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Creston Review Dec 20, 1935

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 A  *��������� ��������� I  '   '  *     :���������       ' "   - *        ' " " ^  ** -   "'l      ���������"  ��������� K * ���������/  _ PROVING lv\l  1      LUBRARY  I VICTOR I A,1 B.C.  I���������-,- ������������������"��������������������������� -:������������������  {-"  - ������������������ -   ,,(.'  --   ���������  V   Provincial L*t*w������T  jl .* / f  CV  THE    CRE  REVIEW  Vol. XXVI  CRESTON, B.C.,   FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20,  1935  No. 34  HuntingSeason  Sale of Hunting licenses Larger  than 1934���������Geese and Ducks  Quite Plentiful^Wheat Fields  Attract the Geese.  The 1935 hunting season, which closed  at Sundown on Sunday, has been quite  an average one according to W. H. Cartwright, game guardian, who handles the  territory fram Yahk to Crawford Bay,  and in respect to licenses isstfed the year  has been even more notable than 1934** ,  Up t^thaririddle-of the month a totalf  of 44*S licenses of all classes have been}  issued.   Of these 265 were what is known  as ordinary firearms licenses, while 164:  were issued tb farmers.   Licenses* issued  to non-residents were 13, which is again"  of two over last   season.   During the  season 346 angler's licenses were issued,  and to date 19 trapper's licenses have  been taken out in the area supervised by  Mr. Cartwright.  While the snowfall was light, and deer  hard to get it would look as if the" take  of venison waa much on a par with last  season. . .The kill was Kmriicujariy heavy  in the HCitehener-Yahk -section with  many blacktails brought in. In otber  parts of the. valley the hunters were "not  so fortunate although in all quarters a  fair supply was had.      .V  The 1935 take of geese, particularly  the Canada and white front, or brant,  was at least equal to 1934,* -and were  much easier got as the birds inhabited  the wheat fields on the -Reclamation  farm and the Reclamation Company  area in large uuuibers, and despite the  the absence of sloughs on these dyked  lands there was fully as many ducks  taken as a year ago. Pheasants wero-  fully as plentiful as other season?, but  the grouse were not as much in evidence.  Duck hunting was possibly the better  due the very dull weather the last six  weeks of the season.  On the summer kill of coyotes Mr.  Cartwright reports paying the $2 bpunty  on xoojiBEseaniraaR.- ine seasoa^waa-  ��������� notable in - that there '-were -no serious  hunting mishaps at any point, and, the  local game guardian states that the hunting regulations were splendidly observed  by the hunters a*? a whole. So far the  trappers have also had /quite average  luck and with higher fur prices can look  forward with ;..confidence to a profitable  season.  tirday from a four day hunting trip** into  the Goatfell-Yahk section, but unlike  some previous parties had no luck whatever in securing a venison supply.  Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Huscroft were  hosts at bridge and court whist at their  home on Saturday night. There were  three tables of each and a delightfnl  lunch was served about midnight. At  bridge the high score prizes were cap.  tured by Mrs. D J. McKee and Harry  Helme with Mrs.--A. W. Sinclair winner  at Consolation honors. At court whist  the high scorers were Mrs. M. Ross and  W. Demchuk, with consolation award to  Mr. Hagey.  Wynndel  G. Hindley is on a visit with his brother arid sister at Harrop this week.  Miss Annie Hook was a patient at  Creston hospital a few days last Week.  Miss Gwen. Phillips of Fernie was a  wfekend guest of Misses Mary and  Leah Abbott  Jim and 6. Hulme, Mrs. Hulme and  daughter, -Betty, were auto visitors to  Bonners Ferry last week.  G. Benedetti, who has been a patient  at Greston hospital, following ah operat-  Institute: Hears  Nursing Talk  3  f   -ft  * ' :V  Miss Cook<������ r Hospital Matron,  Discusses Home Nursing���������  Will Distribute Christmas  Cheer���������Annual Meet, January  woo onris  ������������������u.   day.  Wynndel badminton players were  guests of the Sirdar club on Sunday evening at Sirdar,-where Wynndel was  again winner.  The hig attraction this week is the  school concert and Christmas tree Friday, 20th, when Santa will appear with  a well filled sack.  A meeiin"*" of the Wosssn's Auxilia.r*1"'  was held at the home of Mrs. Collins  Wednesday last. Results of the recent  sale were'riiscussed and arrangements  were made for a dance and waffle supper  early in January. Mrs. C. Gregory *-wi1l  be hostess for the annual meeting on  January 15 th.  Lister  a guest of  Miss  Huscroft school,  Miss   Webster  was  Robinson, principal of  at the weekend.  Wallace Sinclair is busy with delivering  the winter's supply of -30 ricks of wood  to the Lister Bcnool.  Alf. Kockott is busy with the erection  of a new residence on his farm, next the  A. Wv Sinclair p^ace.  Geo. Pearson of Yahk has been in with  his truck a"couple of timea tbfe'past week,  taking out loads of baled alfalfa.  Rev. R. E. M. Yerburgh announces  that the Anglican worship on Sunday,  December 29th, will take the form 6f_a  children's Service.  School'cloflea today for the Christmas  vacation; In the afternoon the children  and teachers will present a short concert  programme. Misses Curtis and Web  ster leave on Saturday for vacation at  their homes. ,  Col. Lifter and Measrp. Becker, Brnd-  ler ond H. Sommerfeld got back on Sat-  NEW YEAR'S EVE  NOVELTY  Following a lengthy  illness the death  of Mrs. H. F. .Robson  occured at.;her  JMrtwafegjyw v^T*Kj������gSlffn������r * f*?F������i������ 3*__SSS!- ������^552&-  frona:Cb"rist Church, Creston, on Saturday afternoon, Tifev. R E. M. Yerburgh  officiating. The pallbearers were-, R.Clarke, E. Hulm***v C. S. Heister, Sam  McNeil, C. Wigen and W. Greig. Many  were out to pay their last respects and  the floral remembrances were beautiful.  She is survived by her husband who has  the sympathy of all in his great bereave-  ���������tnet-t .       Y?,- ���������  A military whist was hfld at the hall  Wednesday evening last. The prize winners were Misses Leah Abbott, H. Hagen  and A. Ben>detti and G. Payette. Consolation honors went to Mrs. R. Uri,  Miss O, Hagen, M. Hess and W. J.  Cooper. After whist there was a meeting to discuss. thev cemetery question.  After much talk and the'"readir>i*" of a  letter from Boswell regarding the cemetery at that point, a vote was taken as  to establishing a Wynndel cemetery- or  going in on a central burying ground.  The majority favored a, Wynndel cemetery. A committee was chosen to look  over ai tea and ascertain cost was named  as followsV J. G. Abbott, Mrs. R. Uri,  W-..J*: Cooper, E. A Hacket. A. F.'Rudd,  J. Wigen, A. Martell and C. Payette.  The meeting closed with a lunch and  dancing. Silver collection was taken  and after expense-" were paid the balance  goes to Creston hospital.  The December meeting of Creston and  District Women's ^Institute was held at  the home of Mrs.-YMallandame on Friday afternoon. Tja& president, Mrs.  H. W. MacLaren. was in the chair. 16  members were present along with one  visitor. '  "_.  A letter of thanksiwas read from Principal Kolthammer 'op Arrow Creek school,  for donation receiveii from the institute  towards the purchase of an organ for the  school. Also for .the magazines and reading material which will be of &reat. help  to the pupils.  Mrs. V. S. MaaLachlan. provincial  superintendent, an d^ Mis a DeWolfe, welfare supervisor for the B.C. government,  are working with the institute regarding  the eyes of a local* child that require  attention. A number of cases came to  the attention * of the institute of people  needing clot lies, etc. Member having  any warm wearables that will be of use  to the e families should leave them with  Mrs. MacLaren, to be distributed.  Milk is being continued until the end  of the year to two small children.  Christmas parcels 'were discussed and  members are asked to contribute toys or  other gifts suitable. for yuletide. These  are to be left at Eddie's Barber shop on  December 23rd.     r  The annual  meeting of   the institute   CH   I 1*^.1*1    ���������~    T��������� ���������..������������������,   At-Xm     ~mt-    t-.���������   r-~   -8TVMI    MMKt   MM^itmJM     \JMM   UtMt.MMV.MJf     a.U)   MM i.      .UC    J4U4JJC  of Mrs. MacLaren.'-for the election of  -officers. A set of: table napkins and  tatted handkerchiefs were raffled and  realized "$8. These were won by Mrs. R.  Stevens, and Miss Edith Couling. Mrs.  R. Ibbitson and Mrs. C. Murrell were  asked to audit the institute books.  Flowers will be purchased for the hospital at GhTistmas? 'Diuring the afternoon .a^RracJiical tj-fe'tk'was gi.v.������n,by Miss  Coo'^^^a^bhVcC^^rest'dnV hospital,' on  home nufsihgV'*-She-''; ^pressed -pleasure  at being associated with Institute' effort.  The tea hostesses were Mrs^VBud And  rews and Mrs. Mallandaine. -The freewill offering was, generous.  holidays today, and the windup feature  will be a concert by the pupils-  Fred McWilliams is leaving this week  for Carmangay, Alberta, where he will  spend the holidays with his parents.  A. Rohe of Wynndel has been cutting  logs for his new* home to "be erected on  the old Wittman property at Lakeview.  Jake Fritz is at present a patient in  Creston hospital. Robert Stewart, who  has been in the hospital for some time,  has returned home, but it will be a few  days yet before he will be around as  usual.   -������������������  381 Cars Apples  Shipped Dec. 15  61 Cars Exported���������Wealthys in  Overseas Movement���������Estimated 50 Cars Still to Move ���������  Three Months' Packing Season  Alice Siding Social Club dance at Mrs.  John Marshall's on Friday evening was  largely attended, and the drawing took  place on the Christmas cake that had  been on raffle. Herb Gobbett of Creston  held the lucky ticket. The music for the  dance was by Tom and Bob Marshall  and John Rin gheim of Lister. The raffle  was a splendid success, and the funds  will help with the construction of the  new community hall.  Canyon  Mrs. Cox and baby   of Boswell  visitors this week with Mr. and Mrs.  Knott.  are  F*.  xhe community Ubristmas concert and  tree will be at the community hall  Thursday, 19th.  The hunting season, which closed on  Sunday, saw the lightest kill of deer in  Canyon's history.  Bond & Son are busy on the contract  of stuccoing and plastering the new  nurses' home at the hospital at Creston.  Mi3s Grace Bothamley is, at Creston  this week, where she is On the sales  staff at the Co Op. Store for the holiday  rush'  W. Cook if? busy remodelling the base  ment at the'publie school which will  be  utilized next year as a junior room  for  the    Canyon .public school, which will  then havs four teachers.  .MM������n3UJBmX.MVrMMM* ^ VMl VMM.TTM. ~    Wm W^*- ^ ^   contract at Arrow Creek. It^is-expected  the portable mill of John- Huscroft wil  be.-moved in o saw the. timber. 1  John  Nelson.  Alice Sitting  Corner is back from a visit at  Louise Jones was taken to Creston hospital on Monday for treatment for an infected hand.  . Mr. and Mrs. Kent are" here on a visit  with their son-in-law and daaghter. Mr.  and Mrs. McCreary.  School   is due to close for  Christmas  Martin  Nelson    and   L.  fer'aig have  ���������-   - - - *^f* jf*U'���������i������^ ��������� -   V83CB1  1^   The United Church Ladies* Aid report  a successful Christmas sale of- work with  cafeteria supper at the hall on Thursday  night last, the affair enjoying a cash intake of about,$25. In the evening there  was a concert which was also well attended, with the pastor, Rev. Andrew H.  Walker as chairman. Violin solos were  contributed by Anne Berggren and T. R..  Mawson; vocal solos by Miss Ethel VanAckeren and W. J and Donald Truscott  of Creston; reading by Mrs Lester  Clarke; vocal duett by Mrs. Kolthammer and Miss F. Knott; piano duett by  Mrs;' Walker and* Mrs. W. Fraser of  Creston; piano solo by Phyllis Barn-  hardt, and an instrumental quartette by  Jarvis brothers and Leonard and Wilf.  Bond.  pie  Up to the middle of the month ap 0n  shipments from all points in Crest 0t  Valley had accounted for an outgo e  381 carloads, and the estimate of th  fruit inspectors and shipping houses ts  that there are still about 50 cars to roll,  which will give the valley an apple ship  ping business considerable in excess of  1934 when the total crop was nnder the  400 mark. Due ? the crop running to  smaller sizes than' in 1934 the 61 cars  that have already gone to export is  somewhat in excess of last season.  Creston Products. Limited, Creston's  newest shipping bouse is taking a  breathing spell until after the yuletide  holidays, but is planning to clean up  packing and shipping before the end of  the year. This firm has had an excellent  season with th*: trucks which took out a  majority of the crop, although four cars  were sent to export.  Long,  Allan & Long,  Limited   have  about fifteen carloads still to go out and  will be resuming packing at the first of  the year.   Their export business showed; 7  a gain over 1934 and iucluded three carloads of Wealthys.   1935 was the first  season the firm had ever sent this variety  to export.   The other overseas shipping  was confined to Mcintosh and* Delicious,  with the exception of a single carload of  Cox Orange^   But while the export trade  showed an increase tuere was not tne  1934   demand    for   apples   in   eastern  Canada.   Long,    Allan   &   Long have  made payments in full on all fruits up to  and including pears and Wealthy  apples  and advances have been made on  other  lines.    Mt.    Allan is   particularly    well  pleased    with   the  showing   made    on  Wealthys the price of which  is at least  35 per cent, better than a year aso.  At the. |_xchange the stock on hand is ^  "estimated -at- 20 fc_rloads, made^-ip' of  Wagener.  Spitz,    Delicious,    Spie,s and  Romes..    Of these all but   about 4000  boxes are packed and in  cold storage.  The firm had 42 cars to export this seas?  on-in which  was four carloads of Wealthys.   The Excha ge also handled the  Boswell  crop and   report  shipping six  cars to export from that point, five of  which were Cox Orange.  The Exchange packers were laid off on  Thursday last and the records show that  the packing staff had been on duty almost three months, as the graders commenced operation on September 13th.  That the crop is in excess of 1934 is indicated by Exchange shipping records. To  date they have rolled 210 cars and have  20 more to go, for a years outgo of around 230 cars. In 1934 the total movement was hut 213 carloads.  Kitchener  Under the auspices Erickfson  LndieB' Hospital Auxiliary  Park Pavilion  CRESTON  :'V  ues.,  7:|5!AN(5i:I������[0 iit?������'p;m.  GOOD MUSIC  Bazaar Realizes $210  The results of the first annual Catholic  Ladies' League baazar and tea held on  Saturday at th-eHorne Cafe were beyond  all expectations, and a grand total of almost $210 was realized at the bazaar and  sale of tickets on some raffles.  The holders of the lucky tickets on the  drawings, which took place that evening  woro as follows: Comforter, J. A. Castle,  Nelson; bed throw, Mrn. J. E. VanAckeren, Canyon; dell, Mrs. Frank Tompkins, Cr-r-ston; turkey, Jim Handley,  erickson; fruit cake, Mrs. Heinl, Creston.  Those in charge of the aula and tea  woro: Fnncywork table, Mrs. Chas.  Davis, RykerbB*: Mrs. Olivier and Mrn.,  NnatiisU Homo -cooking, Mra. J. E.  Hayden, Mrs. Frank Colli. Kitchen  Mrs. Leslie Timmons, Mra. J. SV Patrick, Mra. W. Huraclt, tMr*������. Schmidt.  Mrs. "Bud". Andrewa capably handled  the ten tnblofl, having ns --lerviteurB Eva  and Yavonno LaBollo, Nora NostaBi and  Ceclllo Olivier ��������� Mrs. Krumhout waa In  ���������^hnrffo of the drawing"*.  Tho Home Cafo waa suitably decorated  in Chriatmuf? colorn of rod nnd green and  two Hrtioll Chrlatmat* trooa added greatly-  to the appearance The Catholic Ladies'  Lpragup wlc-h to thank all thorto who  helped In nny way to make thia event  such nn outstanding aucccat*.  '���������   ���������'���������'''���������   ���������    '*������������������"'' Y......Y,1Y....Y...���������  ���������AIt������ OF THANKS   .  Friday > Saturday  DEC. 20th-21st  EXTRA SPECIAL 1  FRIDAY NIGHT ONLY���������To  the  first SO little girls buying tickets  we wilt give a ^picture of Shirley  . '    Temple. 7Y  SATVRDAY���������TO  THE ADULTS  With every SOc, tiefeet we will  give Free a chance on a Drea-  sed- Turkey, to he drawn for  right after the show.  A. Hanson has left for Vancouver for  the Christmas holidays.  Mrs. A. Manuel was a Creaton visitor  at the weekend, returning  on Tuesday.  Miss Jessie White of  itor with Mr. and Mrs.  Creston is a vis-  B.Johnson.  Admission  50c.  Singing and Dancing  Laughing and Romancing  your heart  My Soup"  Shirley sings her way into  with "Animal Crackers In  and "When I Grow Up."  John Bolea reveals a new romantic side  sin King "It's All So New To Me'! nnd  "Curly Top." .���������;���������.       ���������        ���������  Rochcllo   Hudson   endears herself.to  you with her song.  In Life."  'The Simple Thinge  Shirley   temple  in  Suppor Incliidod  ' Mr. H. F. ttobaoh tokow this moana of  oxproHBlng hla very > sin cor (* appreciation  of nil tho   ������ymouthy   and   kindhnn-*e������  pproolntlvo of tho  'ancoti.  nn.iyril     una.  asa     aaan    ivbui  and in particularly npr  buautif ulfloml .romombrc  with  JOHN BOLES  ROCHELLE HUDSON  JANE DARWELL  Claude Simpgoh of Lumberton arrived  on Friday for- a few days' hunting before  the season closed.       - ������������������������������������  Ed' Orford of Yahk arrived last week  with his team, and Is working at Goatfell West N.D. camp.  M J. Boyd, who has been on a visit  with Mr. and Mrs. G A. Hunt, returned  to hiB home at Creaton on Friday.  S.E. Jones, secretary for Creston Hill  Mining Company, left on Tuesday on a  business visit to Spokane.  Job. Orton, sub-foreman at the airport,  is on tho sick list, and Andy Anderson iB  in charge as sub-foreman.  A. McMillan is the how sub-foreman  at Goatfell West camp, and A. C. Scott  is head cook nt the airport.  Roy MuflRGr. truck driver at GaatfeU  E������Bt N.D, camp, waa a Cranbrook visitor last week, for medical treatment.  Mnjj. P. Harcourt of Calgary, Alborta,  and E. Laztmby of Yahk, woro here on a  tour of inspection of N.D. cam pa in tho  district on Saturday.  MeH8r������; Brown and Downey. proHidont  and treaaurei*. of Creaton Hill  Mining,  Coanpany, of Sf^kitn.*;, were Iwrc on'brne-  Ineon Friday and Saturday.  A. Laidlaw arrived last wook from  Cranbrook to drtvo truck at Goatfell  West N.D. camp. .Tattle Carroll, regular  truck driver ia on thoalck Hut at hla homo  In Cranbrook.  . *Tho.comprcaaor hout-o and hlackannlth  shop ia now built at Creaton Hill Mining;  Onmprmy, Tnd Baldwin **>( Erinkwon  ha������ completed the contract of iniitalUng  pipe  \,mf  and a  dam haa  bean   hiinlt.  Rails, drills and dump cars have been  hauled up to the mine. Compressor and  engine are expected next week. <  G. E. Merrill, pole inspector, of Spokane, shipped out two carloads of poles  for the Naugle Pole & Tie Company,  Spokane, last week. Tho poles were  purrchased from G. A. Hunt.  40 men arrived last week for Goatfell  East N.D. camp. The total men in that  camp how is 140. Twenty men arrived  for Goatfell West camp last week. There  aro now 160 men in this camp. Th������ airport camp crew number 125.  Christmas Cheer  Proceeds to Creston Women's  Institute Christmas  Cheer Fund  Parh Prntuvulsottm,  CRESTON  riday, Doc. 21  FIGHT P.M.  H.S. Girls   vs. Ladles Rep.  7 :,������������������,.    NINE,P.M.     '  Admission . ���������  25c. 'Y'V--^j>>.-V>'Vi'.;Y'  THE   BE^^  ���������V^  Edwoi^sbtii-Q  , tL*tefccY FOOD T*AT l,*  fe^ **^ NOURISHED ***4S  MORE CANADIAN  CHILDREN  THAN  ANY OTHER  CORN  SYRUP  A product cf    Ths CANADA STARCH CO.. Limited  WORLD HAPPENINGS  BRIEFLY TOLD  Convicted from, fingerprints on a  mirror they had stolen, three middle-  aged men -were sentenced at Bombay  to imprisonment of from one to three  years.  Ontario department of education  has ordered compulsory teaching of  civics in all public and high schools  In the province, starting in October.  A new text book will be ready soon.  Business is better all over Canada  and the morale of the west is improved, Robert O. McCulloch of Gait,  Ont., president of the Mutual Life  Assurance Company of Canada, said  In an interview in Victoria.  A pearl the size of a pigeon's egg  and said to be capable of protecting  its wearer from all danger was part  of the loot recently taken from the  tomb of a Manchu prince near Peiping by grave robbers.  Lady Byng of Vimy, widow of the  former commander of tbe Canadian  Corps, Lord Byng, who died last  June, has informed "Dominion headquarters of the Canadian Legion she  Will take part in the Vimy pilgrimage in July next year.  Successful use of an instrument  which bores through tbe brain to the  skull pan and burns away tissues  producing a fluid that causes hydrocephalus, a condition causing infants  to become idiots, is announced by "Dr.  Tracy J. Putnan, of Boston Children's  hospital.  Nearly 527,000,000 of new ordinary  life insurance, a slight increase as  compared with the same month last  year, was sold in Canada and Newfoundland in August according to returns of the Life Insurance Sales  Research Bureau, Toronto. Of the  total, sales in Saskatchewan were  $996,000.  Grows Huge Grape Vine  German Boy Planted Riding Switch  Left By Customer  Thirty-five years ago a Dr. Dick of  Diamond Creek, Victoria, was out  riding near Heidelberg, Germany. He  left his riding switch behind at a  smithy's where he was having hisi  pony shod. The smithy's lad recognized the switch as a grape vine cutting. He planted it in his cottage.  Now it has grown to a full vine 35  yards long extending over the fence  across a line and along the eastern  wall of a hotel.  To Shorten Ocean Trip  Irish Free State Plans Ship-to-Shore  '.*.'���������'Pto������-^r7 7-  London will be- brought within  three days of New York when civil  aviation plans which are being devised by the government of the Irish  Free State come into operation���������  possibly next year. V'""  The scheme alms at a service of  high-speed aircraft of the Douglas  type, to intercept t������e big Atlantic  liners off the west coast of Ireland  and to speed the passengers to London, with the saving" of a full day of  travel time.  With ships of the type of the Queen  Mary and Normandie the Anglo-  Irish air ferry will make London and  New York a matter of a mere weekend trip.  From Galway on the west coast  of Ireland to Southampton by liner  is at present a full day's journey,  with an additional two hours to London. The new air link would bring  Galway within, three hours of London.  It is proposed to use amphibian  machines.  From Dublin the idea is to form a  new air link not only with London  but also with Paris, Brussels, and  Berlin.  SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  OCTOBER 13  THE STORY OF JEREMIAH  ���������   Liner Gangway Blocked  Passengers At Southampton Held "Up  By Thousands Of Bees  Thousands of bees held up passengers about to embark on the liner  Moldavia at Southampton. England.  The bees settled down comfortably  at the foot of the passenger gangway and defied attempts to move  them. A hose was tried, but this  merely incited the bees, and caused  them to buzz in clouds, scattering  onlookers. Eventually order was restored, and embarkation proceeded.  Alberta's Coal Reserves  Alberta's coal reserves total 40,-  200,000,000 tons and lie buried in  1,717 square miles of provincial soil,  Sir Montague Barlow, one-man commission investigating collieries, was  told. Dr. J. A. Allan, head of the  geology department, University _f  Alberta, explained Alberta's topography and geological formation.  A recent check showed tha*t only  25 of the 1,100 Gideon Bibles placed  in one Detroit hotel in 1928 remain  in their rooms.  .UUA!A!.M.!.&W-^-S.1:iMV.T.W^  HARVESTING IN SASKATCHEWAN AT 20 BELOW 1  England To Receive Relic  Armada Jewel Has Been Given To  Art Collection Fund  The Armada jewel, one of the most  beautiful relics of Queen Elizabeth's  time, is to return to Britain. It was  bought at a saleroom in London for  2,700 guineas, and it was announced  that it had been given by Lord  Wakefield to the National Art Collection Fund. The jewel formed part  of the Fierpont Morgan collection of  miniatures. It will go to the Victoria and Albert Museum, Kensington, London.  Just about the middle of December,  one of the most unique and interesting annual harvests  to  he  garnered  on   the   North   American   Continent  will be in full swing.   No! Not wheat  ���������but Mineral Salts.    The scene will  be   Little   Manitou   Lake,   Watrous,  Saskatchewan.    The  harvesters  will  be the employees of the Department  of Natural Resources   of   Saskatchewan; and the harvest itself will consist  of  the  tiny crystals of mineral  salt which   form   in   Little Manitou  Lake each year at "freeze-up."   It is  one of the essential conditions that  the harvest  be   completed   within   a  period of ten days.   When the Prairie  winter comes in real earnest, and the  thermometer shivers down to 20 below zero, the Departmental men,  warmly attired, and wearing waist-  high rubber boots, gather up these  crystals with specially constructed  shovels, and store them in the Government warehouse at Watrous, from  where they are later distributed. The  medicinal qualities of this saline lake,  known for many years, are becoming  more and more "widely recognized,  and as a consequence these harvesting operations are assuming ever-  increasing proportions, and the Lake  is proving to be one of the Province's  most Important natural resources.  Golden text: To whomsoever I shall  send thee thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall command thee thou shalt  speak.   Jeremiah 1:7.  Lesson: Jeremiah 1:1-10; 6:10, 11;  8:18; 26:1-24; Chapters 36, 37, 38.  Devotional Reading: Psalm 26:1-7.  Explanations And Comments  Courageous Speaking Enjoined,  Jeremiah 1:6-10. In the thirteenth  year of Josiah's reign (about 626  B.C.), Jeremiah, the son of a priest,  became conscious of a divine call to  the prophetic office. It is natural to  understand that he had long meditated upon his country's sins and had  felt Impelled to denounce them, but  was most reluctant to undertake the  task. The Inward struggle which  took place in his sensitive and shrinking heart when something different  from his ordinary consciousness made  him certain that he was destined to  be the prophet of woe, he tells in the  form of a dialogue between God and  himself.  "Ah, Lord Jehovah! behold I know  not how to speak; for I am a child,"  He was not a child in years but he  lacked experience, he feared he had  not the ability to speak, he distrusted  himself. In the jargon of to-day, he  had an inferiority complex. "Say not,  I am a child" was the answer to-his  troubled thoughts that came to him;  "for to whomsoever I shall send thee  thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall  command thee thou shalt speak. Be  not afraid because of them; for I am  with thee to deliver thee."  The commission which Jeremiah received was to be "over the nations  and over the kingdoms, to pluck up  and to break down, and to destroy  and to overthrow, to build and to  plant." His task was to be destructive and constructive. He must strive  to make the people give up their  vices and weaknesses which were  making for internal corruption and  for political destruction, and to implant in tbeir hearts new ideals of  righteousness.  The Courageous Speaker Threatened, Jeremiah 26:8-11. During the 40  years, of Jeremiah's ministry, his was  the task of setting himself in opposition to all the currents of his time,  for Judah believed that she would  escape the impending doom, that  Jerusalem was inviolable because it  held the temple, that the nation could  not perisb. Jeremiah had to warn ���������  her that her only possible course was  to surrender to Babylon. At some  great feast, doubtless when the people  were gathered at Jerusalem, Jeremiah uttered the warning recorded in  the first seven verses of chapter 26.  The (Courage of Convictions, 26:  12-15. Jeremiah's defense was that  his message *had come to him from  God, and he urged them to amend  their -ways and doings, and to obey  the voice of Jehovah. If they would  do this, Jehovah would avert the evil  which he had pronounced upon them.  Prophecy, then was regarded as conditional; a change of conduct could  prevent the threatened punishment.  D. E. Warford, of Sawtelle, Calif.,  lays claim to being the most tattooed  man in America.  IN UP-TO-DATE  STABLES  ���������Old Reliable Minard'a  When horses coma In to stable with wlre-  euts or Bnddlo boils, or cows havo enked  udder, the thing to do is set the M'nnrd'n  bottle nt once, as Mr. Dowd of Glenboro,  Manitoba, knows.    Ho writes:  "I like your Minard's Liniment. Liko to  bave it ln the house. I have found your  Minnrd'fl Liniment especially aood for  barbed wlro cuts on horaeo."  A. famlly^Joctor prepared Mtwtrd'n Liniment  over ������0 years ago, Still Invaluable In  ���������v������>ry  fttfthln  nnd  ������*v������*ry  hotn*i*������. t,Q  \m*S2F2  21% foot of white or coloured  paper for kitchen use���������covert**  ���������helvo������, lining drawero, etc.  "*' 1IAMXLT0M, ONTAJUO  laMaMwaNaMaaaaaaaaHaaaiaaMiNaaNaiBaM^^  We^mS-���������m^(L^c���������m. 7-TWdU  *  Crochet  %/our Qaij  Scraps o  (Wool  Unto an  Gjfqliatz  .(Persian  Qardm  , PATTERN   5439  Even though you have nothing on bund hut tiny scraps of wool, you  can fashion thia lovely afghan. And tho wool may bo of different weight*-.  Each block���������4*MJ inches square���������can. bo done in different' colors. And what  a jeweled effect you havo whon done I It docs indeed look like a colorful  oriental tapestry. Doing each block in different colors, too, makes the work  moro fascinating for each is an adventure. Besides an afghan you can  mako lovely pillow topa oi* chair acta. Can't you ace what a lovely and inexpensive Xmaa gift these would bo?  In pattern 6430 you will And complete instruetionfl for making tho  afghnn shown at. woll an pillow tops and chair wots; an Illustration of tho  block and of tlio otitchoa needed; -material requirements.  To obtain this pattorn nond 20 cents ln stamps or coin (coin preferred)  to Household Arts Dopt, Winnipeg Ncwopapor Union, 175 McDormot Avo.  K,, Winnipeg.  Titer������ Its no Allco "fOrooka pattern hook i>ubl'uheA  Busy Year For Sun  More Bclipses In 1935 Than For Past  130 Years  The  sun   this   year   presents   its  greatest show of eclipses for the past  130 years. The moon will have passed  between the  sun  and  the  earth  no  fewer than five times, and the moon  will be in the earth's shadow twice.  This according to Professor Alfred H.  Joy, secretary of the Mount Wilson  Observatory, is the greatest number  of eclipses possible in one tyear. Not  since 1805 have the sun's rays been  obscured   so   often,   states   Reuter's  correspondent   in   Pasadena.    It will  be only the second   time   since 1255  that   there   have    been   five   solar  eclipses in one year, and   there  will  not be another such number until the  year 2185.  Making Ten-Year Tour  Bicyclist**    From   Sumatra   Do   Not  Believe In Speed  Two Sumatran cyclists who do not  believe in thc modem craze for speed  have arrived at Bombay on a ten-  year tour of the world. They started  from their homo in Sumatra in July,  1031, and have taken over throc-and-  a-half yearn to complete 5,000 miles  on their bicycles. They made fairly  long stops in Indo-China, Siam and  Burma and in various parts of India  in order ot learn the language ^ and  study tho peoplo and thoir religion.  By 1030, tho United States public  debt la expected Lo total. $3-1,208,000,-  000; approximately $270 for ovory  man, woman and child In tho country.  Soviet scientists nro building a  telescope which will have tho third  largost Ions in tho world. 2118  ROYAL  YEAST CAKES  give you perfect  hveads9 rollss  coffee cake and  buns>������- ���������  ^ .\������w;'-->*'"i?:,:''-"*"*sj:'*I'*!''''*ra  mtmmmmm  RalslnBread and Bunsglveteraptlng  variety to your menu. See page 13 of  Royal Yeast Bake Book for recipe.  Tbe *!?_ts!s family villi like these  tender Parker House Rolls. Recipe  In Royal Yeast Bake Book, page S2.  I!  il  It's easy to make this delicious  Coffee Cake. Reclpo on page 12%  Royal Yeast Bake Book.  k  IIGHT, tasty bread is  ���������** largely a matter of perfect leavening. That's why  it is so important to use dependable yeast. With Royal  Yeast Qakes you can he sure  of full leavening power every  time. Each Royal Yeasfc  Cake is protected by a special airtight wrapper. They  keep in perfect condition  for months.  a���������<****���������/M>WV������a*l������"*"tm������.  TwoHelpfuT  Booklets.. m  /*    FREE!  Tho ''Royal Yeast  Bako Book" tells  alt about the art  of bread-making  and gives tested  recipes. "Tlis  Royal Road to.  Better Health"  explains how tho  regular use of  Royal Yeast Cakes  as a food will Improve your health.  BOY MADE-IN-  CANADA GOODS  STANDARD BRANDS "LIMITED  Frailer Ave., and Liberty St.,Toronto. Ont.  Semi me, free, the "Royal Yeant Bake nook' ���������  and "Tho Royal Road to Bettor Health.'*  Nnme-  Stroot.  Town.  .Prov. ,  Out Of Polities  Hcm-y Ford said in an interview  published in Tho Detroit, News that  ho is not interested in any "Ford for  prosldont" boom, or in politics o*en-  orally. Discussing; tho business outlook, the motor magnate said: "I  am not a prophet but I havo the  feeling that business and wage trends  will bo up, and I do not bollevo tlio  political campaign of next year will  have any appreciable offoct on business, ono way or tho other."  ' A SAFE  OINTMENT  Soothing  ^,M-M ���������***!.>��������� *M.-m.<.*%*. m.m %.m.<^.  ;(eut}������)*30c,$Cfl, rawTM  THE   REVIEW.   CRESTON,   B.    C.  <f)  f ���������*  URGE LARGE SCALE  EMIGRATION PLAN  TO THE DOMINIONS  Newcastle-On-Tyne, England.���������The  conference on emigration to the empire concluded after preparing a  written case for a government-assisted emigrat'On scheme.  The brief, which a deputation will  present to the government, urges a.  large-scale?! emigration scheme would  help solve' unemployment at home  and abroad. Financial assistance  would be repaid by saving unemployment relief.    V   7  YV  Establishment .Pf an empire development and em'gration board with  statutory powers is advocated and it  Is suggested the annual budget  should provide grants to settlersr  Tbe plan will be submitted to the  cabinet by the lord mayor of Newcastle, R. S. Dalgleish, and a deputation of members of parliament and  representatives of emigration authorities from all parts of"*���������the country.  