BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland News Jan 29, 1902

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xcumberland-1.0176525.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xcumberland-1.0176525.json
JSON-LD: xcumberland-1.0176525-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xcumberland-1.0176525-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xcumberland-1.0176525-rdf.json
Turtle: xcumberland-1.0176525-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xcumberland-1.0176525-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xcumberland-1.0176525-source.json
Full Text
xcumberland-1.0176525-fulltext.txt
Citation
xcumberland-1.0176525.ris

Full Text

 -A**' t    -*���������  ^irtiWi-VMw..  If'  NINTH YEAR.  CUMBERLAND';   B. C.    WEDNESDAY,   JANUARY 29,  1902.  h *  Dry  Goods,  '.    '"  ;<    .,''**������������������,���������  Carpets and  Rugs, /,     v  Linoleum,    I - ,  Matting,   r  '  '  " <���������,������ . '  Curtains,,    ,c  ^      House Furnishings,  Groceries, -  " '    -. Flour and Feed,  <     -j   ,  > ' Boots & Shoes,  r ^     1   *   Rubber Goods,  ��������� 1 -C* j  Gents.-Furnishings,/ Clothing.  ��������� Oomlimatioii'IronlBedi and Spriigirom  -* .���������������������������������������������-���������,      * ,*       ���������������-��������� ���������       ������  re^g8gg-a[������B15BB3nBBH^^  -Sg^^Sgge  6S-   <&*>!&."   JLV5-VJimJLH-*.M  '61 -YAT^S -STREET;    VICTORIA, B. C.   rf , S\  *������r'*   ' ^ HARDWARE.^MILL-X'N.D   MINING' MACHINER-Y,;  ^'|;.r \    ANbfFARMiNG^rANb^DAlRYING   IMPLEMENTS,  '-ta:������'   - --  OF-ALL'-klN-DS>:u-s'V'* ,'���������-��������� -V. ..*"  \   -  ������������������IV j* -" AgentstforMeCofinicli.Harvesting^Machinery..   .  ,   ���������^-���������������������������v^Vrite for pricAi-arid.paBic^lais:^Prb^Dra-w'er,'&oa.*-v---. ,     #���������-������������������?,-���������  SSSr  ���������t-     *4..  ��������� - re-  FOR  Igricultoal Report  .      **���������     ; >. ,  The sixth' roporfc* of 'the Depart**.)  rnent'  of   Agriculture,' 1900,   has  * ' S* '   < ''  recently   been    issued'   from"' the  r       * 1 T  Government  Printing Office, -Vie-,  ,zt   -1 -   -  tor 1 a: .   The"  report   is - profusely  .illustrated, and the compilation1 of  the letter-press relating to farming  &c.6,  throughout  the Province,   is  1 .      (J, I >,  both valuable and interesting. The  report says'that:������������������' The production  of agricultural products throughout  the-Province-has   materially  in-  ���������*    ' l  creased-since the issue of the last  =���������   ''  ��������� -       ,   ' ���������      - j  report. . Root crops suffered'sever  ely-from   the depredations' of cutworms/     By ' means   of   Farmers'  Institutes a-sreat deallpf -valuable -  information on  farming  problems  has 'teen'1 promulgated throughout  .,'       - *   .  -     > ,'  the Province ".through ���������the  lnstru--  v    -        > ;      * ������ .   .,- '   , .   1  mentality of ,able (lecturers.,    The,,  ���������production of cereals, ''with the ex  'ception.ofsoats, -is not increasing."^  Land can be put >to more; profitable  use. '  Cigar tobacco is 'beirigrpro--  duced   in'increasing quantities/at4  j   ''       ��������� ,   - ' ,' );     *  Kelowna, where a cigar factory is in -  successful operation.-; ��������� The" produc-  ' - i   **        *''  tion   of* fruit is , largely increased. ^  Hop raising is still being carried on  Loid. Aberdeen's  ranch, near-vcr-'  ,nbn.     Some, of 1 ther Lower Frascr  growers have".abandoned'thehvpro-  duction.* .Co-operative dairying is  earnest attention. Clearing of lands  ,     *%  by the use of blasting powder ;is  bound to be the only efficient and  least expensive way of getting 'rid  of stumps. Forestry has had, alL  the attention bestowed upon it that  it is possible to.give with the limited means at command.,,.-  (rjciECErdin iirtTF, ,fir.-*egatoatisi ��������� WW. >.u if t ��������� m ���������'wwtgngur-x -e������Ma������am������!Crss?zzy-t  which   are" ornamental   as  ,well  and a source of lasting'pleasure.  We h we a most complete assortment-  Easy,  I NETS,  \CHINA  HAIRS,      LADIES' , DESKS.      MUSIC   CAB-  WORK    BASKETS,,      PARLOR    TABLES,  CLOSETS,    - HEARTH     RUGS,      'TABLE  COVERS,       FINE    CURTAINS,    '.TABLE . LINENS,  I'APKINS,    BUREAU, COVERS,    -TEA and DINNER  SILVER, WARE,       RODGERS    CUTLERY.  AND   BRONZE   ORNAMENTS   -E1S,  ���������i-llNA  \  Our Catalogue gi>s full information and Prices���������Free to you.  ���������WElCEK/   BROS, -  THE FURNISHERS,      \ ' VICTORIA, B.c  V  -  taken of Government assistahce'in  severaL localities for the,erection of  creameries:   ��������� - One; condensedMmilk  "factory, is'' in- operation at --Mission  -City._ 1 ne.imporfcatiorfiot pUiVbred  live  stockt from the" Eastern" provinces   have^been most successful.  The production of horned cattle for  beef is reported profitable in nearly  every section of the country. Dairy  cattle   have   increased    in   value.  Horses have been more profitable of  late, large, draught horses are most  profitable. Sheep are only produced  in limited numbers, being bred for  mutton only.     The swine industry  is capable of great expansiveness".  The imports  of  swine  and    their  -products  amount  to the value  of  nearly  a  million   dollars   yearly.  The production  of  poultry is probably one of the most' remunerative  branches of  agricultural industry,  and many breeders of fine poultry  are reaping a good harvest from a  comparatively small out-lay. Soiling crops and ensilage are, now receiving attention in many quarters,  and   we may,  ih  the near future,  look to a great accession of these  important   branches.      Dyking of  the rich delta lands of the Fraser is  being    successfully    pushed,    and  large  tracts ou   both sides of  the  river are now kept free from water.  The dyking operations of the lands  of the Kootenay have  been   abandoned for the present.    The raising  of the bounty on coyotes to $2 per  head is more highly appreciated by-  those   interested1.     The   Canadian  thistle is increasing.     Plum rot is  prevalent in,the humid  regions of  the Lower Fraser. .  The number of,  noxious insects has  not increased.'  neither  are   diseases   of   animals.  Experiment  stations   in. different  parts of the Province are constantly urged upon the attention  of the  Government,    and     the    Deputy-  Minister  recommends that one be  established in the neighbourhood of  Victoria, so as to be under the immediate supervision of the officers  of the Department of Agriculture.'  The analysis of soils requires most  1  Tlie Sew Council,   ���������  The Mayor and Councillors were  duly -sworn in by Magistrate  Abrams*,at their first convention  last week. They then went to business and among' communications,  read one from the, band committee  asking for the use of the Old School  Room for band purpopes. The re-  quest will no doubt be acceded to.  Mr Banks' application re/raise of  salary ras'laid over. .'" Mr. Nunms  was Jre-appointe I 'city clerk ; Mr  Banks,rpolicemahjrand Mrliornal,  scavenger! - '  ' In /connection -with--! the Old  School-house -thu "Council' intend  removing the building across the  street to the lot next, the "fire hall,  - if this lot can be procured frona'the*  Wei.  Col. Co.     The building Will"  then  be utilized  as a  band room'  ,     - - -T - *-   , ���������  and a gymnasium.   ., <   h  The   Electric /Light'   Franchise  By-Law - was ���������   reconsidered '   and  - , *-  finally passed)  LOCALS.  LEAGUE, OF  American . Sportsmen.  ' __ *  ' ' ' ' > -        ',  ' The object of this Association is  already' denned in the following  creed heading the constitution and-  by-laws. There '.is' every prospect  ;of a local chapter, being organised  ih this place.,~     ���������   , .    '���������,",'-,  r "The'Leag'ue of American-Sports-/  men is organised for the purpose-of  protecting   the   game .and     game  fisues; the song, insectivorous and  other innocent birds, not classed as  :, ,Rev. Mr Dodds has" gone on a  ���������visit .to Vancouver.  L * >  A magnificent sonvwas born to  Mr and- Mrs Pillsbury last week.  A  little  Btranger  also- came to"  stay with Mr'and Mrs Hunden.  - It  is the opinion of many^that  the newly elected Council are some  of our staunchest and best citizens.  ��������� -i  There has been quite a number  o  of patients received at the Cumberland Hospital during the last two  months, the majority of whom are.  '<��������� ,       it'1  rapidly convalescing under the skill  ful attention of our popular physi- ���������  cians and -attentive young nurses.  The hospital is still under the Blip-, -  ervisipn of Mrs Hall who- now, as ,  always, has proved.herself a careful ;,  and competent matrom ' *.  1  ' 1*.  ���������<t' ' i*^  Pianos.5���������Messrs Hicks ���������<$���������; Lovick  are offering for sale in  addition to"  the world renowned ."Chickering*"  and   Mason  &   Risch'pianos,'the  " Henry Herbert" in .walnut'case, _  7������ octaves, and new improved scale.  The price-is so reasonable that it is .  "now  within, the  means of * every'  family, wishing ar durable and perfectly toned instrument,- to secure   ���������  one,aslhey are'veritable bargains.'  A member of the'.firm1 will shortly _'  visit Union. ���������.,,."���������.       "     -     ���������-  Woodmen's Banquet:  "-'?  \<*  game birds.  Its prime object is to enforce  game laws, where such exist, and to  secure and enforce such laws where  not now in existence.  It aims to promote good, fellowship among sportsmen; to foster in  the minds of the people a love of  nature and of nature's works ; to  encourage the propagation of game  and game rishe=, and the re-stocking  of game fields and public waters.  To these ends it will act in unison  whh State, county and municipal  authorities who aim at similar  ends.  The, League of American Sportsmen   will  not   compete  with  any  other organiza ion that has similar  objects in view.     On the contrary  it desires to enlist the sympathies  of, and to co-operate with, all such.  The League of American  Sportsmen is opposed to excessive slaughter  of  game  and   fish,   under the  name of sport.     We are opposed to  the killing of any innocent bird or  animal, which is not game, in. the  name of sport, or in wantonness, or  for commercial purposes.  We are opposed, to the sale of  game and game fishes, at all times  and under all circumstances.  ,-We  believe in   reasonable bags.  We believe the killing of game and  the taking of fish should be limited  by law, not only as to seasons, but  that the bag for any one man, for a  day, and for a season, should be. defined by law.  We, as individual members of  this League, pledge ourselves to  work for the education of the public, and especially of our boys, on  the lines indicated above; to cooperate with' our officers, and with  State or municipal officers, in the  enforcement of game laws, whenever an opportunity offers."  ���������' The Cumberland Woodmen of the  World met'together*with friends at  a social banquetjn the dinirfg room  of the Union Hotel last Thursday,,  evening'and after disposing of a  generous and most appetizing din-v  ner which reflected the greatest  credit on the hostess, ^ Mrs - S. C.  Davis, spent a pleasant evening  enlivened with songs, anecdotes,  ��������� toasts, &c Mr T. E. Bate presided,  and this is enough to let people-  know that the affair was well chair-  c  ed. The Society is to be congratulated on the success of this their  first dinner here. The following is  the programme:���������  " The King "  proposed by T. E.  Bate, responded  to by H. Pullen ;  "President U.S.A.," proposed by J.  P, Struthers, responded to by G. W.  Clinton; " Woodmen of the World"  proposed by G. Clinton, responded  to by J A. Fraser;'," Wei. Col Co." ,  proposed by F. Ramsay, responded  to by G. Clinton, W. Johnston and  J. Kesley;   'Mayor and Aldermen,"  proposed by R. Shaw, responded to  by W.   Willard;   "The Governor-  General  of Canada,"   proposed by  G. W. Smith, responded to by Rev.  Mr Glassford; "Kindred Societies,"  proposed   by   0.  H.  Fechner,  responded to by G. Clinton, masons ;  Whyte, I O.Q.F.; Magn'one, Druids;  and  Robertson, K. of P.;   ���������'Prosperity of B.C.,"   proposed   by  T.  Banks, responded to by Rev. Mr  Cleland.; " The Ladie3," proposed  by 0. H. Fechner, responded to by  E. Barrett; "Prosperity of Cumberland," proposed by J. B. Mac-  Lean, responded to by C. H. Tar-  bell ; " The Press," proposed by C.  H. Tarbell, responded to by W. B.  Anderson ; ''Host and Hostess,"  proposed by C. Segrave, responded  to by S. Davis. Songs, &c, were  rendered in good style by F. Ramsay, 6. H. Fechner. C. Segrave, C.  Vater, R. Robertson and K. Pullen,  a  m  11  > ,.1  '���������>,  'I'  'j.    ���������   '*ft  ,   -'���������  i   '  ������������������    if  ,       \  -,-���������������������������--  t    ,   ,  J; .   /^  .)������������������      '    - r-  I9  "41  iit\  I*-  ������11  -H  ���������?f  m  \f r  1-- L  Mi  W  P m-T*ute*&j**i -\
���l��w-.S r* i,>UiA*it*t*JU *li *.w*-^i' tjM,A*.f*tf*4����ArjL-s*SS. 4.1*
���-^i-v.^^-Ai-sj^
���> J* _��*��-/iM1J&J&&Ffin>*i r K\,JT^vjr&ntvii
E^A.iUUri.fW-49'^-rie.t -W-tti-^'
i-jJi tj Jjw.1 ��w--k<-^-U*v---kij ^.��i.��-  ufciUi-i-J^j^Aj'^iMafc-tyii^iiv-i.
1
! ' <
X-SSwKU    EVERY    WEDNESDAY.  .
Subscription, $2 a year, in advance.
101. 38. Hit&erson. 3��&ttor.
\
o
!&" Advertisers who want their ad
changed, should get copy in by
12 a.m.. day before issue.
Subscribers    failing    to    receive    0Tiik
News regularly will confer a favor by, noti-
' fyiug t*ie  ��ffice-
r
Job Work Strictly O. O. D/
Transient Ads Cash in Advance.
<. OilPBILLS' .
DIRECT from lhe GB,OWEK to the CONSUMER
C. J. MQORE. ". Sola Agent
CIVIC    ELECTIONS.
The'   election    for    Mayor   last
Thursday resulted in,favour of Mr
Willard who defeated Mr ,Roe, his
' opponent, by 9 votes.    TheCouucil
for 1902 will thus be :��� Mayor, .W.
V Willard,   Aldermen���E.- Cain an, J*.
. Beidj R. Robertson, T. E.' Bate', -F-.
' Partridge, and M. Mitchell. School
Trustees���A.; H.   Peacey,'   TV-H;1
Carey, and H." Campbell were elected/Mr   Peacey  heading   the  poll-.-"
'   We   have  no  hesitation, and'take
' great;-pleasure* in stating that the
new l May or and Council will find
/  civic^affairs^in a most satisfactory
, state; upon - their  taking the  reins,;
and the public.will most .assuredly ,
endorseavote of thanks to the- last -
Mayor andCouncil for the exemplary
���way in which ,they have conducted.
the city business since taking office..
During the  past  year  many improvements   have   been .done    in
streets and other, .public .works, and,
yet there has been ho foolish or-un**
* *- i "���
���   necessary spending of money:. They;
will .'leave  a balahcein.hand,.and;
therel will be no fetters to trouble;.1
the newl board.     Thanks to Mayor-
.Carthew and "the.Councillors;. They
- met for the last'time in their-term,
last week, and the cordial manner
in which,a vote of thanks was passed for Mayor Carthew showed the
high esteem in which he was -held
by the Aldermen and public servants.
The usual quiet prevailing at the
bay was somewhat broken in upon
by a'little "tea party" indulged in
by some of the Indians that occas-,
ionally gather around. ^ Special
constable Hudson was around,and
took a hand-in.'the affair which
seemed to put rather a "vet*blanket " feeling over, the participators.
.Results���Fines-ranging from fiv.eto
fifty 'dollars""aiid .costs, with the'
'Joptiori of free board at the hotel de
Stewart for-from 30 to 75 days.      '
���   MUNICIPALITY
'-  " ��� of 'riui���, ��� -.      \    \^i. '
CITY -.OF  C U M JBERLAND ;-.
ftSAMAL" SM1IEBT,-
*-��    " r.    t     '
"The McMillan Fur & Wool Co.
have placed their .price' circular on,
file at our office for reference. ��� This
house'1 'has been-- established for
nearly 'a quarter of a century, and
shippers find their dealings with
them.-very satisfactory.   ,
PB.OCL.AMAT102-JS.
EXTENSION   RELIEF.   c
It will be gratifying to the public
to know that the collections among
the Company's employees' for the
Extension Relief Fund .reaches
near,$600, which will no doubt be *
materially .increased by the business men of the town. When the
fact that we ourselves have so late-
ly been badly crippled by two serious disasters, No. 6 explosion
and the burning of our best mine at
No. 4, is considered, the amount
reached is beyond expectation arid
shows two things���-that the town is
rapidly recovering, and that she is
peopled with a class of^ whole-souled
generous people.
I-        WHARF    NOTES. f
Transfer was in on Sunday for a
load of Coke.
S.S. Otter loaded a cargo of coal
for Victoria on Saturday.
Barge Robert Kerr loaded 1800
tons of coal for Vancuuver.
S.S. Tepic'and scows have made
three trips to Vancouver with coal
last week.
S.S. Wellington arrived on Wedr
nesday and loaded a cargo of coal
fo- the Treadweli Mines. .��� Douglas
Island.
Ship   " Glory of the Seas," Capt.
Ekren, arrived from San Francisco
on Thursday.   She will carry a, full
.cargo of coal to San Francisco.
T.U3   Ohobalis  and  scow took a
loud oi coke-; to Tan  Anda on Wed- ]
aesday.    ' Reports the gjiielter run-  |
ning   "full  blast"    and   business
looking up in consequence around
Van Anda.
[L-S-] t ��� -   ������    '     ,-'   J
HENRI G. JOLY de'.LOTBINIERE, j
.'-,,, . "CANADA,,   .    ''_   '   '
.. Povince of British-.Columbia , '
EDWARD VII., by the-Grace of God, of
- the United kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, KlNG, Delender
of the Faith, etc., etc., etc.
To our faithful the members elected to
serve in the Legislative Assembly of
our" Province of British Columbia, at
our City of Victoria^���Greeting-.
A   PROCLAMATION.
D. M. Eberts, ! WHEREAS We are
Attorney-General. - VI desirous and resolved, as soon as may be, to meet our
people of our Province of British Columbia, and to have their advice in our
'Legislature :
' NOW KNOW YE, that for divers
causes and considerations, and taking-
into consideration the ease and convenience of our loving- subjects, We have
thought fit, by and with the, advice of our
Executive Council, to hereby convoke,
and by these presents enjoin you, and
each of you, that on Thursday the twentieth day of February, one thousand nine
hundred and two, you meet us in our said
Legislature or Parliament of our said
Province, at our City of Victoria, FOR
THE DISPATCH OF BUSINESS, to
treat, do, act and conclude upon those
things which in our Legislature ol the
Province of British Columbia, by the
common Council of our said Province
may, by the favour of God, be ordained.
In Testimony Whereof, We have
caused these Our Letters to be made
Patent and the Great Seal of Our said
Province to be hereunto affixed :
*        ��� ������ ��� ���
Witness, the Honourable Sir Henri
Gustave Joly de Lotbinierk, K.C.
M.G., Lieutenant-Governor of our said
Province of British Columbia, at our
Government House, in our City of
Victoria, in our said Province, this Qth
day of January, in the year of our Lord
one thousand nine hundred and two,
and in the first year of our Reign'.
By Command, ���' ���   ;.
j:���'D./PRENTICE,
Acting Provincial Secretary.
25-l-'02.   2b ;
TRANSFER OF LICENSE.
T JOHN RICHARDSON, of the
1, WaVERLY HOTEL. Cumberland,
B.C., beg to notify the public that I have
this day, January 4th, 1902, Transferred
the License of the said Hotel to Mr
Samuel Shore, late of Wellington.
JOHN   RICHARDSON.
January 4th, 1902.
8 1*'02.    35
BECEIPTS.
.Cash on hand Jany. 1, 1901,
. Road Tax,  -        r,       - ���- " -
,Sidewalk Tax, -    .   "-
"Dog Tax,     .-      '���-.'.
t ' ' 4
"Real Estate Tax,
���Trade Licenses, -
���Scavenger,' -    -'
'Scale Fees, --."-,    -
��� $..  39 66
r "-270 ,00 .
-'    '.36'00,,
,% '' -6 oo,..
991  50
1601 25
- '; 823 25
��� ', 22 75
Currant   ancl   Sultana   Raisin   Cakes
....... .......10c. and 25c.. ,
' . ' *
*    J. --
Short    Bread    and     Chester    Cakes
 25c. and 30c. per doz	
Biiasmuir Avenue,
Cumberland.
��sg^ags����?^p.2-?^^
���/I
/-
<             *  .'  -               . $3790 41
Expenditure, . .-      ', - .-3775 27
���Gash on hand,   -     '- , , $    15  14
.(--.*,' ..
Due on Sidewalks,    -���" ,, $    86 00
-   , Due on Scavengering,   ..       25 00
'     '. -,    * Total,      -. $111  00
Accounts Owing���         , *      'i"
-''   E. P.riest.for Surveving', -' $ 12  Ko
S.vLeiser* for Nails, Coal
,    :  Oil, &c., .��� -'( - ' -      - , \" 3S 65
>"E. J. Prior & Co. for Scales,   ''    111 00
, '���        -                ���'     . Total,' $162  15
r f^-j^J-iaamnj**��a
-    EXPENDITURE. ��� '   ��- ,("
Election Accounijany. 190I $    22  50
Refund Road Tax ':<  -   26 00
1      *\ i
Isolation Hospital .'.'!.-. - ���    ���- 85 00
1 )bnation to No/6 Explosion* ' '   *
Relief ,. -   -.  25000-
2 Cai ts    90 00
I Horse  150 00
Harness * '  25 00
'Freight *  2 20
Repaiiing Stable  31 00
.Laying on Water at Stable.. 8 So
Solicitor's Fees '..... 25 00
Water Trough  20 80
Sundries  30 65
Advertising ( 74 50
Office���Auditor's Fee " 10 00
.     Clerk's Bond  6 00
Chairs  10 So
, Stationery and Post- -
age  , -31 90
Sundnes  2 2*;
Sidewalk      266 3 r
Fire Department.'  19 3s
Tools   1 75
Clerk's Salary  240 00
Drains  675 27
Refund Trade Licenses .... ' 6 65
Horse Feed and Repairs  113 20
T. E. Banks' VVages  720 00
Hornell's Wages  742 00
Light Account  48 75
Erecting  Sca'es       t      35 99
Refund Real Estate  3 60
$3,775 27
LAWRENCE W. NUNNS,
City Cj-kkk.
Jany- 131I1, 1902.
1 havCexamined all books and   vouchers and find the same to be correct.
HENKYF.  PULLEN,
Auditor.
15-l-'02    2t
TAX    NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN in
I** accordance with the Statutes, that
Provincial Reuenue Tax and all assessed
Taxes and Income Tax,: assessed, and
levied undei the Assessment Act and
amendments, are now due and payable
for the year 1902. All taxes collected for
the Comox Assessment District are due
and payable at my office, situate at Cumberland. This notice, in terms of Law,
is equivalent to a personal demand,by
me upon all persons liable for taxes.   '
JOHN BAIRD,
ASSESSOR AND COLLECTOR,
Comox Assessment District,.,
Cumberland Post-Office.
Dated at Cumberland 2nd Jany.,  1902.
8-1-'02.    4t.
Hardware,'
, 'Paints; , ' ,;   :
: -. 'V.^rnisltes,'"-.  "
���' -,���'.(    iWal'I '��� Paper;
" ������   Paint Brushes.,
.'CHEAP ."������;" : ���-.'.-
���.''''���'���'���D'qQ-RV:;r:',
':; '���: ���'-..'";'' MATS7
,.'   . - .' We "   ���;��� ���"'���"
��� ���   ���' , Have-
'J
1 hem
ivenne,,
GTuaberlaiid,
h
KQ  GZtriMTT.mf2UKU.TZ.TTLS
���t        1 t I
A. 'Hv-PEAGE Y; ;��et'CStatMer
���^������^^.-^v^^-sg
for; tH'At^oough;^try ^    ;, . ;'fe^
^��^&Z?Z-'   ^^^���=^^^^^^^^^^^^^-
WINTER'S-7 . "     -���
,   ' INSTANT ' '
CD UGH
C
\j RE,
it's a good one, and -reliable
FOll
miLDREN       AND       ADULTS.
Wc   are   selling   our  TOILET SOAPS   at   Cost  to   make
room. Finest   GLYCERINE   and   'CASTILE . SOAPS
Away'Down.
$1 STORE OPEN Sundays fioin 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.r
ML "    , -"���nc- n'om 5 P-m- t0 ^ P*m- ' ' l($L
(S   Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland,  B.C.   Ik
123 HASTINGS ST ,
Vancouver, B.C.
88  GOVEENMENT  ST.,
Victoria, B.C.
January 1st., 1902.
MESSRS GIDEON HICKS & CO.,   wish  all  their  Customers, a   Happy New
Year, and beg- to announce that in future they will trade under a new title, viz :������
1
�� Hicks & Lovick Piano'Co
The Management of The Hicks & Lovn_k Piano Co. is in exactly the same hands
as under the old title and all accounts are payable as usual.(
WHITE   'US    FOR    CATALOGUES.
JOMIffiAI.
u
-r|-w "-.-ww-^juP^* 1 ������*���*���-.��1
COURTENAY- 33.0.
Headquarters for Sportsmen in: the
Best Duck* and Pheasant Shooting
GROUNDS in the district. '...'���' ....    ������
MEALS PROM PTLY SERVED     .
The Best of������
WINES,'   liiaUOKS,
���i
Hand  SVIade Single
....MAltWmtiS...
$15, S20 and $25 for Rubber Trimmed.
Factory Harness $10, $12 & $18
and    CIGABS
 -In Stock.
"���' ���������" ;"'��������� ��� '^~"
������"���;���    BARBER SHOP, ...
In connection   with   the   Hotel.
D. W. "RICHARDS, Manager-
jP^Repairing Neatly Done
while you wait.
slT
n-pwwMii-1 -.i -ai-aw M^Lggv ;ei jim>jnium!nm<mmz*M*q
\
NOW IS THE TIME TO
ADVERTISE    IN
THE
a
NEWS.''
