their supplies at present.  . BUTTER���������Dairy ��������� Conditions are  not favorable to 'the production of  dairy  butter and there is very little  Is * the .Critical Age iir the. Life of all  ,'  ������       "   Little Ones. ,   . ' , -  During 'the    teething period great  care/sho'uld'.be taken "of baby's health  The"''1 little   one   suffers greatly;  the  gums are hard and inflamed and any  disorder ' of   the stomach or  bowels'  increases the peevishness of the child"  and" often fatal results follow. Mother's    greatest   aid   at this period.is  Baby's    Own   Tablets���������the surest of  all .remedies in curing the min'or ail-  unents  of children.    Among themany  mothers 'who testify,to the value, of  these Tablets ,is Sirs. R. B.'Bickford,  Glen  Sutton,   Que.,   who   saj-sV   "My  little :babyjsuffered_much from teething   and   indigestion.*   1   procured a,  box    of Baby's*-Own Tablets*.*and it  worked wonders in baby's  condition  ���������in fact I believe it saved my little  one,'s'    life.   I  sin'cerely  believe' that'  where now. many a home .is,- saddened through death of a little one", joy"  would    be    supreme if these'Tablets  had    been    used.   I     consider   'theni-  baby's best doctor and would not be  without them. _ c  Baby's Own Tablets when given  in accordance with the' directions'  prevent restlessness and nervousness  '���������cure simple fever, diarrhoea, constipation, colic and all stomach  trouble. Guaranteed to contain no  opiate or other harmful drug. By-  dissolving a Tablet in water it can  be given with absolute safety to the  very youngest baby. Sold by diug-  gists. or direct by mail, post paid*,  at .25 cents-a box, by addressing the '  Dr. Williams' Medicine Co., Brbck-  ville.   Ont.  coming in.  any    this    week,  are   paying   22c  sion    basis,     for  bricks or prints;  ary     qualities.  have  have  and  you  A thorn.in the  two  in tho bush  hand is' worse than  MARD'SLIfflENT Cures DaMruf.  Effect of GraY-itntiarse.  ���������If a man'weighing twelve stone were  to be transferred to the moon, the  weight of his body, measured at least  by the attraction which the moon  would exercise upon it, would be reduced to about two stone. If his muscles and his frame remained the same,  it would seem as if he would be able  to jump over a wall twelve feet high  on the small globe without any greater  exertion than would be required to  clear a wall two feet high on the earth.  Prices have not changed  Wholesale   dealers  per pound,   commis-  fine butter in tubs,  16 to ISc fos or din-  while    seconds     are  worth 10  to  12c .per pound.  CHEESE���������Jobbers are getting 13  to 131/oc per pound for cheese.  Stocks now- in hand are from Ontario. . .  '  EGGS���������Receipts fell off considerably the fore port 01 the week and  prices went up in consequence. Besides iv good local and eastern demand the British Columbia trade has  been taking Wunitoba eggs freely,  ancl it takes a lot to supply this demand. For a while this week commission houses were getting loc per  dozen, commission basis., for fresh  candled .eggs, but as the floods which  caused ; the shortage' have now subsided; and eggs are coming in more  freely .again we 'quote .last 'week's  prices 'namely, 12c per dozen, commission basis, or 10c per dozen at  country points.  POTATOES^- Farmers' loads, delivered in .Winnipeg, are worth 20 to  80c per bushel.  Things we don't want- are given to  us" to console us for.the lack of the  things we want.  If a man would secure his  undivided attention all he has  is to talk in Ms sleep.  wife's  to do  BEE [INDUSTRY.  j,  Every head of', clover consists of  about sixty flower tubes, each of  which* contains, ah infinitesimal quantity of sugar. Bees will often visit  different heads of clover  6 to the hive,' and in  order to obtain the sugar .necessary,  for a load must, therefore,: thrust  their 'tongues into about 6,000 different flowers! A''b"ee"wili make twenty trips a day when the clover patch'  is convenient, 'to the hive, and thus"  will draw the sugar" from 120,200,  different, flowers in the,course-of a,  single day's work. ,  IINARD'S' LINIMENT for Sale EVOTlefe.'  True patriots work' for their' country's, future   insteads of  boasting    of  its--past. Y.        -.  1- _J " *���������.  ' The^e never was, and never will   be, a,  universal panacea, in one remedy, for all ills  fco.-'jvhich flesh is heir���������tho very|nature of  many- curatives -.being * such that were the L  germs of other "and differently seated diseases rooted in the system of the patient���������  what would relievo one ill in turn would aggravate tha other.   We  have, however, in  Quinine Wine, whsfi .obtainable in a sound,'*  unadulterated state, a remedy for many and  grievous iLa,, By its gradual and judicious .  nae the frailest systems are led into convalescence and strength by the influence which -1  Quinine exerts on nature's own restoratives.  It relieves the drooping spirits of those with  ,  whora a chronic state of* morbid despond-  ���������.  ency and lack of .intt/est in life is "a disease,  and; by tranquilizing \'*he nerves, disposes to '  sound and" refreshing sleep���������imparts vigor >,-  to the action of   the blood, which,0being  stimulated j courses throughout; the ^veins,  strengthening the healthy animal functions''  of the ^system, thereby making activity a  necessary result, strengthening the frame,  and giving life to the digestive organs, which.   *  naturally,demand increased substance���������re- .*  eult, improved appetite.' Northrop & Lyman, ,,>  of Toronto have given ��������� to the public their '[  superior Quinine Wine at the usual rate, and, '  gaugea   by the opinion of  scientists,' this  win-a approaches nearest perfection of any in  the market.   All druggist"*- sell it.  i '   *    i  "t  '."   ���������- f,' r j  ml  V--  Y^,Y,  '-^���������?v  Ails'- man who gets  ground floor and stays  use for  a fire escape.  in ' on   the  there has no  Cholera morbus, cramps and kindred com-  p'ainis Annually mnke their appearance at the  same time as tho.hot -weather, green fruit, cucumbers, melons, etc.. and many persons are do-  b'lrrod bom exiting these tempting fruits, but  tl'.ey need not abstain is they hnvc Dr. J. D.  Kellogfr's Dysentery Cordial, and take a few  drops in water, it cures the cramp and cholera  111 a remarkable manner, and is> sure to check  every disturbance of the bowels.  Two people may be able to live as  cheaply   as   one, .but   it  depends    on  whether  gaged.  they are     married    or  en-  Tf a man can live alongside a public school for two years without losing his temper,' the recording angel  ceases to pay any attention to his  actions.  Bccaiise of the poor quality  sum petroleum, su-pplicd  it.  t  cian government has  ordered  York 720,000 gallons.  of IIus-  he C rein New  SB. A. W. CHASE'S  A CATARRH CURE  free.  1 a a  Is sent direct to the diseased  parts by the Improved Blower.  Heals the ulcers, clears the ilr  passages, stops droppings in tho  throat and perman.intly cure*  Catarrh and Hay Fev������r. Blower  All dealers, or Dr. A. W. Chaso  Medicine Co., Toronto and Buffalo.  Tlie   Mace   In   12nf.-land. ,  Every deliberative civil body in England, even down to the town councils,  is. provided with a mace, which if-  ��������� brought forth with solemn'.'ceremony  and placed on. the table before the de  liberations begin. In one or two city  coitncils a candlestick of silver is add  ed to the mace, and acts passed in th<  absence of these objects are suppose  to be ili.egfih ���������  Plenty  of  Clocks.  There are 2o0 clocks in Buckingham  palace, and it is a work of no small importance to keep them going. Some,  of them are as old as the time of Louis  XVI., and the works are still in good  order.  ... DEATH OF A XOTED MIDGET.  A noted personage has passed away  at Cardiff in "General Mite," a midget only 30 inches, high, well-knovyn  to the public of Great Britain and  the United.States. The cause of JiiS'  deatli was acute dyspepsia.:. The demise of this celebrity took place at  the show-rooms in St. John's Square  where, with other artists, he hud  been entertaining the public for sp'iiio  time past. The deceased was born  in Washington thirty-one years' ago.  He was married, and' his wife, still  resides in Washington, but, the one  child of the marriage is dead.  Wise is tho prophet who does not  allow his predictions to go on rec-7  ord.  Vr>T**������y t-avi-d nwi p"i:i iclioved V>v a honso-  iold rt-medy, Dr. Tuomas' *J2clectricOil���������a small  Itiiinlhy ot \iliu-h u.