Cop'es of the statement afterward  will be circulated to Dominion premiers, high commissioners and agents-  general, with a letter from the lord  mayor of Newcastle appealing for  their co-operation in an effort to  bring about the biggest move ever  made for the repopulation of the empire by families and communities  from the United Kingdom.     .  New Gold Strike  Made On North Ann Of Great  Slave "Lake  Edmonton.���������A new gold strike  west of Yellowknif e bay on the north  arm of Great Slave lake was revealed to the world when Dr. Fred Jolliffe, of the federal geological survey, flew out of the north after a  summer spent in the northwest territories.  "The strike was made September  15 several rales from the Burwash  discovery," said Dr. Jolliffe.  He refused to divulge the name of  tbe prospector who made the strike  pending the filing jofhisu official report when he returns to department  of mines headquarters at Ottawa.  Dr. Jolliffe and his party of 15  student assistants from the University of Alberta, explored an area of  roughly 10,000 square miles on the  north shore of Great Slave lake and  found that 2,800 square miles of the  district was underlined by pre-Cam-  bian sediments and volcanics, relatively favorable for the occurrence of  gold and silver deposits.  Dr. Jolliffe left Sept. 24 for Ottawa.  Stage Sham Air Raid  Fleet Of Giant Bombers Visit Island  ,.   Of Malta  "Valetta, Malta.���������A fleet of ��������� giant  bombers and other aircraft droned  over Malta in a sham air raid recently, with this tiny British island  outpost plunged in darkness and eerie  silence.  Promptly at 9:30 p.m., every house,  street and traffic light blinked out.  Simultaneously, the twinkling lights  of British warships riding at anchor  in the harbor went off.  Thousands of citizens thronged the  historic bastions bf Valetta and the  seafront during the raid.  Acting-Governor Luke surveyed  the operations. Aerial and military  authorities said they wero well  pleased with the island's loyal cooperation.  Coining Ethiopian Money  Rome.���������Italy is already coining  Ethiopian thalors, for uso following  tho incursion of Italian forces into  Ethiopia. Employees of tho mint  said tho coins are to bo URed by tho  military and civil governors which  Italy plans to Install In Ethiopia, to  pay off tribesmen who seok work  under Italian domination.  ��������� Moro Wheat In Store  Ottawa.���������The Dominion bureau of  ptatistico reported Canadian' wheat  In store for the week onded Sept. 20  amounted to 220,802,570 bushels, an  Incroaso of 13,958,880 ovor tlio previous wook. The vlsiblo supply for  tho corresponding week last year was  a23,tl������0,20S bushols.  A Quiet Session  Jin i _ ��������� __i  Princo   Edward   Island's   House   Of  Assembly Meets  Charlottetown..��������� Another chapter  was written into the history of British parliamentary procedure when  Prince Edward Island's House of Assembly, filled with 30 Liberal members, met and carried on the affairs  of state without an official opposition.  it was not a house of "yes-men,''  however. At least two government  supporters served notice on Premier-  Walter Lea that they were not going  to be a rubber-stamp for cabinet-  directed policies.  When the money bill, the most important legislation of the special one-  day session, was being studied in  committee under the guidance of tbe  premier, W. H. Dennis, Prince, and  H. H. Cox, King's, raised objection to  Canada's smallest province providing  for $3,000,000 expenditure to refund  loans and carry on public works. To  give the cabinet this authority two  months after taking office would be  going directly against the policy of  retrenchment which placed them in  power, the critics contended.  Absence of -an official opposing  party helped to speed the work of the  session and at an early hour the  governor, accompanied by his secretary and aide-de-camp, returned to  give His Majesty's assent to the bills  passed.  The house was prorogued to meet  ordinarily in March, 1936.  Abolish Ration System  New Decree Is Effective In Soviet  Russia  Moscow. ��������� A government decree  abolished the ration system of selling  some prime food products, cutting  prices in open commercial shops.  The decree constitutes an important step toward liquidation of the  present double sales sysiem whereby  workers make purchases in "closed"  ration shops and the general public  buys in open shops.  Prices of the two have differed  widely, workers getting the benefit  of extremely low rates. .  The decree abolished ration shop  sale of meat, sugar, fish, butter and  potatoes - and threw all- buying of  these products into open shops, substituting one fixed price for the previous double price system.  The new price scale reduced beef  more than 50 per cent. It now will  sell from five rubles up per kilogram. _ Sugar will be four rubles and  52 kopecks per kilogram as compared  with 6.50, and butter was reduced  from 24 rubles per kilogram to 15.  To prevent speculation, it was announced, no purchaser will be permitted to buy at one time more than  two kilograms of meat; two of sugar;  a half kilogram of butter or three  kilograms of fish.  FILIPINO PRESIDENT  Hours Of Labor Set  Legislation   Will   Be   Brought   Into  Effect October 5  Ottawa.���������Legislation for limitation  of the hours of labor in certain industrial undertakings in Canada will  be brought into effect on Oct. 5.  Regulations for the carrying out of  the measure have been drafted.  Based on a 1919 convention of the  international labor organization of  the League of Nations, tho legislation  constitutes part of the reform program brought down by the government at the last session of parliament.  Would Defend Record  >Haaa-������aanlaali���������ani* a)  If Speed Prestige Threatened Campbell Will Raco Again  London. ������������������ Sir Malcolm Campbell  and his Bluebird are through with  breaking records unless somo  foreigner gives thom a now mark to  shoot at.  Silt' Malcolm announced at a dinner  in his honor that ho had had his fill  of blistering speeds, but that thoro  was still a great deal of lightning in  his racing car that might be coaxed  out if Britain's speed prestige was  threatened.  Another Leaf Competition  Montreal.���������Third annual competition for tho most boautiful autumn  tintod maple loaf Is announced by  tho Canadian government through  tho Canadian travel bureau. First  prize will bo JP100. 21.1.8  By an overwhelming majority, Senator** Manuel Quezon, above, was  elected first President of tbe new  Philippines Commonwealth. Vice-  President Garner, of the United  States, will attend the inauguration  exercises on November 15, when  Quezon will take office for six years.  The Federal Vote  Results Should Be Quickly Available  After Closing Of Polls  Ottawa.���������Although various adaptations of proportional representation  and the single transferable vote are  used in some provincial elections the  Dominion general election Oct. 14  will be conducted on the traditional  single-vote system.  Electors will have only one choice  between the contending candidates.  They will mark an "X" opposite the  name of the candidate they favor and  the candidate with the largest number of 'Ts" will be elected. There  are no second br?:third choices.  With the single-vote, system in  operation throughout the Dominion  on election day results will be available probably for all constituencies  within a few hours of the closing of  the y&ls?  .     4?^' * -*/* " * J"** "r- ~  Another Storm Hits Japan  Typhoon   Kills   48   And   About   iqo  Are Missing  Tokyo.���������A typhoon which whirled  freakishly and destructively across  Japan, from Kagoshima to Wendai,  killed at least 48 persons, and about  100 were missing.  Several ports in the inland sea reported that fishing craft were missing, and the steamer Tonegawa  Maru, with a crew-of 13 and 19 passengers, also was missing.  The typhoon was the fifth death-  dealing storm in three months over  Japan proper.  Installing McGill Principal  Montreal.���������It is expected at least  24 Canadian universities and colleges  will be represented at the installation of Professor A. E. Morgan as  principal of McGill University Oct.  5. Dr. Robert C. Wallace, president  of University of Alberta/Edmonton,  will be in attendance.  Farewell Banquet  Governor-General  And   Countess  Of  Bessborough Are Honored  Ottawa.���������A farewell banquet was  given by the government of Canada  to the Governor-General and Countess of Bessborough.  The term of office of the Earl of  Bessborough as the king's representative in Canada expires shortly.  It was an affectionate farewell at  which, in addition to Sir George Perley, who presided, there was a distinguished gathering of representatives of the state, the diplomatic  corps, the church, the judiciary and  the civil service with their wives.  Responding to the toast proposed  by Sir George Perley, the governor-  general dwelt on the happy relations  he had enjoyed during his four years  in Canada.  Veregin Resigns  No Longer Head Of Brotherhood Of  Doul-hobors  Saskatoon.���������Peter Veregin, for. 10  years president of the Christian Community of the Universal Brotherhood  of Doukhobors in Canada, stated here  that he had severed all connection  with the community. He declared  that he stood now as a private Canadian citizen. He had no intention of  leaving the country, he said.  Mr. Veregin, who has been virtual  ruler of the sect in Canada since the  death of his father in a British Columbia railway accident, said he had  tendered his resignation about six  months ago. He would not disclose  any reason for his action. He is now  on his way fo Montreal.  Honesty Was Rewarded  Delivery Boy Returns Valuable Bonds  And Gets Good Job  New York.���������-From the lowly plane  of delivery boy of "coffee and���������" at  $3.15 a week, young Albert Correri  vaulted to a remunerative position in  Wall street.  Correri's role in "the street's" newest success story was cast when he  picked from the gutter avpacket of  bonds valued at $-j5O}QQ0 and.returned them to the owners. C. F. Grun-  wald, vice-president of -C. F. Childs  and Co., Wall street brokers, owners  of the bonds, announced Correri  would start work in the cashier's department of the brokerage firm.  Correri, who is 22, -may also get a  reward.  TO STRENGTHEN  NAVY AND AIR  FORCE IN BRITAIN  London.���������Prime Minister Baldwin  intends to outline measures to  strengthen both the.navy and the air  force when he addresses the Conservative party at its annual conference at Bournemouth.  George Lansbury, Labor leader in  the House of Commons in an address  declared Britain and other nations  were on the brink of a war in which  it would be "Christian against Christian, Mohammedan against Mohammedan, Jew against Jew���������all praying  to the same God for Victory.  "I cannot bow to that sort of  thing,**' the leader said. "The way  out is for some nation, and I want  it to be Britain, to blaze a new-  trail."  Athens.���������The semi-official Athens  news agency announced information  from a German source indicated arrangements had been completed at  Instanbul for Greek and Turkish warships and planes to start manoeuvres  in the Dardanelles and that two Roumanian torpedo boats would also  participate.  It has been reported Greece is prepared to support Great Britain in any  Mediterranean activity which might  become necessary at the outbreak of  Italo-Ethiopian warfare.  Greek newspapers hailed the arrival of British ships in Greek ports,  saying that the people of Greece have  come to regard the annual British  naval manoeuvres in Mediterranean  waters as a welcome tradition.  Siege Of Lucknow  Ten    People     Alive     To    Celebrate  Thrilling Event  London.���������Ten people in different  parts of the world celebrate one of  the most thrilling incidents in the  modern history of the British Empire,  the siege of Lucknow in the Indian  mutiny.  The oldest survivor of the' siege is  C. G. Palmer, a resident of British  Columbia; the youngest Arthur  Dashwood, 78. living in London.  Dashwood's mother gave him birth  in the residency at Lucknow, where  17 people were herded in one room  during the siege. Despite her ordeal,  Mrs. Dashwood lived for more than  70 years. .  Mussolini Opposed  Report From Italy Of Some Opposition To War Plans  Paris. ��������� French newspapers re-  j printed a story from The London  Referee saying Prince Umberto, heir  to the Italian throne, is opposed  to Premier Benito Mussolini's conflict  with Ethiopia.  (This report "was described as utterly false in Rome and London by  authoritative Italian spokesmen.)  There is a possibility, the story-  said ,of General Itaio Balbo, governor  of Libya and Italian air hero, leading a revolt against II Duce.  "Balbo, whose relations with the  royal family are excellent, is also  opposed to the Ethiopian campaign,"  the story asserted. "A large number -  of Italian superior officers share his  view."  RECEIVING THE KING'S CUP.  Sentry Killed By Lions  Five Belonging To Emperor Selassie  Make Dash For Freedom  Addis Ababa.���������Five of Emperor  Haile Selassie's big lions escaped,  killed one sentry, and injured flvo  more.  In this rush for freedom they devoured several of the Emperor's  pedigreed Australian sheep and killed  two horses.  Colonel Mekouria, the commander  of the imperial guard, seized a machine gun and shot all five beasts in  succession.  Pilot T. Rose, driving a MIloa Falcon machine, won tho King's Cup Air  Race "round tho British Isles'" this year, and Is .shown receiving the coveted  trophy from thc hands of Sir riiililp Cunliffo-LlBter,  Insurance Premiums Higher  British Vessels Passing Through Sticss  Canal Must Pay More  Singapore.���������Fear of trouble developing in thc Mediterranean was  reflected hero whon marine insurance  companies warned special premiums  for "war risks" must be paid by British vessels returning to England  through the Suez canal.  To escape payment of tho war risk  premiums British ahips must go all  the way around the Cape of Good  Hope.  Gordon Bennett Trophy  Warsaw.���������The Polish balloon Fol-  onla was awarded tho Gordon Bennett trophy as tho winner of the 27th  Bennett international races that began here Sop. 15. Tho Polonia, ono  of tho 13 entries, travelled about  1,007 miles after a flight of 58 hours  and 54 minutes, it wna officially announced. It reached an altitude of  16,732 feet. Another Polish balloon,  tbo Warsaw, wan second. CRESTOK SdgYinE-W  AH changes for tlie  February issue of  the East Kootenay  Telephone Directory  must be made hy  this date.  KOOTENAY  TELEPHONE  yiPANY  Limited  THE GRESTON REVIEW  Issued every Friday at Creston, B.C.  Subscription:    ������2.50 a vear in advance*. ���������;  $3.00 to U.S. points. \  C. F. HAYES. Editor and Owner 1  CJX.fc.SxON,  ts.C.m i-itluAY, jliEC. 20;  HOME   BREW  In connection with the market- \  ing  of  defrosted  apples a   state- \  ment  issued  by  the    B.C.  Treei  Fruit Board   covering sales up to *  December  7th,    would    indicate ���������  that the tr^de is no: 100 per cent, j  doubtful of the keeping quality of j  these  frosted    apples.    Of   total  sales to that date, accounting for  just over 40,000 boxes, It is stated  that the big preference  was for  the  long-keeping  Rome   Beauty  which  made up  I4s.Q03 boxes of  this total, next to which was  the  still later keeper, the Yellow Newtown, with Delicious a close third  in popular demand.    Here is how  the 40,000 boxes    old were made  up:    Mcintosh,   243;    Jonathan,  2,756;  Wagener,  4,056; Banana,  276; Spy, 2389; Grimes, 91; Early  Sundries,   633;   Romes,    14,003;  Delicious,      5,238:    Spitzenberg,  3932; Stay man, 1718; Late Sundries, 42, Winesap,   4; Newtown,  5,229.    Total, 40,601.  M-HZtT..*Ik'.-iXbVou and all Your Friends . . . and you can pay  ye*.*? guests nd Rne^jbd^plimcnt than 4o serve them any of the choice  B.C.D." b*-_no5s listed above.  There is both variety and economy  in the wide selection of these mellow and perfectly aged  products  Y ..   and  the answer to the  sensible  gift  .,   '     problem.    Buy early and avoid disappointment.  "V,"4"i*"T.*Y;*i\ ���������^^ilU*"** ���������**-*-.-'. '���������' * --*���������*"-* i"*h~/s"  HHSHBBMBiE  This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government ol British Columbia.  Penticton has hit upon a splendid plan for securing  a supply of  what might be termed necessities  for the  Christmas  hampers  sent  out in that town under the supervision  of  the  Rotary  Club.    In  advance of Christmas the  movie  theatre is made available to  the  club for an afternoon  show  exclusively  for children  who gain  admission by  presenting  canned  goods, jafti or any variety of food  suitable for yuletide distribution.  With the great variety of donations received in this fashion those  in  charge find  it much  easier to  make the funds available secure  the other commodities that are  requisite   and  necessary    for    a  Christmas hamper.    The youngsters get a great kick out of helping in such a good  cause and  in  this  way,   too,   many a home  is  able to make a modest contribution that otherwise would nor have  opportunity   to  help  in   a  good  work.  In the Okanagan Kelowna  Growers Exchange appears to be  the only co-operative selling  agency that proposes to extend a  measure of relief to growers who  lost apples picked and in the orchard at the time of the late October freeze. Whatever aid is  given will bo at the tho discretion  of the directors the president of  which hat* mado it quite clear  that it will bo limited entirely to  whatever profits the Rxohange  will mnkc on 11)35 oporntionK. In  connection with the freexe, Vernon appears to have suffered the  least due, i'm the News points out,  (lie fact that in the North Okanagan there are fow apples later  Mclnto-'h Reds, all of which wore  in  f-torago   before  the    cold   dip  came. At Penticton the Co Op.  