"i\
f\
1
!/'
III
ft
I
AW
Ik
m
wm'"	
U.*h^
���t'r'vi*,-;' <(���-.?.?*��������� j?r.-?ri
t*fy,-*?&,sV'tf:??7rT.:*''V'.!Z- K   4  V  -,-Ji ww  Tl--.^-*** "-<i������  'f  \    '   vv '4  C\ '  ���������K  I-   *���������  NINTH YEAR  I*  CUMBERLAND,   B. C.  .WEDNESDAY,   JANUARY 29,  r902.  TheBI  r  >\\  '->;  Dry  Goods, :        '    '  Carpets and  Rugs,  Oholeum,'   ' ;     '        ,  Matting, \   ,    '  ,   <    Curtains, ���������,  House Furriishings,  ,     ,,     (groceries,  1       Flour and Feed,  ���������, -   > * *        ��������� '    '  \ - Boots & Shoes,  "J 7' *   *" ^  , ,'"    '       ;       Rubber Goods,  Gents'. Furnishings,    Clothing.  .CpfflMnatianlronlBeraiiil SpriEg froni - $9.75-  ������������������  &  ^  HaBEBBBBBBMaBmW-^^  &<?gg5sess??g-  .SS-  ..- a-  eli;o  ehquf,.,'l&  P.,  ,;6TYAT������S STREET, ^VICTORIA, B.C.   v������  ; ��������� ��������� HARDWARE**-MILL AND/,MEN ING -- MACHINERY-,  V ,*!,AN D[ FARM1NG. ,AN D - DAIRYTNG" .IMPLEMENTS  -  OF- ALL, E*!N-DS>'-;<;- . V-A-   v-'' ~.\ - ; " , '- X< U,, J," ,,  'j-  v^     Agents-fqrMeCormick' Haryesting^Machinery-l - i  '-.  'v^.  C -11 iv'----Write-for pcic-^s and'p'.iHict/laiV^v'PrQ^brd.virer 503.-S,.--���������.  ,   fa      .   - ',      ��������� . --.,���������'.>      -      ������������������������������������..     -���������������������������'-. *.      ���������- -   -    -  18  f;  ft)  ,1.  :?  g5������SS@3S  FO'B  ?lit ART  ^Agricultural Keport.  ' The sixth' report of 'ttie Depart-^  ~".     ~-1     7  rnent   of * Agriculture, '/1900', " has'  r ' < I  recently   been    issued    from'' the  Government  Printing Office, -Vic-  ���������v - -j ������������������    ,  tor ia.     "The   report   is   profusely  illustrated, and the compilation1 of  the letterpress relating to farming  cfec,   throughout  the  Province,   is  both valuable and interesting. The  report says that:���������" The production  of agricultural products throughout  the - Province   has   materially  increased  since the issue of. the last  report. ,( Root crops suffered sever  ely from ,'the depredations of.'cut-i  worms.  ,' By   means   of   Farmers'  Institutes a great deal of valuable  information on  farming*, prdblenis  , ������' >~       .' <     "*'������,���������  nas   been   promulgated'throughput  'the Province  through ithe  instru-  -. -     '*'"       ->  mentality of  able'lecturers.     The  ���������    '    <-      ,.-*���������> *    .  production' of cereals, ��������� with,the ex '  ceptiori. of oats,' is not increasing."  Land can be put to'more profitable  -use.' ''/Cigar tobacco is - being'"pro-  ���������duced   in. increasing -quantities 'at  ���������Keiowna, where a cigar.factory is in'  successful operation. 'The produc-  i        t'   \ i.   .* ������������������  ,     /-. '���������*  tion  of fruit  is  largely increased.  Hop raising Is still being carried on  Lord Aberdeen's' ranch,- neaiviVer-  non. Some of* the "Lower Fraser  growers have, abandoned'their/pro-,'  due tion. .Co-operative dairying is  finding more iavor withthe farmers  generally, and-:,advantage -is-being  takehr'bf Government 'assistance'iri <  seyeral localities for. the^erecdoivof  earnest attention. Clearing of lands  h}' the use of blasting powder is  bound to be the only efficient and  least expensive way of getting rid  of stumps. Forestry has had all  -���������the attention bestowed upon it that  ,it is possible to give with the limited means at command. .���������  The lew Council,  The Mayor and Councillors were  duly sworn in by Magistrate  Abrams at their first convention  last .week. They then went to business and among communications,  read one from-the band committee  asking,for the use of th^Old School ���������  -Room for band purposes. The request will no doubt be acceded to.  Mr Banks'' application re raise  of  **������������������������������������ x   i        i ���������  salary ras-laid'over.    -.Mr Nunnis  *" f v r  was  re-appointe I   city .clerk ;   Mr <  Banks; policeman; and Mrliornal,  scavenger.      ' .    ,'"  . In connection with the Old  ' School-hou3e thu Council intend  ���������removing the building across'.the  street to the lot next the fire hall,  if tin's lot can be procured from.the  Wei. Col-. Co. The' building will  then be utilized as a band room'-  and a gymnasium. '       ,    ,'"'���������  The1 Electric   Light    Franchise*1  By-Law   was     recoiifcidered     and  finally .passed.  LOCALS.  -   Rev. 'Mr Dodds has1 gone* on a<  visit .to Vancouver.  LEAGUE   OF  American   Sportsmen:  creameries:!:- --'Ohe'-. cohdensedkfmilk  ^^  .which -are   ornamental   as  ,well  and <t source of lasting pleasure.  X. ' - *  We h \ve a most complete assortment���������  EASY, CHAIRS, LADIES' DESKS. MUSIC CABINETS, l WORK BASKETS,, PARLOR TABLES,  CHINA CLOSETS, HEARTH-RUGS, TABLE  COVERS, FINE CURTAINS, '.TABLE . LINENS,  ,NAPKINS, BUREAU COVERS, VTEA and DINNER  SEIS, SILVER -WARE, RODGERS CUTLERY,  CHINA   AND   BRONZE   ORNAMENTS "   ..  Our Catalog-iie gives full information and Prices���������Free to you.  "W'IEIIjIEIR,   BROS,  THE FURNISHERS, VICTORIA, B.c  W(  FOR   NEXT   20   DAYS.  offer  S hirts:;  H ats,  M en's  and  ............ Boys' Clothing at..........  INSPECT OUR STOCK AT,  C; J. MOORE'a  live c stock  from'the Eastern ,Pro-  1    - i**  vinces have^been most'sucoessful.  The producti on * of horned cattle for  beef is reported1 profitable in nearly  every section of the country. Dairy  cattle1 have increased in value.  rHorses have been more profitable of  late, large draught horses are most  profitable. Sheep are only produced  in limited numoers, being bred for  mutton only. The swine industry  is capable of great expansiveness".  The imports of swine and their  products amount vto the value of  nearly ��������� a mihioi? 'dollars yearly.  The (production of poultry is probably one of the most remunerative  branches of "agricultural industry,  and many breeders of fine poultry  are reaping a good harvest from a  comparatively small put-lay. Soiling crops and ensilage are now receiving attention in many quarters,  and we may, in the near future,  look to a great accession o'f these  important branches. Dyking of  the rich delta lands of the Fraser is  being successfully pushed, and  large tracts ou both sides of the  river are now kept free from water.  The dyking operations of the lands  of the Kootenay have been abandoned for the present. The raising  of the bounty on coyotes to $2 per  head is. more highly appreciated by  those interested. The Canadian  thistle is increasing. Plum rot is  prevalent in the humid regions of  the Lower Fraser. The number of  noxious insects has not increased,  neither are diseases of animals.  Experiment stations in different  parts of the Province are constantly urged upon the attention of the  Government, and the Deputy-  itlinister recommends that one be  established in the neighbourhood of  Victoria, so as to be under the immediate supervision of the officers  of the Department of Agriculture.  The analysis of soils  requires, most  \ The object of this Association is,  already ' defined" in   the  following  creed  heading the constitution and  by-laws.     There/is-every prospect  ' of a, local chapter, being organised  in'this place.        '      "  'T '-The "League of American Sports-.  men is organised for the purpose-of  protecting   tlie   game   and    game  fisnes; the song, insectivorous and  other innocent birds, not classed as  A magnificent son -was born io  Mr and Mrs Pillsbury last week.,  r A  little  stranger, also came to  stay with Mr and Mrs Hunden.  It is the opinion of many that  the newly elected Council are some  of our staunchest and best' citizens. '  There has been quite a number  of patients received at the Cumberland'Hospital during the last two  *    '   --   /  months, the majority of whom are  rapidly convalescing under the skill  ful attention of, our popular physicians and attentive" young nurses.  ' Thehospital is still under the supervision of Mrs Hall who now, as^  always, has proved herself a carefulJ ^  and competent matron.  PiANOS.���������Messrs Hicks & Lovick  are" offering for sale in  addition to  the worlds renowned.'/Chickering " '  and  Mason  &   Risch  pianos,  the1  "Henry Herbert", in walnut case, V  7^ octaves, and new improved scale.  The-price is so reasonable that it is  ' now1 within ��������� the   means of   every  family, wishing a durable and perfectly toned instrument^ fo" "secure \ ,  one, as they are veritable bargains:v  A;member of the' firm will shortly  .visit Union.     '.-, ��������� ' '  ,r  Woodmen'i" Banquet.  game birds,  lis prime object is to enforce  game laws, where such exist, and to  secure and enforce such laws where  not now in existence.  It aims to promote good fellowship among sportsmen: to foster in  the minds of the people a love of  nature and of nature's works ;' to  , encourage the propagation of game  and game fishes, and the re-stocking  of game fields' and public waters.  To these ends it will act in unison  with State, county and municipal  authorities who aim at similar-  ends.  The League of American Sportsmen   will  not   compete  with  any  other organiza ion that has'similar  objects in view.     On the contrary  it desires to enlist the sympathies  of, and to co-operate with, all such.  The League of American Sportsmen is opposed to excessive slaughter  of  game  and   fish,   under the  name of sport.     We are opposed to  . the killing of any innocent bird or  animal, which is-.not game, in the  .name of sport, or in wantonness, or  for commercial purposes.  We are opposed to the sale of  game and game fishes, at all times  and under all circumstances.  We believe in reasonable bags.  ' We believe the killing of game and  the taking of fish should be limited  by law, not only as to seasons, but  that the bag for any one man, for a  day, and for a season, should be defined by law.  We, as individual members of  this League, pledge ourselves to  work for the education of the public, and especially of our boys, on  the lines indicated above; to cooperate with our officers, and with  State or municipal officers, in the  enforct-ment of game laws, whenever an opportunity offers."  ,    The Cumberland Woodmen of the  -  World' met-Hogether, with friends aV-  a sqcial.banquet in the dining room'" ,  oi< the Union Hotel last Thursday^,  evening' and after  disposing of' a  generous and most appetizing dinner  which   reflected    the   greatest  credit on the hostess,  Mrs * S.  C.c  , Davis, spent a   pleasant   evening -  enlivened   with   songs,   anecdotes,  ��������� toasts, &c.   Mr T. E- Bate presided,  and  this  is enough to  let people  know that the affair was well chaired.    The Society is to be congratulated on the success of this their  first dinner here.   .The following is  the programme:���������  "The King"   proposed by T. E.  Bate, responded  to by H. Pullen;  "President U.S.A.," proposed by J.  P, Struthers, responded to' by G. W.  Clinton;" Woodmen of the World'-1  proposed by G. Clinton, responded  to by J. A.-'Fraser;'" Wei. Col Co."  proposed by F. Ramsay, responded  to by G. Clinton, W. Johnston and  J. Kesley;   'Mayor and Aldermen,"  proposed by R. Shaw, responded to  by,W.   Willard;   "The Governor-  General  of Canada,"  prupoeed by  G. W. Smith, responded to by Rev.  Mr Glassford; "Kindred Societies,"  proposed   by  O.   H.   Fechner,  responded to by G. Clinton,'masons ;  Whyte, I O.Q.F.; Magnone, Druids;  and . Robertson, K, of P.;  ' ���������' Prosperity  of B.C.,"    proposed   by  T.  Banks,   responded to  by Rev.  Mr  Cleland.;   " The Ladie3," proposed  by O. H. Fechner, responded to by  E. Barrett;   "^Prosperity of Cumberland,"  proposed by J. B. Mac-  Lean, responded to by C. H. Tar-  bell;   " The Press," proposed by,C.    -  H. Tarbell, responded to by W. B.  Anderson;    "Host  and   Hostess,"  proposed by C. Segrave, responded  to by S. Davis.     Songs, &c, were '  rendered in good style by F. Ramsay,   0. H. Fechner. C. Segrave, C.  Vater, R. Robertson and K. Pullen,  !?  I!  .'f  r!  11  ' - ���������  n  *   t.  'o k  1 " hi  "-���������-  * -,  ft srtl I*,   8  t- f  \   ���������  i   ',  *.. 1  U  1M  it  > e  ���������(,  U -;i  \(:i  hS  N -  1-i-ntS  "ft  |8-f-  I  :  111  j  I--  1 i ������  ODOESS  <*  of Africa.  ��������� ��������� ���������  A Story of the Golden  Fleece.  ��������� ��������� 0  By ST. GEORGE RATHBONE  mmeommmmmmmmmmmmoct* mm  ".Tim. Jim Bludsoe, is it you'?'  'And the wild looking savage .with  --iVho.-ii. he liacl been'fencing so desperately in the attempt to have his life  ���������Btatrfi-crcd hack and dropped li is own  ���������w.-XKipon  while ho cried: "  ."The devil! It's Mr. Hastings,  sure pop!"  At this 'a couple of figures' ran forward, bursting through -the sheltering' bushes. ; ,  No need to toll Kex who they were,  for tho one in  the lead  was  tall   .of  .form,    'with     t'he     figure   an   athlete  .might envy.  Another .moment and he. found the  parms of the Knglishman around him  ������n spite of the paint, and paraphernalia that went to make a full-Hedged Zambodi warrior out of him, and  fi--)icily of,a gqnuine bear  "'.ludsoi: danced around  .��������� ing* to''imitate the ec-  iros and hops of. a war-'  -rior preparing to go upon the -warpath; "and Little l-'hil stood near by,,'  -evidently'in sympathy v/ith it all.  This-was an event'worthy of being,  celebrated--���������an event'to be marked in  the   calendar   of   their   lives   with     a  white cross. - r    .  '  From despair they 'had suddenly  -"found .reason for the wildest hope,  .and     "Rex     gave  his   artist  friend  as  their  recovery   would   be     almost     a.s  sudden as their colli*.pse.  When the fire-fiend died low, and  only ashes remained to mark the  site of the kraal, the voice of the  vindictive and stout-hearted Ilas-  sa.ic' would make itself heard in the  land,   calling    aloud     for    vengeance  were  curse  primarily  that had  res-  fall-  ���������cnjoyed thr*  hug:   \v-  ���������them en.   ��������� .  centric --'ge'si  upon those who  ponsible for the  en_upon  them. '        ,  Then would begin ' a * pursuit that  might continue to the voiy stockade  of Uuluwayo. for these Zambodi warriors know litUc what fear in war-  fnre means. Zulu braves have proven  that in more than one fierce battle  with British regulars; p.nd theJ:lood  of a young Prince of France was  consecrated by the assegais of these  hard lighters.  '-Looking backward occasionally  they could see tha,t the conflagration  \'va.v growing gradually less in volume, as the lodges became more  scattered.  , The work had been accomplished,  and when 'the shock of desolation  passed away they could expect to  have a desporaU' pursuit inaugural ed.  -..Still on horseback they would bes  in a position to defy the most ' de-  'termined of foes, provided they  avoided' pitfalls and ambuscades, for  which these Zulu tribes are noted���������a  trap is their usual means of- securing game, and in war they naturally  apply the same tactics with-a view  to exterminating their foes. '  The high  spirits     consequent     upon  the  success  oi  their  plans, .were not  destined to hold out!  '   Kex     saw     that     something , was  GUS' SATISFACTION.  wrong when  a halt  goo'd a thing in-the line of a bear hug  ," -as  he received. ���������    ���������  . "This is a miracle ��������� we had rea-  ���������son' to believe yGu migh't be in that  Ihouse they were bombarding.' but' I  -never* dreamed you had changed to a  Zambodi,"  declared 'Lord   Bruno.'  "And how came you here���������where  .-are the others, Monsieur Jules, the  ���������-doctor, ,Ked Eric?'' asked Hex, as a  -ihorrible suspicion flashed over him  etbn.t these brave fellow adventurers  ���������might have, met the fate that ever  i'hangs over .those .who invade hostilg  Hands. ' 4       ,_  "Don't    worry���������-the   boys   are "   all  right.     We were,-to  meet  them    here  after they had set fire to the kraal."  ���������"What!  Was that" your work?"- ,  **I rather, think you got in" ahead of  the boys. When 1 saw the fire balls  popping over tho stockade' I knew* it  'Whs all day with tlie whole business.  What* a grand sight, Kex. Perhaps  some day we may paint it- between  us. ' It would make a scorcher for an  exhibition. But tell me, my dear fellow, is this young girl with you the  party, known as the fair god of the  Zambodi?" i    -  Lord     Bruno's    voice    took    on    a  suvin   of  eagerness  and  anxiety,     as  * he turned toward the party in whom  Jie was so deeply interested.  Slefore Rex could make a reply sev-  ->eral figures loomed up close by, a  .-signal was uttered, and upon Bludsoe  -answering, who should. advance but  /llc-d  f-iric and his two companions.  "The' old cabin's-a wreck���������-couldn't  i-locate 'em that- ������������������-- must have skedaddled,   T - reckon. t  But   they  set fire  to  ." t- e  pesky 'kraal  with   theiu  fireworks  b. f .re  we could  use a   match    Glory,  (! ives  a fellow a  can  expect  aftortile cowboy,  the addition   ' to  fxjtitt  see  tasxe  of  it scorch,  what  he  wards," -Tattled off  Then  he    noticed  was called,' and  Lord Bruno entered into an* earnest  discussion1 with   Bludsoe. *    ���������<  Tho latter struck a match and  dropped to' the ground, as , if bent  upon an  examination. '      * ,  Then he ' used some strong  language.   '      . '      ,,"'*':  VWhat's wrong?" asked Hastings,  hurrying to where   they stood.  "The bosses are gone!" replied  the cowboy.  ' Here was  a  fearful calamity,     a.nd  while  Ilex  could   not grasp   its r  full  scope as'readily as   tho. prairie rider,,  he realized  that an   exceedingly grave  condition  confronted  them.  To 1)0 afoot in this African wilderness, with a whole tribe of enraged,  warriors hunting high and low for  them, was a slate of affairs calculated  to   alarm   the   boldest. , r ,  it must needs bo. something beyond the ordinary that could make  Jim Bludsoe frewn and shake his  head.  A closer examination .was made.  This   only   served   to   confirm,     the,  facts.. .   however    disagreeable     -they-  'might  appear.    -  '   -  Home cunning enemy had-' either  seen them hide Lhe animals** or else  by a' mere' accident had run across  them. '        . , '������������������.-'  At any rate 'the* Jiorses were gone,  and it would be useless looking for  them.     ���������  But for the presence of the young  girl the air in (hat neighborhood  would ha\e been-fairly sulphurous,  such was, the rage of Bludsoe and  Bed   Erie.  The   doctor   homg    a  took   things  as   they   <���������  a   disciple  of  might   have  philosopher,  ���������ame.   much   as  the   prophet   'Mohammed  done:   and   Little     Phil  We'll skip it,, reader; for it would look  neseemly to begin a story, with an oath  like that Gus Gurley swore, standing  over his wife's dressing table that morning. And Gus wasn't a swearing man  either. ,   <.  How came he', then, to commit such a  breach of etiquette and othics? " "Well,  may be you wouldn't have done it; but  don't be ,too sure till you've heard enough  to be able to "put yourself in his place."  Imagine a young husband :of six  months' standing, ardent, fond and trusting, casually entering his wife's dressing-room in her absence, and stumbling  on a mischievious-looking, rose-colored  note, freshly opened, a cupid nr every  crease, and ��������� a lurking lock of another's  hair*���������red���������peeping stealthily from its  folds.!  The very paper blushed guiltily as  Gus caught it up. Eagerly and -wildly  his eyes ran over the contents. For "a  moment he stood amazed and metion-  less, and then broke out���������. But we've  promised to skip that. Perhaps any  .other man would have given utterance  to as much, reading such,a missive as  this, addressed to his wife: '    ,  " Affinity, Aug. ��������� th, 18���������,  "Dkakest Kate :���������How  could you ko and  marry that great hulkv   follow behind my  back, and without a word of notice ?  "ThoiiRli I've returned too late to forbid tho  bans, I'm atill In time to give that lord and  -master of yours a hint���������which I mean to do-  that an older love than his won't quietly suffer  another to monopolize its rights. ������  ' "ISxpoct me by Monday, and keep a kiss for  '"���������Sour ever affectionate      Sam Smcth." \  Smith! Smith! Sam Smith! ��������� Faugh!  What a name! Had , it been Brown,  Jones or Robinson, there might have  been some bearing it. But Smith! And  red-headed, too! "Frailty, thy name is  woman!" Yet it might bo that Smith  "was some presuming puppy, whose vile  epistle was the sheer result of his' own  impudence.- But no; tne .wife- that  could receive such a communication and  conceal it from her husband could not.  be else than false.   "  Smith's heart's blood was the-very  ' least atonement the case admitted' of.  Had Gus been more collected, he might  probably have bided his time aud taken  his peace-destroyer unawares and then  "tripped hiin," trusting to an intelligent jury and proof of a mental alibi to  bring him out all right. But he was  not sufficiently rational'for that,<aud so  ���������adopted tlie foolish plan .of, summoning  Smith to mortal combat. ' ' -'    .'  Gus had a friend,' Captain   Borax,   a  retired quartermaster, thoroughly .versed  in points of honor.   The   captain was  ���������just the man for the'emergency; but, as1  ill'luclc would have it,' he   was   out ? of  ,tp\vn for the day.  , That no time might be  lost,   Gus demanded satisfaction by mail,  directing  his challenge to the address indicated in  the caption of Smith's, note: and fixing  a time and place" at' which his friend,;  -Captain  Borax, would. be prepared to  coufer with "any friend' of Smith's.    At  the'same time a brief message  to Mrs.,  Gurley explained' that important busi-*  ness necessitates her husband's absence  for. the' nextT tew 'days." .Moanwhile,  Gus took up' quarters   at   an obscure  country inn,  leaving everything to the  management of the captain,  whom he  had succeeded   in finding at last, and  who, proud to be sought for such a service, promptly repaired to the appointed  rendezvous, where  he was punctually  met by a friend   of  Smith's.    The preliminaries were speedily settled, and a  meeting was arranged for the following  The combatants were to stand back to  back, and, at a signal, to wheel and fire.  Gus had already taken his place, and was  struggling, manfully but' doubtfully,  against an inclination, . will-nigh  irresistible, to leap over an ' adjacent hedge, and run* as fast and  far as his legs could carry him,< when'  an exclamation from the captain caused  him to turn his head.  "In Heaven's name, who's that?" said  Captain Borax, accosting the fellow-  second, in the act of conducting a young  and beautiful lady to the very spot destined for Smith.' ���������    *���������  '��������� My principal, gentlemen, Miss Sam-  antha .-mith���������'Sam Smith,' as' she's  callr*'' Air short.' the other answered.  ,G d'saw it all. Flinging down the  p::-'.ol, he rushed forward, and' would  certainly have hugged and kijjsed " Sam  Smith," without ceremony, if her sec-,  ond���������no other than her affianced lover  ���������hadn't looked like a chap that' would  stand no nonsense. * As it was, no man  was ever equally pleased ,by, the discovery that he had made an ass of himself. .     '  The-lock of hair was the only puzzle  unexplained, and " Sani " soon cleared  that up. It.svas one of Guy's own, given  long before to Kate as a souvenir.  " Sam " had stolen it, to tease her friend,  and had 'taken the method we have-seen  of returning it.' Of course it wasn't red,  but auburn.,        ''  t "Sam " and her .'friend .went home  with Gus,,first solemnly promising, as  did the captain to keep the secret, and.  above all, not to lot, Kate know; but,'  bless you, such things ahvays"do get out.  J To  I tad It'lJa<r        '      '     -' -  , Isaac'!Newton was very absent-minded  Sometimes, after arising in the morhing.'  he would often sir.'with ono leg ,in- his  ���������breeches, and thus remain for hours con  side-ring   some- mathematical problem,  ..zyj.thout ev- thinking of r.he-other lea.  .Norwegian, fishery commissioners have  been measuring the salmon's leap by  means of standards erected below water- ",  falls. They have found that the fish can- ,  leap to a height of twenty feet.   , jf*  A horse owned in a Kentucky town haT ,  developed  carnivorous inclinations.     He  rejoices in dining on spring chickens and   ���������  recently ate-fourteen, for a square meal.  ',  ���������' He does not stop to remove the'feathers.  ' There   i3   a   quaint   little   fish   which  .haunts the .weed tracts of the gulf stream tr  .and   there   builds  its   nest  and,, lays   its '  eggs like a bird 'rather than a fish.   This  ' uuimal. the antennarius, imitates ' ih  color the" weed it. lives'in and, like'the  chameleon, constantly changes its color.  ,One kind of, wasp found in Brazil and  ,Guiana makes its nest of a brilliant  white pasteboard, suspending it'from the-  highest branches" of the tree so as to es-  iCape the attention of the monkeys; which  in those' "regions have a troublesome  habit  of ' investigating  everything,   even  'a hornet's nest.  A, LITTLE  FISH  STORY.  The  Solid  vtheir number, and when his eyes fell  ���������. on 'Maid Marian he guessed, the truth,  '���������-for these independent cattle punchers  ���������--.ire quick as lightning.  "Say, that must be -Mr". Hastings.  "This here is quite a neat surprise;  -and the pai, too. Well, if we uns  know what's' good for us, we'll le-  \ant cut of this cussed country like  jack   rabbits  before a  pcrairic fire."  His  advice was  as sound  as  a  nut  jand all of them anpreciated  the fact.  ���������-Lord    Bruno made   no effort   to ad-  c- dress   the  girl.  The   first   thing   to   be  * done was  to male- aood  their o'-*c*p.*.  . unci once  this hud  i*e--u olTcclo.l minor  matters could be easily Hot I led.  So they quitted the hltle gin do that  -'hod  come  so  near   be ing   I!.������.-  scene  of  - a desperate hand-to-hand  combat   be-  xwee:'.   two   friends   t*i   dc-p   disguise,  'turning   their   backs ' on   the   burning'  -village.  All   th*s   had  occurred   iiv less   time  and  around  : height,  slipping.  general  (1 good.  were  the  seldom   made   himself   heard.  Lord ilruno shouldcre.'Lthe blame,  drdnring that it was pretty much  his fault ��������� Blud.'-oe had suggested  lea***, ir-g fonie on" 10 guard the pre-  cio;:s animals, but be had 'believed  q\ or;.' arui would be needed at the  kraal, in order to carry out their  design.-*.  Tin;  mischief   was   done,   the  horses  had -been   stolen.  to   them  and   now  to   make   a  it '  safe  re-  re-  out all there  ������������������than   it   takes   to   transcribe   it  , 'th e   excitement   within'  tlie   stockade   was   sLil!  so   that   their    ciuu:<*������*.  away' without bringiup;  '-.-.battle, with tlie native.-)  'Overhead    the    very    heavens  .���������---oirlow   with   the' rofiecUon    c of  and  jil. ii>  of  * on  a  SCO!no  terrible sea of /ire below, and to a  timid soul, so wonderful' was the  spectacle that so in e fears , might have  bi*en  amused as to  the destruction  of  'the   whole   universe   by   a     wave     of  '��������� ilanie.  Kex  immediately sought, the side of.  ���������'Alari-. n. Much as lie despised his ridiculous costume he could  not keep his  ���������distance.  At least she would not con-  -sidr'i- him. less a man  because circum-  .���������stnnces had .compelled him. to adopt  such a disguise, she who had been beside     him     when     he    wielded    that  i weight v  sword,   hallowed  by a    his-  '��������� tory connected with many a Scottish  bai t !���������������������������*��������� field   when   Highland   clan     and  muinod  treat.  i-raich emergencies bring  uuiy   be   in   a   mon.  Although Bludsoe was deeply mortified and inwardly furious at the  trick played upon ���������them, lie speedily  recovered himself and began to consider what was  best to  be done.  Under ordinary conditions it  would have suited him exactly .to  ha->g about the neighborhood. re-  ru.-'.inim; concealed from tho blacks.  ������;������������������'. il so.po i.'orsd opportunity aroso  n their hi*  >\v    ���������������������������<���������   -*.  1-  .!'���������  U>  any  the  J ,0 v.  nd  lord  pitted     their    strength  t   the hosts of Edward.  ���������-was  a   quality  essential     to  tu   this   game,   for     although  s   were  for  the  hour  appar-  ic-stricken   by   the   terrible  -that    had    befallen    them,  miw-i > t* reco\ereu  \\--s <ii:'*t rem���������Lord  i!r.;i'(i df-sirr-d to place as much distance between the destroyed kraal,  with .the vengeful Z-imbodi. and  th'-i,' o". :i pis-sons, as possible. Perhaps the presence oC Marian hud  something to do 'with' this; . At  -rale it was determined 'to' make  move.  J'.iudsoe.  was   fully   aroused.  Mo knew full well they would be  followed by a .swarm of eager vengeance seekers, and to throw these  trackers off the trail- it "was necessary that he-bring to bear all the  tricks learned in his wild .life along  the   Texan; border.  As they turned their backs upon  the silent-volcano which in the  ages gone by had been such.a factor  in the landscape of that country,  an outlet of the eternal, fires. Lord  Bruno managed to get Rex at his  side, in order to question him coh-  eeruing" the  girl.  What he heard seemed to give the  Briton, great satisfaction, for he  squeezed the hand of his companion  several  times.  As the time drew near, Gus grew nervous. The faot is. Smith's alacrity Had  taken him a little aback. " He had felt  quite confident, that that miscreant  would shrink from encountering the  man whose honor he had outraged. But  instead, without turning the word,  Smith's second had chosen pistols, and  named ten paces as the distance! It was  plain the wretch was as bloodthirsty as  unscrupulous. ^ Besides, Gus was no  shot, which Smith, judging from his  choice of weapons, no doubt'was. How  much better, Gus' began to think, to  have fled forever from the scene of His  un happiness, or to have invoked the benign aid cf the laws of South Dakota.  But it was too late now to retract.  From a troubled slumber, such as condemned criminals are apt to fall into in  the last hours of their last night, Gus  was startled by a sensation as of a bullet piercing his thorax. It was only  Captain Borax poking him in the ribs,  byway of reminder that hio "hour Had  almost come!"  In a brief space���������how very brief it  seemed���������they were on the fatal field.  At nearly the same instant a close carriage drove up, containing the enemy's  party.  Smith's second sprang out, closing the  door behind him. Ho took Captain  Borax aside, and the two held a hasty  consultation; which over, the ground  measured, pistols loaded, positions allotted, and everything in readiness, it only  remained to place the. men and give the  word. ���������     , ,  Trout   That   Was   Frozen  ���������For Eleven   Years.  Ir. 1873 I was.residingat Junction City,  A pretty little town located iu a romantic  spot on the "banks''of Mill creek in  central Wisconsin.   The country at that time  was new,, and fish and game wercplenti-"  ful.    Mill creek'was at,the time famous  ns a trout stream, it,' being .no ..trouble 'at  all to catch fifty pounds of speckled trout  in a half day's fishiiig.    On Feb. 15, JS73  ���������I remember that date because it was  my' twenty-first   birthday���������I   took  down  my rifle and struck out into the forest for  the.purpose of killing a deer." I had wandered-along the banks of the.stream for a  distance of perhaps two miles when, I ran'  on to an old hunter-who had cut a hole In  the ice, through which' he was fishing for  trout.    He was meeting with great success, for .scattered all  around  him could*  be seen the speckled -beauties,,'where he  had thrown them as he took them off his  hook.  I was invited to help myself, which  invitation  I   clie'erfully   accepted, ' and   I  proceeded to" put a number'of the fish in  my gamebag.   " v     ���������}     -     *���������; ..-.,",  Tt was just 4:47 o'clock when I-.retnrn-  "i'd Upiue that arcernoon.'jLired and hungry,  and after hanging up in'y rifle took one of  'the largest of the trout and placcd.it out  iu 4i large cold storage 'warehouse that  stood near my house, intending to present  it to Uncle Sam Carson'for his breakfast  the next morning. The fish was forgotten and, as a result, lay in that warehouse solidly'frozen until June 10,' 38S4.  Now comes the strange ipart of my story.  On the night of the date last mentioned,  just about eleven years after this fish had  been placed in the cold storage, the building was totally destroyed by fire.' During the process of the fire the fire department, in the effort to save the property,  had thrown sufficient-water to fill up the  cellar, which, by the way, was walled up  in rock and cement and was therefore  water tight. Three years later it was decided to rebuild the cold storage warehouse upon the site originally occupied,  and men were set to work pumping the  water out of the cellar, which the rains  bad kept well filled. To our amazement  447 fair sized speckled trout were taken  out, besides the old one, which had evidently fallen into the cellar at the time  the warehouse was destroyed, thawed  out and spawned. The original trout was  easily identified, one of its eyes having  been accidentally knocked out and a part  of its tail broken off before it was placed  in the warehouse.  Lioncton   Is   Built   on .Sj������ong;ea.  Tho sponge which you see iu the shops  ready''for'toilet use or which, you may  chance to observe when dragged from its  .holdings in shallow water does not strike  you as likely to form a very solid foundation for building purposes. Yet .London  is built on sponge. - "���������    ���������   ,  "  Of   course, the   statement   requires' a  little explanation. 1 The flint that forms  the substratum of London so������l is'nothing but petrified sponges;  if j-ou examine   tho  fossil   sponge,   or  flint,*; with   a  glass, you can  see the structure 'of,tho  animal.    They.are .in layers.-        ���������    ��������� , ���������  ' In the .southeast 0"  England  the flint  is found under the chalk beds, but in the  'Thames valley the, water,has gradually  washed away the chalk-and, left the flint.  ."As   hard "as   flint,"   although - perfectly  correct,   sounds " rather - strange ,in   the  light, of the above facts.'*   '    ���������    ���������'  t ,  , Orl-glnnl. Home  of Golf.  - The Scotsman contends that golf fa  Scotch sport - to .which poetical reference  'was madeiin^'Adamson's "Muses Threuo-  die." published at-Perth as'long ago as  1C38.' The terms used "in the sport-are  for the most part,Scotch. -'But'the'Dutch  assert that it was first played in'Holland  on the ice, ,and .before 1G3S the Dutch  poet Bredero, described how "the golfer,  with ice,spurs,on, stands ready to smite  with ashen club weighted with lead-or*  his,,Scottish cleek ���������of the leaded box."  But while this, may be the earliest poetical - reference, to the game, it does not  show-that Holland is' the original home  of golf. "The reference to; the "Scottish-  cleek"'seems'at first sight to point rather  to Scotland.- *      ' /*;.  Bl������r  VUitlnjr Card*. ,<*.,  In   Korea  visiting, cards -measuring r  foot square are' in vogue.'   The sayagesr  of   Dahomey   announce --their" visits   to  each'.other   by   sending, in ��������� advance' a  wooden   board  or'the  branch of/a-tree  artistically   carved.\ "When.the   visit  is,  paid^ the "card'^returns to the possession  of'its owner/'who probably uses it,for,]  many  years.''  The -natives  of ���������Sumatra'^  use-for-n-risiting"card" a-piece "of wood,'  about a foot long decorated with1 u bunch  of straw and a knife.    -.  ANIMAL ODDITIES.  A  Kindly Inquiry.      "���������'  Fairlie ��������� Jack-;    have    you    that  pounds I lent you the other day?  Flyntie���������Not all of it, old chap;  what I have will do me a day or two  longer. Jolly kind and thoutrhtful of you  to inquire'though.  ten  but  Unless a girl gives a young man a private lecture on'economy occasionally she  doesn't .take much interest iu him.���������Chicago News.  Mosquitoes and other gnats furnish  utmost the sole food for a very large  family, of insect eating birds known as  flycatchers.  Mosquitoes are not, as is popularly  supposed, a hot climate insect.' They are  tar more numerous in places where the  winters are severe.  The age of fishes can be told by their  scales. These show under the microscope  stripes -similar to the hands in tho crosscut of a tree, which indicate the age of  the fish.        ������������������*���������'���������.  TWO   LOVES ,OF A  SAILOR.  Oh, an old n"Mi sat and blinked i" the sun.  And a son;-; v,f the sea sang he. ���������    .  Hp sang a scnig- of a /hsnriner bold  And his sweetheart' so true, the Bea.  Sing: ho, yo ho,.sing hey!  O'er creste'cl billows, through dashing spra/.  With sails a-bulging, sue scuds away���������  Away, away, o'er the waters gray��������� ^  Away through tlie dying dayl  Sing ho, sing heyl  Oh, the mariner bold his ain love pressed  To his heart and her sweet lips kis;0���������  Sweet lips that sworo they would e'er oe trus  When he sailed away i* the mist.  Sing hey, oh, hey. ye hot  Through the singing tops the wild winds blow.  Into the,dank mists the ship doth go.  And the'nurmer sings as ho rolls below,  "My loie wiil be true, 1 trow!"  Sing hey, yo hoi*  Oh, the lassie ashore forgot her man,  But his sweetheart, the sea, proved true!  She lulled him to rest on her heaving breast,  And her white arms about him threw.  Sing ho, ye ho, sing hev-;  He went to his one true love that day  At peaie in her.arms tore'er and aye���������  Less lasting'the lassie's.peace,'they 6ay���������  She wed with 0 lump o' clayt  Sing ho, sing hey!  ���������'���������St.-Paul Di������-"*'-H.  Iii  NEYS  Deep-Seated Kidney Disease Often the Result of a Neglected'Oold  ���������Then Go me Great Suffering s from -Lumbago and Backache.  (To be Continued.)  l/ove's young dream soon develops  into 0. nightmare when the young  wife cannot cook.  Did you ever notice that it is   the  girl with the    pretty foot     that has  most  trouble keeping  her   shoe  laces j  tied ?  Few people realize what a vast proportion of serious illnesses arises from cold settling on some delicate  organ of the body. The kidneys arid liver, as well as the lungs, are very easily affected by sudden changes of  temperature, and the results arc often suddenly fatal. It is a common experience with farmers, teamsters,  railroad men and laborers to have a cold settle on the kidneys and throw-these organs, as well as the whole  digestive system out of order. There is usually backache, pains in the sides and limbs, deposits'in the urine,  pain and scalding with urination and irregularity of the bowels. (  M ���������  /ft  So many thousands of cases of serious kidney disease have been cured by Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills  that they have come to be considered an absolute cure for all kidney derangements. They are purely vegetable in composition, prompt and pleasant in action, and' thorough and far-reaching in /their effects. They  are endoi-sed by doctors, lawyers, ministers and others, and are beyond doubt the most efficacious treatment  obtainable for diseases of the kidneys and liver. One pill a dose ; 25 cents a box ; at all dealers or Kd-  manson,  Bates   &  Co.,  Toronto.  ----*^.-t--^'-i*-i;i:;������-*,'^'*-"'i'^T! I
-       J,  ,
'    '1 {'
"-   '���'
/
/
>  fK
< in
THE GRAVE   OF KEATS.