-uuily Mifiicos to curb a  coii'.'h. lioal n noie, cur, bruise 01 sprain, relievo  '.uinb.iir'), rhviuiiisti-iTi. neundjjwi, excoriated  nipple-., or hilt'imcl bje-i-t.  AX OPEN* KIT-CHEN,  in     order     to     facilitate     dietetic  treatment   for   patients   with   scanty  means     an     'open kitchen"  has been  founded by charitable persons at Berlin, and has already a year of useful  existence     behind     it.      Portions    of  food     are    obtained  from  the   "open  kitchen"     by tickets,  which arc sold  at a very lov/.';price; but some Of the  out-patient hospitals ' (policlinics)  at  Berlin buy a number of these tickets  and  distribute  them gratuitously  to  needy  patients;      Charitable  individuals, have likewise bought the tickets *  and    distributed    them    to those in  want.      During  the  first year  of. its  existence the kitchen provided 36,000  portions    of   food,    some being consumed     on    the premises and  others  being sent out hot to patients.  '���������One ounce of Sunlight Soap is worth more than  Two ounces of impure soap.  REDUCES  EXPENSE  .Liis. for the Octagon Bar If your grocer cannot supply, \srito to  IiETSa BROTHERS, LIHITED, Toronto, sending his name and address,  and   a   trial   cample   of   Sunlight Soap   will   be sent you  free of C03L M  ,ttJM.jet.������'Jr<*.l,-iW ** ***��������� Jrf-!������(r-������^������-������������fC.V,  ^J^., rf^a ipp.4 ^,^,-������������������^������-M.���������   M-*,--*.  ;.'  fl-  b a  ' is  *'  ISSUED    EVERY ��������� WEDNESDAY.  Subscription, $2 a year, in advance.  TT0L 38. Hnfcersoh. E&itor.,  ' 23T Advertisers who want t1 eir ad  changed, should get copy In by  9 a.m.  day before'issue.       ,  Subscribers    failing    to    receive     Thk  "Nkws regularly.will confer a favor by  noti-  fying the   ofhce.  Job Work Strictly C. O. D.  Transient Ads Cash in Advance.  The Coronation.  Despite the malicious tactics of  Opposition in the Legislature,' British Columbia will be represented at  Coronation ceremonies by Premier  - Dunsmuir.     We   think  that if  a  *.   .felection had to be, uiade no more  - , truly,   representative . man   could  ���������    have been found..    Mr Dunsmuir  has immense interests in the Province; the number of his employees  on the Island are numbered by the  thousand, and on the Mainland he  is also largely interested. His most  rabid political opponents.will concede that the Province could not be  represented by a gentleman more  worthy of the honour. ��������� Mr Dunsmuir left Victoria en route for  London on the.evening of  the 8th  **" i  ihst.  Dear Mrs B ���������', in reply to your inquiry as to which is the best tea to use, 'twould say that in rny opinion it rests between the Blue Ribbon and Monsoon  Packet Teas., If you like rich, strong tea,'then 'Blue Ribbon is undoubtedly the  best, but should your taste be for a delicate and very flavory tea i would advise  you to call on C. J*. MOORE for a packet of Monsoon. Personally, I drink Blue  Ribbon in the morning and Monsoon at 5 o'clock, but then, you know. I am a  perfect crank about te<t. ' ...     * ' *'  '  ' . Yours' truly,  '<��������� SARAH GRUNDY.  PERSONAL. I  L A. Mounce, M.P.P., and family  have returned to their home in  Cumberland. <  Rev. Mr Cleland.and family left  0on Thursday morning oh a visit to  Portland, Or.. .  Mr Henderson, the Dominion inspector of telegraph lines, t]paid  Cumberland an official visit" last  week.' -''_-"  Master Douglas Coilis who has  been attending college in England  for the past four years arrived here  on Wednesday morning to visit his  parents. ,_  Mrs Fleet, wife of capt. Fleet of  H.M.S. Phaeton, will return to  "Victoria in time for the coronation  celebrations, she having spent the  ^past five weeks at Comox Bay.  Chenille and tapestry lace covers  vey cheap at Moore & Co's.  WHARF    NOTES.  S.S, CIayoquot called in.for burik-  er coal on Friday.  S.S. Kildonan and scow was over  for a load of coal for the C.P.R.,  Vancouver.  S.S. Active was in for fuel Saturday., She was bound to the Rock  Bay logging camp.  S.S. Flyer and scow was over  from New Westminster for a cargo  of coal on Saturday.  S S. J. L. Card arrived from the  Northern Canneries on Friday, and  Hfter taking on bunker coal proceeded to Steveeton.  S.S. Cymbeline, captain Smythe,  came in for bunker coal Monday.  She was bound to Vancouver to  load a cargo of oats for South  Africa.  