Growers take the stand that their  plant was plenty big enough and  that if the orchardist failed to  have his apples in their warehouse the blame was on the grower, not the selling agency.  December 20.    We call attention  specifically to the  date because just one month hence Creston village will be called  upon to  place in nomination the names of  men they would like to see serve  as councillors for periods of three,  two and one year.    In January a  full board of three ipembers  will  be chosen, but after that but one  councillor will be elected   each  year, as is  the case with   school  boards.    Like all its predecessors  since incorporation  in  1924  the  outgoing    council  has   failed to  please everybody and a  month's  notice  is not too long to enable  those who are shoutiug time for a  .change to   line   up   new  talent.  With polling set for January 26th  it is hoped the council will see to  it that the balance sheet is out in  good time next month.    With no  liquor profits available   for the  past three or four years and  no  raise  in the old time  12 mill   tax  rate, financing the village is becoming the  more   serious   each  year and the ratepayers, as  well  as those who will have the governing of the town in hand,  should  know exactly how Creston stands  financially.  All the candidates in the federal  election in Kootenay East last  October budgeted too low in connection with campaign costs according to thc official return** in  this matter that have been made  to Chas. Edgar of Fernie, returning officer. But while they all  underestimated running expenses  all of them seem to have kept  costs well under the proverbial  thousand dollars a week which  was about what it cost in the old  days in the Kootenays. B. O.  Ivorson, C.C.F. nominee, set an  all time low for ieven a losing  candidate, with a total campaign  cost of but $521, of which $455  was contributed by 12 parties.  Considering he was never in the  riding after the real fight commenced Hon. H. H. Stevens' total  expenditure of $1448 looks quite  generons, but is not at all out of  line with the expenditures of R.R.  Bruce, Liberal standard bearer,  who made it a short fight and a  merry one, to expend $2889. Mr.  Stevens' official agent states 8  persons contributed to his campaign, but Mr. Bruce's statement shows only one contributor.  As to deficits, Mrf Ivorson spent  $80 more than wtm contributed.  Mr. Stevens' cver-expenditure  was in the neighborhood of $200,  and Mr. Bruce exceeded his available funds by about $300.  ������������������  L UMBER I  We are in a position .to supply  your requirements in  Rough and Dressed 1 and 2 Dimension, Boards  and Spruce - Shiplap.  KILN DRIED FLOORING  (Gyproc, Shingles, Cement.  Our prices are right.    You get the grade you  order and full measure.  ���������EL  CHAS. O. RODGERS  ORlSBTOTSf  ra������  .*������  i*8  .*>  ���������"������������������ia  Five and Ten-Acre Blocks  Improved and Unimproved,  Easy Ter una.  J. *G. Connell  Box 11. CRESTON  w%mUm.m\m������m\m%fm\mm\^^  *       The Consolidated Mining &       S  Smelting Company of Canada, Ltd.  TRAIL,   BRITISH OOL.UMBIA  Manufacturers of  ELEPHANT BRAND COMMERCIAL  FERTILIZERS  Ammonium Phosphates.   Sulphate of Ammonia  Superphosphates Complete Fertilizers.  Producers and Refiners of  TADANAC BRAND METALS    . ','  Gold, Silver, Lead, Zinc* Cadmium, Bismuth  IwftWmWMAVimWItrtmlmm'miW fflvv  lv  ��������� <.*-,  ' 1^^   TII9I Mir  as  iv-or.   1 taw  ������������__9"������������Vai������g  *i������iltt  are thc  NATTY BAGETTE  avid the latest  PRINCESS iVIAftiNA  WATCH  ���������the old stantibys are also  going strong.  j nekedby MrsT W. ji. Long and A. K.  Palfreyruan. A i-piendid iunch was served after, cards.        ? *-~  BellnWer, Calif., Bulletin; A Thanksgiving breakfast was served in the social  hall of the Baptist church last Thursday  Kforr.ing -to members of the Baptist  You-fjg Peoples' Union. Dr. Denton,  present pastor of the church, was the  speaker of the evpnt. Oth?r features of  the program were two piano solos by  Frank Clark".and selections by a mixed  quartette composed of Eivaline Clarke,  soprano; Irene Henesie, alto; Frank.  Clark, tenor; and Byron Johnson, bass.  Mrs. Elnora Henesise accompanied.on  the piano.  PRICES  from  $5.00  up!  A close second is COSTUME  JEWELERY, from 50c. up.  Then SILVERWARE, a good  selection to choose from at  v?rv moderate prices.  A fine assortment of GLASS  STEMWARE, besides  CHINA.  AS TO BEAUTY AND PRICE  YOU'LL BE PLEASED  BOTH WAYS!  Don't forget���������  LIPHARDT'S  is the place  Local Flowers for Holiday  Creston-grown mums, carnations snapdragon, ferns and house plants for the  Christmas trade and all other times, are  now available in quantity at the, greenhouse of James Moores on Little Avenue.  Coming here from Coleman, Alberta,  about three years ago, Mr. Moores has  gradually developed his trade until now  he is operating two greenhouses each  60 x 16 feet, and a smaller one 20.x 12  feet. The latter he is devoting principally to the growing of snapdragon, while  one of the former is exclusively for mums  and carnation?, both of which show fine  quality and are in all the leading shades.  The other large greenhouse is planted  principally to tomatoes for which there  is a considerable local demand. In these  quarters he is also developing bulbs for  the spring trade. The greenhouses are  steam heated and by maintaining a temperature of 55 degrees Mr. Moores is  turning out plants and flowers that are  splendidly adapted to local climate.  Erickson  Perley Putnam is a visitor with Spokane friends this week, leaving on Wednesday.  There will be Anglican church service  at the schoolhouse on Sunday afternoon  at 3 o'clock.  Frank Putnam, M.P.P., wasa business  visitor at Nelson a few days at the middle of the week  Mrs. A. McKelvey left yesterday for  Calgary, Alberta, to spend the holiday  season with her daughter, Mrs. R. F.  Lid gate.  Mr. and Mrs. Frank Celli left on  Thursday by auto for Vancouver, to  spend the holidays with friends in the  terminal city.  Mr. and Mrs. T. Wilson and daughter,  Jean, left on Thursday for Vancouver  for the holiday season with Mrs. Wilson's  darents. Mr. and Mrs. Tingley.  Erickson Ladies' Hospital Auxiliary  are having their usual New Year's eve  novelty dance at Pairk pavilion, Creston  Tuesday December 31st, with an admission of 50 cents.  Erickson Ladies' Hospital Auxiliary  had ten tables of players at their invitation bridge on Wednesday evening last  at the home of the president, Mrs. F  Putnam. Tho high scorers were Miss  Cooke and C. B. Twigg, with second  prizes going to Mrs. Fowlie and .1. G.  Connell.   Consolation honors  were an-  Hospital Sells Gift Acres  There was a small attendance at the  December meeting of the directors of  Creston Valley Hospital on Wednesday,  with President F. V. Staples in the  chair. The financial statement showed  321 hospital days compared to 440 in  October. Collections showed improvement and included wood. Owing to in  crease of space to be heated this winter  much more wood is needed than formerly, and it is hoped that additional  supplies will soon be available. The  president announced that the hospital  ten acres on the flats had been sold for  cash to J. G. Abbott of Wynndel. The  thanks of the board for gifts were  accorded to J. G. Abbott, Canyon  Auxiliary, N. Husband, G. Jacks. C. O.  Rodgers and Wynndel Women's Institute.-. Due in part to the favorable  weather, work on the Nurses' home is  progressing well, and it is hoped that  it will be ready for occupation within six  weeks. The chimneys and Interior  plaster have been finished., One coat of  exterior plaster has also been put on,  and stucco will be applied in the spring  when danger of frost has passed. The  first donation to be received for the  Nurses' Home since construction commenced was the proceeds of an entertainment put on by hospital enthusiasts  aged nine and seven. An > electric  percolator and toaster, and all the bedroom wall plugs have also been donated.  I.- 1 __J 111 1  ������-Uc������ai ������tnu rers-uaai  For expert radio service phone Speedway Motoas, 51T. Erickson.  Birth ���������At Creston hospital, December  11th, to Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Ham, a  daughter.  Denzil Maxwell of Cranbrook arrived  on Wednesday on a visit with his mother,  IV^fa    .Too     \A ������������������������"���������**��������� wria.11  The Grand is presenting Shirley  Temple in "Curly Top" Friday and  Saturday nights this week.  T. J. Crawford left at the middle of  the week for Vancouver, and will spend  the winter at coast points.  D. G. Alexander,  Creston  TireShop,  has moved from the old jfremier .-.l_arage.'  building to. UniversalMotors.      -...  GAS ENGINE FOR SALE���������Stickney,  IM h.p.. just overhauled, bargain for  cash.   Enquire Review Office.  F. Sainsbury of- Cranbrook is assiss-*  tant at the C.P.R. depot while M. Anderson is away on Christmas vacation.  The town is now without the services  of a handyman, Canute Anderson resigning from that position earlier-in the  month.  For New Years' eve Erickson Hospital  Ladies' Auxiliary are having their  annual dance with an admission of 50  cents, which includes supper.  Up to thc middle of the month apple  shipments from Creston Valley points  totalled 385 carloads, and it is estimated  there are still 50 cars to ship.  FOR SALE���������Springer Spaniel pups,  registered stock, strong, healthy. Hunters and companions. Suitable gifts. D.  Harrow, Box 592, Nelson, B C.  Entertainment and social evening by  Creaton Wolf CubB at the Parish Hall,  Friday, December 20th. at 8 p. m.  Adults 25 cents; children 10 cents.  Local stores will be open on Monday  and Tuesday evenings of this week, and  be closed all day Wednesday and Thursday���������Christmas and Boxing Days.  Every adult attending the grand on  Saturday evening still have a chance to  win a dressed turkey, which will be  drawn for immediately after, the show.  Harold McLaren arrived on Tuesday  to spend the - Christmas  holidays with  *"*^'   A-A  ��������� A-Ai-AifJfr-i-'*>* r* r ������������������% ii jft'1 f _T* l__iriAw"ifca������a__i.*l"^ll m%t.*%mm\   iA.-l4*A>AiI (%\  jA j|yijjk|*%i^n^ IptfTfrKE Cr^tS^B-^IFE^S J%^ "^  SEE OUR COMPLETE LINE OF  Rogers and  Eiaciio Sets  We also offer you export Radio Sorvicc  with the la test equipment  P_pt__pt  flnBIBwi  Phone $VT  j������w^_k ^LWF ^^Wk B^ _______*  ^ffl    IM9   HM    Effl   ffil ^9      ^~"~~~"~"~*"k  ERICKSON  ������Am-������w������i  >vr^~ymwrmir^r~**i~wr*  ^^m^mrw^&WtVmmTw������4^44)m*'^fm14N4&1-'iWfwVm^&mWWmWw^ P_a  PHONE 19  f*0;BOX31  SATURDAY . MONDAY - TUESDAY  BACON, 6 and 8 lb. slabs per lb.  CRANBERRIES, per lb.-    ���������    -  COFFEE, Nabob, 1-lb. glass jar  CHRISTMAS CANDIES, 25c and  MIXED NUTS, 3 lbs.    -  $ .27  .49  .SO  RADISHES  LETTUCE  CELERY  his parents, Mr. ajftd Mrs. H. W. McLaren. He'is a student at the University of B.C., Vancd"uver.  See our stock of;used Battery and Electric Radios Speedway Motors, Erickson. .....:_,; .I*', S  FOR SALE���������Pure Labrador Pups  fr.om Old Country? field trial champion  stock, beauties. Just right for next  season. G. C. HVColeman. Box 473,  Cranbrook, B.C. J  School closes for*the Christmas holidays today. Operations will be resumed  on January 6th. With the exception of  the high school staff most of the teachers  will remain in town for the vacation.  The last of the season's church bazaars  was that of Saturday afternoon under  the auspices of the Catholic Ladies'  League, It was the most successful of  them all, enjoying* a cash turnover of  $210. ;:-.f->,  The 1935 hunting season closed on  Sunday, jueeriiunters were active the  last week and those operating in the  Kitchener-Yahk section had considerable luck. The kill of blacktails was  heavier than usual.  With the 'addition of the most  modern and complete tire repair and vul  .arizing equipment in the west, plus  first-class workmanship, the Universal  Motorsj>f Creston, have advanced their  service"to 'the*motbrinj* public.   "    ^ "-  At the annual meeting of Creston  Lodge A.F. & A.M., last Wednesday  evening H. E. Ostendorf was named  master; L. W. Bell, senior warden, and  H. H. Wilks, junior warden Installation" takes place on Friday evening, December 27th.  League basketball fixtures on Friday  night resulte 1 much as expected. The  Review downed Pharmacy by a one  point margin. Cardinals won overhigh  School boys, and in an exhibition game  Loallo won from a second string squad  from Wynndel.  Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Murrell left on  Tuesday for Vancouver where they will  spend the balance of the month on a  yuletide visit with their daughter, Mary,  and son George. The latter is a junior  officer on the C.P.R. Pacific liner Empress of Canada, which will be in port at  Christmas.  In aid of the Christmas Cheer fund  two basketball games are being pla ed  at Park pavilion this (Friday) evening.  At 8 o'clock the High School clashes  with a ladies' rep. team, and this is  followed by a game betwpen. Imperial  Groceteria and Loallo. The admission  is 25 cents.  An Anglican Young People's Association haa just been organized in connection  with Christ Church, Creston, with the  following officers: President, W. C.  Courtney; vice-president. Miss Kate  Payne; secretary, Misb M. Blinco; treasurer, Clifford York; executive, sports,  Douglas Alderson; social. Miss L. Trevelyan; refreshment^ Mrs. Calkin. The  society is to meet each Tuesday evening  at the Parish Hall.  Father Hartmann officiated at a quiet  wedding at Holy Cross Church Creston,  on Wednesday morning, when he united  in marriage, Miss Elenorn, eldest daughter of M and Mrs. J.. Nastasi, with  Michael Tula* ico, eldest son of Mr. and  Mrs. John Taiarico. Tho bride was supported by Mrs. Lin Anderson .of Sirdar,  and tho best man was the brido'a brother, Arthur Nastani Tho ceremony was  witnessed by just the immediate friends  and relatives of the contracting parties.  Tho newly weds aro spending tho honeymoon ut count points, and on their ro  turn will reside at Sirdar.  Creaton Hospital Womon'a Auxiliary  was exceptionally successful with tho  aala of ticket.* on tho drawing for the  hope chest the event enjoying a total  salo of $207. Tho lucky tickets wero  drawn at tho Grand theatre on Saturday  night, with President and Secretary F.  V. Staple und II. A. Powell of the  hoapital board In charge. Ruby Palmer  wiia tho winner of tho chest. Tho  Bocond prizo, a blanket, went to Col.  Mallnnclaino. A third prize, an electric  lamp, was won by Mra. C Frannon.  Seller of lucky ticlcot waa Mrs. Beninger,  who also was awardod tho prize for Bell  ing most tickets, a total of 11 books.  Mrs. Maxwell won second prize for  tickets selling witb nine books.  FOR SALE���������Purebred Jersey heifer,  fresh, price $50. A. H. Pigott, Wynndel.  *���������     m-    -.���������    m.     -    ���������    -    ���������    m.    m.    sm    m.     m.    mm    ^     m. . m.    m.    m._m.    m.. ^ . a. a ��������� A- A- m.. A. A��������� A - *.    m. - m. . m.   A . m. . ^    .  SHOES IN GOOD CONDITION SAVE  MANY A DOCTOR'S BILL  Too often colds, bronchitis, even pneumonia can be traced to wet and  cold feet; the result of shoes that need repairing.  Prevention is always better than cure. Don't delay; have your shoes  repaired today. We will do a good job that will make your old shoes good for  many weeks' longer wear. It's not what you pay; its the quality you  get that pays.  SKATES SHARPENED HOLLOW 6R0UND AND HONED BY EXPERTS 25 Gents  i  ff_V*3  Courtney's ShoeRepair  Next door to Liquor Store, Creston  4  i  -A. A.- A- *���������-A..A. M..^..^.. Jtr<f.-^,^ MfrrA-A.  Now is the Time to Fill Your Co al  Bins for the Winter Months.    Try  mj&Vkf&ii  imWGmWi  "���������%  Coal That's Coal���������Clean and Clinker less.  CRESTON   TRANSFER  ���������    P.O. BOX 79  ALBERT DAVIES  PHONE 13  wwt'w  l������J'fi'*������l������,?**-flft  ww-rn-m-  wm^*^^jm^mr*y^wr^mm'^m*'T0'^^F^*m***m^^mqM^qm~m^mmr^^������^j-m  *;v  No Job Too Large or Too Small  PHONE 21  ���������and be suro your requirments are taken care of promptly and efficiently. TBAINED  MEN OF EXPEDIENCE AT YOUR  SERVICE  H. S. McCREATH  CO/Vl_i.   WOOD,       FLOUR,   FISEJIO  ���������v  ���������wr  *w  H_r  nr  r^T<  ���������V  *  *wr  *������������������������  *v  "wr  ���������*<r*  'wr  m  <r  ������������������w  ^"*  GIFT SUGGESTIONS!  WE INVITE YOU TO INSPECT OUR STOCK  Waterman Pews and Sots Parker Pens and Sets. Perfumcry  Ftmcy Stationery. Toilet Cases. Yardley Sets  Cute*. Sets.      Kodaks and Brownies.      Leather Hand Bags  Jasanine and Gardenia Sets. China and Silverware  BOOKS,      TOYS,      GAMES,  BOX CIIOCOLATES-Neilson's, Page & Shaw, Holly's.  CIGARS and CIGARETTES in Christmas Wrapping  Creston Drug & Book Store  . al.A.BARBOUR.MGM.  aa  *_1������ ���������.MJtM.M ��������� n:9.mMM.mmMUMMJILmW.m.tlM���������m .MM.m.t.mM.mMMMMMMMmmMMM tAMKtfJi'lOii THE   REVIEW.    CKESTO 5X.   B.    C  2 Things That Combat  Colds Like Magic!  Ask Any Doctor . . . Then Follow Simple Directions  Pictured Below. Quickest, Simplest Way  Take two  lets. Make  ���������"Aspirin."  "Aspirin" Tab-  sure you get  Instead of using fartcy priced "cold  remedies" try the new-day cold  treatment pictured here. Your own  doctor will approve it. It -will start  easing the average cold or sore  throat almost as fast as you caught it.  The "Aspirin" you take will  start combating your cold internally  at once; if throat is sore, crush and  stir 3 "Aspirin" Tablets in a third  2.  Drink a full glass of water.  Repeat treatment i*12 hours.  of a glass of water; gargle twice. Da  not rinse mouth.  ��������� "Aspirin" Tablets are made in  Canada. "Aspirin" is the registered  trade-mark of the Bayer Company,  Limited. Look for the name Bayer  in the form of a cross on every tablet.  //  DEMAND  AND   GET  ASPIRIN  //  Inaugurates New Service  Japanese    "Department    Store    Has  Opened Free Marriage Bureau  Not content with merely imitating  the merchandising- practices of tho  West, a large department store in  Osaka, Japan, has instituted a new  native service for customers. A free  marriage bureau has been opened in  the store. There men and women who  desire to marry may register and  furnish pertinent information about  themselves.  Marriage in Japan usually is arranged by families, rather than by  the individuals concerned, through  go-betweens who receive a commission for their services. The new  bureau will take over the work customarily done by the go-between.  There is a business reason for the  establishment of this free service.  The couples who meet through the  bureau will purchase their wedding  outfit at the store.���������New York Times.  Holly Days  are here again  ���������choose the,  'Better Times Gift"  A Tense Situation  As the Italo-Ethiopian war progresses, and with economic sanctions imposed by the great majority of the members'of the League of Nations gradually tightening, the situation in Europe becomes increasingly grave.  The danger of what, a few months ago, appeared to be little more than  a colonizing A'enture of Mussolini in North Africa at the expense of one of  the black races, developing into a world conflagration of even greater magnitude than the Great War of 1914-1S with far greater losses and more fearful consequences to civilization seems more imminent with the lapse of time.  While incidents reported from Europe indicate almost daily fluctuations  of this world peril there can be no gainsaying the fact that once again all  Europe is an armed camp with all nations breathlessly watching the trend  of events and the more powerful ones ready to assume the offensive or defensive as circumstances may require or politico-national exigencies may  warrant.  One day despatches contain news which reveal a dreadful maelstrom  into which the nations are being sucked willy-nilly, with or without their  desire. Two or three days later the news is nioreassuring. The crisis of the  moment has been bridged. People breathe a little^feg>re easily and await the  next hair-raising development, reasonably sure that it will soon appear.  And so it goes from day to day. A situation develops which brings  tension and alarm. Ominous threats are uttered. Diplomats hastily exchange notes and conversations, threats are withdrawn or modified or "explained*'. The tension eases. The peril has been averted momentarily at  least, but the black shadow remains and will continue to exist until it is  either dispelled entirely or becomes a terrific substance.  It hardly seems conceivable that when Mussolini put his threatened  invasion of Ethiopia into execution he could have been aware of what was  to follow.   He must surely have assumed that the League of Nations would  Radio Inquiry  Parliamentary Committee May Hold  Investigation  A parliamentary committee may be  established when the house meets in  January to investigate radio broadcasting in Canada, particularly the  administration of the radio commission, it was learned recently.  It was understood every phase of  broadcasting   would   be   probed   including the possibility of regulating |  broadcasting by a general manager'  instead of a commission of three.  During the campaign Mr. Mackenzie King took exception to certain broadcasts under the name of  "Mr. Sage" and promised reform of  broadcasting: regulations to stop  abuse of public men. It is probable  the "Mr. Sage*' broadcast will be investigated.  "M*%     *C..l^ mmZm.mm\mm     I..*..    ll.������M.������fc������.  It   Is  dipper    Ends    Isolation  Residents Of Guam  Residents   of   Guam   Island hailed  arrival of the mail-laden China Clip-  be split asunder -when its members -were faced with the question of carry-   per  as  ending  the  isolation  of this  ing out their obligations to prevent or punish Violation of ihe. territory vof   tropical Pacific isle.,  The eraft had  Islanders Are Delighted  China  Of  another member or that some of the stronger members would be willing to  put a telescope to a blind eye rather than fulfil their duties and run the risk  of precipitating a situation which might lead to a general conflagration.  If that was the viewpoint of the dictator of Italy he guessed wrong. If  he thought he could bluff: the dominating powers of the League, again he  guessed wrong. It would have been the easy way out for the League to  have begged the question and to have found excuses to permit Mussolini  to have his way in North Africa, knowing that the imposition of sanctions  might lead to a very dangerous situation. They did not, however, but took  their solemn pledges seriously and decided to implement them. Action followed decision.  The peril lies not so much in the mere fact that the League has imposed economic sanctions and is making them effective but in the possibility  of some of the members weakening in the face of threats, or of abandoning  the position they have taken because of danger from other quarters or because it may become advantageous to do so.  And Mussolini himself is in a dire predicament. He has now gone too  far in his adventure to recede without imperilling his position among his  own countrymen. In fact, recession would spell disaster for him at home.  On the other hand he cannot expect to carry his campaign to a successful  conclusion with a great majority of the nations cutting off his supplies, but  defeat in Ethiopia would terminate his career as Italian dictator.  left Alameda,  Calif., four days previously.  The graceful sky liner, nearing the  end of its first flight over a trans-  Pacific air mail route, arrived at  Guam from. Waka Island at 3:07. The  1,300-mile distance was covered in 10  hours, three minutes.  Two hundred pounds of mail was  unloaded and speeded to the postr  office for delivery, while Capt. Edwin  Musick, skipper of the flying boat,  and his eight-man crew were welcomed by officials.  Recipe For Youth  Live In Present Is Advic������ Of Famous  Humorist  George   Ade,   the   humorist,   tells  how to be young at 70.   "Live only in  A   Concentrated   Energy And  Heat Producer  Butter ih one of the foods which  has been widely used for many centuries,   but   whose   true   nutritional  merit has only recently been brought  to light, according to Laura C. Pepper,   of  the  Dairy and Cold Storage  Branch,    Dominion    Department    of  Agriculture.     Recognizing   the    importance of adequate amounts of fats  in diet and the valuable contributions  made to health   by   butter,   modern  scientists uphold the generous use of i  this superior fat.  Palatability and high food value  are the two qualities which earn for  butter the distinction of being "the  fat for -which there is no substitute."  Pats recommended for their tasteless  properties hold little or no interest  for thc woman who prides herself on  her cooking. She knows it is butter  that makes cream sauces look and  taste so rich; it is the butter used  in cakes and cookies that evokes  praise from friends; and, similarly, it  is butter that insures excellent  flavour and colour in many dishes  prepared for the family table.  As for food value, butter is a concentrated   energy  producer,   yielding  21/_  times as much heat in the body  as the sugar and starch foods.   This  is a  strong argument in  favour  of  using plenty of butter,  particularly  during cold weather when the body  requires extra heat.   Butter is easily  digested and readily and completely  assimilated by the body; it contains  small quantities   of   lime and phosphorus, and in addition has a high vitamin   content  which   distinguishes  it  from other fats.    It is an exception-  Now Linked By Wireless  Lone Island Of Grand Cayman Connected With Jamaica  An island paradise where time for  centuries has stood still, heard a belated warning of the march of progress, when wireless communication  was established between Jamaica and  Grand Cayman, one of her dependencies.  Lying about 300 miles northwest of  Jamaica, Grand Cayman is the  ���������"whitest" island in the West Indies,  more than 4,000 out of a total population of 5,000 being from English  stock. Many of the original settlers  came to Jamaica about tha time  Charles H. was put on the throne,  and when his governor began to make  trouble for "them, here, they moved  to Grand Cayman. Others are descendants of English pirates and shipwrecked seamen who- were the ter-  ���������^^.v ... M^fMm.-^jjjmt^. nvuiu i,v..ii>iiiu.>.v **..������ wuiuvi u.k> j.bu.������<u/x������ >^������������. v������* .,-.*...    On the   tne present,    ne   saici������      lUiiis   xne  horns of this dilemma, it can be assumed that Mussolini will leave no stone   secret.    I caught.myself reading thei ally good source of Vitamin A, which  unturned to disrupt the accord which exists among the nations who have   obituary -notices   recently   before   I! builds up resistance   to   disease   and  rors of xne Caribbean more than 200  -  years ago.    Piracy that brought -yx.-  certain rewards   was   abandoned for  the easier trade of -wrecking���������luring  ships ashore by false beacon fires.  A religious people, they habitually  prayed ships would be caught on the  coral reef bounding the island, and a  story is told how a congregation who  ran out into a storm, to loot a wreck  were hailed by the parson: -"Brethren,  wait for the benediction, and let's all  start fair."  But to-day the Grand Caymans  are described as the happiest and  most lawabiding people in the -world.  So peaceful have they become, it is  said the only sin they commit is in  dropping their h's.  Until Governor Sir Edward Den-  ham of Jamaica formally opened the  wireless service, the only communication witb Grand Cayman was by  boat.  combined in imposing punitive measures against him.  Mussolini unquestionably knows that there is unrest against British  rule in India and Egypt and that the Moroccans and Tunisians would welcome an opportunity to throw off the French yoke. If by stirring up  trouble in these countries he could divert some of the energies of these two  great powers into other channels it would be of distinct advantage to the  Italians.  For it is quite conceivable that the outbreak of strife in these countries  would bo the precursor of troubles and warfare in other countries and might  develop into the long-prophesied conflict between the Christian countries of  the world and tho nations which bow their heads to Mohammed.  While it is difficult to forecast what combinations might result from a  split in thc ranks of the nationals now engaged in preventing the culmination of Italy's act of aggression, because of thc many diverse interests involved and the ramifications interposed among them, tho situation is fraught  with perils which may well cause apprehension even among many peoples  who at thc moment appear remote from danger.  turned to the sport page, and that is  a sure sign of ossification," Ade  mourned. "But I won't let myself  become a mossback and a has-been  so I keep the old bean in touch with  the latest news, tlie latest plays, tho j  latest movies, and the latest books." I  promotes normal health and growth  Butter Is also one of the few foods  which provide Vitamin D���������the sunshine vitamin���������so necessary for the  development of bones and teeth.  A civic law in Tenganan, Dutch  East Indies, forbids -men to work in  the village uxider penalty of being  publicly thrashed by women.  Sirius, the dog star has a star companion made of substance so dense  that one teaspoon of It would weigh  about 3<L0 poundg.  The National Physical Laboratory  at Toddlngton, Eng., has a tank,  670 feet long and 30 feet wide, in  which scale models of boats and ships  of all sizes are tested for speed and  seaworthiness.  Japan reports that 1,803,000 Japanese aro now living** 'in other countries.  Sixteen is tho most dangerous ago  whero bicycle users are concerned.  A HcuHonnblo -Request  And while the Govornnmcnt Is paying thc farmers for all the plys thoy  don't raine and all pic corn and wheat  and cotton they don't plant why  don't they pay tlie radio song-croon-  ors for every radio song thoy don't  croon? And why not pay. the gals  Who lecture and do parts in radio  drama for keeping off the air, asks  the Chicago Tribune.  Now Kind Of Marathon  j Wear a board or pay a dollar is tlio  law in Anaconda, Montana, thhi winter. Thc annual whisker marathon,  first event in Anaconda's "whiter  sport carnival", has started. Every  man in tho town must lot his beard  grow or pay thc city a dollar for an  exemption permit.  *���������-**  KMttiSHSi'i'^  I  !  I  %$m  '/.-'.���������y.-'.-jm- -\i.-,.v;.-.'-,.������,.y..-.'-.<.-,'-,'-..vyA  ���������ftfi  SJ^^T4^m* s  \jMQ(& COUGH !)/$()������)  Medicated with ingredients of Vicks VapoRub  j!|3*|*|*i-*>t|'.v#*.0*\������^  mMjfW^ggVmA  0  Saved Ity Ilund-ShaUo  An Alsutiun pup s*avcd ito life by  offering to "shako hands" with ita  would-be executioner. Sontencod to  death because it was thought to bo  vicious, the dog captivated C. J. Wol-  lott, stock Inspector at Sydney, Australia, and ha arranged to roturn It  to tho owner. 2128  You'll save ita'modest cost before half thc  roll is used. That's because this heavy  waxed paper keeps left-overs fresh, moist  nnd flavorful. Ask for Appleford'a Pura-  Snnl because of the exclusive knife edg������  cutter on tlie box.  #5*  &..  IT  YOUR  J) 8*" %j ������*��������������� "P | BH w&  LBST  I'WiiiniiH, ,  '"'"! "���������   7,1.J,*:'.!,, -i:   .--...^������������������.���������������������������,.,..-r!..!...-.(,,,,<<,f-.^.-r.-.-i   .���������������'���������������������������-���������*   ���������������������������������������������<'������������������'���������'������������������ ������������������^mH.^/jSmr^ .!.:-.;������������������.���������;..>..'.(.'m...:-.   j..l-,���������:���������.������������������.. .-..^ -.i ��������� i .-^���������^ ���������j^'���������   Warehouse*- At Calgary, Edmonton, Regina and Winnipeg CMSSTOK REVIEW  Urn      f    ������/  Fib-si cK Piy-sfr Half  Hoop Season  High Girls Unbeaten���������Honors  Even in Men's Division���������Both  Last Season Leaders Trailing  ���������No Games During Holidays  MENS DIVISION  Played  Won  Lost  Pet.  Cardinal"*  6  5  1  .85  Loallo _ , 4.4  3  ,��������� 1  .66  Imp. Groceteria 4  2  2  .50  High School  6  2  0  .00  LA*pIE������;:P!������I$ION ,y  -  -  Played  Won  Lost  Pet.  High School ....���������...6  ..- 6.  - 0  2.00  Review  .?..���������.': 6 '  -3  3  .50  Pharmacy ' 1.6  .'' 2,  ���������*?  .33  Creston Motors^.U������../.6  .    1  5'  .16  There was a large crowd put .for Friday  night's Commercial League .basketball  games at Park pavilion. The girls game  was fast, but the; two boys' fixtures were  rather poor. Wynndel squad was the  second string team and were hot fast  enough for Loallo. In the second men's  game Cardinals won from High Sehool  45-15. In the girls' section Review  nosed out Pharmacy 22-21.  Creston Review showed their oldtime  form as tbey.rt de over the druggists for  two periods,, playing badly in the third,  and coming back strong to win in the  fourth by a 22-21 scoreT Nora Payne  was at her best, putting up the best  game ofthe season so far. She worked  hard, taking the tipoff and racing in for  rebounds, converting them successfully  to garner eight points. Marteiio was on  again, piling up nine points. Palmer and  Lewis played steady at guard, breaking  up the renshirt rushes successfully. The  Review was much rougher than their  opponents, having 16 penalties to  Pharmacy four. The losers played fast,  clean basketball, but their hard luck in  shooting was one factor against them.  Speers made.ten of the *2i points, with  the rest of *J*be . baskets divided between  E. and Y. LaBelle and Abbott. 7 The  latter was the pick of the pill pounders  bringing the ball ddwit the floor and  feeding the forwards    Teams:  Phrmacy���������Abbott 3, Speers 10, E.- La-  Belle 3, Y. LaBelle 3,Crane 2, Tompkins,  P. MacDonald, Learmonth, Moore.   "21.  Review���������Bourdon, Swain 5, Marteiio  9. N. Payne 8, Palmer, Lewis.   22.  The second fixture. Loallo vs. Wynndel, was a win for Loallo 41-9. The  losers were no match whatever for their  more experie ced opponents, and "their  unfamiliarity with the floor and crowd  was a real handicap. Por the winners' P.  Bourdon played inspired ball. He wa**  responsible for 20 of the 44 points scored  by his teamY Jim Dale handled the  floor play to perfection and put up a  brilliant game along with, -Buff J^astasJL..  Loallo had nice combination and were  real sporty towards the visitors. Wynndel lacked practice and shooting ana  were inclined to be rough. Gib Payette  and Elmer Hagen were the pick of the  losers.   