I have beheld that grave with violets dim
In the great Cassars* city, where he sleepi,
And over it a little laurel sweeps, '
Fruited and leafed eternally for him.��,
Not far away a pine, of sturdier limb,
1    Leaf,   flower   and   grass   the   mellow   sunlight
\   ,     steeps, '      ,     '     '
And this dear grave! >-Ah, how the soul upleaps,'
The breath comes tremblingly, and the eyes swim!
���    , -'
In dreams that bordered close the sleep of death
He felt the blowing flowers above liis,breast;
This moment I beheld a wondrous thing.
.These   blossoms,    Btirring   in   the   wind's .light
I breath, ' -
1   Do not they fec-l (.above all violets blest)
!       The ever vital'dust from whence they spring!
!      " ���Edith, M. Thomas in Scribncr's Magazine.
^VANESSAi
4.
-���������O*0*-
4
���V
Tho Story of a Slight Mistm-   1*
derstanding. v
' < ' t
- ,' *    * * '        -
"I'did not see you' down /in ,W ads worth/,
wood    last    night,     Hardeastle?"    said
Henry James Dwight to his friend, leisurely lighting a cigar as he spoke.
' "No, I have not been for a week or two.'.
Lust time I was*dowu*I took, an old lady
there."   ' ",     ���*. <   , ' ���
"An old lady! Well,. I've given .over
troubling myself about/them now. What
I am ' anxious about' at^present is'that
Camberwell beauty."   ;,-,  _   *���*?       .  \-
Rose Craven, the girl who was listening
to this conversation from-the other side of
the'clipped yew hedge, waited eagerly.for
the'next remark'.,''She-had ,not realized,tj
being a woman, that there was-anything'
dishonorable in Jistening-to'the conclusion,
of a'conversation,', the commencement of
whi'chl she- had ��� accidentally' overheard.-
She"; was especially anxious^ as- to what
she;was~t6 hear next, because she knew
herself to be -the', girl from Camber-well���
she" had just'quitted'a school  there���to'
whom her,cousin and fiance, Dwight," had
referred.,   Certainly the'allusion was flattering, andyi-t Rose' Craven,did not-like
the flippant'tone, in'.which if was spoken.
"Beautiful creature, that." said Hard-
castle enthusiastically, in response to"His
friend's remark. ' "What a lovely color!"
"Yes; altogether a charming 'thing.
And; worth quite a lot'of money,too."
"I, understand 'so. -Takes."some catching, though."    ; l '.
"That's the- difficulty���to make the
catch," ��� said Harry' Dwight. "I have
been trying for several months."
."Only one,'' murmured poor, Rose, to
herself. She remembered, only too'well,
how long it was since h^r handsome cousin had come' to- stay at" their .farm.
Dwight'was'a medical'student, and^his
lengthy.'stay at Wa'dswoKh Hall, farm'
was'due to���the examinations for--which' he-
was preparing theie in quiet.' Hardeastle
was an acquaintance,he had made in^the
neighborhood.   -,.,        ' ^  , ~    '       ,   /������",���., ^\'
Rose1 Graven had indeed a lovely color
as. she kurned ,away,'   and   wjlh   cheeks
blushing Mwtith  anger-"walke'd slowly-into'
tho house, i So tl-i~* was' hcw-Oarry.-tnlkGd
of her���what Harry thought of her really!
There was not a word of that beautiful      ^  ^
sentiment  be. had 'spoken  to her���not  a (-"something about taking an"oldTady here!
enthusiastic in his pursuit of-*that study.
On that particular evening, however, 'it
was questionable if the rarest moth that
ever took wing would have succeeded ia
attracting his attention, for he was in.,ft
���tate of utter, abject and' absorbed despondency.
Perhaps it ,was something of, a coinct**
dence",that Rose, whose anger had evaporated and. who' was in a stats of wretch--
���dness  'as    complete    as   Harry's   own,
Bhould also be attracted out of* doors by
the cool of the evening and should also
select , Wad* worth .wood  as  her destination.    However I hat, may be.  the  lovers
Met, in n1 place whet---* iht-v had often met
before; jusst within the j-h-xlo nf iht-* trees.'
On   coinp*   Dwieht.   Rot**'*.,.fir��!t   impulse
was to return In the direction fx*om which
she had just come;   She had retraced her
steps a  few yards, .without speaking a
word to the young man, when she "heard
his beeps behind her, and in'another moment a�� arm slipped around her waist.
Harry Dwight-had resolved to use to the
utmost'his influence in-order to obtain an
explanation from her.       -
"Mr: Dwight!" cried Rose indignantly.
'"I request you to desist at once from your
impertinence." .. '   -  " /,
, The young man, perhaps encouraged ��y
a suspicious trembling iu\lhe voice of the
girl,-did-not in'tho least obviate his objectionable conduct. ' * < ,
, "Rose,, darling," he said without re-
moving'his arm, "don't be so,,cruel to me.'
I cannot bear to go away tomorrow,leavings masters as they are'at present. In
God's sight, Rose, .1 can say that I hare
not done anything to make myself more
unworthy'of you than I'have ��� always
known' myscif to be." ,- ' ''
C"Tk'nt may,be,"\rejoined the girl; "but
I did ,not previously know' how unworthy'
that was."   ,      * ,        *'       ���
"Rose, Rose! * Every word you/say cuts
me to'the heart/ I protest that I have,
nothing on my conscience.' ,Rose', darling,*
remember all the' walks wo have had here
attimes, and for the' sake ���'of the memory
of what we have been to each other give
me the chance to explain away this'-misunderstanding'."." / i '-*'-.-- ' ...
Perhaps if was the sentimentality always 'produced in the mind of youth by a
beautiful, summer evening- that led Rose
to break the resolve she'had made.'"
t "Harry," she-said, standing still, and in
the dim" light he could no(t-perceive in her
eyes',thettears,of which he could detect th��'
presence ��� through her .voice: ' "Harry,'. I
will tell you all, though it seems impossi-,
bta that \you should ever'be able to* ex--
plain^it away.- I have been judging you
Out of your own mouth. I overheard by
accident the conversation between you
and Mr. Hardeastle yesterday. < I was behind the hedge whilc-you were speaking."
..."I, do not recollect.,what Hardeastle
and-I^were'talking about," said -Dwight.
"Oil, Harry!   Don't make things worse.
by telling lies!   You must recollect."
��� ."On my honor. I,do not/ ,Or, stay,"' I
"think we were tallcing 'about, entomology.
What was it you heard that upset you?"
J''The-tone in' which Dwight spoke was
one of f genuine "surprise and  innocence.
For a moment Rose indulged in hope, and
then,   as  the, words  she had overheard'
came back to her mindC with'freshness,
���-she burst into sops..-  ,  -. -.      -,
"You    began   by    talking   about   this
wood," she said.    "Mr. Hardeastle. said
minster attired only in a blanket as'the
people were coming outof the church.
To this he agreed, but the dean passing
out knew him. "What," cried the divine,
"Mr. Nash in a masquerade!"
��� "Only a Yorkshire penance, Mr. Dean,
for' keeping bad company," said Nash,
pointing to his companions.   "
cret of your touch, my master.' and she ( .depths.   Yearningly 1 stretched
1        rThe Pate ot Temple Bar.   '
It is ludicrously characteristic of English taste that while Temple Bar.'with
all its associations, was sacrificed in 1S73
'upon-the pretext that it blocked up the
highway for traffic a contemptible pillar
surmounted by tia. dragon blocking the
way, to a far greater extent was set up in
1880 'as a memorial of Temple Bar. The
statues upon this memorial, representing
Queen Victoria and ' Albert ^Edward,
prince of Wales, are by Boehm. While'
Temple Bar itself might'have been re-
erected as an entrance to the Temple gardens for ��500, this "absurd '"memorial" of
it cost ��10,1196!  Temple'Bar-was rebuilt
- as'* 'the entrance to Sir H.-B. Meux's
grounds at Theobalds, Waltbam Cross,'in
1888.���Hare's "Walks In Londo'n."    /
Methuselah's  Atlvnntnfire.        ,
��� Mr. Dukane���How do yon account for
, the longevity of Methuselah, and ..the
,, other patriarchs?   " -   '-.       '      a   ,
Mr. Caswell���Oh. that was before so
many diseases had boon invented.���Pittsburg Chronicle-Telegraph.   -   ',,
THE STORY
���������[ OF A;SONG
By Mrs.'     ,r \      ���  ;.' /-'
H3E3IAN1I KATZSCHTVTATt.    a
word of'love at all.1',. She was a difficult
catch; she was'worth a lot'of money,
those1 were the things he said about her.
She resolved to control herself and have
no more to do with the man. Indeed,
within an hour she had resolved to break
off her engagement at once, and she
hoped that her cousin would immediately
quit the Hall farm if shodid so.
Dwight was considerably astonished
when he went in to tea at the change
which had taken place in the behavior of
Rosp toward him. She sat silent and reserved' throughout the meal, over which
her aunt presided, and allowed Hardeastle and her thcle. usually the most silent
members of tie "party, to sustain the conversation. At\the close of the meal she
requested Dwijht to grant her the-favor
of a few minu^s- conversation, and together they walked down to the summer
house at the bot--.ni of the-garden.
"Have I done bmething amiss. Rose?"
said Dwight lighy as they entered.
"I can enter in> no explanations with
you, Mr. Dwigbt-Weplied Rose bteadily.
"I must beg you cask none from me. I
have only to reque\ that you will release
me from the engamaent ��������� entered into
with you." \
"Release  you  ffOyour engagement."
stammered   Harry   wight.     "What   do
1 vou mean. Rose?     x\ cannot be in ear-
nest."     ��� \
"1 am thoroughly marnest."
"But whatever can j,*. -.���-������-,sons be?    I
am  not  conscious   of Wing  done  anything to offend you."    \
"1 have my /easons.(r. Dwight. 1
trust that you have.euoi. of tlle {-.pntle-
mnn about you to acced0 my ix,quest
without demanding expl^-jo-jj..--
������But it is deuced hartn a  fellow."
protested Harry, "to be s.ito the r-gilt
\about without a word of eanation.': "
"Nevertheless, ,1 beg yo^accept th0
situation.".   , .';_   -���.-.'��� v.���
"Of course," sa>(1 D^-Spt-jkenly,������"if
vou give me no alternative. must ac_
cede to your request for a ilse- Uut-
I cannot help thinking that'ty is ^mi,
misunderstanding. If you K how 1
love1 you. Rose"���     ' * ���    \
.   "Mr. Dwight, I neither kno^v. dGsire
'to' know what your feelings m^ .,��'
This answer naturally -awak^ SQVQe
.resentment in the mind, of the y*vman.
He attempted to expostulate, \Rose
cut him short. ��� #-   , ,      ,\
"Nothing is to be gained by dL!ng
the  matter  further,   Mr.   Dwigl(she
"* And realizing that such was t\e>
Harry quietly raised his hat and',.
<   and despondently returned to the \&
The following morning-be. announcest
he was about to leave the farm ant
he would return to the city upon thj
Then you said," went on Rose tearfully,
"that what j-ou were after now was the
girl from Camberwell. And you said
what a good catch I should be and what
a lot of money I was worth. Oh, I overheard all your mean,- mercenary talk."
And a sudden burst -of anger almost
choked.the girl.
"Was -that, what I said?" queried ths
amazed Dwight. "Were those the very
words I used?"
"The very words," declared Rose.
1  "Did   I  say  'That girl from Camberwell   is   worth   a   lot   of  money?'"   said
Dwight perplexedly.' *-
"You did. Those were your words, I
think. Or, stay, you said 'that Camberwell beauty,' and the way you said that
was an insult."
But instead of being overcome by this
information Dwight. to the utter surprise
of Rose, burst into a peal of laughter.'
"Vanessa Antiopa!" he cried. "I swear,
Rose, that I was talking about Vanessa
Antiopa!"
"Another girl?" cried Rose, with flashing eyes.
Harry 'Dwight's laughter was renewed.
"No girl at all. Rose." he declared, "but
merely a butterfly, the CamberweH' beauty; Latin name, Vanessa antiopa. I'll
show it to you in Newman when we get
back if you don't believe me. It is a rare
insect, worth a good deal of money and
difficult to catch; believe me."
And before Rose had time to decide
whether she believed him or not she
found tbat' he had takeu it for granted
she did.���-Penny Pictorial Magazine.
lowing day.      , - ���..-..       ,\
It was a still, calm, altogether lc
No  Xetr V/ona-an There.,
It is cxJrornely difficult for Chinese of
the higher classes to fir. 1 husbands for
their daughters whose feet have attained
tlie natural size. It is thought that women who desire unmaimod feet are actuated by no honorable motive, the crippling making it difiicult for them to go
about and keeping them more closely at
home than would be the case if they had
full use of the stunted members..
Love between husband and wife as it
exists among Christian people is unknown in China, and it is a subject that
it is not considered decorous to discuss.
Suicide is common among women of all
classes, and, aside from grief after bereavement, unhappiness in marriage: is
the: most common cause of such tragedies.
Hundreds of wives, it-is estimated, end
their lives every year in Peking alone.
���...-.,- Bean Waalt.
Beau Nash, who, like Beau Fielding
and Beau Brummel, expiated his contemptible vanity in an old age of obscurity, want and misery, was reduced to
strange   expedients   between   1G95   and
iL   ��������� ���   , 1705.   A favorite resource was the ac-
evening oh which Dwight set ott tor \ceptance 0f extraordinary wagers. Being
he expected would be his last \\at York and having lost all his money,
through Wadsworth wood���for some tLome Qf ^jg'frjends pi.ocl3jse(i to equip him
at any rate. As usual, upon his sont^.j^ 5Q guineas upon this proviso, that
rambles.-he carried the green net wa\e wouid stand at the great door of the
marks the entomologist, for .Harry  W\
; * Only a little worn black .book, so small
;that it,could, tie carried in one's pocket,
andyet the-faded writing tells the, heart
secret of a lone poet's life. ' lt-might still
'have Jain at the  bottom of: that musty,
pile of manuscript if I had not found my-
rway into .the old obs-cure'shop one after-
t noon of that -never to be (forgotten summer in Vienna.   -And'so 1' give it to the
world.    "What should I do. without you,,
ray beloved confidant!'" You are'not to,me"
-pages of lined paper between two covers, j
but my inner self, to whom If unreservedly pour out my longings and aspirations.
To you-only can I 'give sorrow, words' to
, voice-my deepest joy.'  It makes no difference to you, dear, little journal, that I am
short of stature and, of sight, round shouldered, awkward- in my! manner a'nd my
gait.   Wha't  care  yout that' my  face  is
plain and my speech halting?  ,Those outward signs that make the man foremost
have never-troubled you.'  -You know'the
real Franz Steinert, his .weakness and his
strength and are ever, ready, tV receive
his.confidence, and you.shall have it,.best
of friends.   To you I!ll "think aloud.     -*- *
v "Have you forgotten that this is Jan.
31,' and I am twenty-one?..Think what
ta Iong.-uphill climb life;has been-to that
.little'lad^old Holzer taught to play-and
sing!   Aye," but1--think  again' of , all  the,
joy that music has brought to him!J How
proud my dear old master'was of all I
did!   I can remember once he'gave me
Bach/a   'Heart   Ever   Faithful'   for   a
theme, and when 1 improvised1 and modulated into different keys he cried out with
delight,   'The  boy  has   harmony   in his
finger ends.'
"What do I not owe .you, faithful
friend and teacher? Were you not the
first to place within my hand the key to
the deep hidden mysteries of tone? I am
convinced that today -will be the red letter ,day of my life, for the count's patronage must bring success. I wonder if
' he dreamed what his ��� generous offer
meant, to me.
\'I tried to stammer my gratitude, but
human speech fails to show what is in
the heart. Only 'the language, music
speaks can adequately tell of disappointments, lofty desires, hope's fulfillment.
The count laid his hand upon my shoulder as ,1" played, and then I came to
know at once that he felt the thanks I
could not utter.
"By    the    calendar    it    is    a    month
(though I can scarcely believe it) since
that  morning,  when,  trembling,   I  tried
to   make   a   careful  toilet   for "my   first
visit to my noble patron's, where I was
to  give  lessons  in  music to   his  daughters.     My    threadbare    waistcoat    and
frayed linen never showed so plainly.   I
was an hour inking the seams of my coat
and pariug the edges of my cuffs. Finally
I started for the palace, my heart thumping so loudly against my ribs that, when
I haltingly finished my inarticulate greetings to. the count, I feared to hear him
ask the lackey, 'What is that pounding?'
"While   I   was   vainly   struggling   to
command  breath  aud   words  a  fairylike
apparition stood  beside me.   Her father
said,  with loving accent,  'My daughter,'
but inwardly I questioned, 'Can anything
so exquisite be material flesh and blood?'
There seemed to be, a gleam of sunshine
in the half darkened room.   I looked and
found it was,her smile.    I hoard a tender
cadence,   a   strain  so   beautiful   it  could
only come from heaven.   Dumb and motionless I listened for it again, and then
I knew if was her voice.
"How can I t-e.1 even you, my inner
self, of, all her graciou'sness of manner
throughout these weeks, of all. her love
for what is best in music, of her keen
appreciation of a thought expressed in
tone?.. ,     -.���' ...   -,..-'    ' ;������:/ -'..'
"Days, weeks, months have passed,
I'm told,: and yet I could count time only
by two hours each week. How short
they are to hold the whole of life! Can,
I be���I, who never looked with love upon
a woman until now, and she as far above
me as the stars, although not sharp and
glittering like those distant orbs, but
sympathetic, kind and true, my Lady
Caroline!
"What could have moved her so this
morning? She seemed oppressed, and as
she finished playing Bee.thoven's favorite
'Andante' tears filled her eyes.
"'I love it and seem to feel it in my
heart,' she murmured, 'but when I play it
sounds so cold, so harsh.   Tell me the se-
lifted up her eyes beseechingly to mine.
"For a minute's space I1 could not answer, for there rose before me my miserable, starved childhood, so unutterably
different from the life of her who questioned me. I shivered as I seemed to see
an- ill clad boy of twelve, in the early
dawn of a bitter winter's day, making his
way ' to the practice- room where no
warmth nor ray of sunshine ever penetrated, and where his numb fingers could
hardly call forth the tone's he loved, and
so hungry that even'his loved music could
not bring forgetfulness of that gnawing
hunger., ,        ,
"A wave "of pity filled my heart for ,that
desolate little lad. as-though he were,
'some other than myself, as I recalled the
piteous" letters lie would write to his
brother, begging a few kreutzers with
which to buy an apple or a bun to keep
body and soul together, and, looking down"
upon this dairity ,child of, fortune as ,she
still questioned me with those dark eyes
of heaven's blue, I stammered:    .
" 'You would kuow the secret of .my
touch?. ,1 studied1 it in a school whose
uame I pray you may never comprehend
���the' school of poverty. The masters
who taught me all I know may come to
you in later years, and, if they do, their
training, hard though' it may be, will give
you all you'long for in your music'<
"Oh, little book of mine, words are too
poor to tell the sympathy, the encburage-
3nent in her voice���her face. If jjpod.had,
only made her nearer to my level���wh.'it
am I saying? - Would I, if I 'could, drug
her down to'my poverty,1* my hedged .n.
life? No,l never! She is ""my star,* my
queen, whom I shall ever worship. d   *
','While  I stood ,trembling before her,
' speechless with love, she spoke again: ���' *
", 'Surely you have somethinc to sav to
me,> my master?'      ,        ,    ,     <-,-'
"Hesitatingly,-1 drew a .slip of pap'er
from   my  pocket,0, saying:, 'Yesterday, -I*
was,uneasy,i,restless, and in the eve'ning,
to bring sleep,.'! walked many "miles.   Returning weary, I stopped at a little wayside' inn, and as "I sat at table idly turning the leaves of a ��� book some one had'
left   there' this   line   caught ,myr   eyer
"Hark, hark!* ,The lark at heaven's gate,
sings."-   And instantly a melody, sang itself to the words, and I-was compelled to
write itt down.' .I/searched my " pockets
for a bit of < paper, but could find-none,
so I used ther bill of fare.   Will you pardon me that,I bring it to1 you just as it
is?'   ' ������ ���      ���*   ^     v ,
"Then,  without more words,' I ��� played
it to her���played as I- never had before.
- She sat near me, and when I paused she
did  not speak,  but with her eyes said,,
,,'More!'.        --..---,."*.'.
. " 'This, I wrote and thought of you," I
whispered,- and I, played  'Who Is  Syl-
via?     '       '      ���    /-:  '^\.    ,..
' " "When 'I rose to go, it was ,my ,lady's
turn to tremble. 'I���I'���*-jshe stammered,
and' in her confusion I .grew, strangely
self r possessed,. T long have- wished to
ask you .why���why, asJ you, have .dedicated- so many* of your noble works- to
others, I alone am left' 'unnoticed. Do
you(not think me worthy?' She glanced
��� up shyly, while; hot blushes overspread
neck, and brow/'^My voice'��� sounded far
jD.vr&y as I said: "���"-'    - V,
i ".'My' lady, 'do you not ,know that
everything -I have ever done is already
dedicated in my heart to you?'
"The blow has fallen, > little speechless
comforter. She is going from me.
These few lines which she has written
take from me sunshine, life, and thrust
me into that outer, darkness whence there
is no escape: * ,
. " 'Dear Master���In three days we
leave for Hungary to pass the summer.
Will you not come and give one more
lesson-to your pupil?   C. E.'    , ���
"Mein liebschen, thou art gone and
hast taken with thee all,save honor! I
did not speak, though thou didst question
me with thy sw'eet eyes, but yet my soul
communed with 'thine, and it did-* seem
that thy heart answered mine. Heart's
dearest, couldst thou read aright thou
must have seen and known for months
how dear thou art "to me. I do not
speak'thy" name alone within this little
room without falling upon my knees ,in
reverence for thy goodness.
"Canst thou divine the pang it cost me
that I must let thee go and .never say
'I love thee?' And yet, through all the
hitter pain one thought brought comfort
���rapture. It was this: That I, so poor
that I dare not tell thee in words the
worship that I feel, yet have tho power
within me to express my love for thee in
never dying song. Yes, yes! Immortal
beloved, in my heart there sings for thee
a song of songs that will live when we
are gone; will live to tell the world the
sacredness of man's love for woman, of
my love for thee.
�� * * * * ��� ��
"A
sang
Was
my arms*
and     breathed,     'Where    the.  darkling;,
streams are creeping, dearest, let us go/
Then love touched my voice and carried
it on ,wings of glory unto my desire.
"All the stars keep watch in heaven,
'While 1 sing to thee,    ' '
And the night for love was given; t
Dearest, come to me. '
power from above .filled me as I
my swan song to my beloved.
I' awake? Was I not dreaming?
I feel again the thrill with which, 1 saw
the outer blind move slowly back, and lathe' moonlight,, grave, and pale, there-
stood my Lady Caroline. Although Ir
heard no word, I knew 'farewell' was on<
her lips and in her tear dimmed eye.
"She stood an instant: then, aa' sho-
reached to'draw the blind, that was to-
shut her face "from me' foreverinore,.
there fluttered from her hand'and dropped down at my feci this crushed whit-arose.���Chicago Tribune.
o Manas-iii}-; a Ilaitband. ' ���
Every unmarried woman has said: "V3
like to own that man for ,'one day.' .I'd
teacli him to behave." ,' But have j'ou noticed, that when, they marry they don't
'seem to���manage' any better than others?'
������Atchison Globe.r '     *,"' ���"
I       = *       \       '   ���
, Chenpenlnsr. , <
Jones���I've just been, doing something-
that always makes me feel cheap.
Smith���What is that? ���' , ,  ���   !���
Jones���Comparing    my ' Balary'   with.
what I think it ought to be.       -    J  "
,'M
A Real Martyr.
She���Yes. she is a woman who has suf^
fered a great deal because of her belief.-
He���-Indeed! 'And what is her belief? -
She���That'she can wear a No". 31 sbw
���v.l_ji Nn. 4 _rnnt. , ,        -' <,       \
'   ~; " -���������    ,.  . c ,>, . 1
.*���'���
if-
Ants Are Mosanlto Eaters.' j
"The most interesting thing to me is t��"
see-an antn handle a mosquito'," "��� said;"��-''
New\Orleans- physician.    "Somehow'they v
seem to'be*fond of niosquitoesrand they'  :
pounce'upon them with gretit4 vigor.--If"-.'
Vmosquito'happcus to get wounded rfear */
the ant nest so' fie'cannot get into tho*
air and' escape, wee' unto the ^winged in-
4 sect'." "The' ants 'will   pounce  upon " hiroV"1
with vigor," and,'ho will wind .'up in tho-    (
ant  storehouse,  where1 he  will  be duly  \
seasoned and put "away for "winter food. - -<
or .probably, devoured on the spot if tho
members' are mosquito" hungry. ,*In( my'
observation of the ant and. the .mosquito^/ ������
i" have! found thatp ants' are, very fond of-
the -winged ���-pests,'r.and   really; they ,aro ', ���
great mosquito'destroyers, and no-doubt/'
they would destroy many more^for food ���/'
"purposes,if they could get to.them.  They;,
have the strength/the "courage and tho ' ,-
inclination', and' 1 expect they -would Jive''",
���on mosquitoes if they had a chance -to '-��,J.
do so."      ��� - '   .- ' , ."''-''.VV v,,;,"
V   '       1? J -V_ 1 *       f"  -1    .4/"/       X _i
'tfP
���fi-A-yi
Hi
���J   "   v\
������ ���- i.*a r
.''  M
'II -
;'--.;
���I**? I
-    IIninan> SanHliine. ,/^   ,    '  x    - i~~J'
\ Next,.to, the. sunlight of^ heaven'-is "the"v.f"!^
sunlight of a happy face.',,-./    V V V''-W"'?
It may. be'.n.- very ^little; face^ne-that-���,���-.yi'
we nc'stle-upou our(bosom qr^sing.to,sleep..^,.';,
ia our arms,with a.lullaby.'"%T .   "     /,   ���V'''-*
-"It--may,bevaVwiinkled face/but it is ult,^
the clearer vfor; tbat and all the brighter./'
,We linger near it and love" to "look-upon, ,,
it   and   say,   "Heaven   bless" tKis   happy . .
face!'-' .We must1 keep it.v^ith us as.long
as we can, for home will lose, much of ifc*   '-
brightness when that fac'i is'goos.    j .j,' '    ,'
It may be a very plain face, but there'if  .
something in it which lifts it above the   -
commonplace, and ,we forget five hbmeli-   J
ness of features in the beauty-of i:he soul
shining  through.     There   is' &   world  olT,
magic  in the  plain,  cheerful face!���Exchange.        <j  --_ ���   ',
' Advantage!  of   Foreiffn   Tra-vel.
"Successful Farmer���Son George 'got'
tome sense durin' that foreign tour, any-,
how. - i . '    .   '���
Wife���I hain't seen it. ��� -'
"I have.    You know he spent a goocfr'V
while in Lunnon, as he calls it." \"-.    '.
"Yes, an' I'd like to know what good it
did."
"Use yer eyes, 'Miranda.    He learned.    -
to turn up his pants when it raids."
-s'A
i v   ,,-"'1
'*.'- i.-J
-.������>4I
f,Arfl
rti'A
���*���>%'**���.,
0,1---.-%--
���j.'-v-Vi-uk
' ft"ifti
'*-      ' '* -���'*,-*,l
.'.
..>-'
��� -j/ ��>"^-^
��� -J    '.:-\'
��� i   ...-, va
' i   *-��� -"41
"trl
- --        *    .-'>|
...     ,    >-     ,,;.p
, -     *        ,. t-
'v
:>Z\
���/���-*���
"How many days I have neglected you,
dear little book. I am so weary, so tired
of this hopeless struggle, that something
within mo cries, 'Take courage, it is not
for long; your work is nearly done!' God
grant it may be so, and yet that night,
when underneath, her'.window ;.I stooped
and lifted to my lips this faded rose her
hand had thrown me and read these
words wrapped round the stem, I felt
life held no deeper bliss:
" 'Beloved, I know well,now the masters who taught tliee so long ago the
secret of.thy thrilling touch and tone, for
they are daily with me. Their names
mean life and they are called experience
and love. What can. I say to thee of
thy dear song, whose melody still fills my,
soul, save that it tells me all I longed
to know, and leaves me comforted
though broken hearted?'
"I read again and yet again her dear
confession. I pressed it to my heart,'my
lips. Those first days when my Caroline
had gone my song kept ever ringing in
my ears���the song that was to tell her
how I loved���adored.
"At last there came a time -when even
love could bear no more. T must, I will
go and sing my song to her' I cried in
my despair. 'At night, when all is hushed and still beneath her window, I can
ease my heart.'
* * -�� * * ���        ��
"It was past midnight, when I crept
through the -garden gate. Silently I
stood awhile beneath her window. Far
off   a    nightingale   sang   in   the   forest
v The  Vainplre.
.The following is taken from the Japa*
nese papers:
"A vampire.was caught the other day;
in a cavity of an old tree iu Ginz-n,
near Nagaoka, by the woo'dcutto- employed by Mr. Suzuki, a match manufacturer. The body of the animal measures
enf},; foot and the tail bix iuches. It 13
said to possess two large wings, with
which it covers the face of tlie victirn-
whuse blood it sucks."