The U.S. s.s, MacArthur called  in on Monday for bunker coaL She  was bound north to Alaska to spend  the summer on survey work.  S.S. Wellington, capt.Salmond,  arrived from San Francisco Thursday and took a cargo of coal tailing  again Saturday afternoon for the  game port.  S.S. Oscar was in on Thursday  for a cargo of fireclay for Victoria.  S S. Tepic and scows made' three  trips to Vancouver during the  week. ��������� '      ',  , Barge Robert Kerr was over on  Thursday for a cargo of, coal for  Vancouver. >  *t   ^  The D.G. s.s.Quadra called in for  fuel on ,Wednesday.- She was returning from the West Coast of  Vancouver Island and the Islands  lying off Cape Scott, as far north as  Triangle Island, where she had  spent ten days searching for wreckage fronf the missing sealing schooner Hatzic of Victoria, While they  found a large amount of wreckage  there were nothing among it that  ,was likely,to be identified as "belonging to the missing schooner.  The captain reported very stormy  weather on the trip.  The' new 'stern, wheel steamer  Mount .Royal, built for the Hudson's Bay Co, for service on the  Stickeen and Skeena rivers, palled  in for water on Tuesday last. She  was bound for Telegraph Creek on  the Stickeen river. Mr.JasYrhoni-  8onJ;the manager* of the' Hudson's  Bay Co., went north on" her on a  tour of -inspection of the Company's  different postsr in th'e*north: From  him we learned that it was his intention to have the new boat make  four trips between Wrangel and  Telegraph Creek, and then she is'to  go to the Skeena river to finish' up  the season. This boat has been  constructed in such a manner a3 to  draw the least possible amount of  water, and it is expected that when  fully loaded for the river trip she  will not require over twenty inches  to float her.  Important Announcement,,  ��������� _  We have made' arrangements by  which our subscribers  may secure  the   :i News,"    together   with   the  "Montreal  Family  Herald"; and  " Weekly' Star,"   at a  very cheap  rate. -. The two papers, from June  1st,   to  December  31st,   1902,   together with the beautiful corpnation  'pictures of King Edward and Queen"  Alexandra*, for $l.oo. h   Strictly in  advance.     Think ot" it!     The. two  papers  with  supplements  for, 100  cents.    Here is a chance, for people  not already subscribing,.to try our  paper'andget the "'Star,'/ the most  popular eastern journal.'   Old sub-'  scrlbers,1-by paying^ arrears, if any,  and   the 'dollar  in  advance,  may  take advantage of this offer.  VIOLIN  Di THOMSON.;   -     -  Music for Dances,  &c,  at.  snort notice.     Older.*,   Mr" E.   Barrett,  at  the Big Store,  will he promptly attended1 to.  Teacher-  supplied  left with  MONDAY,  CARD    OF. THANKS.  Mr E. Jrmes desires to thank,the  many friends' for floral tributes to  the*, memory of his1 late wife', and  for other' "many"'kindnesses "and  acts of sympathy. /  NOTICE. .  ALL ACCOUNTS due to the late Edwabd  Pollings, shoemaker, of Comox, must be  c paid to Mrs Jane Rollings, Executrix,  on or before the first day of July,  1902;  and all Accounts owing must lie presented  for payment by that date.  MRS JANE ROLLINGS,  Executkix, Comox.  21-5-02  23RD       JUNE,       1902  -A.    GH2/^l2sT0D  Evening's   Entertainment  FOR      THE  FERNIE    SUFFERERS,  ���������      ^ UNDER  THE   AUSPICES   OP   THE  Cumberland   Ladies'   Talented   Performers.  GOOD MUSIC AND SPECIALITIES.  To Have something Swell.  B  Take a  Dry Sponge  and   pour  on   it  a  bucket   of water  It  will  swell  every time sure.      ....      ....      ....       ....  UT we are not selling sponges, our line is   SWELL     BUGGIES  of all kinds. We have just received a Car Load of Open and Top Buggies  with Steel and Rubber Tires. Expresses of all kinds with Platform, Half-  Platform; Duplex and Elliptic or Hog-nose Springs. Buckboardsj Carts,  Sulkies, etc., all of the most Upto-Date Patterns and Finish. Guaranteed  for one year by the Makers and ourselves.      ..           .,..    ....  IAF1II0   8 Till  OAREIAGl  fORIS  8-12--Q2  STANLEY   CRAIG,    Prop.  MAGNET cash STORE  /.  SEASONABLE    GOODS.  \ <  Ready - Mixed' Paints,  Alabastine,     Whiting,  k Glue,.    Wall -  Paper;  Garden Tools,     Flower   Pots,     Etc.  Dunsmuir- Avenue,  Cumberland, B,C.  fA.fi. PEACE Y,  FOR   THAT COUGH,   TRY  <^jS&&.?