Teams:  Wynndel-Al. Cooper, Fred HageiJ-  John Markin 1, Taylor, W. Marian, <U*  Payette 4, Elmer Hagen 3. w.  Martell.   9.  Loallo���������Dale 3, Scott 2, Young 2. A.  Nastasi 1. Maddess 9, F. Bourdon 20, S.  Nastasi, 41*  The final clash between High School  boys and Cardinals was also one sided  and uninteresting to watch, ending up  with a score of 45-15. High School was  completely outclassed by their, stronger  and faster opponents. Des. Trutcott  missed several setups b/ bduncing_tbe  ball each time before passing. Win*  LaBelle had tough luck with his shooting. Jim Rogers played nice ball but  Cliff. York was wild in his passing.  Cardinal play was almost perfect combination. * Ben Crawford was playing m  oldtime form at guard, chalking up n  points. Tony Morabito was a little too  slow for the balance of the team.  Hurford played a fast game but was  loose at ball handling;.    Teams: "' t  High School���������Goplin 7, York. A.  Morabity, LaBelle 4. Truscott 2, Avery.  Weir. 15. ���������     ' ���������    '      "  f Cardinals���������Cobus 8, Crawford 11.  T. Morabito, Hurford 6, Corrie, 20 45.  BIThese games wind up the first half of  the league season. Play will be re-  svmed the second Friday in January.  Bosweii  a visitor to Creston  Jack Bishop was  over the weekend. *  R. Malloy was a business visitor at  Nelson at the weekend.  John Wilson has just left for a Christmas holiday visit at the coast.  Birth���������To Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Brown,  December 11th, a son���������William Dean.  Mrs. Mead of.CrPston is a Boswell vis  itor at present, with Mrs. D. G.   Brown-  Jack Bishop and Wilf. Bainbridge left  Tuesday to trap on the Silvester Spence  trap line.  Mrs. Bell of Trail was a recent Visitor  with her mother. Mrs. I. Lewis, returning on Friday.  Joe Karpowitch has been hauling Itf**1*"}"  ber from the Soukoroff tie camp, which  is now closed down.  Mrl and Mrs. Gullett are at present  visiting Mrs. Ike Lewis, and will be here  over the holiday season.  George Everall of -Rossland has been a  guest of Mr. and Mrs- McGregor at the  close of the hunting season.  Wm. Mackie is  confined to the  house i November.,  with a slight attack of measles,  presumably  contracted   on his recent  visit to  Trail.  on Thursday.   The grader is now work  ing In the vicinity cf.Goat Creek.  Mr. and Mrs. Pelham Richardson are  staying with Mr. and Mrs. Sherman until the former has recovered sufficiently  to travel to Winnipeg. Man.  A tournament and dance sponsored by  the Memorial Hall Society was held in  the hall Saturday e/ening, and was well  attended, quite a few making the trip  from Sirdar. Music for the dance was  provided by K. Wallace, who kindly lent  his radio for the occasion.  Boswell badminton, club journeyed to  Sirdar Friday evening and won a match  with Sirday experts, by a margin of 8 5  sets. Among those;making the trip were  Misses Pat. Wall, Anrie Swasnile, Betty  Davies, Wiifhie Bebbington. Pat Johnstone and Will Mackie,' Pers-y Mackie,  .Sceve Sherman. Sta^>. Bebbmgton, Jim  Johnstone and Lloyd and Raymond  Cummings.   7      ,.  The marriage took ?place on Saturday  of Gladys,] only daughter of, Mr. and  Mrs. PT Rich ardson, and Frances Dudley  Cummings, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs.  S. J. Cummings. The ceremony was a,  quiet one and was performed by . Archdeacon Qraham at Nelson. The newly-  weds returned here oh Sunday, and have  taken up residence in the cabin on the  S. S. Frank ranrh.  The December meeting of the Church  Guild was held at-, the home of Mrs.  Higgins. Among those attending were  Mrs. J. Howell, Mrs. Cummings, Mrs.  D. V. West, Mrs. Kennedy, Mrs.  Wallace, Mrs. E. Bainbridge and Miss  Smith. It was decided to make a  donation to the parish fund, good cheer  fund and the Salvation Army The result of the white elephant sale held  recently was most gratifying. A profit  of $40 was realized.  At Kaslo the Hospital Women's  Auxiliary has so much money on  hand that it was able to draw  $8.15 in interest on funds in a  savings account.  The Courier is informed that  there are only about > half the  number of people 6n relief in  Cranbrook as there were at this  time a year ago.  Co-operative associations at  Vernon and Enderby are arranging to purchase the creaineries at  those points now operated by  Burns & Company.  Up to December 6th the'Miner  reports that Rossland has had 26  days in succession without a ray  of sunshine. The snowfall1 has  been surprisingly small.  Fernie Rotary Club will need  $800 more than last year to provide needy families with turkeys  this Christmas. This is 1 rgely  due the increased price of the  -birds.  Prairie buyers have a preference for Rome Beautys in their  purchases of defrosted apples, according to figures supplied by the  B.C. Tree Fruit Board. Delicious and Newtqwns are equal.  NAVIGABLE WATERS  PROJECTION ACT  R.S.C. 1927, Chapter 140.  PETER CHARLES BRUNER, hereby  gives notice that he has under Section 7  of the said Act, deposited with the Minister of Public Works at Ottawa, and in  the omce of" the District Register of the  Land Registry District of Nelson, at Nelson, a description b! the site and the plans  of a reclamation scheme for reclaiming  3223 acres of flooded lands on the west  bank of the Kootenay River lying  between the United States Boundary  and the South end of Lake Kootenay  and known as Nick's Island and 217  acres of land contained in Lot 10,002 an  Indian Reserve, which area if secured to  be included within the p-oposed scheme  by the erection of dykes sufficiently high  to prevent the said lands f om flooding  during the flood season.  AND TAKE NOTICE that after the  expiration of one month from the date  of the first publicatio i ot. this . notice  PETER CHARLES BRUNER will  under Section 7 of the said Act apply to  the Minister x>t Public Works at his  office in the City of Ottawa, for approval  of the said site and plans, and for leave  to construct the said reclamation scheme.  DATED this 20th day  of December,.  A.D. 1935*.  PETER CHARLES BRUNER.  Our K, B. 0. Broadcast  Kimberley stores will be closed  the days following Christmas and  New Years.        ?���������  John Thoem has closed his shoe  repair shop at Graid Forks to go  fruit ranching at Oliver.  According to the Free Press  turkeys are ten cents -a pound  dearer at Fernie this year.  Salmon Arm is proud of its  November record when no cases  were heard in the police court.  Bui b growers at Summerland  report  suffering  heavy  losses  in  |-the severe  weather at the first of  A. L. Palmer, Dolf Weir^anoY Don-  You ng of Creston were business   visitors  m. Mm.m   *.   m..m. .*.. m. .*..+.. m. . ~.. mm. *.   *m-m. . m.   m.-*.. m.   ^ . *.. mm   ^.- m.   *..*.-*. .^._ m.. m..m.. m. m.. m . A . m   m.m.  [Give the  Lasting Joy of  I GENERAL ELECTRIC  GIFTS for the HOME  Simplify your Christmas shopping by selecting from the wide  variety   of   Electric   Gifts    . .    modern    gifts   that   give   magical  convenience, day after day. year after year. You will find a big display  of Electric Gifts at our Store . . . For the greatest thrill of all, you  can make this Christmas-memorable for years to come with one of the  larger    electrical    appliances,  wide choice of selection.  General     Electric     gifts     present     a-  Hotpoint Percolator  Makes delicious, fragrant  coffee by **Hot Drip" method.  Several Beautiful models.  Hotpoint Iran  Patented Thumb Rest and  Heel Stand help to make light  work of heaviest ironings.  Although, times are tough at  Fernie the bu iness section is  being decorated with trees for  Christmas. " r       '  Grand  Forks  house  to house  $500 for welfare  this winter.  is putting on  a  canvass to  raise  and relief work  1  Hotpoint Toastovor  Toaster  MjUfitrous chroma finish.  Toasth two pieces at a lime���������  perfectly.    An ideal gift.  Hotpoint  Waffle Iron  This   attractive   gift  crisp,   golden     brown  right ������*J the l.4*M*>.  designed.  makefi  ....    waMefi  liiiUtm-lifully  H HMHM     0*3Hy- y ?_>     h Bi    B_a_J__ _HS_l_a_ri.     y*g|l_BSy  Shop Early for Assortments as this promises  to' foe*'ai very busy ^hriRtin'ns-SeaBon  WHSt Kootenay Power & Light Co. am. ;  Mi^ B. C. phone M  W ' ��������� Mm  Burns ������S*YCo., have entered the  butcher business at Vernon where  they have bought the store of  W. G.Drew.  >The Gazette claims that reductions in electric light rates will  save Grand Forks citizens about  $2000 this year.  The Selkirk bonspiel carried on  for years by curling-rinksat Cranbrook and Kimberley has been  dropped for 1936.  Accord ing to the observor one  store alone at Salmon Arm will  stock 500 boxes of jap oranges for  the holiday trade.  If a few more violinists and saxaphone players come forward  Rossland will be able to organize  aconcert orchestra.  At Kimberley an effort is to be  made to raise $4400 for a swimming pool 100 40 feetf to be ready  for use by next May.  At Salmon Arm the merchants  have agreed on closing at 5.30  p.m. each afternoon and opening  at 8.80 in the mornings.  In the absence of the sno w the  deer stayed at the higher levels  and Kaslo's 1935 take of Venision  has been lighter than usual.  Cranbrook was still playing golf  at December 14th, which was so  unusual that the Courier calls  special attention to the incident.  At Nakusp hope has been given  up of the potato crop surviving  the early Novenjber freeze, and  the growers are ploughing them  out.  Amongst the new buildings  erected at Kelowna this year is a  new brick and hollow tile tsuiridry  ��������� one of the few in the B.C. interior.  Anew surge tank and pipe line  into the power house.'at. Revel-  stoke estimated to cost $28,000 is  now compl ������ted ������������������ bu t the eb^t * * is  $40,000.  FOR YOUR  FURNITURE  REPAIRING  and  Upholstering  New   Furniture  Made to Order  Doors and  n. am mm  windows  All Work  Guaranteed  ft II   furnilis*fffj^risers  y.firuiiitiuacaiiup  Wilson Ave.      CRESTON  2nd Door from Review Office]. .  35 YEARS' EXPERIENCE !  ."������;-*���������"*."-  t Standen  PAINTER and HOUSE  DECORATOR  INTERIOR WORK A  SPECIALTY.  PAPER HANGING OF  ALL DESCRIPTIONS  SOLE AGENT for  RAMSEY PAINTS, VARNISH  ENAMELS, Etc.  .. *���������*  All Work Guaranteed.,  GIVE ME A TRIAL.  C.V. PAINT SHOP  Wilson Ave.      CRESTON  2nd Door from Review Office*.  SEALBD.TENDERS addressed to the  undersigned and endorsed "Tender for  Public Building. Hollyburn, B.C./* will  be received until 12 o'clock noon, Fri-  dny, January 3, 1936, for the erection  arid completion of a Public Building at  Hollyburn, B.C. *  Plans and specifications can be peen  and forms of tender obtained at the  offices of the Chief Architect. Department of Public Works, Ottawa, the Resident* Architect-,. Post Office Building,  Victoria. B.C., the Caretaker, Post Office  Building. Vancouver/B.C.. the Building  and Construction Industries, Exchange,  342 West Pender Street, Vancouver, and  at the Postoffice Hollyburn, B.C.  Tenders wiil not be considered unless  made on the forms supplied hy the  Department and in accordance with the  conditions set forth therein.  Each tender must be accompanied   by  a certified cheque on a chartered bank in  Canada, payable to the order o the Honorable the .Minister   of  Public   Works,  equal to   IQ per  cent, of the  amount   of  the tender, or Bearer Bonds of the Dominion of Canada or of the Canadian Nat  ional Railway Company  and its constituent  companies    unconditionally   guaranteed  as to principal and  interest by  the Dominion  of Canada,  or the aforementioned bonds  and a certified   cheque  if required to make up an odd amount.  Note���������The Department, through, the  .Chief Architect's office, .will supply blue  prints and specifications of the work on  deposit of a sum of $10.00 in the form of  a certi*fied bank ; cheque payable to the  orde- of the Minister of Public Works.  The deposi t will be released on retu rn of  the blue prints and specification within a  month from the date of reception of  tenders? If not returned within that  period the deposit will be forfeited.  By order,  N. DESJARDINS.  Acting Secretary.  Department of Public Works,  Ottawa, December 2,1935. 1  LAND ACT  Notice of Intention to Apply to  Purchase Land  In Nelson Land Recording District  ol? Kootenay District, nnd wituatc  near Thruma, B.C.  TAKE NOTICE that George Popoff  and Jacob Polovnikoff of Thrums, B.C.,  occupation, ranchers; intend to apply for  permission to purchase the followinK  described lands:  Commencing at a po_t planted ot  the N.B. corner of Lot 6898, Kootenay Districtt thence west 20 chains;  thence north 20 chains; thence east  20 chains; thence south 20 chains;  and containing 40 acreB more or leBS.  GEORGE POPOPF  JACOB POLOVNIKOFF.  Applicant!-*,  Dated Oct. 19 1935.  Hi  iiiriTiJiiilliMMi  Daily Opportunities  are offered to the mail with  ready money*  Accumulate a ftmd bo that  you may be aMe to take  advantage of juot ouch  opportunities.   Systematic de*  "**soisift8 flu. a SaviujX'S Accouut  ���������will enable y^u to do this.  st  \mJI JL \mr*\^ $&!&.������&aK.ala^j8V%B^I*8*J^1  'Bl  Crcnton Branch  '** *-l?T,.  ,������ii,Hi"i?li'ltV*Ti'l'i,  .   V  fntkuer  >       ft"     I*    ������������������"       ���������*-.l'"l    ,���������������"*���������   .    ������'l  ���������M-H", ���������* ,'i,..a.**..rl.   ..  .M'.M.fMi.m*.. THE   KEYXEW.   CRESTOH.   By   C,  E-ilweitrcIsbu ������*t|  SYRUP  Ik  . cY*E*fcY F������OD THAT i_.  K**^        NOURISHED      *T Hi*  -MORE CANADIAN  CHI LESSEN  THAN  ANY OTHER  CORN  ���������CaL^KkBI ������l   -  ^9> ��������� *%W������-  A product pf    Tbe CANADA STARCH CO.. Limited  -4  WORLD HAPPENINGS  BRIEFLY TOLD  Convicted from fingerprints on a  mirror they had stolen, three middle-  aged men were sentenced at Bombay  to imprisonment of from one to three  years.  Ontario department of education  has ordered compulsory teaching of  civics in all public and high schools  to the province, starting in October.  A new text hook will he ready soon.  Business is better all over Canada  and the morale of the west is improved, Robert C. McCulloch of Gait,  Ont., president of the Mutual Life  Assurance Company of Canada, said  In an interview in Victoria.  A pearl the size of a pigeon's egg  and said to be capable of protecting  Grows Huge Grape Vine  German Boy Planted Riding Switch  "Left By Customer  Thirty-five years ago a Dr. Dick of  Diamond Creek, Victoria, was out  riding near Heidelberg, Germany. He  left hi3 riding switch behind at a  smithy's where he was having his  pony shod. The smithy's lad recognized the switch as a grape vine cutting. He planted it in his cottage.  Now it has grown to a full vine 35  yards long extending over the fence  across a line and along the eastern  wall of a hotel.  Liner Gangway Blocked  Passengers At Southampton Held Up  By Thousands Of Bees  Thousands of bees held up passengers about to embark on the liner  Moldavia at Southampton,   England.  its wearer from all danger was part, The bees   settled   down   comfortably  of the loot recently taken from the  tomb of a Manchu prince near Peip-  To Shorten. Ocean Trip  Irish -Tree State Plans Ship-to-Shore  'Planes  London will he' brought within  three days of New "Sork when civil  aviation plans which are being devised by the government of the Irish  Free State come into operation���������  possibly next year.  The scheme aims at a service of  high-speed aircraft of the Douglas  type, to intercept the bi������ Atlantic  liners off the west coast of Ireland  and to speed .the passengers to London, with the saving of a full day of  travel time.  With ships of the type of the Queen  Mary and Normandie tbe Anglo-  Irish air ferry will make London and  New York a matter of a mere weekend trip.  From Galway on the west coast  of Ireland to Southampton by liner  is at present a full day's journey,  with an additional two hours to London. The new air link would bring  Galway within three hours of London.  It is proposed to use amphibian  machines.  From Dublin the idea is to form a  new air link not only with London  but also with Paris, Brussels, and  Berlin.  SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  OCTOBER 13  THE STORY OF JEREMIAH  ing by grave robbers.  Lady Byng of Vimy, widow of the  former commander of the Canadian  Corps, Lord Byng, who died last  <.���������"'*:*���������*--������; has informed Dominion head-  quar. --..s of the Canadian Legion she  will take part in the Vimy pilgrimage in July next year.  Successful use of an instrument  which bores through the brain to the  Bkull pan and burns away tissues  producing a fluid that causes hydrocephalus, a condition causing infants  to "become idiots, is announced hy Dr.  Tracy J. Putnan, of Boston Children's  hospital.  Nearly $27,000,000 of new ordinary  life insurance, a slight increase as  compared with the same month last  year, was sold in Canada and Newfoundland in August according to returns of the Life Insurance Sales  Research Bureau, Toronto. Of the  total, sales in Saskatchewan were  ���������$996,000.  . Alberta's Coal Reserves  Alberta's coal reserves total 40,-  200,000,000 tons and lie buried in  1,717 square miles of provincial soil,  Sir Montague Barlow, one-man commission investigating collieries, was  told. Dr. J. A. Allan, head of the  geology department, University of  Alberta, explained Alberta's topography and geological formation.  