VesetaUon   In   Ua-tvall.
Parsley once sown in Hawaii grows
forever, apparently. Lima beans continue to grow and bear for over a year,
and they have to be gathered every week
after starting lo boar. Cucumbers bear
the entire .--year, and so do tomatoes,
which, with proper attention, bear for
years.    Raspberries bear for six rnouths.
Inthe  Sinus  Boat.
Her Father (to the youn�� roan yrha
had been calling with considemble fre*
quency)--'I"would .like to know whether
you are going to marry my daughter.
Young .Man���So would I.1 Would yofl
mind asking her?
His  Courtesy.      ���
"So yon won't chop the wood?"
"I'm afraid," replied Meandering Mike>
'"dat.de exercise would start an appetita
dat  '.ud   tjcspaas on  your hospitality."
A   SI Jus   (jtiusce.
Willie.*-i-a.' why do they call onr lao��
Kii.i'.'o the, (iiotlier toiurnc?
I'a���'Sh! It's , f.ecause your fatheS
never g��ts a chance to use it.
borne men resemble lobstp'rs: they turn
red when they find themselves in hot
water.���Chicago News.
It  always amuses  people to  see littl��
logs^i'-h't.���Ati-hispu Gh.be. Jv   *  i  ���������-���������������������������^-���������^���������������������������'���������-���������^���������^-^^  ���������OtilS&J&tygfrXLfibm^&^^^k^AK^&^.ntte^^^&iitf+"*+*&*. W&. j -f-iVifr-f rt  ���������FS'ionssBBHisar.  -������������������wy-ffifri-WTO-^irta-'tf-^  *&'.    V     ,    lriL <r ���������SB:  .^?-^-j-rM-ca!ftg"*i*-'rri'aasSv-fefcK  H  ,<  ���������a  ii.f-  I! -  I. >  >  . f  I' '  |i   -  < -  It ,  I."-1  I'  R".  ��������� r  /  ODDESS  of Africa.  ��������� ��������� 9  A Story of the Golden  Fleece.  ��������� ��������� ���������  By ST. GEOSGE RATHBONE  ���������*���������������������,  almost    as  ".Tim. Jim Bludsoe, is it you?'  Yind the wild looking savage' /with  "-vVhom he had been fencing so desper-  -atel'v in' tho .attempt to have his life  ���������sta.-rs-cred back and dropped his own  ���������weapon while'ho cried:  "The .devil! It's Mr. T-Tastings,  sure pop!'"  At this a couple-of figures ran forward, bursting through the ���������sheltering bushes. ,   i  No need to tell Ilex who they were,  For tho one in the lead was tall yoi"  form, with the figure''an athlete  .might envy.'' '  Another moment and he<- found the  ������������������arms of the Englishman around him  ���������in spite of, 'the paint and paraphernalia that went to make a full-Hedged Zambodi 'warrior out of him, and  -enjoyed the fc'icity of,a genuine bear  "hug;   w- lludsoe -danced ���������   around  ���������them ei-v  -- ���������'-   ing   to  imitate lhe    eccentric gest tos  and  hops   of 'n  (war-  ���������rior .preparing to  go  upon, theT   wary-path,  and Little IJhLl stood  near, by,'  ���������evidently in sympathy with it ail.   ' ,  This was an event worthy of being  celebrated-1���������an event to be marked in  , :the   calendar   of   their'lives   with     a  wh i te cross. ' ~ ��������� "        , '  From, .despair','   they,,   had suddenly  -found -reason    for     the .wildest hope,  .and     TXex ,   gave  his   artist'-friend  as  good a thing in the line of a hear liug  'as he received. * ,  "This is a miracle ��������� we had rea-  ;son" to  believe  y&u  might be  iu that'  ���������Vhouse  they  were  bombarding,   but     I  -never dreamed -you had  changed to a  Zambodi,"  declared -Lord .Bruno.'  ,.    "And    how came you . here���������where  '.are' the others,     Monsieur     Jules,  the  -doctor, Red Eric?" asked Kex,    as    a  "Jhorrible suspicion    'flushed' over     him  i-that. these   brave   fellow adventurers  'might have    met  the* fate that    ever  <hangs  over those who  invade hostile  Rands.  ���������"Don't worry���������tlie bdys are all  riirht. We were, to' meet them here  after -they had set-fire-to the kraal."  ,     ������������������".Whatl   "Was. that' your, work?"  ," *'T rather think you got in ahead 'of  the boys,     y-hen 1 saw the fire   balls  ' popping- over the stockade I knew it_,  was 'all day with the whole business.  What a grand, sight," Kex.' l'erhaps  some day we1-may -paint it between  us. Tt would make a scorcher for an  ���������e::hihitiqn.     But tell me,  my dear fel-  ���������low, is this young girl with you tho  party known as the, fair god of the  Zambodi?" "  Lord    Bruno's, voice    took    on    a>  stroin   of  eatyerness  and  anxiety,     as  he turned toward the party iu whom  Jie  was"so deeply  interested.  ;Ticfore Rex could  make a   reply sev-  ������������������eral   figures   loomed   up   close   by,     a  their  recoverv  would  be  sudden as their collapse.  When the fire-fiend died low, and  only ashes remained to mark the  site of the kraal; the voice of the  vindictive and stout-hearted Has-  sajc'would make itself heard in the  land, calling aloud for vengeance  upon those who wore primarily responsible for the curse that had fallen  upon  them.  Then would begin a pursuit that  might continue 1o the vciy stockade  of Buluwayo, for these Zam'bodi war-,  riors know little what fear in -warfare means. Zulu braves have proven  that in more than one fierce battle  ji\ ith British regulars; -and'the blood  Of a young Prince of France . v/as  consecrated by (the assegais of these  hard  lighters.'  Looking backward - occasionally  they could see that the conflagration  was growing t-rnduaily less in- volume, as the lodges became more  scattered.    ��������� " '  The work had been accomplished,  and when the shock of desolation  passed away- they could 'expect to  have a desperate pursuit inaugurated.  Still on horseback they would be  in ������a position to defy the most determined of foes, provided <- they  avoided pitfalls and ambuscades, for  which these -Zulu tribes are noted���������a  trap is their usual means of securing g.ime, and in war they naturally  apply the same tactics with a view  to exterminating  their foes.  Tlie high spirits ' consequent upon  the success of their plans, were not  destined to hold out! ( '    ���������  Rex saw that something ' was  wrong when a'halt was called," ' and  Lord Bruno entered into an. .earnest  discussion   with   Bludsoe.  GUS' SATISFACTION. .  We'll skip it, reader; for it would look  'ueseemlv to,.begin a story, with ari oath'  like that' Gus Gurley swore, standing  over his wife's dressing table that morning. And Gus wasn't a ��������� swearing man  either. '    -.  How came^he. then, to'commit such a  breach of etiquette'and ethics?, "Well;  may he you wouldn't have done it; but  don't be too sure till you've heard enough  to bo able to "put yourself in his place."  Imagine a ,young husband :of sis  months' standing,ardent, fond and trusting, casually entering, his wife's dressing-room in her absence, and stumbling  on a mischieviotts-looking, rose-colored  note, freshly opened, a enpid in every  crease, and a lurking lock of. another's  hair���������red���������-peeping  stealthily from its  folds! '. y    \  The very paper  blushed guiltily as - ���������hadn't looked like a chap that' would  The combatants were to stand back to  back, and, at a signal, to wheel and fire.  Gus had already taken his place, and was  struggling, manfully but doubtfully,  against an * inclination, will-nigh  irresistible, to leap over an adjacent, hedge, and run as fast and  far as his legs could carry him, when  an exclamation from the captain caused  him to turn his head.  " In Heaven's name; who's that?" said  Captain Borax,  accosting'-the  fellow-  second; in the act of conducting a young  , and beautiful lady, to the very spot'destined for Smith.    .  ���������      ��������� -,,  ,    '��������� My principal, gentlemen,,Miss Sam-  antha   '.-mith���������7'Sain -Smith/   as she's  eallr'* /or short.' the other answered.  ,   G   6 saw it all.    Flinging down 'the  pi.-toi, he rushed forward,  and would  certainly have hugged and kii'jsed *" Sam  Smith," without   ceremony, if her sec-,  ond���������no other than  her affianced lover  .Norwegian fishery commissioners have  been , measuring   the  salmon's   leap   by    \ \$\  means of standards erected below water-  ���������)i  The   latter   struck   a     match  if  and  bent'  --signal was uttered', and upon Mudsoe  -.answering, who --should, advance "but  .Red  ftric and his two companions.  ���������'The'old cabin's-a wreck���������couldn't  -.locate' 'em thar ��������� must have skedaddled,   I-reckon.     But   chey set  fire  to  - li e  pesky   kraal  with  them  fireworks  b. f .ra. wo could  use a  match.  Glory,  unit  see it  scorch.     Gives  a   fellow a  ������������������-iasxe  of     what  he  can  expect  after-.  *��������� wards," .Tattled  off  the cowboy.  Then he noticed the addition to  ���������*��������� their number, and when li is'eyes fell  ������������������ on Maid Marian he guessed, the truth,  vfor these independent cattle punchers  ���������-.are quick as lightning.    .  "Say,   that must   be, Mr.   Hastings.  "This   here   is     quite  a   neat  surprise:  .and   the     gai  too.       Well,   if  we' tm.s  know   what's   good   for   us,   we'll   le-  ���������\ant  cut of this cussed country    like  jack  rabbits  before a  pcrairio fire."  5-Iis  advice was  as sound  as  a nut  -rand all of them anpreciatcd the fact.  ���������-Lord    Bruno  made    no effort    to ad-  <��������� dross   the  girl.  The   first   thing   to   be  '-done  was  to make nood  their e-cvp**.  -and once this had be-.-ii cd'ccled minor  matters could be easily Hell led.  So they quitted the hi tie glade that  -'had come so  near  being   I In-  scene-  of  - a desperate hand-to-hand  combat   be-  ���������cwc(*:i   two   fri-mos   n   dei-p   disguise,  turning   their   backs   on   the   burning  v ill ace.  AH   this   hod   Occurred   in   less   time,  ���������than   it   takes  to   transcribe   it,,   and  "tlie   excitement,   within Mind       around  the   stockade   was   still   at its height.,  so   that   their    chuPc**:   -of      slipping  iiwny  without bringing' cm  a general  ���������-battle.With  the native:! sc-omed good.  'Overhead    the    very    heavens  were  -������������������aglow   with   the   reflection       of     the  -.������������������terrible   sea   of   fire-below,   and   to   a  timid-soul,   so  wonderful-    was     the  spectacle that some fears  might have  been  aroused as  to the destruction  of  ' the Whole   universe   by   a     wave     of  ���������- Hamo. ' ���������        .  Kex immediately sought, the side of.  ��������� 'Alari-n. Much as he despised his ridi-  ���������culous costume he could not keep his  ���������distance. At least she would not con-  -sider him. less a man because circuni-  ���������st'finces   had   compelled .him  to  adopt  such a disguise, she who had been beside", hiin     when     he    wielded    that  . weightv  sword,   hallowed  by  a     history connected with  many a Scottish  ���������'bat-tW'cld   when   High land   clan     and  " ���������ml lord pitted     their    strength  i   the hosts  of Edward.  ���������  was  a  quality  essential     to  in   this   game,   for     although  ' s   were  for  the  hour  appar-  ���������ic-stricken   by   the   terrible  -that    had    befallen    them,  dropped   to' the   ground   as  upon, an  examination.  Then      he       used "     some,     strong  language.  "What's  wrong?"    asked  Hastings,  hurrying to  whore   they stood. L  ."The  bosses >   are,1   gone!",     replied  the cowboy. , _     '  '  -Here  was  a  fearful  calamity, c   and  while  Hex  could  not  grasp   iCs *  full,  scope as readily as  the, prairie rider,  he realized'that an  exceedingly grave  condition   confronted   them.  To 'be afoot in this African Avilder-'  'ness.   with a '���������whole  tribe  of  enraged  warriors   hunting  high   and   low   for  them was a-state of affairs calculated  to   alarm   the   boldest.  It   must ������������������'"needs' be   something .   be-  .yend' the   ordinary   that   could- make  Jim   Bludsoe   frown     and     shake  his -  head.   ' * .  "A closer examination'was made. >  This   only  served   to   confirm    - the  facts,      howes er-  disagreeable   ' they  might -appearv       ' ' '        -   P  Home', cunning enemy; had ' either  seen them hide the animals������������������ or else  by- a mere accident had rim across  them. * ,'_,���������''.  At  any   rate   the horses  were gone, ,  and   it   would   bo  useless  looking*  for  them.  IJut for the presence of the young  girl the air in that * neighborhood  would . ha\e been-fairly'sulphurous,  such was tlie nige of Bludsoe and  Bed  Eric.  The   doctor   being, a      philosopher,  3.0-  t'-<)!v things as they came, much as  a dij-fiple of the prophet 'Mohammed  L)*.i-;ht have done, and 1,-illic Phil  seldom   made   himself, heard.  JiOr-cl ilruno shouldered the blame,  dvchirifij that it was pretty much  his fault ��������� Bludsoe had suggested  !ea\ l.'g f.onu- on- 10 guard the pre-  ci.-'.s animals, but lie had believed  cvflry arm would be needed at the  kraal, in order to carry out their  designs.  The mischief was done, the horses  had been stolen, and now it remained to them to make a safe retreat.  yuch emergencies briny out all there  may   be   in   a   man.  . Although   Bludsoe  was  deeply mortified and inwardly Jurious     at     the,  trick , played   upon   them,   ho   spc-dily  recovered   himself  and   began   to  consider what was best to be done.  O'nrior ordinary conditions it  would havo suited him exactly to  ha.'-y about the neighborhood. re-  rn.*-inim; concealed from the blacks.  ii'-\ il soaH- '.'oo'l opportunity uroso  . lien their li'*;\-e.s coi;J-! ic reco\-*ri-u  y.'\v 1 he '.-.>���������-��������� \\,������s di.Yi re-it���������Lord  ilruno desired to pi.ice as much distance between the destroyed kraal,  with the vengM'ul Z.'.mbodi. and  lh'-i.' own pi rsons, as possible Perhaps the presence of Marian had  >,on.i*l hi..������' to do villi this. /M ti n\'  rale it was determined to make the  move.   ��������� . ' .'.,������������������  Bludsoe was- fully aroused.  Ho .knew* .full well they would be  followed by n swarm of eager venge-  aiu-e seekers, and to throw these  trackers ofi' the trail it was necessary that he-bring- fo bear all the  (ricks learned in his wild life along  'the.' Texan   border.  As ,they turned their backs upon  the. silent volcano which in. the  ages gone by had- been such a factor  in the landscape of that country,  an outlet of the eternal fires. ' Lord  Bruno managed to get. Rex at' his  side, in order to question him concerning   the  girl.  What he heard seemed to give the  Briton great satisfaction, for he  squeezed the band of his companion  several  times.  Gus caught it up. Eagerly aud wildly  his eyes ran over tho contents. For a  moment he' stood amazed and motionless, and then broke out���������. But we've  promised to" skip that. Perhaps any  other man,would have given utterance  to as much, reading such a missive-as  this, addressed to his wife: r '  ' " Affinity, Aug. ���������th, 18���������',  "De-vrest Kate :���������How. could you {jo and  marry, Unit creat bulky follow behind ray  back, and without a word of notico ?  "Though I've returned too late to forbid tho  bans, I'm'still in-timo to give that lord and  master of yours a hint���������which I mean to do-  that an older lovo than his won't quietly sutler  another to monopolize its rights. -       ,   *-  -"JSxpect mo by Monday, and keep a kiss for  ���������"your ever ailectionate ,   "Sam Smith."  , 'Smith! Smith! Sam'Smith'!   Faugh 1  What a name!   Had  it   been   Brown,  Jones or Robinson,  there might have  ' been some bearing it.    But Smith! And  ,-;red-headed, too!    "Frailty, thy name is  woman!" ' Yet it might bo that Smith  was some presuming puppy, whoso vile  ; epistle was the sheer result of his- own  -impudence.-   But   no;' tne ,,wife,.-that  ' could receive such a communication and  conceal it from her husband' could, not  be else than false. . c  * 'Smith's heart's lilqod was the very  .least atonement the <case admitted'of.  , Had Gus been more collected, he might  probably have bided his time aud taken  his peace-destroyer unawares and' then  "tripped him," trusting to"an( intelligent jury and proof of a mental alibi to  bring him outf all right. But he was  not sufficiently rational'fur that, and "so  adopted tlie foolish plan of summoning  Smith to mortal combat. ���������        * ��������� ���������*  , Gus had a friend,' Captain Borax,' a  retired quartermaster, thoroughly versed  in points of honor. The captain was  just the man for the emergency;- but, as  ill luck"'would have it, he was out of  town for the day.       - ��������� ' ' '  ,That no time might be  lost,   Gus de-  , manded satisfaction by mail. ��������� directing  his challenge to' the address indicated in  "the caption of'Smith's note," aiid fixing  ;atime and place ,at' which-his friend,.  Captain  Borax, would  be prepared,to  coufer with any friend of Smith's.    At  ,the same time a' brief' message  to Mrs.t  Gurley explained that important busi-  " ness necessitate^ her husband's absence  for"vthe' next   tew ��������� days.   ..Meanwhile,  Gus took up' quarters   at   an obscure  country inn,  leaving everything to the  . management of the captain,  whom he  had, succeeded  in finding at last, and  who, proud to be sought for such a service, .promptly repaired to the appointed  rendezvous, where  he was punctually  met by a friend  of   Smith's.    The preliminaries were speedily settled, and a  meeting was arranged for the following  ' stand no nonsense. As it was,< no man  whs ever equally pleased by, the discovery that he had made an ass of himself.  The-lock of hair was the only puzzle  unexplained, aud " Sam " soon cleared  that up. It was one of Guy's own,'given'  long before to Kate asr a souvenir.  ���������*' Sam " had stolonit,1 to tease her friond,  and had taken the" method we have seen  of returning it.' Of course it wasn't red,  but auburn.. ��������� - ,      ���������  , "Sam" and her friend'.went homo  with Gus, first solemnly promising, as  did the captain to keep the secret,, and,  above all not to lot Kate know; but,  bless you, such things alivays\lo get out.  falls.   They have found that the fish can���������   v>  leap to a height of twenty feet.   , ' jtr^  A horse owned in a Kentucky town has      j  developed  carniyorous  inclinations. ,   He  rejoices in dining on spring chickens and  recently ate fourteen for a square meal.  He does not stop to remove the feathers.  There, i3   a   quaint   little   fish   which  haunts the weed tracts of the gulf stream  and   there, builds   its' nest  and  lays  its  eggs like a bird rather than a fish.   This'  linimal.     the    antennarius,    imitates    in  color the weed  it-lives in and, like the  chameleon, constantly changes its color.-    j  '������  One kind of wasp found iu Brazil and*  Guiana   makes' its   nest' of   vt brilliant  white pasteboard, suspending it from the  highest branches'of the t'roft'so as to,- escape the attention of the monkeys, which  in   those   region's   have   a. troublesome  ^abit  of  investigating  everything,  even  a hornet's nest. , ���������  I!o Hud It I Jan. '  Isaac Newtou"wa������ very absent-minded  Sometimes, after arismg'in.thoinoniing,  he would of teu sir. with one - log in his  breeches, and thus,vemain for hours con.  side-ring some- mathematical problem,  .lyj-tjiout evn" thinking of, the other'leg.  A  LITTLE  FISH  STORY.  London   Is   Built   on   Spongcm.  Tho sponge which you see in the shops  ready for toilet 'use or which you may  chance'to observe when dragged from its  holdings in shallow water does not strike  you as'likely to form a very solid foundation for building purposes. Yet London  is built on sponge.       < ���������   ���������'    * - - >  Of course, the statement requires ,a  little explanation. The (lint that <��������� forms  ,the substratum of ' London'so>l. is nothing but petrified sponges; if you examine tho ,-fossil-sponge or,-flint, with a,  glass, you'can see the' structure of'the  animal.- They are, in layers.    ,  In the southeast of England the flint '  is found under the chalk beds, but in the  Thames'.valley the  waterThas gradually  w-ashed.awny-tne chalk>and left the flint.  "As   hard   as-flint,"  although ' perfectly-  correct,   sounds   rather   strange ,in 'the-  light of the above,facts.        ,  Solid  As the time drew near, Gus grew nervous. The faot is, ��������� Smith's alacrity had  taken him a little aback. He had felt  quite confident, that that miscreant  would shrink , from encountering the*  man whose honor he bad outraged. But  instead, without turning the word,  Smith's second had chosen pistols, and  named ten paces as the distance! It .was  plain the wretch was as bloodthirsty as  unscrupulous. x k Besides, Gus was no  shot, which Smith, judging from his  choice of weapons, no doubt was. How  much better, Gus began to think, to  have fled forever from the scene of his  tin happiness, or to have invoked the benign aid cf the laws of South Dakota.^  But it was too late now to retract.  From a troubled slumber, such as con-,  demned criminals are apt to fall into in  the last hours of their last night, Gus  was startled by a sensation as of a bullet piercing his thorax. It was only  Captain Borax poking him in the ribs,  by way of reminder that hia "hour bad  almost come!"  In a brief space���������how very brief it  seemed���������they were on the ' fatal field.  At nearly the same instant a close carriage drove up, containing the* enemy's  party.  Smith's second sprang out, closing the  door behind him. Ho took Captain  Borax aside, and the two held a hasty  consultation; which over, the ground  measured, pistols loaded, positions allot  ted, and every thing in readiness, it only  remained to place the men and give the.  word.  . '-  The   Trout   That   Was,! Frozen  .,;, i For Eleven   Years.  "     -     1  Iz. 1873 I was residing at Junction City,'  A pretty little ttown located in a.romantic  spot on the banks of. Mill creek in  central Wisconsin.   The country at that time  was new,, and fish and game were plentiful.    Afill creek' was at ,the time famous  as a trout stream, it being no trouble at1  all to catch fifty pounds' of speckled trout  in a half day's fishing! . On Feb. 15, ��������� 3 S7i>  ,���������I remember that/date because it was  my  twenty-first   birthday���������I ,,took  down  my rifle and struck out into the, forest for  the purpose of killing a deer.   I had wandered along the banks of the stream for a  distance, of perhaps two miles when "I ran  on to an old hunter "who had cut a hole in  the ice, through which he was fishing for  trout.    lie was meeting with' great suc--  ce&s, for'1 scattered all  around  him-could'  be seen'the speckled beauties,  where he  had thrown them as he took'them off his  hook.   I was invited to' help myself, which  invitation   I   cheerfully ^accepted,  and. I  .proceeded .to put a number'-of the,fish ih  my gamebag.., ,   \    ���������      . ,    '  It was just 4:47 o'clock when I-returned Id-t-iuc that afternoon,'.tired and ^lungrry,"  and after'hanging up my rifle took onelof  the largest of the trout .and placed it* out  in ii large cold storage warehouse that  stood near my house,-intending to present  it to Uncle Sam'Carson for'his breakfast  the next morning. The fish was forgotten and, as a result, lay in that warehouse solidly frozen until June 10, 18S4.  Now comes the strange "part of my story.  On the night of the date last mentioned,  just about eleven years after this fish had  been placed in the cold .storage, the building was totally destroyed by fire. During the process of the fire the fire department, in the effort to save the property,  had thrown sufficient water to fill up the  cellar, which, by the way,Qwas walled up  in rock and cement and was therefore  water tight. Three years later it was decided to rebuild the cold storage ware-,'  house upon the site origiually occupied,  and men were set to work pumping the  water out of the cellar, which the rains  had kept well filled. To our amazement  447 fair sized speckled trout were taken  out, besides the old one, which had evidently fallen into the cellar at the time  the warehouse was destroyed, thawed  out and spawned. The original trout was  easily identified, one of its eyes having  been accidentally knocked out and a part  of its tail broken off before it was placed  iu the warehouse.  Original Home of Golf.' ,...���������.  The Scotsman^'contends that golf is'a  'Scotch sport, to'which poetical reference  ,was made in-Adamson's "Muses.Thre'no-  die," published at-Perth as long ago as  1C38.- The terms, used-in the'sport-are'  for the most part Scotch! .But the,Dutch  assert that it was'-"first played, in Holland  on the ice, and before lGSS^the Dutch!  poet Bredero described-how'"the golfer,  with ice spurs on, stand's ready to smite  with ashen club weighted with lead or  his Scottish - cleek .of the , leaded box."  But while this may he the'earliest poetical reference., to the game, it does not-  show'that Holland is the original home  of,golf. '.The reference, to the."Scottish  clock" seems at first sight to, point rather  to Scotland.-   '>-.*"��������� " ",<  Biff   VUltlng Cards.  fl  In ^orea visiting' cards' measuring ������r  foot square are in vogue., .The ^savages:,'  of' Dahomey announce their visits to  each -other .uby sending ��������� in advance''.a  wooden ' board or the branch of a tree  artistically carved." When ^'the visit is  paid, the "card" returns'to,the possession  "of-'its 'owner,', who probably" uses it for  many - years.^ 'Tlie-natives---of Sumatra  use ���������for-a-visiting -caroT a- piece of -wood  about a foot long decorated with a' bunch  of straw and"*a knife.  ten  A Kindly Inquiry. -  Fairlie ��������� Jack;    have    you    that  pounds I lent you the other day?  ���������Flyntie���������Not all of it, old chap; but  what I have will do me a day or two  longer. Jolly kind and tkouarhtful of you  to inquire though.  ANIMAL ODDITIES.  Unless a girl gives a'young man a private lecture on economy occasionally she  doesn't take much interest iu him.���������Chicago News.  TWO   LOVES ^F A  SAILOR.  Oh, an old nrMi sat and blinked i' the sun.  And a soup v,f'the ^oa sanij he.  He sans a song: of a-ni-iriricr hold  And his sweetheart so true, tlie sea.  Sinp- ho, yo ho,'sing hey!  O'er crested billows, through dashing- 6pr������/,  With sails a-bu!ginjj, sue scuds away��������� ,.  '   Away, away, o'er the waters gray���������  Away through the dying dayl ''  Sing ho, sing heyl  S)  Mosquitoes and other gnats furnish  utmost the sole food for a very targe  family of insect eating birds known as  flycatchers.  Mosquitoes are not. as is popularly  supposed, a hot climate insect. They, are  tar more numerous in places where the  winters are severe. ���������  The age of fishes can be told by their  scales. These show under the microscope  .stripes similar to the bands-in. the cross-,  cut of a tree, which indicate the age of  the fish.  Oh, the mariner bold his aln love pressed  To his heart and her sweet lips" kiss^���������.  Sweet lips that swore they would e'er oe true  When he saiJed away i' the mist.  Sing hey, ,oh, hey, ye ho!  Through the singing tops the wild winds blow.  Into the dank mists tlie ship doth go.  And the mariner sings as ho rolls below,  "My love will be true, 1 trow!"  Sing hey, yo hoi  Oh, tho Lassie ashore forgot her man,  But his sweetheart, the sea, proved truel  She lulled him to rest on her heaving breast.  And her white arms about him threw.  Sing ho, ye ho, s,mg IieW  He went to his''one true love that day  At pen te in her aims fore'er and aye���������  Lew lasting the lassie's pcuco, they say���������  She wed with a lump o' clay!  Sing ho, sing.hey!  ���������-���������3t. Paul Di*���������'l"\.  01    THE    KIDNEYS  Beep-Seated Kidney Disease Often tlie liesult of a Neglected Cold  ���������Then' Co me Great Sufterings from Lnnihago and Backache.  (To be Continued.)  Love's young* dream soon develops  into a. nightmare when the young  wife cannot cook.  Few people realize 'what a vastproportion of serious illnesses arises from cold settling on some, delicate  organ of.the body. The kidneys and liver, as well as the lungs, are very easily affected by sudden changes of  temperature, and the results are often suddenly fatal. It is a common experience with farmers, teamsters,  railroad men and laborers to have a cold settle on the kidneys and throw these org*ans, as well as the whole  digestive system out of order. There is usually backache, pains in the sides and limbs, deposits in the urine,  paiii and scalding with urination and irregularity of the bowels.  Did you ever notice that it is the  girl with the pretty foot that has  most trouble keeping her shoe laces  tied ?  St'sSBoS  So many thousands of cases of serious kidney disease have been cured by Dr. Chase's KidneyrLiver Pills  that they have come to be considered an absolute cure for all kidney derangements. . They are purely vegetable in composition, prompt and pleasant in action, and thorough and far-reaching in/their effects. They  are endorsed by doctors, lawyers, ministers and others, and are beyond doubt the most efficacious treatment  obtainable for diseases of tihe kidneys and liver. One pill a dose ; 25 cents a box; at all dealers or Ed-  manson,  Bates  & Co.,  Toronto. ~r-  mmmmmm**  i  \  <1  THE GRAVE   OF  KEATS.  I have beheld that grave with' violets dim  In' the great Cesars' city, where he sleepi,    ,  And over it a little laurel sweeps,  Fruited and leafed eternally for him.  Not far awav'a pine, of sturdier limb,       ���������  Leaf, 'flower   and   grass   the   mellow   ���������unliglit  i        ' steeps, ��������� ''     .  . And this dear grave! - Ah, how the soul upleaps.  The breath comes tremblingly, and the eyes swim!  In dreams that bordered close the sleep of death  Ho felt the blowing flowers above bis breast;  This moment I behold a wondrous thing.  .These   blossoms,    stirring ��������� in   the   wind's   light  . breath, H <  I   Do riot'they feeUabove all violets blest)    _  ���������t      The ever vital dust from whence they spring I  1 '       ���������Edith ll.' Thomas in Sciibner's Magazine.  thusiastic in his pursuit of that study. 1 minster attired only in ������ "f nl^ m th.  ���������T .Tw ������������rriP,ilnr eveninit.  however, it    people were coming out of the churcn  i-VANESSA'l  +  -������������������o*-������-  ���������J*   The'Story of a Blight Misun-, f  '.j. derstanding.      ' T  "I'did notice you down in WadswortH  wood    last    night,    Hardeastle/"    said  Henry James Dwight to his friend, lei-  ' '    surely lighting a cigar as he spoke.  "Xo. I ha*ve not been for a week or two.  1  Last time I was down I took an old lady  '' "I14'"An olcl lady!/ Well, I've given over  < troubling myself about them now. _ What  -I  itm, anxious about at^present is that  Camberwell beauty."   ,..     *-;       ..';.���������"  Rose Craven, the-girl who was listening,  -    to this'conversation from-the other side of  . the clipped yew'hedge, .-waited eagerly for.  ' '- the next remark.-- She-had.not realized,  '''     being a woman, that'there was anything  ,      dishonorable in listening, to the conclusion  v ''   of a" conversation:- the commencement of,  ���������whirh, she   had   accidentally   overheard.  K     'stie'was especially anxious as to what-;  ''-Vshe was'to hcar-.n������t, because she knew  JT /herself to be the-girl from Cauiberwell-  *)   l she .had just, quitted  a .school  thcre-to  '   whom her cousin and fiance,-Dwight, had  referred., -Ceitainly1 the allusion was flat-  K'     tering. and yet, Rose'Craven did not like  <      the flippant tone in which it was spoken.  ,  "Beautiful creatine, that," said Hard-  .   castle enthusiastically, in response to his  -   '    friend's remark.    "What a lovely color! ,  "Yes; ' altogether'a    charming   thing.  "   '   And, worth quite a lot of money too." >  "l! understand so.    Takes some catching, ^though."       v   " '  "That's 'the- difficulty���������to   make   the  ''   catch."   said'Harry   Dwight. Jl   have.  -   ,    "been, trying'for several,months.      .  "Only  one.",; murmured  poor  Rose to  ��������� "    ���������'*. herself.    She 'remembered, only too well,  how long it was* since h<--r handsome cous-  '    ,   in   had   come'! to-, stay   at* their   farm.  -. *  ' Dwight was-ft, medical .student   and his  *. -��������� Icngthv'stay  at rWnds.wo.th  Hall; farm.  ��������� r, ^was,'dueto.the,examinations.for which he  '���������'. -',   was preparing thei e in quiet.    Hardeastle  was-an acquaintance hc_had made in the  ' "' ' neighborhood., V. '- ,'*'<. " , ** , '���������*' "<,������������������  . -Rose Craven had indeed a lovely color  as' she turned-away," and with cheeks  blushing" with anger talked slowly, into,  the house, t So tin- ������as how-Hart yT talked  of her-what Hur.y thought of^hep really!  en  -  On that particular evening, however,  was questionable if the rarest moth that  ever took wing would have succeeded im  attracting his attention, for he was in a  state of utter, abject and absorbed despondency. ,   ' .    .  Perhaps it was something of a coincidence that Rose, whose anger had evaporated and who was in'a stats of wretchedness as complete as Harry's own,  'should also' be attracted out of doors by  the cool of the evening and should also  select Wad*worth wood as her destmn;  tion.' However that may be. the lovers  ������et. in a place whet*-* they had often met  before, just within the *-b:i.le'<*f the trees.  O-n cpintr Owieht.' Ro-.-*'- fi."-*T impulse  was to retura In the direction from which  she had just come: She had retraced her  steps a few yards, without- speaking a.  word to the young man, whe,u she heard  his .-taps behind her, and in" another moment aa arm slipped around her waist.  Harry Dwight had resolved to use to the  utmost his influence in order'to obtain an  explanation from her.'  "Mr. Dwight!" cried Rose indignantly.  "I request you to desistat once from your  impertinence.''   - ' - '       *  The young man, perhaps encouraged ������y  a suspicious trembling iu the voice of tne  girl, did not in thelcast obviate his objectionable conduct. '   [      . ''-1^"'  "Rose, darling," he said without-removing his arm, "don't be so cruel to me.  I cannot bear to go away tomorrow leaving matters as they are at present. In  God's sight, Rose,',I can say-that, I have  not done anything to make,myself more  unworthy "of you than I have 'always  known myself to be." '       .,',������,*  i.a*'Th'at may be,"'i rejoined the girl,    but  I did not previously know how unworthy  that was."       - ���������","'-���������.������  "Rose, Rose!   Every word you say cutSi  me to the heart.   >I protest that I have  nothing on my. conscience. * Rose, darling,-���������  remember'all the walks we havo had here  at times, and1 for the'sake of the memory,  of what we have been to each other, give,  me the' chance, to /explain away this misunderstanding."    ' <���������'       r  rerhaps.it was the sentimentality al-  ways produced in the mind of youth by a  ihonntiful'summer eveniug-that led Rose  1 people ..   To this he agreed, but the dean passing  out knew him. "What," cried the divine,  "Mr. Nash in a masquerade!"  , "Only a Yorkshire penance, Mr. -L>ean.  for keeping had company," ,said ^ash,  pointing to his companions.  The Fate ot Temple Bar.  It is ludicrously characteristic of English taste that while Temple Bar. with  all its associations, was sacrificed in Ibid  ��������� upon the pretext that it blocked up the  'highway for traffic a contemptible pillar  surmounted by a dragon blocking the  way to a far greater extent was set up in  18S0 as a memorial of Temple Bar. lhe  statues upon this memorial, representing  Queen Victoria and Albert .Edward,  prince of Wales, are by-Boehm.- \Mnle  Temple Bar itself might have been re-  erected as an entrance to the Temple gardens for ������500, this absurd '/memorial of  it cost ������10.-JOG! Temple Bar-was rebuilt  as* the entrance to Sir-H. B. Mens s  grounds at Theobalds, Waltham Cross, in  1888.���������Hare's "Walks In* London.  ' Metlinselnira Aclvantnee.  Mr. Dukaner-How do you account for  the longevity of Methuselah and the  other patriarchs? ' .  '-Mr. Gnswell-Oh. that was before,so  many diseases had been'invented.���������Pitts-*  ^burg Chronicle-Telegraph  "t  ���������  THE STORY.  I    OF "A SONG  By Mrs.        '      ������   ������ v. '  E3E2LANN KATZSCIIMAS.  \  ,*������������������  beautiful 'summer  to break'the resolve she'had made. ^  , "''Harry;" she said, standing still, and in  the dim'light he could not perceive in her  eyes the tears of which he could detect thft  presence ..through 'her voice. "Harry,' I  will(tell you'all, though it seems impossible-that vou should ever be-able to explain it-away. I" have been judging you  Out of your own mouth. I .overheard by  accident the conversation between you  and Mr. Hardeastle yesterday. (I was behind the hedge'while you were speaking.  - "I do not recollect what Hardeastle  and I were talking'about," said Dwight.  "Oh. Harry!   Don't make things worse^  by tell ing, lies!   You must ��������� recollect.".;  - ",'On myuhouor I do not. . Or, stay, I  think we were talking about entomology.  What was it you heard that upset j'ou?", c  The tone in wh?ch Dwight spoke'was  one" of ^genuine-.surprise  and innocence.  For a moment Rose indulged in hope, and  .then,,-as the  words-" she had overheard  came back -to her mind with freshness,  "���������she,burst into sobb.-       _    ---.  v  "You   began   by    talking   about   this  said.    "Mr.-Hardeastle said  Only a little worn black-book, so small  that it could be carried  in one's pocket,  and'yet the faded.writing tells,the heart  'secret of a lone poet's life.  'It might btill  'have Iain at the bottom of that musty  -pile of manuscript if l*had' not 'found my  wav into .the old obs*ure--shop. one aiter-  'aoon of, that never to be forgotten sum-  'mer'.inWienna. . And so I give.it to-the  world.'  "WUiat should I dp^ without you;  ^ihy beloved,confidant!' You are not to me  pages of lined paper between two', covers,  but mv inner self, to whom I unreservedly pour out my longings and, aspirations.  To you.'only can I 'give sorrow words  to  voice my. deepest joy.   It makes no difference'to you, dear little journal, that 1 am  .-r  j. -^-4. .������iw1 r.f ci-rht   round ShOUl-'  M-i,ori wis not a  word of that beautiful     WOod," she  intimrat he had 'spoken .to her-not 'a |> something about taking an old lady here  word of love-at all.,   She was a difficult  :a������tch.  she -as Wrth  ^ lot  of  money.  those were the things he said about her.  She resolved to'control herself and have  no more to do with the man. Indeed,  within an hour she had resolved to break  ofE her engagement at once, and she  hoped that her cousin' would immediately  quit the Hall farm if she did so.    " '  Dwight   was   considerably   astonished  when he went  in to tea  at the.change  which had' taken place in the behavior of  , Rose toward him. - She sat silent and1 reserved throughout the meal, over which  her aunt presided, and allowed Hardeastle and her- uncle, usually the most silent  members of tie party, to sustain the conversation.    Atvthe close of the meal she  requested Dwisht to grant her the favor  -of a  few minutes' conversation,  and to-  cether they walked down to the summer  house at the bottom of the garden  "Have I done something amiss. Rose.'  eaid Dwight lightly as they entered. ��������� _  "I can enter into no explanations with  you, Mr. Dwight." replied Rose steadily.  "I must beg yotrto ask none from me. I  have only to request that you will release  me from the engagement 1 enteied into  with you." ' ���������  "Release  you   from  our  engagement,  stammered   Harry   Dwight.     "What   do  you mean. Rose?    You cannot be in ear-  nest. ���������  "I am thoroughly in earnest.  "But whatever can your reasons be? I  am not conscious of'having done anything to offend you." . .  "I have my /easons. Mr. Dwight. 1  trust that voii have enough of the gentleman about' you to accede to my ^request  without demanding-, explanations,.",..,  "But it  is deuced   hard  on u   fellow,  protested Harry, "to be sent to the right  about without a word of explanation. '  .   "Nevertheless, 1 beg you to accept the  situation."/. ��������� .'���������..���������*.������������������ i'���������"'���������"-"   *���������..  "Of course," said Dwight brokenly, -"if  vou give me no alternative. I   must accede to your request for a  release.    But.  I cannot help thinking that there is some  ���������'...-misunderstanding.'    If. you know how   1  -love you, Rose"��������� ������������������      ��������� ������������������'������������������.'������������������/���������-,  "Mr. Dwight, I neither know nor desire  to know what your feelings may be."  This answer naturally awakened some  resentment in the mind of the young man.  He  attempted, to expostulate, .but Rose.  cut him short.        . - ������������������      ;���������'  "Nothing is to be gained by discussing  the   matter  further,   Mr.   Dwight,'   she  ,SaInd realizing that such was' the case.  Harry quietly raised his hat and slowly  and despondently returned to the bouse  The following morning he announced hat  he was about to leave the farm and that  he would return to the city upon the foi-.  Itt still, calm, altogether love^  evening on which Dwight set off for what  he expected would be his last walk  through Wadsworth wood-for some time  at any rate. As usual, upon his solitary  rambles, he carried the green net which  Sarks the entomologist, for Harry  was  Then you said," went on Rose tearfully,  "that what you weie after now was the  girl from Camberwell. And you said  what a good catch I should be and what  a lot of money I was-worth. Oh, I overheard all your meanr mercenary talk/'  And a .sudden burst -of anger almost  choked the girl. , - '     .  ' "Was that what I, said?" queried tha  amazed Dwight. "Were those the very  words I used?"  "The very words," declared Rose.  "Did I say 'That girl from Camberwell is worth a lot of money?' " said  Dwight perplexedly.  "You did. -Those were your words, I  think. Or, stajr. you said 'that Camberwell beauty,' aiid the way you said that  was an insult."  But instead of being overcome by this  information Dwight. to the utter surprise  of Rose, burst into a peal of laughter.  "Vanessa Antiopa!" he cried. "I swear,  Rose, that I was talking -about Vanessa  Antiopa!"   ���������  "Another girl?" cried Rose, with flashing eyes.  Harry Dwight's laughter was renewed.  "No girl at all. Rose," he declared, "'but  merely a butterfly, the Camberwell beauty; Datin name, Vanessa autiopa. I'll  show it to you in Newman when we get  back if you don't believe me. It is a rare  insect, worth a good deal of money and  difficult to catch, believe me."  And before Rose had time to decide  whether she believed him or not bhe  found that' ho had taken it tor granted  ���������she did.���������Penny Pictorial Magazine.  No  yew Women  There.  It is extremely difficult forChinpse of.  tlie higher classes to fin - husbands for  their:daughters whoso feet have attained  the natural size. It is thought that women who deaire unnuiimed feet are actuated by no honorable motive, the crippling making it difiicult for them to go  about and keeping them more closely, at  home than would be the case if they had  full use of the stunted members. ���������  Love between husband aud wife as it  exists among Christian people is unknown in China, and it is a subject that  it is not considered decorous to discuss- i'  ' Suicide is common among women of all  classes, and, aside from grief after bereavement, unhappiness in marriage is  the most common cause of such tragedies.  Hundreds of wives, it is estimated, end  their lives every year in Peking alone.  -,'���������;.. Bean Nasi*. ' .  Beau Nash, who, like Bean Fielding  and Beau Brummel, expiated his contemptible vanity in an old age of obscurity, want and misery, was reduced to  strange expedients between 109o and  1705. A favorite resource was the acceptance of extraordinary wagers. Being  at York and having lost all his money,  some of his'friends promised to equip him  with 50 guineas upon this proviso, that  he would stand at the great door of the  Bhortfof stature and of sight, round shouldered, awkward in my manner and my  gait. .What  care  you-that  my. face  is  nlaih.and-my.-spcech.-halting?- Those out-  'ward signs,that make the man'foremost  have never troubled you.    You .know the  real-Franz Steinert. his.weakness and his  strength "and ^are ever ready, to. receive  his confidence, and you shall have it, best  of friends. . To you I'll think alo,ud.,   - (  "Havp yon forgotten that,thi-=������ is Jan.  81' and 1 am twenty-one?-.Think what  a long, uphill climb life has .been to that^  little lad old-Holzer taught'to play and  sing!   Aye, but 'think tagain-" of; all the  joy that music has brought to him!   How  proud my dear old master was,, of all I  did!   I can remember-once he-gave me  BacK'si   'Heart   Ever   Faithful'    for   a  theme, and when,. I improvised and modulated into different keys he cried out with  delight,   'The   boy   has   harmony   in  his  finger ends.'    v '  "What do I not owe you, faithrui  friend and teacher? Were you not the  first to place within my hand the key to  the deep hidden mysteries of tone? I am  convinced that today will be the red letter day of my life. loathe counts patronage must bring success. I wonder if  he dreamed what' his generous offer  meant to me.     l r  "I tried to stammer my gratitude, hut  human speech fails to show what is in  the heart. Only the language music  speaks can'adequately tell of disappointments, lofty desires, hope's fulfillment.  The count laid his hand upon my shoulder as I'played, and then I came to  know at once that he felt the thanks I  could not utter.     '  "By the calendar it is a mouth  (though I can scarcely believe it) since  that morning, when, trembling, I tried  to make a careful toilet for my first  visit to my noble patron's, where I was  to give lessons in music to his daughters. My threadbare waistcoat and  frayed linen never showed so plainly. I  was an hour inking the scams of my coat  and paring the edges of my cuffs. Finally  I started for the palace, my heart thumping so loudly against my ribs that, when  I haltingly finished my inarticulate greetings to the count. I feared to hear him  ask the lackev. 'What is that pounding?  "While 1 was vainly struggling to  command breath and words a fairylike  apparition stood beside me. Ilor father  said, with loving accent. 'My, daughter,  but inwardly I questioned. 'Can anything  so exquisite be material flesh and (blood I  There seemed to be a gleam of sunshine  in the half darkened room. I,looked and  found it was her smile, I hoard a tender  cadence, a strain, so beautiful it could  only come from heaven. Dumb and motionless Mistened foivit again, and then  I knew it'was her voice.  "How can I tell even you, my inner  self, of air her graciousness of manner  throughout these weeks, of all her love  for what is best in music, of her keen,  appreciation', of'.a thought expressed in  tone?   "   .",'  "Days, weeks, months have passed,  I'm told, and yet I could count time only  by two hours each week. How short  they are'to hold the whole of life! Can  I be���������I, who never looked with love upon  a woman until now, and she as far above  me as the stars, although not sharp and  glittering like those distant orbs, but  sympathetic, kind and true, my Lady  Caroline!  "What could have moved her so this  morning? She seemed oppressed, and as  she finished playing Beethoven's favorite  'Andante' tears filled her eyes.  "'I love it and seem to feel it in my  heart,* she murmured, 'but when I play it  sounds so cold, so harsh*   Tell me the se  cret of your touch, my master.' and she  lifted up her eyes beseechingly to mine.  "For a minute's space I could not answer, for .there rose before me my miserable, 'starved childhood, so unutterably  different from the life of her who questioned me. I shivered as I seemed to see  an ill clad boy of twelve, in the early  dawn of a bitter winter's day, making his  way to the practice room where no  warmth nor ray. of sunshine ever pene-  tratedi and where his numb fingers could  hardly, call forth the tones he loved, and  so hungry that even his Joved music could  not bring forgetfulness of that gnawing  hunger. '  "A������wave of pity filled my heart for that  desolate' little lad. as though he were  some other than myself, as I recalled the  piteous lettei's he would write to his  brother, begging a "few kreutzers with  which to buy an apple or'a bun to keep  body and soul together, and, looking down  upon this dainty, child of fortune itf she  still questioned me with those dark eyes  of heaven's blue, I stammered:  " 'You would kuow the secret of my  touch? I studied it in a school whose  uame I pray you may never comprehend  '���������the school, of poverty. The masters  who taught me all I know may come to  you in later years, and, if they do, their  training, hard though it may be, will give  you all you'long ior in your music.  "Oh, little book of mine,' words are too  poor to tell the sympathy, the encouragement in her voice-her face. If God had  only" made her 'nearer to my level-what  am I saying? Would I, if I could, dr*g  her down to my poverty, my, hedged ;n  life? No, never! - She is my star, my  queen, whom I shall ever worship. .  "While I stood trembling before her,  Bpeechlcss'with love, she/spoke again:   L  " 'Surely you tiave something to sav to  me,,my masterV        ' ',..'.  "Hesitatingly, J'drew, a slip of-paper  from my pocket,*--'saying: 'Yesterday "I  was uneasy, .'restless, and in the evening,  to bring sleep,'I walked'many.miles. Returning weary, I stopped at a little way-  'side-inn, and/as .1 sat at table, idly turning the leaves- of a book some oae had  left- there, this line caught my eye:  "Hark, hark! . Tho lark-at heaven's-gate  sino-s"' And instantly a melody sang,itself to.the words, and I was compelled to;  write it down. - I searched my pockets  for-a bit of-paper, but could find none,,  so I used the bill of fare. Will you pardon me that I bring it to you just as it  is?'   ' ��������� *   s '    '        ' -  "Then, without more words, I played  it to- her���������played as I never had before.  She sat near me, and when I������ paused, she  did not speak,  but with her eyes said,,  'More!',   ,     "      -    " ������������������ ���������   '   ; '  "   " 'This I wrote and thought of you,' I  v/hispered,  and  I  played   'Who Is ,Syl-  via?' j.  T -' '���������'     -   '  "When I rose to go, it ,was my lady's  turn to -tremble.- ������I���������F��������� she stammered,  and in her confusion -1 grew strangely  self possessed, T long have'wished to  ask'you why���������why, as'you have dedicated so many, of your noble works-to  depths.   Yearningly 1 stretched my arms-  and    breathed,     'Where    the    darkling,  streams are creeping, dearest, let ns go.  Then love touched my voice' and carried  it on wings of glory unto my desire.  "All the etais keep watch in heavea  While 1 hing to thee.  And the night ior lo\e was eiyen;  Dearest, come to me.  power from above filled me as I  my   swan   song   to   my'  beloved.  "A  sang   ���������j        -.. ��������� .  Was  I   awake?   Was   I  not dreaming?  I -feel again the thrill with which,, I saw  the outer blind move slowly back, and- ia  the   moonlight,   grave   and   pale,   there-  stood   mv   Dady   Caroline.   Although   It  heard no word, I knew 'farewell' was on<  her lips and in her tear'dimmed eye.  '   "She  stood   an   instant;   then,   as'she-  reached to "draw the blind that  was to.  shut   her   face ^from   me- forevermore,,  there fluttered from her hand and dropped down at my feet this crushed white--  tose.���������Chicago Tribune.  Mannsluj; a Haulm-ad. '    ,  Every unmarried woman has,said: "V3  like to own that man forgone day. I'd  teach him to behave." But have you noticed that when they marry they don t  seem to manage any better than^ others?  ���������Atchison Globe. ' \    ,  <       ; :   ��������� Chcupenlnfi-. * (  Jones���������I've just been doing something-  that always makes me feel cheap.'  Smith���������What is that?  Jones���������Comparing     my    salary    witK.  what I-think-it ought to be.      -  ��������� i  .   A Rcnl Martyr. M  '   She-��������� Yes/ she is a' woman who has suf- T  fered a great deal because of her belief.L  He���������Indeed!    And what is her belief?  ,  .She���������That she can wear a No. 3 sbo**  nii_n'Nn.-4_fno1_.--    ��������� ' "    "    ,   ''  ���������*"   '     Ants Are, Mo-sanf to Eaten. J-  "The most interesting thing to me is to*  see an-antJ handle a mosquito.,'ysaid^������;i.    ,  New Orleans physician.    "Somehow they,  seem to.lye'fond of mosquitoes, and they   , u  pounce" upon'them with great .vigor,    it t  a mosquito happens to get wounded near   .-  ���������  ?he ant nest'so lie'cannot get- into the.     ,-'  air and escape, wee unto ,the winged in-     ;  'sect.    The  ants will  pounce  upon  him-     ,*-  wTth vigor, nnd-ho ^V^V^VulT '  ant storehouse, ( where' he* will be duly t  ant  "���������'-I*- '      flU.av for winter food. "  seasoned and put av-.ay  ������.u������ .*���������__,_,_ .A +litt  k 'I  I  \  }   m  <frt  5aprooab������^devoured on tho spot if th. *  "members are mosquito hungry.    In  my  Sivation of the'ttnlWind the mosquito   -  Irhave found that'ants are very fond of ..  the  winged   pests. * and, really   they   are -  great Sosquito destroydrs. and mo doubt   .  8      -       ������������������   icstroy many more for^ood  /���������v  ' '. *���������?;]  ���������.*��������� J i   L  ..,-. -r^s ���������*��������� yu  ���������-I-* ������������-<i, r  '.* -w^.-f  r -1' -at  i r*  ' ^'"'"im  ILL    '11  ��������������� -    ���������r-jt   iW  ' " ��������� ----C-f '1  -' >���������'*:HL  *   'a-���������''.JI  - i, 'ArjA  ������������������ -"--j, i-'-UI  ,'i Ai/rfil  ��������� ,.���������'��������� ----s'r  r. * - - ���������"}{  *,*<���������. "j?-  ���������V*'  "U1  -f  ���������v  ^^Leonid ^ to ^J^.  hive the'strenglh.ahe. courage and the  clfnaSon, and 1'expect^they would hve>;   ' -  ciinauon, ������*"     tK^hati a chance to      .������-  mosquitoes if,they,naa \^^   . ._ ,,>,,,,  i    -.'..1  '.."'iS-Kfl  -,* s' "'--J I  f'������V^|  in  on  do so  !-', -4  -others I alone am left unnoticed. Do  lyou not think mo .worthy?' She glanced  'up shyly,-'while hot blushes overspread  neck.and brow.' My, voice sounded far  ,away as I said: '' ,        - v  ���������      .;*  " 'My lady, do you not know tnat  everything I tiave ever done is already  dedicated in'my heart to you?'  "The blow'has fallen, little sppechless  comforter. She is 'going < froin me.  These few -lines which she has written  take from me sunshine,, life, and thrust  me into that outer darkness whence there  is no escape:  " 'Dear Master���������In three days we  leave "for Hungary to pass the summer.  Will you not come and give one more  lesson-to your pupil?   C. E.'.  "Mein liebschen, thou art gone and  hast taken with thee all save iionor! I  did not speak,' though thou didst question  me with thy sw'eet eyes, but yet ray soul  communed with thine, and it did-seem  that thy heart answered mine. Heart's  dearest, couldst thou read aright thou  must have seen and known for months  how dear thou art to me. -I do not  speak thy name alone within this little  room without falling upon my knees in  reverence for thy goodness.  "Canst thou divine the pang it cost me  that I must let thee go and never say  'I love thee?' And yet, through all the  bitter pain one thought brought comfort  ���������rapture. It was this: That I, so poor  that I dare not tell thee in words the  worship that I "feel, yet have tho power  within me to express my love for thee in  never dying song. Yes, yes! Immortal  beloved, in my heart there sings for thee  a son? of songs that will live when we  are gone; will live to tell the world the  sacredness of man's love for woman, of  mv love for thee.  'm ***** *  "How many days I have neglected you,  dear little book. I am so weary, so tired  of this hopeless struggle, that something  within me cries. 'Take courage, it is not  for long; your work is nearly done!' God  grant it .may be so, and yet that night,  when underneath her window I stooped  and. lifted to my. lips this'faded rose her  hand had thrown me . and read these  words, wrapped round the stem, I felt  life held no deeper bliss:  . "'Beloved, I know well now the masters who taught' thee so long ago the  secret of thy thrilling touch and tone, for  they are daily with me. Their names  mean life and they are called experience  and love. What can I say to thee of  thy dear song, whose melody still 'fills my.  soul, save that it tells me all'.'I longed  to know, and leaves me comforted  though broken hearted?' ;  "I read again and yet again her dear  confession. I pressed it to my'heart, my  lips. Those first'days when my Caroline  had gone my song kept ever ringing in  my ears���������the song that was to tell her  how I loved���������adored.  "At last there came a time when even  love could bear no more. T must, I will  go and sing my song to her' I cried in  my despair. 'At night, when all is bushed and still beneath her window, I can  ease my heart.'  ������ * * * *''.���������*,'���������  "It was past midnight, when I crept  through the garden gate. Silently I  stood awhile beneath her window. Far  off   a   nightingale   sang   in   the   forest  ���������      '     'Human   SunHTilne.1       ^        '   ,  Next, to the sunlight, of,heaven ,is the^  ���������annli-'ht^of a happy, face. ,. ���������       .     v.        ..  Tt mav be a very .little face-^one( that.,.  we nStle,������Pon our bosom br,jmig-to jslccfr ,  i������i our arms with a .lullaby. ,, -    ,  ;,.    \ .  I? maY-be a,wvinklcd face, but it is all,,  theSe-for-that and all the brighter.,  We ingeVnear it and love^to look upon  it and .say, "Henyen blew, thia happy  face"! We must keep it v/ith us as long  as we can, for home will lose much of itt  briehtness when that face is Koas. .  it may oe a very plain face, but tliertflt  something in it which,lifts it above the  commonplace, and we forget ^^  ness of features in the'beauty oi i.he soul  shining through. There is * J������orld of  magic  in the  plain,  cheerful tacel-B^-  change.' ' ' '    .  Advantage,   of   Foreiffn   Trn-vcl.  'Successful    Farmer���������Son   George   got  some sense durin' that foreign tour, anyhow. ' - '  Wife���������I hain't seen it. ,  "I have.    You know he spent a goocr.  while in Lunnon, as he calls it."  '       '   _^'  "Yes, an' I'd like to know what good it  "Use yer eyes,  Miranda.    He learned  to turn up his pants when it ralas.  Tlie   Vampire.  The following is taken from the Japa*  nese papers:  "A vampire was caught tne^ other day ���������������  in a cavity of an old tree in Gin7-n,  rear Nagaoka, by lhe woodcuttc employed by Mr. Suzuki, a match manufacturer. The body of the animal measures ���������  one foot and the tail six inches. It is  saitf to possess two large wings, with  which it covers the face of the- victim  whose blood it sucks."  Ves'etallon   In   Hawaii.  Parsley once sown in Hawaii growa  forever, apparently. Lima beans continue to grow and bear for over a year,  and they have to be gathcied every week  after starting to bear. Cueumbets bear  the entire' year, and W do tomatoes,  which, with proper attention, bear for  years.    Raspberries bear for six months.  V  im.1.*  ���������r: ���������������������������  ������������������31.V I  ���������^-y I  ---��������� I  "������tl  i f ���������"-."���������'���������"*5J-^r''l  -n   -*._ , \V'-*1  -*-' - *?\ ^i'tfI  i-/   -*-,Af Um  i    M ���������    -V--^!  'r    r    - i -*- ���������  ~i5r -���������"*���������  o;r>  1,  In  tlie  Snms  Doat.  ��������� Her Father (to the young man wha  had been calling with consideiitble frequency)���������I would like to know whether  you are going to marry my daughter. ���������;.,  Young Man-So would I. Would j^fi  mind askitig her? -'.,.. -    ���������''_..  IIin   C������nrtesy.  "So yon won't chop the wood?"   .     ���������  "I'm afraid," replied Meandering Mike>  "daf. do exercise-would.'start 'an.'appctitfl  dat  'ud  tie'spuss on  your hospitality."  Willie* -i'a. why do they call oar Ian*  gunge the -mother tonirne?  I'.!���������'^)!! it's decause your fathei  never t'cis a chance to use.it.,   .  Some men roHcmble lobsters: they turn  red when they find themselves in hot  water.���������Chicago News.  It  always  nrnnsps  people to  see  littl������  logs i\"-i\t.���������Atchison Globe. " .        '(  ���������V  A DUEL IN TEE SKY.  I i  \  \  v   -, f  They   were brothers���������came into the  world the same day. the same hour, and  in like manner,  they appeared  before  the tent of Pedro Longman, a showman,  who traveled from village to village with  his troop of acrobats, jugglers and trained lions. i '  '"What can you do?" he asked.  ''   ' "Anything requiring skill aud  agil-  , ity."  "Ah! that is. saying a great deal.  Can 3**ou give me an evidence of your  ability?" '    ,  iThe words were scarcely spoken when  they made a perilous leap over his head,  turned a double 'somersault, and landed  : in smiling precision before him.    Pedro  | was   delighted;' the ��������� engagement;   was  j soon concluded at a ,ver3r small weekly'  ! stipend, the brothers saying: ."Pay us  j what you please; you must decido that."  '    ;    From  the advent of those  two  un-  j known (for no one knew their'real names  j���������they* simply styled   themselves Dick  j and Dock) good fortune seemed to smile  I''on this traveling show. '  ���������  ;    In truth, it was impossible to imagine  ; anything more graceful and daring than  ! these young acrobats, whether suspend-  I ed from tho trapeze, Hying through the  ' I air, or leaping and vaulting in the most  I wonderful manner���������they seemed as one  j body animated by one will;   then  with  ;' incomparable grace they would /light' on  I their feet, and,  hand in  hand,   receive  ��������� the plaudits of 'the  delighted   crowd,  while golden louis, bouquets and billets-  . doux,' thrown by dainty; hands,   would  fall-in the sawdust ring.    But these per- -  fumed billets never had  the  honor- of  -   being   opened���������--not    even    their   seals  broken���������for Dick and Dock seemed   ut-.  terly oblivious to blondes or brunettes,  and when not in the arena, were1 always,  studying their profession or��������� practicing  ,\  new feats of strength and agility.  .  .,    Nevertheless,   they   were good  com-  ,,  ,rades with Joannot, tho clown; with the  cannon-ball man and with the colossal  . fat "woman,   who   was no other than  "madame Pedro herself.   Amid all this  adultation only ,one person seemed indifferent to their attractions and t that  was 2sTita,t the only daughter of , Pedro,  ^themost exquisite little darling you can  ��������� imagine ��������� in    her   rose-colored   gauze,  spangled with gold; she looked like some  aerial-creature flying round the ring,  leaping through   the  hoops  of paper.  