&. 3S@������SS5=?S(  -��������� >"f-'  WINTER'S .  . *'Y    INSTANT '',.���������'.  COUGH ;CURE(if  it's a. good one, and reliable,/-  1      ���������    * r  FOR     CHILDREN    , AND      ADULTS.   <  >. '        * ��������� -  (||L    We   are   selling   our.TOILET SOAPS,, at" C6st   to   make     '  M,    room. Finest   GLYCERINE- and   CASTILE   SOAPS      &  ||      Away-Down.. , t' /        ;     .   *.    ������������������' ���������������  V %  : ' '        '  .  * YY     77~        ms ...  STORE OPEN,Sundays from 9'a.tn.>to*ioa.m.;v   '   ,    "��������� ������ '     ^ft  HI . :u,d from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.~t     '     ���������",'  ] " __: .' i)J       ���������  WgfesssgfcSHSiS'S'^^ ���������Sfe5@gferseg^"ggg@@������g^'"^f -.,  ���������������Dunsmuir Ave.;*- ^Cumberland,  B.C.   $h   *  FOR/S^LB:  MABLEHURST   FARM,  HORNBY     ISLAND,...  (comox district),  ** Containing��������� ���������  230   Acres.   ���������   200 Acres Fenced.  About 400 healthy Bearing 'Fruit Trees.  " 70 Acres cleared up good, and in crops  and hay land.  62, Acres cleared up rough,   but good  pasture. * * v  85  Acres bush���������easy cleared.   -  13' Acres chopped and burned oven  The whole of the-230 acres is excellent  land and will grow any kind of grain and  root crops. Ia suitable for beef, dairy or  sheep.  15,000 Cedar Rails in boundary and  field fences. <.  Large 7-roomed house���������water in house  2 Story Bank Barn, 32 by 75 feet. Sheep  Barn, Hen Houses, etc.  Buildings 5 years old. Abundance of  good water. Nearly 1 mile frontage on  Lambert Channel. 1% miles from Government Wharf.  Good Markets���������Cumberland (Union  Mines), Nanaimo and Victoria.  Good shooting ��������� Deer, grouse and  ducks' plentiful.'  Price, I  $6000  1-3 cash,  balance,  6 per cent.  Also, 246 Acres adjoining���������good land, at  $8 per acre.  Also, several   Good Grade Jersey Cows,  Heifers   to   calve, and Yearling   and  Heifer Calves.  Apply GEO.. HEATHERBELL,'_  Hornby Island.  .-,14-5-02:.  ~���������        -     _-  -STQTICE'IS HEREBY GIVEN that sixty  J)j days after date I intend to apply to the  Honourable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following Crown lands: com-  mencme at a post on the north, shore of  Otter Bay, Chatham Point, Vancouver  Island, thence west forty chains, thence  south forty chains, thence east forty  chains, thence along the shore to the  * point of commencement, containing 160  acres more or less. |  ALBERT FRANCIS YATES.  Nanaimo. B.C.,  Dated the 4th day of April, 1902.  iC-4 02    St  Advertise in tlie News.  Mil';.'  By PROF. SCHAFFNER  Tbe Old   " NEWS " BUILDING.  A remarkable cure effected. Cures baldness of long standing by the use of PEER-  LESS HAIR RESTORER and ELECTRIC  MASSAGE TREATMENT, both of which  combined destroy all germs and invigorate  the*roots which stimulates circulation of the tractive forces that feed the hair follicles.  ���������  From one to two months treatment  will Restore Baldness of long* standing  Daily Treatment $15 per month.  Parasites cause all hair trouble. Daudruff  is caused by a germ which saps the hairs  vitality. Vaseline and oils are of no benefit  to the hair, as dandruff germs thrive iu  them, as well as in all grease. To cure dandruff, which is preceded by, and a sure indication of, falling hair, it is necessary that  the dandruff germ be eradicated. From one  to three bottles of the Peerless Hair Restorer will cure the worst chronic case.  VIOLIN    TUITION.  PROF C.H. SCHAFFNER. conservatory graduate., has decided to locate permanently in  \ Cumberland is prepared to give  lessons,to a limited number of '  pupils on the Piano3> Yiolin and  voice culture. WHITNEY  BLOCK. i ;  LOST between Vendome Hotel and Butcher  Shop, on 1st inst., a Lady's BRACELET,  made up of 22 Spanish J reals.���������Finder  on returning same to "News" office will  be rewarded.    *v  FOUND, on Comox-Nanaimo wagon  road, a Double-Barrelled Breech-loading Shot Gun. Owner can have same  bv proving property and paying for  this advertisement��������� Marshall Laird  Union Bay, May 6th, 1902.  ':!  Y:Tl  * - J  ' -"-���������'*������  ii  ,r]  )t  i  ***  .u  ."Ml  m  In  x-ii  m  M  Air {I  m  m  pi  yt  ' Y  "ill  if!.

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