at the foot of the passenger gangway and defied attempts to move  them. A hose was tried, but this  merely incited the bees, and caused A recent check showed that only  them to buzz in clouds, scattering 25 of the 1,100 Gideon Bibles placed  onlookers. Eventually order was re-J in one Detroit hotel in 1928 remain  stored, and embarkation proceeded.  I in their rooms^  England To Receive Relic  Armada Jewel Has Been  Given To  Art Collection Fund  The Armada jewel, one of the most  beautiful relics of Queen Elizabeth's  time, is to return to Britain. It was  bought at a saleroom in London for  2,700 guineas, and it was announced  that it had been given by Lord  Wakefield to tlie National Art Collection Fund. The jewel formed part  of the Plerpont Morgan collection of  miniatures. It will go to the Victoria and Albert Museum, Kensington, London.  HARVESTING IN SASKATCHEWAN AT 20 BELOW!  Just about the middle of December, <��������� winter comes in real earnest, and the  one of the most unique and interest- thermometer shivers down to 20 being annual harvests to he garnered low zero, the Departmental men,  on the North American Continent warmly attired, and -wearing waist-  will be in full swing. No! Not wheat high rubber boots, gather up these  ���������but Mineral Salts. The scene will crystals with specially constructed  be Little Manitou Lake, Watrous, shovels, and store them In the Gov*  Saskatchewan.    The  harvesters will"  eminent warehouse at Watrous, from  be the employees of the Department where they are later distributed. The  __ ^t-m. . ������    _*   o.__-.__x_^_    medicinal qualities of this saline lake,  known for many years, are becoming  more and more widely recognized,  and as a consequence these harvesting operations are assuming ever-  increasing proportions, and the Lake  Is proving to be one of the Province's  most important natural resources.  Golden text: To whomsoever I shall  send thee thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall command thee thou shalt  speak.   Jeremiah 1:7.  Lesson: Jeremiah 1:1-10; 6:10, 11;  8:18; 26:1-24; Chapters 36, 37, 38.  Devotional Reading: Psalm 26:1-7.  Explanations And Comments  Courageous Speaking Enjoined,  Jeremiah 1:6-10. In the thirteenth  year of Josiah's reign (about 626  B.C.), Jeremiah, the son of a priest,  became conscious of a divine call to  the prophetic office. It is natural to  understand that he had long meditated upon his country's sins and had  felt, impelled to denounce them, but  was most reluctant to undertake the  task. The inward struggle which  took place in his sensitive and shrinking heart when something different  from his ordinary consciousness made  him certain that he was destined to  be the prophet of woe, he tells in the  form of a dialogue between God and  himself.  "Ah, Lord Jehovah! behold I know  not how to speak, lor I am a child,"  He was not a child in years but he  lacked experience, he feared, he had  not the ability to speak, he distrusted  himself. In the jargon of to-day, he  had an inferiority complex. "Say not,  I am a child" was the answer to his  troubled thoughts that came to him;  "for to whomsoever I shall send thee  thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall  command thee thou shalt speak. Be  not afraid because of them; for I am  with thee to deliver thee."  The commission which Jeremiah received was to be "over the nations  and over tbe kingdoms, to pluck up  and to break down, and to destroy  and to overthrow, to build and to  plant." His task was to be destructive and constructive. He must strive  to make the people give up their  vices and weaknesses which were  making for internal corruption and  for political destruction, and to implant in their hearts new ideals of  righteousness.  The Courageo-is Speaker Threatened, Jeremiah 26:8-11. During the 40  years of Jereraiah's ministry, his was  the task of setting himself in opposition to all the currents of his time,  for Judah believed that she would  escape the impending doom, that  Jerusalem was inviolable because it  held the temple, that the nation o**7.a  not perish. Jeremiah had to warn  her that her only possible cov .se was  to surrender to Babylon. -. t some  Treat feast, doubtless when ' ie people  were gathered at Jerusal ax, Jeremiah ut*������red the warning* .ecorded in  the first sevfc_* verses ��������������� Z chapter 26.  The Coura* ;e of Convictions, 26 :  12-15. JerejJiu-.'h's defense was that  his message hau come to him from  God, and he urged them to amend  their ways and doings, and to obey  the voice of Jehovah. If they would  do this, Jehovah -would avert the evil  which he had pronounced upon them.  Prophecy, then was regarded as conditional; a change of conduct could  prevent the threatened punishment  Busy Year For Sun  of Natural Resources of Saskatchewan; and the harvest itself will consist of the tiny crystals of mineral  salt -which form in. Little Manitou  Lake each year at "freeze-up." It is  one of the essential conditions that  the harvest be completed' within a  period of ten days.   When the Prairie  D. E. Warford, of Sawtelle, Calif.,  lays claim to being the most tattooed  man in America.  IN UP-TO-DATE  STABLES  ���������Old Reliable Minard'a  When borsen como In to stable with "wlre-  euLd or naddlo boils, or cowa have diked  udder, tbe thins; to do Is set th* Minard'a*  bottle at once, as Mr. Dowd of Glenboro,  Manitoba, knows. Ho writes:  "I like your Minard'a Liniment. Like to  have it in tbe house. I havo found your  Minnrd'o Liniment especially sood for  barbed wire cuts on horses."  A family doctor prepnral Mlnnrd's Liniment  over CO years nso. Still invaluable in  ���������very stable and every bouse. SO  Wo^u^^mZM^Sd^ irhrtL^  ���������^_fLoi-B___j!r  Haa Jl&kH^I *~|^l|gi ' "'  IBSI^y  it* foot ol* whlto or coloured  paper for kitchen use���������covering'  Hhelve-t", lining drawera, eta.  R*J_M������5  HAHVLV0U, ONTAJUO  (brocket  \Jour Qttif  Scraps of  Qwool  Unfa an  Cffykan  .(Persian  Qardm  PATTERN    5439  Even though you have nothing on hand but tiny scraps of wool, you  can fashion this lovely afghan. And tho wool may bo of different weights.  Each block���������4i_ inches square���������can bo dono in different colors. And what  a jeweled effect you have whon dono! It does indood look like a colorful  oriental tapostry. Doing each block In different colors, tsoo, maltos tho work  moro fascinating for each Is an adventure. Besides an afghan you can  mako lovely pillow tops or chair acts. Can't you sco what a lovoly and inexpensive Xmns gift thenc would ho?  In pattorn 6430 you will find comploto Instructions for making the  afghan -shown as well as pillow tops and chair nets; ah illustration of the  block and of tbo atltchos ncqcled; material requirements.  To obtain this pattorn send 20 conta ln stamps or coin (coin preferred)  to Household Arts Dept., Winnipeg Newspaper Union. 175 McDermot Avo.  10., Winnipeg.  There Is no Alice Brooks pattern book publlslied  More Eclipses In 1935 Thar For Past  130 Years  The sun this year p- jsents its  greatest show of eclipses . >r the past  130 years. The moon will ave passed  between the sun and tl.j earth no  fewer than five times, ar I the moon  will be in the earth's sh. low twice.  This according to Frofesso" Alfred H.  Joy, secretary of the Mou. **-. Wilson  Observatory, is the greatest "umber  of eclipses possible in one yea. Not  since 1805 have the sun's rays ,, *en  obscured so often, states Reutei  correspondent *in Pasadena. It will  be only the second time since 1255  that there have been five solar  eclipses In one year, and there will  not be another such number until the  year 24.85.  Making Ten-Year Tour  Bicyclists From Sumatra Do Not  Believe In Speed  Two Sumatran cyclists who do not  believe In tho modern craze for speed  have arrived . at Bombay on a ton-  year tour of tho world. Thoy started  from their homo in Sumatra in July,  1931, and havo taken ovor three-and-  a-half yoars to comploto 5,000 miles  on their tolcyclco. They made fairly  long stops in Indo-China, Slam and  Burma and in various parts of India  in order ot learn tho language and  study the people and their religion.  By 1936, tho United States public  debt Is expected to total $34,258,000,-  000; approximately $270 for every  man, woman and child ln the country.  Soviet scientists aro building a  telescope which will havo tho third  largest lens in tho world. 2118  ROYAL  YEAST CAKES  give you perfect  breads, rolls,  coffee cake and  huns ���������  ��������� ���������  RaisInBreadand Buns fclYetemptlnfl  rarfety to your menu. See page 13 of  Royal Yeaat Bale* Book for recipe.  Tha -whole family wilt like these  tender Parker House Rolls. Recipe  In Royal Yeaat Bake Book, cage 12.  It's easy to make this delicious  Coffee CiAe. Recipe on pafie 12,  Royal Yea t Bake Book.  ii  IIGHT tasty bread is  -* larg-ny a matter of perfect leavening. That's why  it is ?.o important to use de-  pen i's*7*1: ycr.***..- With Royal  Ye ist Cakes you j^tl be sure  of full leavening po-ft >r every  time. Each Royal Yeast  Cake is protected by .-**, special airtight wrapper. They  keep in perfect condition  for ;nonths.  Two HeIpfut  Booklets.. m  FREE!  The ''Royal Yeast  Balcc Book1' tells  oil about the art  of breadmaklnft  and dives tested  recipes. "The  Royal Road to  Better Health"  explains how the  regular use of  Royal Yeast Cakes  as a food will Improve your health.  BUY MADK-IN-  CANADA GOODS  STAN:     nD BItANDS LIMITED  Praior a.     , end Liberty St.,Toronto, One.  Send mo.     . the "Uoyot VeaatDukoBooli"  -and "The K     -vl Road to Hotter Health."  Name-  Street.  Town .  .M ���������..   Y..  Out Of Folltlcs  Henry Ford said in an Inter v**w  published in Tho Detroit News thu  ho is not Intoroatod in any "Ford for  president" hoom, or in politics generally. Discussing tho business outlook, tho motor magnate said: "I  um not u prophet but I have tlio  fooling- that business and wage trends  will bo up, and I do not bollovo tho  political campaign of next year will  have any appreciable effbet on business, ono way or tho other."  A SAFE  Soolnmcf  Imm-wmwiiiti  |_3c,---Jc(tubO������30c,n THE' ^Tm^JS^rW^GRESTOKv, CS*::������������������  ���������*V7  / t-  *������*<.  "������<������*���������������'  MI6  TO THE  LARGE SCALE  ATION PIMM  DOMINIONS  Newcastle-On-Tyne, England.���������The  conference on emigration to the empire concluded after preparing* a  written case for a government-assisted emigrAt'ons^^  The brief; whieh a deputation will  present Tto the government, itirges a  large-scale emigration scheme would  help solve unemployment at home  and abroad. ��������� Financial assistance  would be repaid by saving unemployment relief. Y  Establishment of an empire development and em-'gration board -with  statutory powers is advocated Tand it  is suggested the T annual? budget  should provide grants to settlers.  The plan will be submitted to the  cabinet by the lord mayor of Newcastle, R. S. Dalgleish, and a deputation of members of parliament and  representatives of emigration authorities from all parts of the country.  Cop'es of the statement afterward  will tae circulated to Dominion premiers, high commissioners and agents-  general, .,with, a letter from the lord  mayor of Newcastle appealing" : for  their co-operation in an effort to  hring ahout the biggest move ever  made for the repopulation of the empire by families and coinmunities  from the United Kingdom.  New Gold Strike  Made    On    North    Arm   Of   Great  Slave Lake  Edmonton.���������A new gold strike  west of Yellowknife hay on the north  arm of Great Slave lake was revealed to the world ^when Dr. Fred Jolliffe, of the federal geological survey, flew cut of the north after a  summer spent in the northwest territories.. V '���������   V.. Y-.-.  "The strike was made Septemher  15 several m*les from the Burwash  discovery,"  said Dr. Jolliffe.  He refused to divulge the name of  the prospector who made the strike"  pending^ the- filing of his official reimport when he returns to department  of mines headquarters at Ottawa.  Dr. Jolliffe and - his party of 15  student assistants from the University of Alberta, explored an area of  roughly 10,000 square miles on the  north shore of Great Slave lake and  found that 2,800 square miles of the  district was underlined by pre-Cam-  bian sediments and volcanics, relatively favorable for the occurrence of  gold  and silver deposits.     -  Dr. Jolliffe left Sept. 24 for Ottawa.  Quiet Session  Prince   Edward   Island's   House   Of  Assembly Meets  , Chairlottetown. ��������� Another chapter  was written into the* history of British parliamentary procedure when  Prince Edward Island's House of Assembly, filled with 30 Liberal members, met and carried on the affairs  of state without an official opposition.  It was not a house of "yes-men,"  however. At least two government  supporters served notice on Premier  Walter Lea that they were not going  to be a rubber-stamp for cabinet-  directed policies.  "When the money bill, the most important legislation of the special one-  day session, was being studied in  committee under the guidance of the  premier, W. H. Dennis, Prince, and  H. H. Cox, King's, raised objection to  Canada's smallest province providing  for $3,000,000 expenditure to refund  loans and carry on public -works. To  give the cabinet this authority two  months after taking office would be  going directly against the policy of  retrenchment which placed them in  power, the critics contended.  Absence of an official opposing  party helped to speed the work of the  session and at an early hour the  governor, accompanied by his secretary and aide-de-camp, returned to  give His Majesty's assent to the bills  passed.  The house was prorogued to meet  ordinarily in March, 1936.  Stage Sham Air Raid  Fleet Of Giant Bombers Visit Island  Of Malta  Valetta, Malta.���������A fleet of giant  bombers and other aircraft droned  over Malta in a sham air raid recently, with this tiny British island  outpost plunged in darkness and eerie  silence.  Promptly at 9:30 p.m., every house,  street and traffic light blinked out,  Simultaneously, tbe twinkling* lights  of British warships riding at, anchor  in the harbor went off.  Thousands of citizens thronged the  historic bastions of Valetta and the  seafront during the raid.  Acting-Governor Luke surveyed  the operations. Aerfal and military  authorities said they wore well  pleased with tho island's loyal cooperation.  ���������FILIPINO PRESIDENT  By an overwhelming majority. Senator Manuel Quezon, above, was  elected first President of the new  Philippines Commonwealth. Vice-  President Garner, of the United  States, will attend the inauguration  exercises on November 15, when  Quezon will take office for six years.  Abolish Ration System  New Decree Is  Effective In   Soviet  Russia  Moscow. ��������� A government decree  abolished the ration system of selling  some prime food products, cutting  prices in open commercial shops.  The ^decree constitutes an important step toward liquidation of the  present double sales system wherehy  workers make purchases in "closed"  ration shops. and the general public  buys in open shops.  Prices of the two have differed  widely, workers getting the benefit  of extremely low rates.  The decree abolished ration shop  sale of meat, sugar, fish, butter and  potatoes 7 andV liu^w all buying of  these products into open shops, substituting- one fixed price for the previous double price system.'  The new price? scale reduced beef  more than 50 per cent. It now will  sell from five rubles- up per kilogram. Sugar will be four rubles and  52 kopecks per kilogram as compared  with 6.50, and butter was reduced  from 24 rubles per kilogram to 15.  To prevent speculation, it was announced, no purchaser will be permitted to buy at one time more than  two kilograms of meat; two of sugar;  a half kilogram of gutter or three  kilograms of fish.  Coining Ethiopian Money  Rome,���������Italy is already coining  Ethiopian thalcrs, for use following  the , incursion of Italian forces into  Ethiopia. Employeos of the mint  wild thc coins arc to be used by tho  military and civil governors ���������wli"'1  Italy plans to install in VJy:' t. a, to  pay off   tribon-***' , . aool*-   work  ���������    ' .,,. uomination.  Hours Of Labor Set  Legislation   Will   Be   Brought   Into  Effect October S  Ottawa.���������Legislation for limitation  of the hours of labor in certain industrial undertakings in Canada will  be brought into effect on Oct. 5.  Regulations for the carrying out of  the measure have been drafted.  Based on a 1919 convention of thc  international labor organization of  the League of Nations, the legislation  constitutes part of the reform program brought down by the government at the last session of parliament.  The Federal Vote  Results Should Be Quickly Available  After Closing Of Polls  Ottawa.���������Although various adaptations of proportional representation  and the single transferable vote are  used in some provincial elections the  Dominion general election Oct. 14  will be conducted on the traditional  single-vote system.  Electors will have only one choice  between the contending candidates.  They will mark an "X" opposite the  name of the candidate they favor and  the candidate with the largest number of "X"s" will ?be elected. There  are no second or third choices.  With the stagier vote system in  operation throughout the Dominion  on election?day results will be avail-  ahle prohably for alt constituencies  within ajfew hours-of thejjclosing of  the polisC< ,- '        '  Another Storm Hits Japan  Typhoon   Kills   48   Artd   Ahout   100  Are Missing  Tokyo.