Fresh as,a. rose  and  changeful as a*  butterfly,    she   mockingly <_teased   the-  brothers, sometimes running after Dick,  sometimes leaping on the trapese behind  Dock.-     Very, cold   and   correct  they  silently received her "r coquetries, never'  showing "the  leasV, familiarity to/the''  daughter of their ^patron.  Time rolled on, and gold rolled into  , the coffers of Pedrav   He was growing  9 rich, and often' wondered "at tlie  indif-  '   ference, of Dick and Dock,   who  had  never asked ,for an' increase' of; salarj--.  This mercenary Spaniard, Pedro, could,  ^   understand why a man would toil  for  -profit 01 position, but to1 work for little  or,noti]ns,Jw.'is unnatural���������there must be  something behind it.* -'  Suituyiiiy a t-iougut struck him. The3r  .   were striving to establish a reputation,.  . "and would then set up- a business for*  themselves.      He  must   retain     these  valuable assistants by a bond not easii3r-  j broken.    "I will'give them my daught-  ; er Nita.    Sapriste! she can only marry  ! one of them; which shall it be?   Dick is  I stronger than Dock,  but Dock is more  I agile and graceful."  ..j     Then Pedro took a decided resolution  ''-< atfid laid his dilemma before the brothers.  " ���������  -''��������� 'Which one of you will marry my lit-  tleJSuta?"- " ���������.--.*  Dick and Dock exchanged looks, then  one of them said: "In ten days we will  answer vou."��������� "Ah, yes," confirmed the  other'; "in ten days."  "That's all right,'' said Pedro. "After  the balloon ascension; I understand." .  Pedro had arranged with an aeronaut  for a balloon ascension, a trapeze to be  attach eel to the car, on which the brothers would perforin their wonderful feats  five hundred^meters above the earth.  - Naturally, thsy, Swished to wait until,  after this perilous adventure before they  could decide."**  Shucupin a court they daily practised  those dangerous exercises which were to  augment their renown and the pocket-  book of their employer.  The day of -the exhibition, arrived���������a  perfect sea of faces���������the baloon oil the  centre swaying like a bird trying her  wings. Wild shouts of enthusiasm as  Nita appeared in her e**oid-spangled costume, dexterous!}- driving the chariot  containing the two brothers. She was  more beautiful n-nd coquettish than ever  ��������� in her rose-colored gauze���������perhaps in'  contrast to Dick and Dock, who were  dressed in black velvet, lightly touched  with silver lace���������rather a funeral costume for such a festive occasion, but  probably choo-jn���������.because the}-would .be  more clearly outlined on the bright blue  skv. ������������������",-���������  Leaping to the ground, the brothers  gracefully salute the crowd: then, turning to Nita, they kneel before her and  gracefully kiss her hand���������something  they had never done before.  The aeronant mounts his car, followed by the two brave acrobats. " Let  her loose!" A moment's silence���������then  deafening shouts of enthusiasm as the  balloon cleaves the air.  Two young and graceful forms climb'  ; through the Cordage of the car and ap-  I pear upon the trapeze.    Their grace and  ��������� audacit}' were marvelous.    With folded  ���������-farms they stand facing each other, very  ��������� pale but'very. determined; a slight iho-  i tion of the hips maintains their equili-  ! brium."   Dick was tne first to speak,  i     "You love Nita ?"    "Yea, and you���������"  I     "Love her and cannot give her up."  I     "And I will not,"answered Dock.  ��������� "Then fate must decide��������� the survivor  will take her."  They step back the length of the trapeze���������a knife clasped in their right  hands���������and in bitter ^anguish gaze upon  each other, utterly careless of the wind  that swayed the trapeze back and forth,  of the vawning gulf below-. Then, with  panting breath and gleaming eyes, they  rush upon each other, still clinging to  the bar that bends beneath their weight;  a frightful struggle ensues; cheer after  cheer from the admiring crowd, Nita  wildly applauding with the others.  ASTHMA SURE FREE  '     ' - "���������  Asthmalene'Brings Instant Relief and Permanent''        - ;  ' '��������� -,       . ���������*" ' '  Cure in All Cases. ���������      , ' "    >  irewery.  fpesh Lager: Beer-  ���������V  THE BEST .,*   IN THE PROVINCE  SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL!  ���������Write Your Name and'Address Plainly., '   <;'  There is nothing like Asthmalene.  brings instant relief,   even   in the   wors  ca;es.    ,It cures when all else fai.s.   ,,  -  The llev. C   P. Wells,' of   Villa   Ridge,  III., says:   ."Your trial'  bottle of   Abthma-  kne received ,in good coDdition.      I ,cannot  tell 3'ou how thankful I (feel* for  the, good  derived from it.    I   was  a  slave,*  chained,  with putridjaor- throat and Asthma for ten  years.    I despaired of ever being enred.    I  saw your advertisement for the cure of this  dreaaful and--,tormenting disease,   Asthma,  and thought you had oyerspoken yourselves  hut resolved to give it   a   trial.      To   my  astonishment,., the trihl acted like a  charm.  Scud me a full-sized bottle."        ���������   .  STEAM    Beer,   Ale,, and   Porter.   \ **      <������������������    f ' / rt  / "       - ���������  ���������  ���������' ���������*������������������    ���������-���������>.' j  A reward of $5.00 will be paid for information- leading, to conviction of  persons wit Holding or-destroying any/kegs  belonging ��������� to this company  HENRY RE IF Ki:,   Manager.  v j ���������  Rev. Dr. Morris Weshsler,  . ' < Rabbi of the Cong. Bnai Lrael,  ,'    Now Fork, Jan   3, 1901.  Drs, Taft Bro3\ Medicine Co.,   -  (Gentlemen: Your A-thnialeue is ' an"e*<i  cellcn-^remedy for Asthma and Hay, Fever,  and its composition -illevia es ail troubles  which combine with Asthma. Its successes  .astonishing and wonderful,  cont' ins no   opium  After having it carefully analyzed, we can state that Asthmalene  morphine, chloroform or ether.    Very trulj yours,     '  '     '.        ,        \, REV. DR. MORRIS WECHSLER  -��������� Avon Springs,'N. Y.,'Feb. 1, 1901.  Dr. Taft Bros   Medicine Co. '   "    , '  Gentlemen: I write this testimonial from a sense of duty, having tested trie wonderful effect of your Asthmalene, for the cure'of Autbma. My wife has been ' afflicted with-  spasmodic asthma for the past 12 \eurs. Hayii-g exhausted my own skill as well as  Tmauy other*. I chanced to aee your sign upon your windows on 130th sireet New York, 1('  at once obtained a bottle ot Asthmale-ie. My wife commenced taking it about th������ first of  November. I.very so<;u noticed a radical improvement. Aster using one bottle her  Asthma has disappeared aod she ih entirely free- from all symptoms. I eel that I can consistently recommend the m^'icinc- to ail who are afflicted wit'i thisdistjessins; disease.    ���������  -.    ' Yours respectfully, O.' D. PHELPS,- M.D.  i.       ��������� ���������  Dr. Taft Pros. Medicine Co. . feb. 5,51901.  Gentlumen: , I was troubled with Asthma for 22-years. I have tried riiiiiierous remedies, but thev havs all' failed. I ran acrossj-oiir^dvertisement and dtartnl with a trial  bottle. I foun-* relief at once. 1 have .-.ince purchased.yoiu ful;-aize bottle, and I am  ever gratefu . "I have'family .of four children, and.f. r six yeais was unuble to work. I am '  now in the best of health aud doing business every day. vi'l'hid tt--;itiiiion-y y- u^can make use  of as you e'ee fit< ���������   (���������' ���������    -- ' ,  Home'audress, 235 Rivingtoii Street.      ��������� ''*   S.RAPHAEL, , j  -'' '   (     ��������� 67 E.ist J29ui St., NewY' rk City,  ,., ^   . ������������������  -    _ i      ,  ������������������      TRIAL BOTTLE SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE. ON'RECEIPT  ���������  - -'^       '    ' " OK POS'lAL'. "'-���������'-'  D<> not delay.;   Write at ouce, a.idr, miug DR. TAFT   BROS.   MEDICINE   CO  Eist 130fch St., New York^City. ,m   ' '   ^ * -      '��������� ,     '  . SOLD  BV ALL DRUGGISTS.  men tney erana motionless ror a moment, when, by a sudden movement,  Dick makes Dock lose his hold and fall  back on the trapeze. Bending over him,  he says: "Will you give up Nita?"���������  "Never 1" He buries his knife in his  brother's throat, the hot blood spurting  in his face. ������������������  ��������� With a wild maniac laugh, he -rises  ���������up and leaps into space, falling.a crushed,  and helpless mass on a distant roof;, the  dead body of his brother , convulsively  clinging to tho trapeze, iioating in the  blue sky'while the aeronant, . who had  seen nothing of this terrible tragedy,  ���������tttill -waves his ������o.ylv-colored flajrs.  t  , Enconrofving.   r  Now that the steamer excursion, was  nearly overhand they could sco the lights  of the city dancing on the waters tho  young man grew serious.  "I should like," ho said, "to pursue the  acquaintance welinve begun in so casual  a way on this boat, and with, your permission I shall* venture,to call upon you  at your home."  "But I don't even know your name,"  protested, the maiden, with becoming diffidence.  "My name," he replied, "is Eddy."  And the friendly darkness hid the  blush that suffused her cheek as she responded softly:    ,  "You may call, Eddy."���������-Chicago Tribune.  '   Their  Second  Mectlner.  When Miss Swagger mot Mr. Sap-  hedde at tho seaside, she thought he was  a millionaire, and he permitted her to  think so, although he was a humble  clerk iu a hotel at the Skwedunk. On  her return home ' some weeks after his  departure it so happened that she stopped over night at the Skwedunk hotel.  Her meeting with Mr. Saphedde was  very embarrassing to him until she said,  "Oh. you didn't tell me you were a hotel*  proprietor."  "No," be said airily. "I own several  hotels over the country, but I.' didn't  think they were hardly worth mentioning. "���������Ohio State Journal.  ���������r w        >  Jtopmalt t lanaimo; Bj-'  *s������",4*\**-* A**-*-  Tv  "lllWl^'-^^--7'   -^-?^-g^--^ ~--** >���������������������������****.���������.r^C? -  '|i  i fmm ii     'xiiwi HM I    i inn i jrr.rT--..  Steamship Schedule-Effective September 30th. 1901  NANATMO-COMOX   ROUTE.  S. S. "City of Nanaimo.'  Sails from Nanaimo, for Union  Wharf, Comox and Way ports on  Wednesdays at 7 a. m.  Sails from Comox and Union  wharf for Nanaimo and way  ports  Thursdays at 8 a. m.  Iiayingr Plnn������.  "What style of house does your husband expect to build, Mrs. Nooritche?  Do you favor the Gothic or the Italian  renaissance?"  ; ;  "Well, I don't know just which of  them I like best..v It don't make much  difference to me as long as at has more,  rooms in it than the Blewbluds have and  the doorknobs are real brass. We can  j������-t along without a Gothic or that Italian thing, I guess, as long as we have a  good high attic finished off and a Turkish corner."���������Chicago Record-Herald.  's. s.   THISTLE/'  Sails from Nanaimo for .Union  wharf and Comox direct on Thursdays at 10 a. m. ,  Sails from Comox and Union  wharf for Nanaimo direct on Fridaj'  at 6. p.m.  GEO. Ii. COURTNEY,  Traffic Manag-er  Black Diamond lursery  QUARTER. WAY, Wellington Road  EUTCHEESOI  %  PEEET  TO THE Ti'AF.   ,  A rich lady cured of her' Deaf,-  ness and Noises in c-the Head by  Dr. ( Nicholson's ��������� Artjfcial     Ear  Drums, gave $]0,000 to his ..Inst)-  tute. po tl.iHt defif people unnblp to  procure the Ear'Drums may have  them free Address No. 14517  The Nicholson Institute, 7 SO  Eighth Avenue, New York, U.S.A.  KURTZ'S OWN  KURTZ'S PIONEER, or  KURTZ'������ SPANISH BLOSSOM  CIGABS  Best in B. C.  and made  by Union Labor ih  ���������&���������������  ASSESSMENT 'AfT AND PROVINCIAL'  , REVENUE TAX.  The  ttz k C-o's  pioneer CBigar ^factory,  Vancouver.B. C.  ria e  ,   .   ,. Incredible.  He���������This author should be ashamed of  himself.   A married man too!  His Wife���������What does he say?  He���������He says that a man's wife "gazed  at him in speechless astonishment."  Why, such a thing is unknown In matrimony!  v--.    ���������   w,  .    ... v..      .���������   ' '���������'    -Ji&H��������� -a"*.-���������"  20,000 Fruit Trees to choose from.  Xiarg-e Assortment of Ornamental  Trees, Shrubs and Everg-aeens,  Small Fruits   in   Great   Varietv.  Orders   by  tended to.  sl2tc  mail   promptly   at-  P. O.    BCX, 190  Two very desirable  4-Roomed Cottages in  the best residential part  of Cumberland. Bar-  rains. Owner leaving  the country. Bona fide  intending purchasers  apply at  iy5      THIfi OFFICE:  WANTED  All kinds plain sewing. . Work  promptly attended to. Apply to  MISS OLSEN, atMrd  R   Grant's  'y.OMox District.  Ml TIC'-] is hereby given, in accoidancc  ���������*��������� ^      rfun the   Statutes,    thftt  Provincial  Keviauu Tax, and  all    taxes   levied   unuur  the Assessmeut Act, are  now/due   for  the  year 1901.    All the above-named taxes collectible within the Cooiox District-are  payable at my otiice. at   the Uourt House Cumberland.    Assessed taxes are collectible  at  the following rates, viz:���������  If p ������id on or before June 30th, 1901:���������  Three-fifths of one   per   cent,   on  real  property. ' ���������  Two  .ind   one-half   per   cent.' on  assessed  'value of wild land.' ���������  One-half of one per cent,  on   personal property.  Upon   uch excess of inco<jne���������u  Class A.���������Oo one thousand dollars and not  exceeding ten thousand dollars,  one   per  cent,   up  to five thousand  dollars,  and  two per cent, on the remainder:  Class'B ���������On ten thousand dollar-, and not  excfeding tAenty thousand  dollars,   one  aud one-half per cent, up to ten thousand  dollars, aud two and one-half per cent, on  the- remainder :  Class O.���������On tweuty thousand dollars, aud  not exceeding rorty thousand dollars, two  and oue-hulf per cent, up totwency thousand dollars, and three   per  cent,   oa  the  remainder :  Class D.���������Ou all others iu excess   of forty  tnousand dollars, three per   cent,   up   to  forty thousand   dollars,   and   three   and  one-half oer cent, on the remainder.  If paid ou or after 1st July, 1901 :���������  .Four-fifths of one per cent, on real property.  Three per cent. ; on the   asses^fd   value  of  wild land.  Three-quarters of one per cent, on pereonal  property. ������������������''*-''''  On so much of the income of any person as  exceeds one thousand dollars, in accordance with the following classifications;  upon such excess   the   rates   shall   be,  ���������    namely ��������������������������� ������������������['   ��������� ,  Class A* On one thousand dollars, and not  exceeding ten thousand dollars, one and  one-half per cent, np to five thousand  dollars, and two and one-half per cent.'  on the remainder,:  Class B���������-Oh ten thousand dollars, and not  exceeding twenty thousand dollars, two  per cent, up to ten thousand dollars, and  three per cent, on the remainder :  Class 0^��������� On twenty thousand dollars, and  not excee-i-vig forty thousand dollars,  three per cent, up to twenty thousand  dollars, and three and one-half per cent,  on the remainder :'.'���������;  Class D.���������-On all others in excess of forty  thousand dollars, tbre and one-half per  cent, up to. forty thousand dollars, and  four per cent on the  remainder.  Provincial Revenue Tax  S3 per capita.  JOHN BA1RD,  Assessor and Collector.  Cumberland, B.C., 11thJanuary, 1901.  My 22 , +z~*rTm&t*i*'  "ZSPttn* -:  ���������^?jvxf:r  ^r\r"*h y**>  '������������������������J*SJ-*J-  a  v  THE   CUMBERLAND   NEWS  -    Issued Every Wednesday*;.;' ,    '  W. B. ANDERSON,  EDIT0H  ��������� The columns of The News are open co all  who wish to express therein views on- matt-  ra of public interest.   '  While we do not hold ourselves, responsi  ���������f  ble'for the utterances of correspondents, we  reserve,  the r ght   of   declining  to  inser*"  -.,'.. *-*., '  -    ,  ommunication8 unnecessarily,personal.  i WEDNESDAY,- JANY*. 22/1902.|  r-.-_ -   _ .-���������>���������-.        ������������������-    '    ���������  - 'Solii&yAIlKeW-sdealers1  ������ Our fee returned if-we fail;   Any one sending sketch and description of  any invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerning the patent-  ! ability of same.,   " How 'to/ obtain a patent" sent upon request.    Patents  " secured through us advertised for sale at our expense. <  Patents taken out through us receive special^notice-without charge, in  The Patent Record, an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted  ' by Manufacturers and Investors.'' /,   'n  Send for sample copy FREE.    Address,,     *-*,-.-..  VICTOR Ji EVANS &   CO.,  * .  n     / (Patent Attorneys,)>', -, t  rifaits BuiMing,     ������- ������������������< WASHINGTON,*. G.  Espiinalt - & Nanaimo Ry.  ,   -TIME TABLE *EFFECTIVE  "   NOV. 19th, 1898.'    '  "  VICTORIA TO WEI/LIiSTGTON.  No. 2 Daily  a.m.'  De. 9:00 ...  '   9:28,...  "   10:9 ...  "   10:48....  -    p.tvtI ,  12:W        '.Nanaimo.  A . 12:3 ..'... Wellington  No. 4 ?.!   4-vr  ,   ' l'.ii.  .... Victoria.., '..... De. 4:25  ..-.Qoldscream: ������������������   4-53  ���������' Koenig-s..:.- "   5.31  .<���������....Dunca.113....... .'...6:15  P.M.   Ar. 7=55  WELLINGTON!). TO '.VICTORIA.  Furnishes .Monthfy to all lovers of  Song, and Music*'a vast volume of New,  Choice Copyright' Compositions by  'the most popular authors'* ;> ���������?_"'- - ���������"'  64 Pap cf.Piaao psic  < ' Half Vocals Half Instrumental  21 Complete Pieces fcfPiaqB:  1  )  } ,  >-  ' l" Once a-Month for'25 Cents..  -~ Yearly Subscription, $2.00.  .If bought in any music 'store at      ���������-.  ��������� ' '  one-half off, -would cost $5.25,  - * a saving* of $5.00 monthly. <,*���������'.  ���������- In" one year ypa get nearly, 800 Pages of -  'Music,"comprising 252 Complete Pieces  -/-for the Piano.> J        ������r.'"   >'  -      ,V"  - ,h If you, will send us the Name and Address of  , -. FIVE Piano ��������� and Organ Players, 'we will' send  ;��������� you a copy,.of the Magazine Free.  -  J.  W.   PEPPER,   Publisher,  Eighth * Locust SU., Philadelphia, Pa.'  1 f  1  /     .  \    '-* SUBSCRIPTION \-. t.;  For   tlie- "Ji^-.-W.. >Pepper _ Piano  Music-Magazine,"price Two Dollars?  \'er year (postage*������������������ paid),-��������� -ca:i   be'  rpWed<Wy applying to-t Fie  office  of  .-News,   Cm ��������� berln'nd!,   B. C.,  .where  c 'fiarnn bp peen. '  1 - --v.'  ���������***���������������������������  The Bestand Most Influential  Mining Paper  in   the   World."'  g  No. I Daily.      ' - .,/������       No. 3Sntvrday.'  < A.M. - .-, ' A>AI#  ���������R.e,|:05" Wellington ��������� De. 4:25  , ���������   |:?6 'Nanftinio.:    "���������1:39''  .. ,%������������������������ Duncans .'....... ���������'   6:05  4, J?:?I ��������� Koenig's*.  "   6:10  ii:l������    Goldstream ."-���������   7.32  Ar. 11:45    .,      ...Victoria '..Ar. 8:00 km.  Reduced latea lo and from, all points  Saturdays and Sundays good to return Mon.  day.**     -" ;     '  "For, rates  and   al" information    apply at  Company's Offices.       > ���������     ��������� '  A. nUNSMUIR  President. ,  ,  J AS. A. Q ART H E W"S \  Liv.erv;*' Stabiej.  'I'EAMSTER - 'AND' DRA.YMEN   ^  *  Single and ' Double big3 rZ  for Hire.     All -Orders'   \  Promptly   Attended   to. ,  :  R.SHAW, Manager. \ -- :  Third St., Cumberland, B.C:  ij,  ,p ���������-,  rf r  Geo. L. COURTNEY.'  ��������� Traffic Manager  * *  OF EVERY CLASS AND DESCRIPTION',.'.,  .<-  (i  -i   ���������/  "4  At    LOWEST    R AT ES  '>  CIRCULARS.  f ,  s."NOTICED ^V  ������������������-*���������'    ., ^  -   -1  * BILL-HEADS ;   .  ','   LETTER HEADS >   ���������  MEMORANDUMS  - ,'   ', '' "envelopes;   .'*������' - '  \'\ . ',  ''  ' business cards  LABELS & BAGS Vj ,  V     ,  --   .. ;;'    ���������" 4  \ BILLS'OF FARE  /Etc.,'  <       (   -  Etc,  Etc.  vn Notice. :  ,'   '   < *"        , ,1' '~  .+1|. Riding���������on locomotives and /rail  !way cars of the -Union .riolliery  ,-Company by any person 'or per  ^sons-1���������except train crew���������is strictly  .(prohibited.,,! Employees are subject to dismissal for allowing same  - - -' 'r   ' v     , By order   ���������.   ," "' '  ���������������     -, -1,1 1  -. .'   ',:?/' Francis D." Little"  '   y *F Manager.-' - >  ���������>>.  .-  >���������  CONCERT PROGRAMMES  "BALL PROGRAMMES  , DISPLAY BILLS  POSTERS   , ���������    -:   .  "   '   ,.    .CONCERT TICKETS]  ;.    BALL'TICKETS  '   "    s '. ''' "MENUS      '     -    '.  RECEIPT FORMS    \ t   -       ;,  ' ,     , * . .*',--*      .;���������.  .      7 ABSTRACT of ACCOUNTS  ' Etc:.':' "   ''vEtc", V; <   -Etc.- >'-  , IHave ta'K'sn    Office  in the  Nas,h-     Building,  . Dunsmuirr Avenue,,,. Cumberland.  and;am agent  for" the .'following*'  ,.   .reliable/ insurance"' companies:  'The  Royal   London "and'* Lan  .^cashire and Norwich , Union.   <���������  ',  'am  prepared to  accept������risks aJ  current * rates.  . I am ..also agent  '  for the Standerd Life/Insurance  f, .Company of Edinburgh and the  ' Ocean"Accident Company of Eng-  *������.. land. '/Please -'cail-/iand; investi-'  ... ;gate before-insurins in any 'other .  'Company.        ' 'i ..   "   ', '   .~ - ��������� j **  -\\*Vr .      /JAMES ABKAMS? Z  S^gg-ggggg g������^fe^e@g ??^^%^?^ " -7  -'  . - '" :������������������- : t- ^''/  CumhENand'.',.   .;.:. -:-,*:  Hobel.    ���������>���������-,:./ ���������/*'/:  ,    cor: dunsmuir avenue -; >  ! AND , SECOND .', STREET, ?r'i  ��������� ��������� '���������   CUMBERLAND,'B/c'.'*''<       '���������������'  Mrs. J. H. Piket,-Proprietress. " '* ' , c'  ��������� /     . '/ 'r'     ;*/ ���������    '/- '-v;r  - When in Cumberland; be; sure'' '; >, j  ;   and stay,' at/the  Cumberland/, 'Zr.  -���������,    Hotel,  First-Class/-Accomoda^^/;;  tion for' transient/and'perman^ ; p  'ent boarders/* ������&?+}'}; -X*'' -'^/Cf'-";  Sample R?oms and;^J3Jic/H^ft]!  Run in Connection ������with'2.>foteV%^i  Rates from-:$lio6 to������$2.66 /per idav,W  PUBUSHED WEEKLY, $5.00 PER YEAR.  SPECIMEN   COPY   FREE. -.  I  253 Bro&.dw&.y,   --  New York.  ORDERS  EXECUTED WITHOUT DELAY.' '  Henry's Kurserits  ' ... M Greenhouses  GREENHOUSE   PLANTS' AT THE  LOWEST PRICES.  F~Sti  Death Intimations  Funeral  Invitations  Memoriam  Cards  On Shortest Notice.  evens  Ideal Rifle.  No. 44.  BeeSupplies,Seeds, arid  Fertilizers.  Agricultural   Implements, Fruit  Baskets and Crates.    ' '   ���������  Fruit and Ornamental Trees.  ;,Biilb-rv for fall planting.  Catalogues free.  M. J. HENRY  3009 Westminster Road  VANCOUVER, B. C  WHITE LABOR  ONLY.  It will Pay you  TO   ADVERTISE   IN   THE          im  NEWS,"  GREAT  WEST  LIFE.  T  HE reason why the Great West  Life Assurance Co. has more  business in force than any other Company ever had at this same age, is their  promptness in Paying Claims, and the  Liberal Contract given, free from all  annoying restrictions.  Any information asked for will be  promptly and cheerfully given.  A. ANDERSON,  General Agent,  Drawer, 5. Nanaimo, B.C.  The most Northerly Paper published on the Island.  Subscription,       - -       $2 oo  per an.  G������  ^c  -K-  Advertising:  , Price Only $10.00.  Made in all the standard calibers both Rim and Center Fire.  Weight about 7 pounds. Standard barrel for rim fire cartridges,  24 inches. For center-fire cart-  ridges, 26 inches.  t t  If these rifles are not carried incstock  by your dealer, send price and we will  send it to you express prepaid.  . Send stamp for catalog describing complete line and containing valuable information to shooters.  The J. Stevens Arms and Tool Go.  P. o. Box 2670'       CHIC0PEE FALLS, MASS  > C f������< ��������� ^J ,\\ v-1- -/"i-,* ,t/lk |  TRADE MARKS*/ /*<-sf  -'���������'-'!''  DESIGNS,, .' .- -*J->\  ���������W  COPYRICHT3 *0- -%  i n������i^k*u-ii^TJir���������"jm ���������=������������������--* ������nd description mar1/- - -^*i  i quick.y ascertain, free, whether an invention ia "^ '-  . Prob������bly patentable. ''coamwSiSuSS^bSStS  nAS?^S^5S?n*#* skotcJI a?d description mar  mick.v ���������"".���������tain, free, whether anMnventlonla\   . , -,. ,���������  ���������eA',*^lble- :Co*mnnn-������������tloM strictly ' ^'rAf  - Eldest agency forsecurin* patonti *-i^ ^J  . Wn havo. a Washington office.      \T ;-#f  'j iu tho -    ', ,. " -���������   ������������������-'"- ti  "'*-  SCIENTIFIC; AMERICAN;  ?rw'rHrla"*fi^'*s*������  Z,���������~.!,3lL.?19i*tb8 ���������   Speclnipn CODiea and I  confidential.  '%atent^Wn' thToi&T ������������X"2oSl ^SVa     , v  . Bjiecial notico iu tho -    -, ,������������������ .vr������* -'Sri*!*?,., ;*, Sv. -,  f?*M six m'nf*^S^rna-]' ^kly,terms$3.00 ayw;'>';^>>  ��������� tree. < Addrcag  .. ' ..MUNN   4   CO.,' ���������/  '.,1!  .i   t  '   * ���������'< I  li  oooooooooo ooooooooo  iLiveryi  .8      -A-nsriD.-'V 8";  0'v  >- ������������������   - - . iSC  Teaming  ��������� O,    I am  prepared   to * O   \..|  ������ ' .furnish Stylish Rigs;! ���������������'  O    J and cio Teaming'at ' C 1 V:J  ������   . reasonable rates. ���������  - q  gD. KILPATRICK,     g.  o Cumberland ������  ooooooobooooooooboo  FISHING RODS  9  Advertising  AdTertising  -Flies of any Pattern Tied to Order.  %-���������  WE  WANT YOUE  t Job' printing I  I SATISFACTORY *5S������|  Dunsmuir Ave.,  Cumberland, B.C.  Office Hours :���������8 am. till 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 8 to 1.  Fancy Inlaying in wood and metal,.  French Polishing.  "Apply  NEWS OFFICE. AN  OLD  FASHIONED  WOMAN.  No clever, brilliant thinker she,  With college record snd degree.  She has not known the paths of��������� fame;  Tlie world has ne\er heard her name.  Home is her kingdom, lo*te her dower;  She seeks no other wand of power.  Around her childish hearts are twined,  As round some rcerend saint enshrined.  And find all purity and good ,  In her dninest motherhood.  She keeps her faith unshadowed still;        <  God rulps the world 'in good and ill.        '  This sad old earth's a-biighter place  All for the sunshine of her face.     v  ,Her -\ery smile a blessing throws,  And hearts are happier where-she goe������,  A ,pentle, clear eyed messenger.  To whispiT love���������thank God for her!  ���������L. M. Montgomery m Congregationalism.  1 THE BAY,OF    I  THE DEAD!  I*..-' *  ������8   A  Story of  Piracy  and   a Hid-    .'������  jg den Treasure. -     ���������5  For years the0deep and tortuous and  ,   -fti-eat bays oh the Lab-sador coast afforded a' safe haven to bloodthirsty pirates  ' - and rovers of the seas *who,  driven by  hot pursuit from  more frequentedi wa-,  ters, repaired to this northern shore to  mend their shattered vessels.   Hero'-dur-  ing   the   short   summer   they   recovered  from their wounds; here, too, they secret-  ��������� ' ed their booty; here perchance the long  ���������^sought treasure of Captain Kidd may be  ���������    ,hidden.   Who can tell what, secrets are  held   forever  in   the   recesses   of these  '���������'    wave   beaten   and' rockbound t shores ?  '.Wondrous traditions are told of hidden  ,"     wealth on Labrador, and that these are  -, * not all 'old men's tales this true story of  Manning may convince the reader:*"  ''    Toward the'close of the eighteenth cen-  i  ' tury'a',Scotchman named Manning set-,  ' tied on the Labrador coast and alone and  ���������(     unaided followed the rough and precarious calling of a fisherman.   At the close  of each "season he visited Newfoundland  to dispose, of his catch to the English  1      traders, buy his stock of provisions and  then return to his lonely dwelling to pass  the long and dreary winter.   For several  o   'yean he led this life till," by his economy  having amassed a few hundred dollars, a  jtreat longing seized him to see his native  laid.   Accordingly he crossed the1 Atlan-  - t r- r i i  tic, .and during the round of visits to his  Scotch   friends" he   met   a   bonnie   lass  whom he persuaded to share his Labra-  *.\ dor' home.1 Fitting out a small vessel'or  ������������������schooner," he, set sail-for America with  - " his young bride and a-crew of hardy settlers and their families.   This was in the  ���������''year,180G.'' ��������� . '-��������� '.���������''-',  - ' But-after,twelve months of industry at  i," Labrador Manning grew'restless and persuaded the most active" and daring spirits  'in those parts to -join him'in a new project.   Toward the lattercpart of October,  '    1807, he placed his effects on board his  vessel and quietly slipped out of the harbor, determining to lead a life of piracy.  All his old habits of thrift and industry  seemed to have left him, a very demon of  ���������    adventure seemed to have driven out his  better feelings and wiped out all natural  affection,-' for with  heartless  cruelty  he  basely deserted his wife and young child.  .   A stranger in a strange land, far from  home and kindred, the fate of the unfortunate woman is not known. ��������� Most probably she did not survive, her cruel treatment long. '  On the coast there'is now a small settlement called Mutton Bay or Meccatina  Harbor, and about a mile east of this sct-  . tlement  is   a  deep   inlet  called   by  the  ., French "1/Arise aux.'Morts," or Bay of  '"' the  Dead.    This   bay   is .screened   alike  '    from the fury of the sea and the observation of passing vessels by a small island  which is easily mistaken for the mainland.'; Under the   rugged   and   frowning  cliffs  whichc overhang   the  Bay   of  the  Dead, so called because an old burying  ground was there, .Manning and his companions landed:' Securely sheltered, there  they perfected their plans for a life of pi-  racytand bloodshed, and in truth no spot  could   be   more   admirably   adapted   for  such a conclave."  . The course taken then by vessels on  their way to Quebec from Europe was  through the strait of Belle Isle, close to  the north shore of the St. Lawrence and  just outside of the island behind which  Manning and his crew lay in hiding. At  that date a packet was sent out annually  by tho British government with the pay  of the forces stationed in Canada on  board. Manning knew this only too well  and was on the lookout for tho vessel.  Unsuspicious of danger, she neared the  island,: when Manning, with his . ship,'  darted suddenly from his place of hiding  and swooped down upon her. She fell'an  easy prey. Her unfortunate captain rind  crew were butchered, the treasure removed, the vessel scuttled and no trace of the  foul deed left. At Quebec, the overdue  ship was anxiously looked for, but Lope  died out at last, and it was thought that  she had succumbed to the fury of the Atlantic. The following year another packet was sent out. and she shared the fate  of-her predecessor.  The loss of two vessels and their crews  in such a  short time aroused  suspicion,  and a third was sent out. but with her a  man-of-war.   All went well till the vicinity of the Bay of the Dead was reached,  ���������when, the man-of-war having fallen far  astern,  the  pirate  schooner darted  out,  quickly captured the packet, secured the  treasure and destroyed all the crew-with  one exception.   This was a negro whom  Manning wished to keep for a servant.  This man,  hoping to propitiate his captor,  told  him that the  man-of-war  was  close behind them.   The news so alarmed  the pirate that he beat a precipitous retreat to the island.   That night another  dread crime vms added to the long list already    committed    by    the    bloodthirsty  wretch.   Fearing discovery and believing  in the adage that dead men tell no talcs.  