���������A typhoon which whirled  freakishly and destructively across  Japan, from Kagoshima to Wendai,  killed ������t least 48 persons, and about  100 were missing.  Several ports in the inland sea reported that fishing craft were missing, and the steamer Tonegawa  Maru, with a crew of 13 and 19 passengers, also was missing.  ���������The typhoon was the fifth death-  dealing storm in three mouths over  Japan proper. , v  More Wheat In Store  Ottawa.���������-The Dominion bureau of  t-'tatistica reported Canadian wheat  in .'-tore for .the week ended Sept. 20  amounted to 220,802,570 bushels, an  Increaseof 13,058,380 ovor tho previous week, The visible oupply for  the corresponding week" last year was  -323,-309,200 bushels.  Would Defend Record  If Speed Prestige Threatened Camp-  hell Will Race Again  London. ������������������ Sir Malcolm Campbell  and his Bluebird   aro   through  with  breaking'      records      unless      somo  foreigner gives them a new mark to  shoot ot.  ..w V  ....ii announced at a dinnor  m his honor that ho h**i.d had his -flTI  of blistering ih,*     ......   \mJ    .7...*    have  was still a grtiat deal of lightning in  his racing car that might bo coaxed  out if Britain's speed prestige was  threatened.  Installing McGill Principal  Montreal.���������It is expected at least  24 Canadian universities and colleges  will be represented at the installation of Professor A. E. Morgan as  principal of McGill i University Oct.  5. Dr. Robert C. Wallace, president  of University of Alberta, Edmonton,  will he in attendance!  Farewell Banquet  Governor-General  And   Countess   Of  Bessborough As������. Honored "  Ottawa.���������A farewell banquet was  given by the government of Canada  to the Governor-General and Countess of Bessborough.  The term of office of the Earl "of  F-'Ssborough as the king's representative in Canada expires shortly.  It was an affectionate farewell at  which, in addition to Sir George Perley, who presided, there was a distinguished gathering of representatives of the state, the diplomatic  corps, the church, the judiciary and  the civil service with their wives.  Responding to the toast proposed  by Sir George Perley, the governor-  general dwelt on the happy relations  he had enjoyed during his four years  in Canada.  Veregin Resigns  No Longer Head Of Brotherhood Of  Doukhobors  Saskatoon.���������Peter Veregin, for 10  years president of the Christian Community of "the Universal Brotherhood  of Doukhobors in Canada, stated here  that he had severed all connection  with the community. He declared  that he stood now as a private Canadian citizen. He had no intention of  leaving the country, he said.  Mr. Veregin, who has been virtual  ruler of the sect in Canada since the  death of his father in a British Columbia railway accident, said he had  tendered his resignation about six  months ago. He would not disclose  any reason for his action. He is now  on his way to Montreal.  TO STRENGTHEN  Honesty Was Rewarded  Delivery Boy Returns "Valuable Bonds  And Gets Good Job  New York.���������From, the lowly plane  of delivery boy of "coffee and���������" at  $3.15 a week, young Albert Correri  vaulted to a remunerative position in  Wall street.  Correri's role in "the street's'' newest success story was cast when he  picked from the gutter a packet of  bonds valued at $150"000 and-return'  ed them to the owners, *C. F. Grun-  wald, vice-president of C. F. Childs  and Co., Wall street brokers, owners  of the bonds, announced Correri  would start work in the cashier's department of tha% brokerage firm.  Correri, who is 22, may also get a  reward.  NAVY AND AIR  FORCE IN BRITAIN  London.���������-Prime Minister 7 Baldwin  intends to outline measures to  strengthen both the navy and the air  force -when he addresses the Conservative party at its annual conference at Bournemouth.  George Lansbury, Labor leader in  the House of Commons in an address  declared Britain and other nations  were on the brink of a war in which  it would be "Christian against Christian, Mohammedan against Mohammedan, Jew. against Jew���������all praying  to the same God for Victory.  "I cannot bow to that sort of  thing," the leader said. "The way  out is for some nation, and I want  it to be Biitafctj, to blaze a new-  trail."  Athens.���������The semi-official Athens  news agency announced information  from a German source indicated arrangements had been completed at  Instanbul for Greek and Turkish warships and planes to start manoeuvres  in the Dardanelles and that two Roumanian torpedo . boats would also  participate.  It has been reported Greece is prepared to support Great Britain in any  Mediterranean activity which might  become necessary at the outbreak of  Italo-Ethiopian warfare.  Greek newspapers hailed the axv  rival of British ships in Greek ports,  saying that the people of Greece have  come to regard the annual British  naval manoeuvres in Mediterranean  waters as a -welcome tradition.  Siege Of Lucknow  Ten    People     Alive     To    Celebrate  Thrilling Event  London.���������Ten people in different  parts of the world celebrate one of  the most thrilling incidents in the  modern history of the British Empire,  the siege of Lucknow in the Indian  mutiny.  The oldest survivor of the siege is  C. G. Palmer, a resident of British  Columbia; the youngest Arthur  Dashwood, 78, living in London.  Dashwood's mother gave him birth  in the residency at Lucknow, Where  17 people were herded in one room  during the siege. Despite her ordeal,  Mrs. Dashwood lived for more than  70 years.  Mussolini Opposed  Report From Italy Of Some Opposition To War Plans  Paris. ��������� French newspapers reprinted a story from The London  Referee saying Prince Umberto, heir  to the Italian throne, is opposed  to Premier Benito Mussolini's conflict  with Ethiopia.  (This report was described as utterly false in Rome and London by-  authoritative Italian spokesmen.)  There is a possibility, the story  said ,of General Italo Balbo, governor  of Libya and Italian air hero, leading a revolt against H Duce.  "Balbo, whose relations with the  royal family are excellent, is also  opposed to the Ethiopian campaign,"  the story asserted. "A large number  of Italian superior officers share his  view."  RECEIVING THE KING'S CUP  Another Leaf Competition  Montreal.���������Third annual competition for tho moot beautiful .autumn  tinted maple loaf is announced by;  the Canadian government through  tho Canadian travel bureau. First  prize will be JpiOO. 21.,t8  Sentry Killed By Lions  Five Belonging To "Emperor Selassie  Make Dash For Freedom  Add's Ababa.���������Five of Emperor  Haile Selassie's big lions escaped,  killed one sentry, and injured five  more.  In this rush for freedom they devoured several of the Emperor's  pedigreed Australian sheep and killed  two horses.  Colonel Mekouria, the commander  of the imperial guard, seized a machine gun and shot all live beasts in  succession.  Insurance Premiums Higher  British Vessels Passing Through Sues  Canal Must Pay More  Singapore.���������Fear of trouble developing in the Mediterranean was  reflected hore when marine insurance  companies warned special premiums  for "war risks" must be paid by British vessels returning to England  through the Suez canal.  To escape payment of tho war risk  premiums British ships must go all  the way around thc Capo of Good  Hope.  Pilot T.  Race "round  trophy from  Rose, driving" ft Miles Falcon machine, won tho Ktng'fa Cup Air  tho British Isles" thlo year, and is shown receiving tho covoted  tho handa of Sir Phillip CunUffc-Woter.  Gordon Bennett Trophy  Warsaw.���������Tho Polish balloon Pol-  onia was awarded the Gordon Bennett trophy as thc winner of the 27th  Bennett international races tl������u,t began here Sep. 15. Tho Pole /.-^ one  of tho IB entries, '���������***.* -ukled about  Vj'j4 miles after a hlght of 58 houra  and 54 mlwaliofl, It was officially announced. It reached an altitude of  16,732 feet. Another Polish balloon*  tho Warsaw, wan second. ,iJiX:s-  OUSSTOStf REVMSW  mJmmmmJ^m^L*  lAiA     dfc h,4      _fc   II 8-_l >_aik-Ai^jl^^.W^k-tJtfcj^Aal-a^^*-^.! AaaA  lla#l.li Ail  This Vdgefalila Collection is a Good One  lean CORN,    lean GREEN _,-  BEANS,    Choice:    2 can K|  ungraded PEAS all for...       wl  kv  ������  I.  ������  MEAT SPEOIAUS  KIPPERS, Smoked, lb         $ .17  POKK ROAST, Ib        .....     .16  HAMBURGER, 3 lbs .25  Jap Oranges, Mixed Nuts, Candies, Ginger Boxed   Chocolates, Christmas Crackers, Celery, Lettuce, Grapes,  Cranberries, Sweet Potatoes, Bananas, and a host  of other good things to eat.  ���������*���������     m .  +���������     ^���������A.A.^.A.A.A.'A.J.^.t.A.^.A,t     ^.A.    -^ . A - A - A.  rocery Spe  - - _ ���������*"*: I I**"  CANDY, Mixed, tb.  20e.  Christmas.  CRANBERRY SAUCE, lb $ .18  Ready to use  taoi -*-*��������� pioc *������, *u    -jl iu      ie  JL -"-MJa-s***- A" A.V-88^, HCOIla   9WCCl.)IMs       .AU  .25  a Community Cub Pack after the New  Year. Mrs. Percivall������ who has had considerable experience with Cubs, has? accepted the position of Cub Master and  wiil-be in full charge of ��������� all Cub work in  Fernie. It is expected tbat the Scout  Association will rent the basement of  the Community. Recreation Hall and aU  Scouts and Cubs will use the same rooms.  Bonners Ferry Herald: A. J. Kent  and son, Ted, and Robert Hewitt went  to Nelson, B C, last Thursday to negotiate an option On a large C.P.R. barge  which it is intended to tow up the Kootenai river for the use of the  Morrison-  GRAPEFRUIT, Fresh, 3 for.  Florida.  OLIVES, Libby's. bottle .:,   Holiday Mixed  .39  VALLEY CO-OPERATIVE  Knudsen Construction Company in moving machinery across the river. An option was taken on a barge 220 feet long  *nd 40 feet wide, _aid Mr. Kent on ms  return here, Friday. If the craft can us  successfully towed up the river, said Mr.  Kent, it will be purchased for use by the  contractors.  w    THE FRIENDLY STORE  F>HON������ 12  WE DELIVER  fvyyT'^'f *'v������'������"f yt'fv  -m'wr -ww  "V'wvm ���������m"w^-^mm ������������������*-��������� *<i������*yii%*'r**������,*i'**g",*������l*,y*,������"������-'>"y'r"v*i**"������*yy������',v������*^*l'r"?'8������  "W��������� ^h^-a���������_.& Aw\^Jmm^mJmm^^mk.mJmm^^m-mmm  lAl ������m,m ���������__ ai, dl a mm ��������� mfk >,A i Am,,  _fc ^mrnrn. 1  FOR THE  t  ���������A  We have now in stock a full supply off First-Class  Local and Personal  21st)    is   the  THE  Gift  t  t  t  ������  ������  OULTRY  Turkeys, Geese, Duck, Chicken  ������������������*-*"��������������������� *m ^ ^ <  *l39l^#%iPI \T\mmU  Beef,Pork,Veal,Lamfo  Delicious Cooked Meats  Cooked Ham, Cheese Loaf, Liver Sausage  Baked Ham, Tongue, Blood Puddings  Head Cheese,  Bologna, Summer Sausage  FRESH FISH  Salmon,     Halibut,     Cod,     Herring  SMOKED FISH  Haddie Filets^   Kippers,    Salt Cod,    Salt Herring  Fresh Atlantic Sealshipt Oysters  Spare Ribs,       Chopped Suet,       Mince Meal  URNS & COMPANY, Ltd.  PHONE 2  3!_*i?*wgBg'i;gg*-BBffi;?3af 'ii***������ ;* ,i \' ��������� ,w m.   j  i  i  i  CHRISTMAS SPECIALS!  I  1  1  i  FOR THE TABLE  ���������j  Our Fruits are the freshest and choicest  obtainable.    They include.  Currants, Raisins, Peels, Figs. Cherries, Dates, Etc.  Layer Figs from Smyrna in halves and pounds  NUTS���������California Budded Walnuts, Brazils,  Filberts, Almonds, and Pea Nuts.  JAP ORANGES.  Mens' Shirts, Ties, Suspenders, Garters,  Arm Bands���������all new.  Splendid assortment of Single and Boxed  Handkerchiefs for men and Women.  See. us for Ladies Hose, Lingerie, in sete, Etc.  Tomorrow    (December  shortest day of the year.  TURKEYS���������Leave your order for  turkeys at Ross Meat Market, Creston.  FOR SALE���������Purebred Jersey heifer,  fresh, price $50. A. H. Pigott, Wynndel.  A. S. Dickinson of Creston Motors is  a bu^ine'-s visitor at Vaecouver, leaving  Saturday.  WANTED���������Peed grain sacks. Will  pay cash or trade feed. Piper Feed  Mill, Creston.  According to official estimates there  are still fifty carloads of apples to ship  from Valley points*  PIGS FOR SALE���������Yorkshires, eight  weeks old, $4.50 each. Herb Gobbett,  K.V. Road, Creston.  Creston and District Women's Institute have fixed the date of the annual  meeting for January 4th.  HORSE FOR SALE���������Work horse,  weighs about 1300 pounds. M. Bilyk,  Timmons ranch, Erickson.  M. Anderson, assistant ^C.P.R.   agent,  left at tne first of the week to  spend the  Holidays at his home at Jaffray.  CRESTON    CAFE  will  be open for  serving lunches  during    and  after    all  dances.   Harold Beninger, manager.  Voting on the beer parlor plebiscite  takes place today. The hours for voting  are 8 a.m..to 8 p.m., and voting is at the  town hall.  The weather is somewhat colder and  since the first of the week there has been  considerable more Sunshine. The snow  still holds off.  Mrs. Vine. Phillips left on Sunday  morning for Prince Rupert, to join her  husband, who recently accepted a position in that city.  Miss Phyllis Hamilton of the nursing  staff of the hospital at New Denver, has  arrived on a visit with her parents. Mr.  and Mrs. J. W. Hamilton.  H. A. Carne, who has been here since  early September in charge of apple inspection work, -eturned to his home at  Sunshine Bay on Saturday.  The crews at all the packing houses  were laid ofi on Thursday last. Between  now and the end of the year the demand  for apples is invariably light.  November enrolment at Creston  publit* school was 237. The shield for  best attendance for the month was won  by Miss Holmes' Division 7.  TheHospital Women's Auxiliary are  more than pleased with the reception  accorded their raffle on the hope chest  on which about $210 gross was realized.  The drawing on the Legion Christmas  raffle takes place at the Grand theatre  Saturday night. There are six prizes  and tickets may be had from any Legion  member.  CRESTON AND SURROUNDING  DISTRICT���������Available for wrn with  car to handle tho sale and distribution of  Watkins Products, serving and selling  many satisfied customers. Good opportunity for worker, none other need  apply. For further information write  The J. R. Watkins Company. 1820  Hornby St., Vanconver. B.C.  Fernie Free Press: The local executive of the Fernie Boy ScoutB Association  have completed arrangements to organize  Complete stock of Christmas  Goods has arrived. This is  your invitation to call and  look the line of presents over.  You are under no obligation  to buy unless you see something that satisfies. We have  presents for  LADIES  MEN  BOYS  GIRLS  A MESSAGE to  Christmas  Shoppers  Owing to the fact that we  have a really fine selection of  V. MAWSON  CRESTON  Practical Gifts for  the Whole Family  j at very reasonable prices, we  do not hesitate to invite you  to do your Christmas Shopping here. See the dis-play in  our * windows ! Come in and  see more!  G. Sinclair  Greston Hardware  '-Uk-BSd-?****'*'-^  a  *  *tt PAYS TO PAY CASH AT THE IMPERIAL   ; _ r���������; i - ������������������ ���������  I  I  |  I  FRIOAY-SATURDAY SPECIALS  Special Christmas Shopping  Do your Christmas shopping the Imperial way and save  ftlSXED NUTS, 5 varieties, 3 Sbs       ...... ;...!:.:$ M  Equal mixture.;        "-������������������'���������'  MIXED CANDIES, 3-Bbs.  .    -50     f  Special Christmas Mixture. %  LAYER FIGS, 2-inch Smyrna, Bb      .19     ������  CLUSTER RAISINS, Muscat, pkg     .24     J  New Crop.  POPPING CORN, 2 lbs Y���������....        ..........    -25  DATES, Pitted, Dainty, 2 pkgs  ;   . ���������    .44  FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES  Celery, Sweet Potatoes, Bananas, Cranberries,  Lettuce, Grapes, Large Oranges.  | PHONE 20.   You'll find prices at the Imperial  -| ' that start competition. ������  ra_*-***-*"M-**-to_*������i^  s  m^mmmMk- dm m a**h l_A af^a-fcil mm mJmmiM dfciaai  >__fcj������^_4_^l_*uA^___������t^__JA_>j|fcaa mm%mimfmm^mJmmmf.  It is Never Too Late  at this Store for Your  CHRISTMAS SHIPPING  ���������4  i  4  I  4  I  4  4  4  4  i  W  '**  i CRESTON MERCANTILE  S/ USEES'    mi    \tm KmpSmw   ^"jKjffir      |������3       iemkjf   Call    \3      mw   v*  G3  I53ES9 CJ    Q   ^-wHjyr (g     "jjjj m    ^jjj      gj      jjg  E3333 EZ5359  GROCERIES  U*J IVI rA l>l Y      LIU,  HARDWARE  CHRIST CHURCH  CRES T Olj!  REV. R.E.M. YBRBUEGH. Vicar.  ^4mmr::.,.::rm^-jj.-Awmm^.J{c^  V jr *l"^*v| 1      m-%     m Jj       -4*y jnt     'a m       _��������� m%  OlSlVC     ������ \~p\mJ   fir Slid '   & OllI*    ikjtlOSCITipb'CSOS-; c  SUM DAY, DEC SS  CRESTON���������7.80 p.m., EvonsotiK.  ERICKSON���������8.00 p.m., Evonaong.  OHR/STIWAS _?V_?, DE���������5. ������*!>  tt.4B p,m���������Holy Communion (midnight)  CHRISTMAS DAY, DEO. SB  CRESTON���������8.00 ft.m., Holy Communion. 11.00 a.m., Mutin*- nnd Holy  Communion.  WYNNDEL-0.30 n.m.. Holy Communion.  We have the stock, and can please you  in your Christmas selection*?.  FOR MEN  See our stock ef Ties, Shirts, Payjamas  FOR LADIES  Newest Styles in Dress Silk Underwear,  Payjamas, Hosiery  FOR THE HOME  Chesterfields, Lotmgea Cedar Chests,  Bed������y Breakfast Sets.  Oi.r Stock of CHINAWARE is Complete  GROCERIES are Handled in Most Vp-  to-Date conditions and at prices  that Will save yon money  S. A. SPEERS  Dry Goods.       Clothing.       Hardware*      Furniture  i  '���������������8|_l' **  'W  +*WW  *  ^a^"^WA^^-ttB^*^Mj^^"'^^^^'^^Y^y^*r^tf"h^^*'^yM^^M*M U^W^VWr^^ W^l* W^U" ^������^ H Uf^ U* W ^tf^U'''^    * %

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