he changed his mind about the negro. He  resolved to bury his treasure, and undei  cover of a blinding storm, while the thunder rolled and the lightning cleft the sky,  he collected his ill gotten gains into five  small casks."  With  the  assistance of the negre k������  placed them in as many holes dug in the  old  burying  ground  of  the  Bay  of the  Dead.   Having accomplished this, he suddenly  sprang on  the  unfortunate- negro  and plunged a knife into his heart.   As  the   lifeblood    slowly   ebbed   away   he  twistpd   the   limp   form   of , his   victim  around the central cask.   At this dread  "moment the old Scotch superstitious nature asserted itself, and he believed that  the  "wraith"  of the  negro ,would   keep  truard over the treasure, preventing* any  adventurous outsider from unearLhlng.it.  He then heaped up the earth over the five  casks in the form of graves,'judging that  no French habitant,.whose reverence for  the   dead   is   proverbial,   would   molest  them,   and   at  each   apparent grave  he  placed a stone to carry out the illusion.  QAr dawn the pirate sentinels saw tlto  man-of-war sailing through the western  passage and heading toward their retreat.  Sail was quickly set, and the schooner  escaped through the eastern outlet.   The  storm of the previous night still  raged  wild and fierce.   The sea was lashed to  fury.   The .waves ran high, striking the  vessel with resistless force, throwing her  on a sunken reef. With despairing shrieks  and prayers to the God whose laws they  had  outraged   her 'wretched   crew  were  launched into eternity.  All were thought  to have perished. '���������  Twenty years passed, a new generation  grew up, and the story-of Manning and  his exploits was well nigh forgotten.  'Then,' as now, trading"vessels from Nov������  Scotia frequented the coast to( supply the  scattered settlements with the necessariee  of life, receiving in return furs, and fish.  In the yearr1830 the captain of one ot  these vessels happened'to be in an inn ia  Halifax talking over his summer voyages while smoking a pipe with a friend.  They observed that an old man sitting at  a table near them; sipping his whisky and  water slowly, appeared highly interested  in their conversation.  When Captain Black left the inn, the  old man followed him into the street and  eagerly questioned him, about the Labrador coast. Before they parted he made  the captain promise to take him to the  Bay, of the Dead the following spring.  Captain .Black had harboredt there once  during a great storm. "In the spring,  when the warm rays of the sun had  loosed the icy^ barriers of the coast, Captain Black, mindful of his promise, sought  the mysterious old man, but found him  dying of fever. Amid the ravings of delirium the astonished and horror stricken  caqtain was told a tale of murder, bloodshed and robbery on-the high seas and of  the hidden treasure'of .the Bay of the  Dead. - ��������� .  Manning (for the dying man.was none  other than the notorious<-'ex-pirate), with  blasphemous curses, foretold death and  destruction to any one who should attempt to secure the ill gotten wealth. In  a paroxysm'of fear and despair he died  unrepentant, unabsolved.-- The ��������� captain  was too boltl a man to,be deterred from  seeking the treasure by a'dying man's  curse, so he immediately set sail for the  Bay of the Dead. -  The weather being foggy and the coast  dangerous, he approached with the utmost caution. Within a-few hundred  yards of the coveted goal, the burying  ground, a strange faintness came over  him, and his limbs refused to bear him.  Eager to secure the" treasure which had  from long brooding become his sole object  in life, he, jvith a great effort, dragged  himself to the-bow of the vessel. At that  moment the ominous words, ''Death,  death, death!" sounded in his startled  ears. , - .���������.���������'''  A mortal fear overspread him, and he  had barely sufficient strength to order the  crew to put about. The sailors, wondering at the strange conduct of their captain, obeyed just in time to prevent striking a sunken reef. Among the crew of  Captain Black's vessel on this occasioa  was a .lad of some thirteen years of age,  Ricketts by name. The captain had made  rather a pet of this boy .and during the  iking voyage had related to him the story  of. Manning. Thirty years passed, and no  further attempt was made to wrest the  wealth from its ghostly keeper. In the  j-ear 1SG0 Ricketts, then in middle age  and living in the United States, was a  haunted man.  In dreams and in Lis waking hours the  apparition of Manning followed him, urging him to go to the Bay of the Dead and  secure the treasure. Old inhabitants of  the coast say that in that year, I860, a  atrange vessel flying the American flag  sailed into the harbor of the Bay of the  Dead. The captain, whose name was  Ricketts, hired a fishing boat and while  ostensibly cuguged in fishing operations  spent a great part of his time in exploring the shore and digging. After a mouth  spent in this mysterious way he departed,,  returning, however, tho following summer. -.-..-���������  Again he was watched and from the  burial ground at .the Bay of the Dead  was seen to'unearth a large wooden box  or cask, which he carried off with him.  Again, so late as 1S80. a strange American vessel paid .mysterious-visits to the  bay.  Their object was and is a subject of.'  endless conjecture among tho fisher folk.  There are now many graves at the Bay  of the Dead,' and the good people of the  coast, with their, great respect for the  dead, disturb them not to search for hidden treasures. .,..-..    '  It cannot be asserted positively that the  treasure of Manning has been torn from  its hiding place and the spirit of the nffl&.  dered negro released from his, long and  faithful vigil. But" it is a sure'and certain fact that a dweller under the cliffs  of the bay has of late, without apparent  effort, become very wealthy, and rumor  hints of treasure trove. Such is the story  of Manning as related by a native of that  bleak and desolate coast, and, though the  mellowing hand of time has thrown a  halo of romance over the picturesque Bay  of the Dead and the deeds done there, the  main facts, are well established.,  tightly grasped a five cent piece. '  "Let me have five cefih.' worth of ozone  Et once," she'said to the druggist. ;  "What did you say, madam?" the druggist asked.  '"Some ozone."  "Why. madam, there's ozone in your  botrle now."  "Sir, I do not want to be insulted;" replied the woman indignantly. "I know  what the doctor told me to get, and if you  don't keep it let me know: Have yougot  any ozone or not?" -        ���������     >  ' "Well," said the druggist, very deliberately, "* 'ozone' is an element in the air  v,-e breathe, and unless the air, in your  bottie has become contaminated it has  about as high'a percentage of it as any I  have in the store. I would suggest that  possibly your physician meant that yon  should get some benzoin." I   ���������  0"Oh, yes," hastily replied the-woman,  "that's it. I knew it was something like  ,ozonc." i    ,  She took tlie five cents' worth of benzoin, .which was almost lost sight of on  account of the ozone which still remained  in the quart bottle.���������New York Times.  The Explanation.   < '  Jones (referring to the pleasant faced  lady who has just passed)���������Ah, my boy,  I owe a great deal to that woman.  1   Brown���������Indeed.    Who is she?  Jones���������M.v Inndl.'idv , , ',.  | THE-;BROKEN-  ICHAirt...  fi '*  ������    , A Story of Italian Hove.    X  c-> . ������j>  Giacomo went rapidly up the stairs to  the fifth floor, and when he had reached  the last landing, on which .two* doors  opened^ono at the right and the > other at  the left, he paused for a' moment, drew a  key from his pocket and for a long-time  regarded, the left'hand door, ��������� heaved a  deep sigh and then opened the door on the  right.-As he stepped oyer the sill he turned his head quickly.and again gazed longingly." at the other door, gave a second'  sigh and finally stepped inside. On entering his 'little room ho removed his overcoat, took a. chair, placed it beside the  wall, seated'himsejf thereon astride, lighted a cigarette and-remained thus, watching tho clouds'of smoke'that ascended to  the ceiling, every few minutes placing his  ear against the wall. ,  lie continiied -to sit there for some  time, had smoked more than one cigarette and had repeatedly placed his,ear  against the wall, when his face. hitherto|  clouded, suddenly assumed an expression'  'of joy. Some one-was moving about'in  the oth������er room.'  "She has come home,"'murmured the  young man. and," in fact, a sound of  chairs and dishps could now be heard. '  " "She ,is preparing supper,"'again,murmured Giacomo, .and, -leaning his head  against the wall, he tried; to catch'every  -mpvement'of bis neighbor, for, though he  could not see her, he was happy in feeling that she was'there'and in thus being  .ihle to live next door to her.   -,  Poor Giacomo! He feared (that he  should never again behold her, and this  was indeed a great grief to him. At one  time he had been accustomed to see her  often, for he used to arrange to meet her  on the stairs, and tnere he was wont to  await her coming for hours and on seeing  her approach at a distance of hastily  ascending a few steps in order to give her  time to arrive, when he would.go slowly  down stairs, feigning to meet her by  chance. But he was always so overcome  on beholding her pass by, ever serious and  reserved, -that he would then bow more  awkwardly than tho most diffident schoolboy and lower his eyes, too timid to gaze  upon her. ,It was all in vain that he told  himself to be less shy, to practice bowing,  to find some pretext to start a conversation, or to make some brilliant remark,  tor- at the ��������� psychological moment all his  fine intentions vanished in thin air, and  he ended by saluting the girl more awkwardly than ever and on one of these occasions by even dropping his hat. Finally,  in despair of ever succeeding in overcoming his timidity and emotion and fearful  of .producing a bad impression, he had renounced tho satisfaction of seeing her at  all. In this way, thought he, if I'cannot  succeed in rendering myself attractive I  shall at least be sure of not displeasing  her. and he had then arranged his manner  of life so as to.go out aud return simultaneously with his fair neighbor and had  tlv.;s contented himsplf with living beside  her, his existence to a certain degree in-  Wanted. Five Cents' Wortlt of Ozone.  A woman rushed into a drug store the  other day.    In one hand she carried an    ^^ ���������..__,��������� J   empty quart bottle and in the other sh6 J was onjy ^gij together by a miracle and  terwoven with hers, while she perhaps  did not suspect that such a person as  himself even existed.'  So he saw her no more, though he now  knew who she was. Her name was Car-  lotta. She supported herself by doing  embroidery, going out early every morning and returning to her home in the  evening. Giacomo was filled with admiration for .this courageous and beautiful  crii-1, who. though all alone in the world,  ��������� for alone she certainly must be, as she  received no visitors, should thus resist all  lhe temptations tapt beset her pathway.  She had .come to live in this house the  preceding year. At first he had only  thought of her as a pretty girl and no  more. Then by degrees, living there thus  beside her, he had ended by always thinking of her and by loving her with . his-  whole heart. If she had only been willing  to say a word or two (to him or if he on  his; side had only; had the courage to  speak, his declaration or rather his profession of faith would have been' brief,  but conclusive���������thus, for instance:  "Signorina, I love you. Will you be my  wife?".  But, then, alas, in order to offer his  hand to the girl it was necessary that the  hand should contain something, and Giacomo unfortunately had nothing. He was  a painter, one of* those artists who  "arise" in the end, but who at the time  possessed naught save hopes and whose  canvases found no purchasers, so that  the poor boy had been compelled to sell  his furniture in order to pay his rent.  Nothing now remained save his bed and  this wretched, shabby old cane chair that  signorina?" ".  "Yes, signor. Last night after the,  commotion caused by your fall, not hearing any further sound, If eared that some  misfortune had befallen you and, so came  here and found you' in. a faint. Now,  however, you are much better, and in a  few days you will be quite yourself  again. But, tell me, how in the world did  you ever happen to fall off your chair in  so strange a manner?"  Giacomo did not reply and blushed  deeply. But women are quick to divine  the sentiments that they inspire, and  Carlotta was not long in reading the  young man's heart.  And now Giacomo and Carlotta are  husband and wife and as happy as it is  possible to be in this world. Carlotta ia  no longer compelled to embroider. The  sale of some of her husband's pictures,  for he is now beginning to be known, i3  sufficient .to provide for them both. They  are living in a sim*">'e but pretty apart-  on which, he was ,now seated, smoking  and lending an ear to the slightest sound  that proceeded lrom the other side of the  wall.  As the blind who by the sense of touch  alone can give an accurate description of  the form of any object, thus Giacomo on  hearing'the rustle of ��������� Carlotta's, gown  against the furniture by her step, now  advancing, now retreating,' by' the silence  that from time to time succeeded sound,  had at last come to "see" ,her,: just as if  she was really standing before him, and  "so would say to himself:  "Now she is setting the table."  "Now she is eating."' ,        , '  ,    "Now she has finished."      , _ '  "Now she,is putting away the things."  And then it would seem to him that he  was really sitting beside her contemplating her in silence.  Sometimes when seated as usual astride  his, chair���������his observatory, as he called it  ���������he would close his eyestaud, give free  rein to-bis imagination.       t,    .    r <.  "Who knows of what she may now be  thinking?", he  would  then  ask  himself.  "Who knows but that she may even suspect, that I am here beside her?   Ah. if  she only knew how I Jjved her!" And the  temptation would then seize him' to make  some disturbance in order to attract,the  girl's attention, such as,-the discharge of  a weapon like some- make believe assa's-'  sin, one who fires a revolver loaded with  powder at a  passing prince'simply that  people may talk about him.   But the fear;  of displeasing her-restrained him, and-he  preferred' that   she, should, never" know  that hedoved,'her'rather .than to be sure,  that she would never care for him. "  ,. Then he fell to building castles in the  air.    -. ."'        t.  '"If is impossible," thought'he, "that  she should never'think of me at all.- She  knows thatTthereis such a*person as,myself; that I dive directly'adjoining ^ier.  When she comes home, she can see that  there is a light'in my-room through the  door that I leave ajar. Like all .women,  she must have some curiosity and at '  times'must surely'ask, herself what I am*  doing" and-why I never go' oiit. 'Perhaps  she has already,noticed me notwithstanding my 'awkwardness, possibly' precisely *  on that account. She may' even have divined that I love her. She may expect  mo to 'declare myself, and, seeing that I  ���������dare not do so, perhaps < she will make  the'first advances. But how can I manage that she shall.not delay doing so?"  And Giacomo, still astride his chair,  continued his reflection*.r Suppose he  were to write her a-letter and pushdt under the door? He had often thought of  doing so. But, then,1 would the girl have  read it? And, even admitting -that she  had, would not the very first,words have  wounded her?1 Should he try and get her  to speak of some one? But'of whom,  then? They had no friend- in- common.  No, no. All these means were .decidedly  objectionable .or impossible. There, was  nothing to be done but to wait. Butyoh,  how long would he have to do so?    ������������������  Meanwhile it was growing,late,-and  Carlotta in her little room was making  theneedle fly rapidly. She had decided  to finish the piece of work begun that  night, and in order not to fall asleep she  \ras singing.  Giacomo naturally sat up likewise, still  in the same -position, listening and mechanically keeping time with his body,.to  the measure of the melody. When the  tune was a slow one, all went well, but  when it was'accelerated his motions became dangerous, for the poor, trembling  chair was constrained to execute gymnastics far beyond its strength. The repertory of the beautiful brodeuse was  most extensive, and hours thus passed by,  .Giacomo truly enchanted with this concert which he was.thus privileged to enjoy.'     ' ..  After awhile, however, the.girl began  to grow weary, and the grand arias  which she had been singing from the first  to the last notes were followed by fragments of songs interrupted now and  again, while the tones of her voice grew  lower and sweeter, and to cavatinas succeeded "romances" and "reveries." Giacomo, still seated,upon his chair, was not  getting drowsy, but continued to stay  there, listening to the songs as in a sort  of dream, mechanically, keeping time by  the swaying of his body to the measure-  of the music. ' Carlotta' also was falling  asleep, but then decided not to go to bed  till her work was quite finished and so  made a supreme effort to shako off the  drowsiness that was ��������� overpowering her  and in order to do so suddenly began to  sing a waltz with all her might, "Walts  of the Roses," by, Metra. Giacomo was  now dreaming. Of course he was dreaming of waltzing aad so moved himself  about, keeping time to the music, but to  this final proof of its strength the chair  refused to respond and, with a fearful,  screeching sound, gave way, dragging  down in its fall the unfortunate cavalier.  This caused such a terrific crash that  Carlotta, overcome with fright, uttered a  loud cry, but Giacomo wassilent, for the  poor fellow in. falling had'struck'his head  against the bed and how lay stretched  upon the floor in a deep swoon.  When he finally regained consciousness,  he found himself lying on his bed with  his head bandaged, and there beside him,  watching over him while embroidering  and seated upon a chair that was neither  old nor shabby, he beheld a lovely young  girl, and whom should it be but Carlotta!  "How is this?" he exclaimed.  "You here,  ment tastefully furnished and are held in  high esteem by all who know them.  One thing, however, causes their  friends to wonder. In the place of ,honor,  in the center of their tiny drawing room,  "there stands a great ugly cane chair  which is ih so rickety a condition that in  order to maintain it in an upright posi-,  .tion Carlotta has been compelled to bind "���������  it together with cords.���������Translated From  the Italian For New York Commercial.  J)  One  ������������������  L.arry Jerome's   PronkB.  Lawrence R.������������������Jerome,  known as;Larry Jerome,, was one of, the best known ���������  of the old school of practical jokers and  "men about town." , With a  friend Mr.  Jerome was watching the progress of a  -real,heart thriller, of the old  days,   the  plot, of course, revolving about the disposition,of, a mortgage that threatened to  thwart the happiness of the heroine���������-the  charming Mrs. John Hoey, in her day as  popular  as any actress  of these times."  With the plot at its thickest/the heroine  in despair, the villain triumphant and the  outlook in every way dark for the perse-   '  cuted girl as the.curtain' was"descending ���������  at the end of the'third act.'    Larry Jer-   r  ome, with tears rolling down his cheeks,  rose from,his' seat and  in  most^ iinpas-,,,,  sioned;tones, his voice broken with sobs,,  but audible' all over< the housev exclaimed  to his companion: ,,        -       , ',-       ,  "By heaven, Tom, I'll pay that-mort-,   )  gage myself!"    '     / ���������>,      ,    >- <"' ' '  Then  this  consummate .old  joker  and '>  clever actor strolled out-into the lobby-, to  enjoy one of the biggest sensations a first ���������  night audience at Walla'ck's had'had  in.   .  their lives.    Incidentally, too, the ruse ol  Jerome's helped materially lo the making   .-.  of the play.���������New York Times. -', ' '"���������'    >'    *  ���������  ��������� - ; '      I  >    f  '1 I  '       , SpItcfnK , v  She���������He says- be loves me, yet he has  only known me, two days.      .   _ "* '  Her .Friend���������Well, perhaps that's thY. &  reason, dear.-'  ���������       \ '���������'>' >> < '  '    -.<-���������-    ���������        '"     -  ���������������, ,   ������������������ i * <  ..Bond* of Sympathy. ���������'  ,, ."There   was   one   consolation   for'"'pur  crew when they- lost that race.",     ;     - -   ,  J   "And what, was that?"  .  .        " -"   ;  "They were  all,in the same boat."��������� , ���������  Philadelphia Bulletin.    ' ' .-  ' ,o  ���������<��������� '  ������       ' , J  t-ar;  '���������   An UnsymphtlictJc Girl.-".   V\  , "Can  I confide'to yon my-secret sor-  -row, Arabella?"    ",<������������������'  "Yes,-Arthur, if-it's a new one. If  it's that"same old,one, I haven't time."������������������  Detroit Free Press.  ,0  '' r.     Johnny's QucHtlons.     , ,v t  Johnny's strapped his books and slate and started (  off to school; ,    ' ' a' '' "   *  lie's enjoined to study well and mind the"teach-  ' '      er*3 rule.      ' ���������    -        *,-���������.'        '  c  He's advised  to  con his books  and  every lesson,  learn ��������� ,  So that he may thrill the'land when it comes bur  ,- /       turn.' -.C( , '   --    ���������  That "is .why  his   father   has , a   most   important  task* * ' *- -     -i  - - -  Re must flndv.the answers for the questions John  -��������� will ask." >      >;       it       m  "Why don't water run up hill? 'Why don't scare-  ,' -.     crows fly ?���������_    "   ,,, t    _       .      ���������:        -,     ��������� ,*.  -When*was Julius C-ssar born?   How'd he come,to  .     die?    - ' it,"  Sive a list of presidents.    Where is Rickjavik?  How is it that sc\en djys only mako a week?  How do you spell phthisis, pa?    Who was in th������  axk? - " -  Where does all the  daylight stay while we're" io  ' the dark? {��������� ���������  "Why  do  pickles  make  boys  sick?    When   waa  Moses born?  Pa, how'many kernels iatin a grain of corn?  Pa, who was it held the pass at Thermopylaa?  Was it like a ciicus pass?    What is Labor day?  Pa,   what  does  a   oyster  eat?    Do .they  live ,in  beds?.'   , '  Does the little oysters' mas have 'to comb their ,  heads? *     - -   ��������� '-      ���������  "What is  germs? \ Tlie teacher  says  they're  ������d  ppneils and     * ,  Must .be antisopticized 'fore they touch our hand. '  She says they must be removed or 'twill never do. '  Are- they   like  us   little  boys���������chew  the  pencill  too?" ' '    .    .  Then   his  p������ -prill  drop his book  and  in accent!  deep  Bay,   "It's time that boys like you were'in bee  asleep."  ���������Raltimore Amenctn.  -     #  <-,   ^'  c  ��������������������������� i  Too Much For Hiin.  Doctor���������Well, Mrs. Timothy, I suppose  your husband has taken my advice and  eaten plenty, of animal food?  Mrs. Timothy���������I hardly know, doctor.  You see, it's like-.this: He was all right  with the turnips and sich like, but'when'  it come'to the hay 1 could do no good  with him at ail, at all.*  Bagley-'a Revenge. .-...*  O* one occasion, just previous to open-7  ing in one of the large eastern cities,  Joseph. Jefferson dismissed his property.;  man, -Bagley, for humiliating him before1  a number of friends by familiarly ad-!  dressing him as "Joey." Bagley got!  drunk right away and that night paid-<  his way to the gallery to see Mr. Jeffer-!  son present "Rip Van Winkle." The;  angry frau had just driven poor, destitute)  Kip from the cottage, when Rip turned'  and, with a world of pathos, asked^'  "Den haf I no interest in dis house?"*'  The house was deathly still, the audience;  half in tears, when Bagley's cracked'  voice responded, "Oniy 80 per cent, Joeyy  ���������only SO per cent." -      ���������_.,  n  k v-t h ���������  in -  i  ���������  i ���������fi-',  ��������� % *? i 1,  ~yrr  vb  THE'CUMBERLAND NEWS  CUMBERLAND. B.C.  SUMMUM,BONUM.  A1-     1  How blest is he that ran but-love and do ���������     ���������  And haS/iio skill of speech nor trick of art  Wherewirh' to tell what faith-approveth true  'And snow for fame the treasures of his heert'  When, wisely weak, upon the,path of duty *  Divine' accord has nude his looting sure,  With humble'deeds he builds his life to beauty,  ',Stron;i- to achieve and patient to eiidure. -���������  But.they that in tlie maiket place we meet,   n  Kach with hi*, tmmpet and his noisy fjctioiC   ''  Are leakyr vessels;, -poming on 'the stieet   '      \  The tiuth they  know ere it has known iU ������*-  , ��������� tioii.  And which, think ye, in his .benign resratd    -  Or words or deeds shall merit the reward? ''  ,'       -        ''   ���������Peter UcAithur ia Atlantic.  TEABS "OF SDFfEKIKCI  HOW RELIEF  CAME  TO   THOMAS  ��������� "     FINDLAY.  OF FETROLIA.  t  He'Had"-Suffered    for   Forty    Years  From   ' Dyspepsia���������Food     Became  , Detestable  and  Stomach    Cramps  Made Life a Burden. '  , ' MUST HAVE HIT THTiSL  An editor in Columbus printed an  itoui that the -than -who was hugging  the hired girl haii better ,stop or Ins  name would he published. Next day  25 citizens paid -up their subscriptions and- told, the editor not to pay  any attention to.foolish stories going- around.   ���������  l  BABY'S HEALTH.  * : t  > A man has a right to express hm  opinion'of the weather, "hut what's  t'he use.       '"','.  '" ���������. THE " BEST  PILLS.���������Mr. Wm. Vander-  Toort;Sydney Crossing, Ont., writes: '"We"  have been usine Parmelee's Pills,' and find  them by far the best pills, we ever used."  Foil  DEIilCATB AND   DBBIUtTATBD   CONSTITU-'  xioirs these.pills act like a charm.   Taken in,  small ^dosee; the effect is both a tonic and a  ' -stimulant, mildly excit'.ng ��������� the secretions of  the-body, giving tone and vigor. * '    '  %:  I1*1 " it.  I )i re    -  tU . ������������������> 1  i , ������ There'is no law .to' prevent' a 'wo-  . . man kissing., a-ipug-dog���������but -just the  * ' same it's-a"mean, "advantage to take  't v    of the,dbg.. V - ������������������->' \  ������*.- "l  '    "',''^-r^���������: '    '/ , ,   '; ,'/, ���������  -���������   ,,    If4 a man' is a   chronic ^grumbler, it  "  always makes" him  happy  to  find    a  . ���������"���������      button off.his coat.when his, vvjfe'is  .*������  busy  ,1-!-  II?    \<  ,i-rt-"  ������������������.!���������>  j,r<^y,f:'  ��������� ���������*���������- - v  c> V **  i -���������������������������H, *.-*-������i--  Thorr, never 'was,'and never will   be. a  **��������� universal panacea, in one remedy, for all ilia  to which flesh' is- heir���������the very nature of  many curatives being such - that ,were -th*  germs of' olher--and'( differently seated ,die-  '  eases j rooted in the system of tho,,patient���������  '*' what would relieve'one ill m turn would ag-  . .gravate- the  other.'  Wo  have, however, in  'Quinine Wine, when obtainable in a sound,  ' unadulterated -state,*'a'rein'edy for many anti  -grievous ills.,.-By,its gradual and.judicious  use therfrailest, systems 'are led into conva-  * lescence and btrength by the influence which  >   Quinine exerts on nature's own restoratives.,  < ' It relieves the drooping.spirits of those with  .whom a chronic state of' morbid despondency and lack of interest m life is a disease,  and, by tranquilizingthe nerve3, disposes to  ���������-  sound and - refreshing,' 6leep���������imparts vigor  -   to the action of > the blood, which, being  ,' - stimulated-;, "courses * throughout ��������� the   veins,  strengthening- ihe Jieaithy animal functions  ���������  ,,of the-system,  thereby making * activity a  . necessary .result, strengthening the frame,  ' and giving life to the digestive organs," which  naturally demand .increased substance���������result, improved appetite. Northrop & Lyman.-  , of Torontor have given*;to the public their  *, superior Quinine Wine at the' usual rate, and,  'I gauged! Y>y the opinion'of .(scientists, this  , wine approaches nearest perfection of any in  the market. -All druggists sell it.'      . , ,_  From The Topici Petrolea,  Ont.  Few men in Petrolea are - better  known t'Han Mr. Thomas Findlay,  who has resided ��������� here nearly forty  years. In 1862 Mr. Findlay, came  here, ,and before the railroad connected with Petrolea he drove a stage  eoach, bringing ih������ early oil men.  When the' railroad ��������� came " here Mr.  Findlay engaged in the oil' business,  but later he suffered from a gun-accident, that disabled his hands permanently. ,,After recovering from his  Mr. Findlay was appointed constable  and night watchman for-' the town,  which office he -has held1 during thirty  years,past. This accident was by no'  means Mr. Findlay's .worst misfortune. ^ From' early'youth he had been  a martyr to dyspepsia, which finally  became so bad that , he'looked forward to death! as a merciful release..  Happening to hear,that Mr. Findlay  had found complete relief from his  lifelong foe; a Topic reporter .waited  on him to find if this was'true' Mr  Fhrdlay was only too glad to tell his  story,( hoping  its* publication* might'  The    Most    Precious'   Thing    in  World to a Mother���������How to  Care for Little Ones. .  the  a-; i  help some other sufferer. ,< " I,-.���������.���������, i ������  pretty old man now,'' said Mr. !���������'md-  lay, ' "but1'' I cannot remember'' the  time' when ' I was not in pain from  pernicious dyspepsia and stomach  ���������trouble until lately.'As'a"young man  on the ' farm I suffered all sorts ', of  pains with it;-food would sour'on my  stbm'ach' anti violent 'vomiting spells  would follow. '. As 1 grew .older my  sufferings increased. I could1 not 'eat  anything1 but ��������� the ' simplest kind of  food','- and ��������� little' of that. My "system"  became" badly run'- down <and' I grew  so'weak that I really looked forward  'to, death as a release from;my misery. iOne ' af ter^anbther I tried doctors ^an-d medicines, but-could get no  relief, then in .despair I concluded to  quit' all'fand .,await' the end. Meantime- my condition > became worse.  Violent, cramps attacked- my' ^legs,  prostratingcine -for a time.*- They be-1  came worse and more frequent-'until  they "one-'day-attacked my stomach,  and I thought "my, end- had come.  Unable to^move'and;ih agony I'"was.  drivenfhome,f as I 'thought/to' die,;  but after an injection of morphine I  gradually-recovered. From 'that^time  oh;4tbe cramps increasing in. frequency  ^  arid  violence.      Nothing gave me re-  I ".      *,      vt~: :     P7T        .. r^,\lLef  except  the  temporary   immunity  Lots   of'fellows  are  -'not  satisfied!.  /Ko price would be too great to  pay for the - preservatiom of the perfect, rosy, sturdy health 'of a baby.  No price would be'- too great; but, as  a matter of fact, the price is very  small���������simply -precaution/, and ��������� the  exercise of goad 'judgment.    '    ,   ,  It. is not good", judgment to give  the tender little infant ' remedies  containing opiates, and the ^so-c-oiled  "soothing';! medicines,' always contain opiates; .they do'not cure,'they  only drug and stupefy the little ones.  Baby's JrOwn Tablets are guaranteed  to contain no opiates and t no harmful -drugs. It is Lhe best nedicine for  little ones, because it is promptly effective and absolutely harmless. For  nervousness, sleeplessness,, ��������� constipation, colic, 'stomach' troubles, the irritation accompanying'the cutting of  teeth, and other infantile troubles,  Baby's Own Tablets, is beyond question the'best medicine''in the world.'  The Tablets are "sweet- and pleasant  to take, and dissolved in "water can  be given ,with; ab&olu'te safety to the  youngest infant;.' Mothers who have  used this medicine-for- .their little1  ones, speak of it in the most enthusiastic tei'ms-^th'at'-.is.-'t-he best proof,  of its-efficacy'. l Mrs. Alohz'oFeltmate,,  Whitehead. N.S.;������sayW "In my opinion Baby's Ownh Tablets are unequalled -for' children. They' take it  readily, and it regulates ,the bowels,  cures them' of peevishness, and is a  great helper (' in ��������������������������� teething. -1 would  hot think of being without the Tablets.,'" 'Sold by' druggists or' sent  post paid on receipt of price,'25 cts.  a box, by* addressing ".the ' Dr. Wil-*-  bams  Medicine  Co/, 'Brockville,  'Ont.-  ���������  .t-.  ��������� MUSIC FOR THE HOLIDAYS  i*     ,_ ' _  Our Mr. Hatcher is now in tho east selecting a stock of pianos and organs for holidays. Among his selection, will be a large number of th������ latest stylos of the WILLIAMS' PIAXOS famed for their pure, full aud lasting: tone. Our new stock will begin to arrive about Dec. 1st and it will be well for those interested to call early. Out-  of-town customers will receive our best attention and all enquiries will be' .promptly  answered. \V ������ send catalogue and price list on request. We handle several different  makes of organs and will be pleasecf to quote prices delivered anywhere. We have a  number of good second hand organs and pianos, in good repair, some as good as new,  at very low prices.   Your credit is good with us, no matter where you live : ��������� :'   :   : ':  ���������������������������  t  ���������I*  ���������  ���������������>  FORRESTER   & HATCHER  - ���������">      V -  Y. M. C. A. Blk", Portage Ave., Winnipeg.  Eldredge "B" Sewing Machines.  ���������*****-������!-������-**>!������������!*������*������!->*^  >!������������������>!<  ������������������:������������������.������������������:<  ������!***���������*'.  V  ���������>";  **������t~t~i**i"i~Z>  even when", they get there ."with, both  'feet, - They kick because they are not  centipedes.'/ * --T^  Beware of  Ointments for, Catarrh  That; Contain Mercury,  as mercury will surely destroy the sense of smell  and completely derange tho whole system when  entering* it through tho mucous surfaces. Such  articles should never bo utedezcepton prescriptions from reputable physicians, as the damage  they will do is tenfold to tho geed you can pos-  ibly derive from them. Hall's Catarrh Cure,  manufactured by F. J Cheney & Co.,Toledo, O.,  contains no mercury, and is taken internally,  acting directly upon tho blood and mucous surfaces of tho system. , In buying Hall's Catarrh  Curo be sure you get the genuine. It i-3 taken  internally, and made in Toledo, Ohio, by F. J.  Choney & Co.   Testimonials free;  Sold by Druirgi-its, price 15c. per bottle.  Hall's Family Pills are tho best.        *  Vvhen a man ��������� has a birthday he  taker* a day off. With a woman it is  often a ca'se of talcing a couple of  years off. \  S0Z0S0NTTOOTEI POWDER 25c  The flowers in  the garden maj-  dead.     but    there    are still'    lots  blooming idiots. -  be  of  .Tas.  Mel-Tee,  Lachlin   McNeil,  Lin-wood,   Ont.  Mabou, C. -B.  John  A    McDonald/Arnprior,  Ont.  C. B   Billing, Markham, Ont.  John Mader, Mahone Bay, N.S  Lewis Butler, Burin, Nfld.  These well known gentlemen all -assert that thev -were cured by MINARD'S LINIMENT.  from pain1 afforded  by morphine.      I  became so weak from pure starvation  that death     stared    me in  the face.  Finally a friend said:   'Why don't vou  try      Dr.    Williams'      Pink    Pills ? '  'What's the use ?' I said, ' I've   tried  everything and just got worse ail the  time.'    'Well."  she said,   'you  try    a  box of Dr. Williams'   Pink  Pills,  they  cured irie,  and I believe they will do  you  good.'    Well,'! purchased a' box  and  started  talcing them.      After    a  little I thought they helped me, so I  kept  on  taking them, for a couple of  months when I felt I was really curedr  after so many years of suffering. My  strength came  back,  my stomach recovered its 'power, and I was able to  eat    anything   I   fancied,     and  once  more could enjoy life.   This is nearly  two years" ago,    but I was cured   to  stay cured.   I have never   had a sick  day   since    or   known    the    slightest'  stomach trouble.      I am confident   I  would be a dead man now if it were  not   for  Dr.    Williams'   Pink    Pills-  nothing else ever helped me."  - The  old  adage   "experience  is  best teacher," might well be applied  in cases of dyspepsia, and if sufferers  would 'only be guided by the experience of those   who have   suffered but  are now well and happy through   the  use    of    Dr.     Williams'    Pink     Pills,  there would be less distress  throughout  the land.      Dr.    Williams'     Pink  Pills  can  be had  at  all    dealers     in  medicine,   or  by mail,  post  paid,   at  50 cents a box or six boxes for ������2.50  by addressing the Dr. Williams' Medicine Co.,  Brockville,   Ont.  The difference betweea men and wor  men who lie is that tlie women don't  mean to; the men1 do.'-   ,  Some people-are "prepared for'  emergency���������except twins/'     ���������, .  any  Oecbokio Dbbavoembnts of the Stomach,1  Lives and, Blood are speedi y removed by  .the active principle of the ingredients entering into the coinpo-dtion of Parmelee's Veg-  etablePiI's., These pills act ep'eciScally on  the deranged organs, "stimulating ,lo action',  ,the dormant -energies of the'system, thereby removinof disense and renewing life and  vitality to the afflicted.";In this lies the great  -secret of the popularity of Parmelee's Vegetable pills. ,;   ��������� ,  .When  scheme,  3'ou   meet -a    man    with  proceed to get in a hurry.  FREE  Wc are Rivinj"- aw ay better I-rentiums than ever before for selling  our Pills:���������A Lady's or Cent's Nickel Watch, stem winder and  setter; a Solid Cold Rmir, set -ahIi real pearls and (-arncts. in  plush case; Violm and Bow, Autoliarp; ten-keyed Accordeon; '  Lady's or Cent's ten-year BoId.filJed Watch Guard; Lady's Dress Goods and Shirtwaists.  , Hoots and Shoes, Air Rules, &c Simply send us your name and address and we will send  you our large illustrated catalogue and nine boxes of the FAMOUS OLD ENGLISH  REMEDY, DR. PRICE'S SARSAPARILLA BLOOD PILLS, postpaid. Sell  'them at 30 c<-nts per bo-c and send u-> our money and we mil send *,ou any one of the above  Premium:, j ou -.elect. > , ,  (fcir Pills are the best remedy in the world for impure blood, liver and kidney diseases,  rl'.cuuiat&ui, stomach disorder-, aud all female troubles.      ' ��������� , ,  ' r - 1  You take no risk as you aiay return Till*;, if unable to sell them.    Remember we are one  of the largest medical firm*, in Canada, and>ou can rely on our Premiums beinp exactly a*.,  represented. 'Send your name at oace and secure an extra I'rcii-iuiii.   Alfctition this pjpef.   ������������������  88  >. BAY ST.  PRICE MFC. C0,e*8r8sT,T0R0Ntd, ONE  -<V -v1  "v**"-"11 ��������� '   ���������������������������"������������������������������������        ������i 1 ��������� ���������������'.��������� '��������� ���������iMiiin.iv   ���������   ','1/ .     ������     .    /  .*     ,    *..fTr\M-'*''t-i/,iy g;  , *vuf^ "{Mx^&ciA ]^f^i^d^  800 DINNER ftHD TEA SET  PIECE AND '.-' ' ".".  ssfP  48: PIECES; SILVERWARE  FREE  -���������Ws.1  Ji ft  fi  ���������'  A raro  cliaccc      Vo iicccption,  WBd  Jspt-ik nothln-,' but tbo trutli.    -J.'011 can  Igtt a full slzu decorated Diuncr and Tea  (100 -fiicce-.) and-12 S.lv.-T'riatcd'taives, 12 l'orfca. 12 Tea Spoons and 12 Tablo  3023. ior solim-: our rcTeuics. -Our 1-us'mcs-* repuUtloa ia for��������� squaro arid honest. ��������� -������������������ ��������������� ���������������,4-1s. * .v^-1 , *, '&  dcall-i-'. nr.ilT,-o-w"l wove It. Etctv honest peason who soils onlv 8 boxes of our, hcvr litp Fink Pills (a & [ , <,.,' *.. ,'f 1  EranVlremodr forall impure and weak condition-) of the blood. Ind--rest ion. Stomach Trouble, Constipatloa ^,',������-; ���������'?,, ,-f * ,  weakness and nervousdiior'ler-4-n pontic l.-ix.-itivc���������a prar.d tonic ami Hfo builder wtll receive our genac i.'. 5-t --',-������������������, -'A1-).1  OTSotTcrL "amtWa -^ -������������ "'������������������'������������������o Dinner and Tea Set and 4S nieces ofsIlYerwajo with ������,- ���������'-, ,,. ' ;W  ^ - Sea������tirul S������v-S PMcd Kuttir trifls. Su^ar Shell, P.cklo I-'ork and Salt and l'cfper Set. wldchwo glv������ ,_ -M'^, s^\l%\  ftbsolntcljftee for cellos the 8 boxesof Pills.L,_-t .,-D*7-���������������.���������l;.:r���������-t,.v���������-_*'oe ������*..'������������-     #T������,������������ .~ ^. -������-mt������ -l   '--' f"-*5 M>  Orierto-Va^anrt-woKentlKlhbyniail, sellthernot25ccntlatos   JTlieso tra_otir rcgnltt  cv are easy to sell.   When sold Bond 1:3 tho money, ���������2.00, and ire (-uarantee',.  'Don't"Send :a Cent.' te^rt^  if you comply with thoofTpr, wo send to evci-yono taking advanteco of this advertisement, tlio IS Knives. UVorks -12  Table Spoons, 12 Tesv Spoons ami 100 xiicro decorated Dinner and tea Set will bo Riven obsolntelr freo. ' V/o ������re a re-liblo    -  concern and frnamntee the dishes and silverw.-iro full size for famll v iko.   IVc'dosiro to introduce cr- P*JJs Into everv Jion-uw 1<J  ���������^MdjttoadvcrUsiuetnUuawoy. Write at once-   NEW LIFE,REMEDY CO./ Bos, 220,T������">n--O.OaU'{ --  1 Samples of the hundreds of Testimonialaweare daily receiving.J     *-''" ^' -  '-' ''  f* ������I*   ������������������    ,$4  l'i&������?  NEWtiFBEZMKirrCO.:���������Sranyth.'Tikstoyouforthelovply  Dishes and Silverware I received, iney are very handsome,  I beg yon to accept my tliaulcs, 1 will do all I can to introduce  your Pills.   , .-,    J  ilss. Burro* Grant. Cantertmry Bt, YortCo., K.B.  ITsw Ltpx*I.emed-? Co., Dear Friend r~*I Tceclted ������y  dlshesto-dny.'lam-morcthandcllghtcdwlththeni.'fcannot - u  express by letter my many thanks to you for them. Youai������ ���������_  hi-rhly esteemed by me for an honest, reliable company ttlj *' "  will do as they agree.    Mf.s. Gerald Bud, Lvncdoch, Out, ' .  SL  A sh-do down hill seems ten times  as s-wift and fast when .you ai*e on it  as when the other fellow is.     *������������������,  Minard's Liniment Cnres. DipMteia.  ^^^^^^^^^^ \  WomaM is less suspicious of flattery  than any other animal.' " '  Life's pleasures are not so numerous thai 5*-ou can afford to snub one.  were it not for the fools in the  world, the wise g-uys -would have to  turn their hands to honest labor. ���������  The man who doesn't fail isn't always a success by a long shot.  We' win to try again and lose ; we  lose to try again for the same thing.  V in     ���������  POOR PUSSIES !  A" hundred tons bfccat's tails were  recently sold "in one lot in New York  the j for ornamenting- ladies' wearing apparel. This means that to fewer  than 1,792,000 pussies had been killed to supply this one consignment,  and yet they say that every cat has  nine lives.  "i'our    neighbor's baby is a crying-  shame.  Minari's Liniment Cnres Colds, Etc.  Good  counsels   observed  are  chains  of Grace.���������Fuller.  The 'beauty  seen  is  partly  in    him  .who sees it.���������Bovee.  The  inan   who   owns  but   one shirt  is,   necessarily,   short  of change.  Levity in behaviour is the bane of  alL that is good and virtuous.���������Seneca.  The seedy looking man is probably  ready to admit Lhat all flesh is grass.  At Your  Door.  -. Our handsomely'< > illustrated 100 page Catalogue  will be sent you on application.  This will place the largest  and choicest jewelry stock  in Canada at your disposal.  We are doing business on-  the closest possible margin  of profit, guarantee safe  delivery of goods and cheerfully refund money if you  are not thoroughly satisfied.  Ryrie Bros.,  Yongg and Aiiela'.it Stt���������  diamond      TORONTO.  Established 1854.  When we say that some " preachers  practice what they . preacli, it is  meant that thej*- rehearse' their sermons. - - ���������   ���������'      -    -  "'Vwl  ������-iJk-C-������S  Vv't*"  SOZODONTfortheTEETH 25c  Many a man who tries ,to bo a'ras-.  cal finds he is only capable of being"  a fool. " ���������    ������   ���������      ��������� S   "  Hiiar&'s Lament Cures Garget irCows.  ; V-  A.n Irishman 'says there is no bless-,  ing  like health,  especially when you '  are sick. . "      '.*"  HE HAS TRIED IT.���������Mr., John And- ,  eraon, Kinloss, writes: "I venture io mv,   '*  few, if any, have received greater ben-aAt,"  from the use of Dr. Thomas' Eclectrlo Oil  than I have.   I have used it regularly for  over ten -fears, and have recommended 1*1  to all sufferers I������knew of, and they also t"  found lt of great virtue in cases of aev&m'  bronchitis and incipient oonaumptiba." -\  When  a wido-w makes up her mind  lo  marry again she selects the man-  j.nd.then  proceeds to find out   what-  Ke likes  best to eat. *-   -  People * who  whar thev  hear  worst half.  only believe ���������-.half ...of  generally believe the  Admiration  isi-the  daughter   of  ig-  / jaiorance.���������Franklin.  In   great   attempts    it is   glorious  even to  fail.���������Lehginus.  The one prudence  of life is  concentration.���������Emerson.  The golden age is before us, not behind us.���������St.  Simon.  The  one-night  stand actors realize  that life Is but a fleeting show.  So rapidly does lung irritation spread and  deepen, that often in a few weeks a simple.V.  cough culminates in tuburcular consumption.   Give heed to a cough, there ie always  danger  in  delay, cet a boitle of Bickle'a  Anti-Consumptive Syrup and cure yourself.  It is a medicine unsurpassed  for all throat  .  and lun-z troubles. - lt is compounded from   ..  several herbs, each one of which stands at  the head of the list as exerting a wonderful  influence   in   curing   con6uxription and   all  lung diseases.  Eve invented   temptation,   but men  have monopolized it ever sim.ee.  & Champion  BANKERS AND BROKERS  WINNIPEG.  Write to ua for prices of SCBIP.  Get our List of Lands.  Stocks and Bonds Bought an"*! Sold.  Wo can furnish the exact amount of  Scrip for any payment on Dominion  Lands.   Do not pay cash.  of. I  ion l  ���������������*>aJSe8fa>a*-'* ���������       ��������� ���������    ..���������������'���������       ������       S5������.  Soso'dosiw 'Toot2^i Po.<������ir32���������Sl���������,      - &5c������������������  All^tores or by mail for the pries.    Saniplo for thf. postagf, %~.  WjIKTED, Agonts for fchq salo of Hardy Russien  apples, currants, gooseberries, ornamental trees  ana sesd Potatoes. Every salesman has exclu  sive territory. Sample outfit free. Good pay.  We are one o������ the oldest established firms .m  Canada. Appplynow- PELHAW NURSERY C0C  Toronto, Ont.  N. B.Cataloguo free.   Farmers can mate good  money during their slack season.       P. N Co.  When women are going to have a  club meeting to debate an important  question their first preparation for it  concerns the lunch and floral decorations.  And lot us supply yon with  a clean cut,modern lot that  will brightennp your pages  and please your readers  and advertisers. , Writous  for estimates on anything  in printer's material.   : : :  TORONTO TYPE  FOOTDBY CO'Y  175 McDormot Ave., Winnipeg.!  W. N. U. No. 853^ * ttrfnryi������rlrttn,*-u -(ta.vv*t lft&tAMtviiiav.   *ijLnrx*tf}ub \.  "a&M*Xblfcit4r^r'4*+*X6������tl*<AeW������l -alwa-*--  ���������^sxcri.'mr���������" i^:  ������dUft'Mt-CC������l -Cd-A-jU.  I-3.3UH-D    EVERY    WEDNESDAY.  E*ubscrjpti-^r>, $8 9. yar, in advance  '    XTOl.: jS: HnDerscm. ..SDitor.,  fr��������� -       .       .1  : =i  ���������i������" Advertisers who -want th -ir ad  ohangrea, should get copy in by  12 a.m.' day before issue.  Subacrioerb     failing    to    receive     Tiik  News regularly, will confer'a fav<r;r \>*   notifying  ihu   othce.  Job Work Strictly C.^O. D.  Ticiiu-aeiic Aim Cash, in Advance.  WANDERING  FREIGHT CARS.  How  They  Are  Rounded   Up  by  tho  '��������� Car Accountant,  The   car   accountant   is   a   typical   Instance  of . development   in   the   railroad  business.    In the early days he did  not  exist.   The superintendent",was supposed  to know in a general way what was being done with the company's cars.   The  j custom was for railroads to carry through  I freight as far as1 the end of their own'  I lines   in   their  own   cars.   Then   it. was,  I transferred   to   the  cars  of  the   foreign  iline, and'so assisted on the next stage to  *"; its destination. So much time, however, ,  j was lost iTi making the transfers that the  j needs of shippers forced upon the rail-  ��������� roads a departure which has now become  ! their general custom. Railroads-permit  ���������all  loaded   cars  to  go  through-to their  ' destination 'without transferv"and allow  one another a certain sum for the use  of the cars. This results in scattering  the cars of the different roads over every  section of track in the country:- It .produces the extraordinary ��������� processions of '  many colored travelers from'distant lands  .'that delight the eyes of youngsters at .a  railroad crossing. "���������..-'",  In theory, the'cars are permitted to run7  ' through over foreign roads to their destination on the condition that on their arri- l  val they shall be unloaded promptly and  ,"started,on the return home. In practice  the-freight agent is apt to use the cars  that are most, handy_'regardless of their"*  ownership.." Alh agent in -..Minneapolis  would hardly tliink twice before filling,up  a Maine" Central "freight, car 'with' a'con-  signinent for Manitoba.' - The> agent at'  Manitoliajwould, not suffer a pang of conscience Vhen-^he-found himself * stuffing  the same Maine ;car, with a cargo of supplies for WacoV Tex. Thus are begun the  wanderings of a car to which, if it were  not for the'car accountant" and his memoranda! there would'sometimes be no end.  It is by.,no" means easy to bring .the  ' wanderers home. When' the Maine Central's, car accountant leams from his reports that his car is being unduly, knocked  about on foreign roads, his first news is  that.it hasspent two weeks'in the yards  at .Minneapolis. "A tracer is-at once forwarded to the transportation department  of the ..railroad,,which is believed to beholding the,car.    By this time tho car is "  -on its way1 to Manitoba.    A-tracer fol-  i lows it there, but with" the similar result  of finding that the car, has been .dispatched for the southwest. A letter to  the company operating the line out of  Waco brings an answer to the effect that  , it is crippled-and has been1' run into tho  shops for repairs or that it has been loaded again, in 'which case the company  promises politely to unload it nnd send  it home immediately. Then the car is  promptly switched off on a branch line  for some local consignee and is not heard  of again, except by the needy agent who  captured it, until it turns up in a tail end  collision in the statec of West Virginia.  Luckily it is not a bit" injured and is able  to continue its wanderings, pursued by  more and more vigorously worded correspondence, until' somebody1 sends it  homn  .   DOOMED TO DIE.  Dear   Mrs   B ;  in reply to your inquiry as to which is the best tea to use, I"  would say ti,at in my opinion it rests' between the lilue' Ribbon and Monsoon  Packet Tej.s. -If you like rich, strong'tea, then Blue Ribbon is ur.df ubtedly the  best, but should your taste be for d delicate and very flavory tea 1 would advise  you to,call on C. J. MOORK for a packet of Monsoon. Personally, 1 mink Blue  Ribbon.in the morning and Monsbon'at 5 o'clock, but then, you know, I !am a'  perfect crank abJut tea.. t  Yours truly,' ���������   -  ',''.- '  SARAH GRUNDY.  ���������*--~*m'-*'mwr,mAt+jn"itttrrmwmrrrrn  With pity at my heart,  I stood and  j gazeU upon the1111-111 before' me; a mun,  i a fellow-being, doomed  by u merciless  I court martial to die; to leave tne origan  I and beautiful world, around nim, and to  oe usuered alone iuco "tlie valley of the  shadow of death."  -A noble-loojhng man  he was,  as  lie   stood   tnere,' unmoved  amid the enemies" that surrounded him,  and a haugnty,  bail defiant, expression  rested upon his haudboine, daring face.   *  He was a Union spy, captured in the  Confederate lines ana bearing upon his  person treasonable payers sufficient to-  have condemned a regiment. He had  made a good fight, but he was at last  overpowered, tne papers found upon  him, and, after a speedy trial, was condemned to die.  I had formed one of the court-martial,  and though I knew that the crime of  being a spy was punishable with death,  yet had i sought to have him spared. I  was young then, for ic was the first few  months of our (Jivil War, and I was not  as used to deeds of blood as I became in  after years ; and, besides, the spy was  young,and handsome, by his deportment  evidently a gentleman, and his reckless  bravery had won my admiration.  Nightfall came upon our camp, and  the following morning the spy was to  be called out and shot, Iliad been appointed to take charge of the execution,  and, seated in my tent, I was thinking,  thinking of the unpleasant duty,I was to  perform on the iriorrow.  . "Lieutenant, a note for you, sir."  I started as the orderly's voice b'ro"ke  the stillness of the night, aud, taking the  outstretched rote, read :  "Pardon me for [disturbing your slumbers,  but as you command the detachment, that, will  to-morrow usher .my soul, into eternity', 1  would see you, if your duties as an ofiicer do  not urge to the contrary. Hoping, you will  erant the favor, I remain, with respect,  WlLUUH liAYES."  I carefully read th? note oyer twice,  and then said to the orderly:' .  "Say that I will come."  A few moments later- 'and-T stood in  the presence of the condemned man.  "Mr. Hayes, you sent for me."  "i did, lieutenant; and it was because of your kindness to me during the  trial, and also that I saw in your eyes  pity_for my fate."  x uo neei ror you, rrom my neart'l do;  and sincerely wish I had not the unpleasant   duty' devolving upon  me of  ordering your execution to-morrow."_   " "I have a favor to ask of you, sir;"7to  please'order the guard to remove some  r;i*-:r-iTK'i*--v,, ,, ti,��������� ��������� n.nt, as it is-a confession I wish to make." .  _ j. ^av-j -.*. cuui.i_Lia,nd to the guard to .retire a few. paces, and 'returning, to the  tent, Hayes at once" began:  "I am no spy, sir. but am condemned  under circumstantial evidence.    I came  into 'the  Confederate 'lines to  visit my  '���������mother,, who lives in   the  south,    although' she is  Union m her feelings.  After a, visit to her of a few days I started to return*, and by the road-side came  r upon a dying man clad as a Confederate  soldier. , Imagine my surprise to recog-  ' '���������- nize in him a noted spy of our own army,  and also recognizing me,   he informed  me that he'haci been wounded the nignt  before, 'by' being fired  upon by a party '  of Confederate cavalry,  and had,ridden  -.on until -he* could -go no further? 'Ho  - knew he was to die, and intrusted to my  caie the papers he had'iabout him.    I  watched'over the'poor   fellow until .he  died, and then hollowing ,out a shallow  grave.  ��������� ���������'   '* 'Left him alono in his glory,'-  and proceeded on my way:   *"       "/,   v   *  /    "I have -little more to-add, except that  '' I am a major'- of cavalry in tlie United'  States Army,  and  wish that you will  "'take ihy private papers "from me after I  am dead and'send them to an address I  ' will give you. * Now this is all I ask.; except that you will  send me pen'and "ink  cby the orderly when you return;";    ��������� ������������������  -  Thus we parted; and  finding   a'scout  awaiting me abmy tent upon my return",'  I gave him   peu.-iirik <and   paper,   and,  ordered him to ride 'over, to  the' tent'  *-where the doomed man was with'thoiu,*  andto toil the guard to release his hands  " of tho'shackles vvhiln he wrote,   but * to"  - keep a close watch upon him.-  A few minutes' after, I was startled  by a loud'shout, one, -two,-three shots in  rapid succession, and . then bthe rapid  rush 01 -hoofs by my .quarters. ;I was  just in time to see the scout's horse dash  swiftly by and recognize by the moonlight, "the commanding form of Wilbur  Hayes, the Union spy, iii the saddle.  ' Men mounted in hot haste, and a chase  commenced, but the daring soldier, escaped,, and thus" .saved.''him from the  death of a .spy.  Upon inquiry, I learned that when the  manacles had been removed from his  wrist, Hayos, watching his opportunity,  with two rapid blows struck the - guard  aud the scout to the ground, and springing lightly on the back of the scout's  horse, rode ram illy away, followed by'  the sho'rs from the sentinels in the immediate" vicinity.  ��������� <SS&^<&=^^^&e^^  WIRE    NEWS.  &  '[special to news.]_     '    ''  ���������Nanairno, Jany. 28.���������Geo.'Riley'-  Liberal, elected to-day by ' 421  of������ a  majority' fur   Victoria.  gg^$**������S������ggS^gggga?s^  CAMPBELLS'  j"  Currant  and   ,Sultana   Raisin   Cakes   ' 10c. and 25c,'...,.'.   Short'   Bread    and     Chester^ 'Cc-Tkes  ....... .'.25c, and 30c --'per doz....   Dunsinuir Avenue,  Cnmberlajid.  '    (Qj ��������� . - ' i  e������nas4nMri!WHini  n- ^T^rrrrcsryzmT'SKK.riauxi  A  NICHT WF BURNS.  A goodly crowd met "last Saturday night in the Old School-house  to partake of mine hostess' Robertson's supper (including haggis) and  join in pong and dance in honour  of Burns the bard. Good music  was rendered by Mr Thomson, and  daylight broke ere the merry, party  'dispersed. Long may they live to  honour the poet. ' - -  Nob   Hill   Council.  Mayor, Robertson Young; Aldermen, Jacky, Butch and M. Hennessey ; Fish Warden, W. Wilson;  City Clerk, F. Crawford ; Policeman, Nickey Nac. Ten applications in for Scavenger. To be  disposed of with the next keg' of  Union Brewery. ���������  TAX    NOTICE.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN in  accordance with the Statutes, that  Provincial Reuenue Tax and all assessed  Taxes and Income Tax, assessed and  evied undei the Assessment Act and  amendments, are now due and payable  for the year 1902. All taxes collected for  the Comox Assessment District are due  and payable at my, office, situate at Cumberland. This notice, in terms of Law,  is equivalent to a personal demand by  me upon all persons liable for. taxes.  JOHN BAIRD,      '  ASSESSOR AND COLLECTOR,  Comox Assessment District,  '..' Cumberland Post-Office.  Dated at Cumberland 2nd Jany.,   1902.  8 1-02.    4t.  '������3ffiSB&  PBOOLAMATIOHS.  [L.S.]        *��������� ���������      - '-",-..���������  HENRI g: JOLY'de LOTBINIERE,  ','   . ' r    , CANADA,  Povince of British Columbia  EDWARD yil.,'by,the Grace of God, of  '." the United Kingdom of Gi;eat  Britain  ' and Ireland and uf the Biitish Dominions beyond the Seas, King,'Defender  of the Faith,'etc., etc., etc.  To our faithful'ihe members elected to  ' serve in the Legislative Assembly of  . our Province of British Columbia, at  ' our City of Victoria,���������Greeting. '  A   PRO CLAM AI'ION.  F RI DAY,     J AN IJ A R Y,    31 st. -  , i-    ' l , '        ' , ' ���������  . .'. '.*...,:'...'.:. FOR THE PURPOSE OF........ * ..'..','  -Al  ���������   J M4W  *A  ���������v.  Bunsmuir ��������� itsniie  /.,.-.  Oumlierlant B.C.  ,D. M Eberts,  HEREASWeare  Lbkrts, ,Mjy  i Atiorney-General.''   iir desiroub and resolved, as soon as may--lie, io   meet   our'  j  people of our Province of Biitish Colum- '  bi;v an<-l   t0   have' then-  Legislature :   * ������-*  NOW   KNOW -YE,  A. H. PEAGE^-.'Drnggi^WtiB^"  advTce   int  our  that for divers,  causes and considerations, and taking  into consideration the ease and convenience of our loving subjects, We have  'thought fit, by and with the advice of our  Executive Council, 'to hereby convoke,  and by these presents enjoin you, and  each of you, that on Thursda) the twentieth day of.Februarv, one thousand nine  hundred and two, you meet us in ou>* said  Legislature or Parliament of our said  Province, at our City of Vic-.ori.-i, FOR  THE DISPATCH OF BUSINESS, to  treat, do, act and conclude upon those  things which in our Legislature of the  Province of British Columbia, by the  common Council of our said Piovince  may, by the favour of God, be ordained.  ' In Testimony Whereof, We have  caused these Our Letters  to   be   made  WINTER'S       .   .ih  .  -    ';-~'    INSTANT '���������;. ��������� ;/ "-.'"���������"���������'-'  ..'."-     ���������"--.- COUGH CUREr  IT'S  A  GOOD   ONE,   AND   11ELIABLE       , ''A  ���������     ' '    -      FOIl     CHILDREN      AND      ADULTS.     *  We 'are   selling   our  TOILE I   SOAPS . at .'Cost  to   make  room. Finest   GLYCERINE 'and   CASTILE   ,SOAPS  Away jjown.        , ���������   >  STORE OPEN Sundays from'9 a.m. to 10 a.m.,  and horn 5 p.m. to<6 p.m. '  Patent and the Grei  il of Our said  Province to be hereunto affixed :  Witness, the Honourable Sir Henri  GUSTAVE JOLY DE LOTBIN-IERK, K.C  M.G., Lieutenant-Governor of our said  Province of British Columbia, at our  Government House, in our City of  Victoria, in our said Province, this 9th  day of January, in the year of our Lord  one thousand nine hundred and two,  and in the first year of our Reign.  By Command,  J. D.  PRENTICE,  Acting Provincial Secretary.  25-l-'02.    2fc  'Columbia- flouring  Ills Company  ENDERBY, B. C.  H  ungarian, y,  .iree Star,  Wheatlets-  10-10,  Strong Bakers  (LIMITED.)  Agents, -   Victoria, B.O  :J  $   Dunsmuir Ave., , Cumberland,  B.G.   m  ������^Sg^83g$@&S������  A\xv\imn?iaiLtXfi*-as.i>j*xrjLmw wngwikTi  ~^..^*.**~^***^~*^^*^*\~ifi+*,Vi,xnY?u>x.i.������ei.t* t  123 HASTINGS ST , ' 83  GOVl-IiNDIENT  ST.  Vancouver, B.C. ,     *--s    ���������.-<.. Victoria,1'B.C."'   '  January 1st., 1902.  MESSRS GIDEON HICKS & CO.,   wish   all  their  Customers  a   Happy'New  Year, and beg to announce that in future they will trade under a new title, viz :���������  Tl������ Hicks k Lovick Piano Co.  The Management of The Hicks & Lovick Piano Co. is in exactly the same hands  as under the old title and all accounts are payable as usual.  WBITE    US   FOB,    CATALOGUES-  GOUETMAY   iiGUSI  COURTENAY, B.O.,  .Headquarters for   Sportsmen in  the*  Best Duck and Pheasant Shooting  Grounds in the district.  ..   ..   ....  MEALS PROMPTLY SERVED  ,The Best -of-������������������ -:-{  WINES,   lilQUORS,  Hand Made Single  ...HARNESS:...  $15, $20 and $25 for Rub-  ber Trimmed..  Factory Harness $10,,$12 & $18  BARBER SHOP  In connection   with  and   CIGARS  ���������-���������In Stock.  the  Hotel.  V.W. RICHARDS,  Manager.  JplP"~l-vepairirjg Neatly Done  while you wait. '  w. will Ann.  sll-  r  NOW IS THE TIME TO^10"58������-^^  ADVERTISE   IN    THE    "NEWS.''  n  ���������si  -['I  I  wl  ft  II  m  M  %i  I  *;  m  f  ������  r '     ,  r)H  VM  ' %\  '���������?isi  i  ���������L t -��������� 1  ml  Mi  m  m  w  m  m  ml  Wm  $m  m,  s!l  a  I  J-PS  Wt

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xcumberland.1-0176525/manifest

Comment

Related Items